National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transport proteins yield

  1. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights Print Cells depend on contact with their outside environment in order to thrive. Two examples illustrate...

  2. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  3. Energy use by biological protein transport pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economou, Tassos

    Energy use by biological protein transport pathways Nathan N. Alder1 and Steven M. Theg2 1 of metabolic energy, using the free energy of ATP and GTP hydrolysis and/or a transmembrane protonmotive force provided insights into the mechanisms of energy transduction, force generation and energy use by different

  4. Yield

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLos Alamos verifies largest single|Yejun Feng ArgonneYield scalings of

  5. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructure of DNA-BoundFinanceStructures for

  6. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8 StructureStructures

  7. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8

  8. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8Structures for Three

  9. Structures for Three Membrane Transport Proteins Yield Functional Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect PhotovoltaicsStructure and Receptorsurvivor 8Structures for

  10. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass into and out of cells....

  11. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia Print Wednesday, 25 May 2005 00:00 Membrane proteins provide molecular-sized entry and exit portals for the various substances that pass...

  12. Relationships among distribution of milk proteins and transmitting ability and yield of milk, efficiency of protein yield and biochemical polymorphisms in Holstein and Jersey cows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nmai, Iris Bella

    1980-01-01

    . R. W. Blake Fifty-seven Holstein and 17 Jersey cows in the first trimester of la. ctation of which 26 Holstein and 8 Jersey cows were also studied in the second trimester were used to study milk yields and composition of the major milk proteins... antigen genotypes were significant (P & . 05). Significant genotypic differences (P ( . 05) in yields of milk, ME end ERPA were observed for systems 0, F, J and M, serum transferrins, S-casein and white blood cell systems. The Tf /Tf genotype was A D...

  13. In Vitro Transport of a Fluorescent Nuclear Protein and Exclusion of Non-Nuclear Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    In Vitro Transport of a Fluorescent Nuclear Protein and Exclusion of Non-Nuclear Proteins Donald D microscopic assay for nuclear transport. The assay uses an extract of Xenopus eggs, normal or synthetic nuclei, and a fluorescently labeled nuclear protein, nucleoplasmin. This in vitro system accurately mimics in vivo nuclear

  14. Transport of organelles by elastically coupled motor proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deepak Bhat; Manoj Gopalakrishnan

    2014-12-17

    Motor-driven intracellular transport is a complex phenomenon where multiple motor proteins attached to a cargo are simultaneously engaged in pulling activity, often leading to tug-of-war and bidirectional motion. However, most mathematical and computational models ignore the details of the motor-cargo interaction. A few papers have studied more realistic models of cargo transport by including elastic motor-cargo coupling, but either restricts the number of motors and/or uses purely phenomenological forms for energy-dependent hopping rates. Here, we study a generic Model In which N motors are elastically coupled to a cargo, which itself is subject to thermal noise in the cytoplasm and an additional external applied force. The motor-hopping rates are chosen to satisfy detailed balance with respect to the energy of stretching. The master equation is converted to a linear Fokker-Planck equation (LFPE), which yields the average positions of the cargo and motors, as well as their fluctuations and correlation functions. We apply this formalism to two specific forms of the hopping rates. Analytical results are obtained for mean cargo velocity, diffusion coefficient and the average force experienced by each motor for arbitrary N, and compared with numerical simulations. The expansion procedure also allows us to quantify load-sharing features among the cargo-bound motors. In general, we observe significant deviations between analytical predictions based on LFPE and the corresponding numerical results, which suggests a prominent role for higher order corrections.

  15. Biomimetic materials for protein storage and transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Millicent A. (Elmhurst, IL); Laible, Philip D. (Villa Park, IL)

    2012-05-01

    The invention provides a method for the insertion of protein in storage vehicles and the recovery of the proteins from the vehicles, the method comprising supplying isolated protein; mixing the isolated protein with a fluid so as to form a mixture, the fluid comprising saturated phospholipids, lipopolymers, and a surfactant; cycling the mixture between a first temperature and a second temperature; maintaining the mixture as a solid for an indefinite period of time; diluting the mixture in detergent buffer so as to disrupt the composition of the mixture, and diluting to disrupt the fluid in its low viscosity state for removal of the guest molecules by, for example, dialysis, filtering or chromatography dialyzing/filtering the emulsified solid.

  16. Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernesto Gonzalez-Candela; Victor Romero-Rochin

    2009-09-23

    We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

  17. Directed transport as a mechanism for protein folding in vivo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez-Candela, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model for protein folding in vivo based on a Brownian-ratchet mechanism in the multidimensional energy landscape space. The device is able to produce directed transport taking advantage of the assumed intrinsic asymmetric properties of the proteins and employing the consumption of energy provided by an external source. Through such a directed transport phenomenon, the polypeptide finds the native state starting from any initial state in the energy landscape with great efficacy and robustness, even in the presence of different type of obstacles. This model solves Levinthal's paradox without requiring biased transition probabilities but at the expense of opening the system to an external field.

  18. Protein motors induced enhanced diffusion in intracellular transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Santamaria-Holek; M. H. Vainstein; J. M. Rubi; F. A. Oliveira

    2009-02-04

    Diffusion of transported particles in the intracellular medium is described by means of a generalized diffusion equation containing forces due to the cytoskeleton network and to the protein motors. We find that the enhanced diffusion observed in experiments depends on the nature of the force exerted by the protein motors and on parameters characterizing the intracellular medium which is described in terms of a generalized Debye spectrum for the noise density of states.

  19. Deciphering the Mechanism of E. coli tat Protein Transport: Kinetic Substeps and Cargo Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitaker, Neal William 1982-

    2012-12-03

    The Escherichia coli twin-arginine translocation (Tat) system transports fully folded and assembled proteins across the inner membrane into the periplasmic space. The E. coli Tat machinery minimally consists of three integral membrane proteins: TatA...

  20. Aquaporins comprise a family of water-transporting membrane proteins. All aquaporins are efficient water transporters, while

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Groot, Bert

    . Further insights, particularly with respect to the dynamics of water permeation and the filter mechanism509 Aquaporins comprise a family of water-transporting membrane proteins. All aquaporins are efficient water transporters, while sustaining strict selectivity, even against protons, thereby maintaining

  1. Proton Transport by the Influenza M2 Protein Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    Proton Transport by the Influenza M2 Protein Gregory S. Boebinger, National High Magnetic Field infections) in native like lipid bilayers has allowed us to determine a novel mechanism for proton transport that has not been observed in any other protein. At the heart of this proton channel is a set of 4

  2. Influence of protein level in ration on yield, composition, and susceptibility of milk to lipolysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Richard Doyle

    1976-01-01

    attributed to corresponding increases in WMT value or leucocyte levels. Milk production was not significantly affected by ration, but de- clined with advancing lactation. Of all constituents measured, only total and whey protein showed significant (P&. 01... influencing lipolysis. The susceptibility of milk to lipolysis has been attributed to numerous factors. Individ- uality of the cow, stage of lactation, stage of reproductive cycle, seasonal changes, and ration have all been implicated as factors The format...

  3. Selective transport and packaging of the major yolk protein in the sea urchin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessel, Gary M.

    Selective transport and packaging of the major yolk protein in the sea urchin Jacqueline M. Brooks of yolk transport, endocytosis, and packaging during the vitellogenic phase of oogenesis in the sea urchin of the ovary and its packaging into yolk platelets of developing oocytes is visualized in isolated oocytes

  4. Kinesin Motor Transport is Altered by Macromolecular Crowding and Transiently Associated Microtubule-Associated Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Jennifer

    01 Kinesin Motor Transport is Altered by Macromolecular Crowding and Transiently Associated of crowding and an increasingly complex cellular environment on the transport of individual motor proteins, we have performed in vitro reconstitution experiments with single kinesin-1 motors walking on microtubules

  5. Sequencing proteins with transverse ionic transport in nanochannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, P

    2015-01-01

    {\\it De novo} protein sequencing is essential for understanding cellular processes that govern the function of living organisms and all post-translational events and other sequence modifications that occur after a protein has been constructed from its corresponding DNA code. By obtaining the order of the amino acids that composes a given protein one can then determine both its secondary and tertiary structures through structure prediction, which is used to create models for protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease. Mass spectrometry is the current technique of choice for {\\it de novo} sequencing. However, because some amino acids have the same mass the sequence cannot be completely determined in many cases. Here, we propose a new technique for {\\it de novo} protein sequencing that involves translocating a polypeptide through a synthetic nanochannel and measuring the ionic current of each amino acid through an intersecting {\\it perpendicular} nanochannel. To calculate the transverse ionic curre...

  6. Rheology of globular proteins: apparent yield stress, high shear rate viscosity and interfacial viscoelasticity of bovine serum albumin solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vivek

    albumin and other proteins in the context of applications ranging from electrospinning10 to synovial

  7. Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proteins Protein Engineering, Structure, and Function Los Alamos scientists seek a comprehensive understanding of the structure and function of proteins which can lead to a...

  8. Autotransporters: The Cellular Environment Reshapes a Folding Mechanism to Promote Protein Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Patricia L.

    the cellular environment affects protein folding mechanisms. Here, we focus on one unique aspect affect protein folding kinetics and the conformations of folding intermediates? We focus on recent have been made to understand the mechanisms by which proteins fold to their native conformations.3

  9. Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proteins Scientists manipulate and mimic proteins for use in creating solutions for medicine, sustainable energy, and more Read caption + Los Alamos National Laboratory graduate...

  10. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-Forum Sign InTransportation

  11. Identification and Structural Analysis of a Novel Carboxysome Shell Protein with Implications for Metabolite Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Michael G.

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are polyhedral bodies, composed entirely of proteins, that function as organelles in bacteria; they promote subcellular processes by encapsulating and co-localizing targeted enzymes with ...

  12. Transport of misfolded endoplasmic reticulum proteins to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Structure of the human class I histocompatibility antigen,struc- ture of the human class II MHC protein HLA-DR1ture of an intermediate in class II MHC maturation: CLIP

  13. A MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN TRAFFICKING IN THE VERTEBRATE RETINA: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTRAFLAGELLAR TRANSPORT AND DISEASE 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krock, Bryan L.

    2010-07-14

    Vertebrate photoreceptors are highly specialized sensory neurons that utilize a modified cilium known as the outer segment to detect light. Proper trafficking of proteins to the outer segment is essential for photoreceptor function and survival...

  14. Overdamped thermal ratchets in one and more dimensions. Kinesin transport and protein folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernesto Gonzalez-Candela; Victor Romero-Rochin

    2006-05-26

    The overdamped thermal ratchet driven by an external (Orstein-Uhlenbeck) noise is revisited. The ratchet we consider is unbounded in space and not necessarily periodic . We briefly discuss the conditions under which current is obtained by analyzing the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and its lack of stationary states. Next, two examples in more than one dimension and related to biological systems are presented. First, a two-dimensional model of a ``kinesin protein'' on a ``microtubule'' is analyzed and, second, we suggest that a ratchet mechanism may be behind the folding of proteins; the latter is elaborated with a multidimensional ratchet model.

  15. Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit the BigProteinProteins Scientists

  16. The high risk HPV16 L2 minor capsid protein has multiple transport signals that mediate its nucleocytoplasmic traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamoor, Shahan; Onder, Zeynep [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)] [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Kwak, Kihyuck [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Bordeaux, Jennifer; Crosby, Lauren [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)] [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States); Roden, Richard B.S. [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21231 (United States); Moroianu, Junona, E-mail: moroianu@bc.edu [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)] [Biology Department, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    In this study we examined the transport signals contributing to HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic using confocal microscopy analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-L2 (EGFP-L2) fusions expressed in HeLa cells. We confirmed that both nuclear localization signals (NLSs), the nNLS (1MRHKRSAKRTKR12) and cNLS (456RKRRKR461), previously characterized in vitro (Darshan et al., 2004), function independently in vivo. We discovered that a middle region rich in arginine residues (296SRRTGIRYSRIGNKQTLRTRS316) functions as a nuclear retention sequence (NRS), as mutagenesis of critical arginine residues within this NRS reduced the fraction of L2 in the nucleus despite the presence of both NLSs. Significantly, the infectivity of HPV16 pseudoviruses containing either RR297AA or RR297EE within the L2 NRS was strongly reduced both in HaCaT cells and in a murine challenge model. Experiments using Ratjadone A nuclear export inhibitor and mutation-localization analysis lead to the discovery of a leucine-rich nuclear export signal ({sub 462}LPYFFSDVSL) mediating 16L2 nuclear export. These data indicate that HPV16 L2 nucleocytoplasmic traffic is dependent on multiple functional transport signals.

  17. Lipid transport mediated by Arabidopsis TGD proteins is unidirectional from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plastid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, C.; Moellering, E. R., Muthan, B.; Fan, J.; Benning, C.

    2010-06-01

    The transfer of lipids between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the plastid in Arabidopsis involves the TRIGALACTOSYLDIACYLGLYCEROL (TGD) proteins. Lipid exchange is thought to be bidirectional based on the presence of specific lipid molecular species in Arabidopsis mutants impaired in the desaturation of fatty acids of membrane lipids in the ER and plastid. However, it was unclear whether TGD proteins were required for lipid trafficking in both directions. This question was addressed through the analysis of double mutants of tgd1-1 or tgd4-3 in genetic mutant backgrounds leading to a defect in lipid fatty acid desaturation either in the ER (fad2) or the plastid (fad6). The fad6 tgd1-1 and fad6 tgd4-3 double mutants showed drastic reductions in the relative levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and of galactolipids. The growth of these plants and the development of photosynthetic membrane systems were severely compromised, suggesting a disruption in the import of polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing lipid species from the ER. Furthermore, a forward-genetic screen in the tgd1-2 dgd1 mutant background led to the isolation of a new fad6-2 allele with a marked reduction in the amount of digalactosyldiacylglycerol. In contrast, the introduction of fad2, affecting fatty acid desaturation of lipids in the ER, into the two tgd mutant backgrounds did not further decrease the level of fatty acid desaturation in lipids of extraplastidic membranes. These results suggest that the role of TGD proteins is limited to plastid lipid import, but does not extend to lipid export from the plastid to extraplastidic membranes.

  18. Proteins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich MatricesstudentsProjectsPropertymaterialsProteins Protein

  19. Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter...

  20. Yield Improvement in Steel Casting (Yield II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard A. Hardin; Christoph Beckermann; Tim Hays

    2002-02-18

    This report presents work conducted on the following main projects tasks undertaken in the Yield Improvement in Steel Casting research program: Improvement of Conventional Feeding and Risering Methods, Use of Unconventional Yield Improvement Techniques, and Case Studies in Yield Improvement. Casting trials were conducted and then simulated using the precise casting conditions as recorded by the participating SFSA foundries. These results present a statistically meaningful set of experimental data on soundness versus feeding length. Comparisons between these casting trials and casting trials performed more than forty years ago by Pellini and the SFSA are quite good and appear reasonable. Comparisons between the current SFSA feeding rules and feeding rules based on the minimum Niyama criterion reveal that the Niyama-based rules are generally less conservative. The niyama-based rules also agree better with both the trials presented here, and the casting trails performed by Pellini an d the SFSA years ago. Furthermore, the use of the Niyama criterion to predict centerline shrinkage for horizontally fed plate sections has a theoretical basis according to the casting literature reviewed here. These results strongly support the use of improved feeding rules for horizontal plate sections based on the Niyama criterion, which can be tailored to the casting conditions for a given alloy and to a desired level of soundness. The reliability and repeatability of ASTM shrinkage x-ray ratings was investigated in a statistical study performed on 128 x-rays, each of which were rated seven different times. A manual ''Feeding and Risering Guidelines for Steel Castings' is given in this final report. Results of casting trials performed to test unconventional techniques for improving casting yield are presented. These use a stacked arrangement of castings and riser pressurization to increase the casting yield. Riser pressurization was demonstrated to feed a casting up to four time s the distance of a non-pressurized riser, and can increase casting yield by decreasing the required number of risers. All case studies for this projects were completed and compiled into an SFSA Technical Report that is submitted part of this Final Report

  1. Algae Protein Fermentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of microalgal proteins to mixed alcohol liquid fuels * Increase the yield of algae biofuel intermediates by integrated conversion of all of the major algal biochemical...

  2. Depletion of cellular poly (A) binding protein prevents protein synthesis and leads to apoptosis in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thangima Zannat, Mst.; Bhattacharjee, Rumpa B.; Bag, Jnanankur

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} Depletion of cellular PABP level arrests mRNA translation in HeLa cells. {yields} PABP knock down leads to apoptotic cell death. {yields} PABP depletion does not affect transcription. {yields} PABP depletion does not lead to nuclear accumulation of mRNA. -- Abstract: The cytoplasmic poly (A) binding protein (PABP) is important in mRNA translation and stability. In yeast, depletion of PABP leads to translation arrest. Similarly, the PABP gene in Drosophila is important for proper development. It is however uncertain, whether mammalian PABP is essential for mRNA translation. Here we showed the effect of PABP depletion on mRNA metabolism in HeLa cells by using a small interfering RNA. Our results suggest that depletion of PABP prevents protein synthesis and consequently leads to cell death through apoptosis. Interestingly, no detectable effect of PABP depletion on transcription, transport and stability of mRNA was observed.

  3. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  4. Low doses of ochratoxin A upregulate the protein expression of organic anion transporters Oat1, Oat2, Oat3 and Oat5 in rat kidney cortex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zlender, Vilim; Breljak, Davorka; Ljubojevic, Marija; Flajs, Dubravka; Balen, Daniela; Brzica, Hrvoje; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Peraica, Maja; Fuchs, Radovan; Anzai, Naohiko; Sabolic, Ivan

    2009-09-15

    Mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) is nephrotoxic in various animal species. In rodents, OTA intoxication impairs various proximal tubule (PT) functions, including secretion of p-aminohippurate (PAH), possibly via affecting the renal organic anion (OA) transporters (Oat). However, an effect of OTA on the activity/expression of specific Oats in the mammalian kidney has not been reported. In this work, male rats were gavaged various doses of OTA every 2nd day for 10 days, and in their kidneys we studied: tubule integrity by microscopy, abundance of basolateral (rOat1, rOat3) and brush-border (rOat2, rOat5) rOat proteins by immunochemical methods, and expression of rOats mRNA by RT-PCR. The OTA treatment caused: a) dose-dependent damage of the cells in S3 segments of medullary rays, b) dual effect upon rOats in PT: low doses (50-250 {mu}g OTA/kg b.m.) upregulated the abundance of all rOats, while a high dose (500 {mu}g OTA/kg b.m.) downregulated the abundance of rOat1, and c) unchanged mRNA expression for all rOats at low OTA doses, and its downregulation at high OTA dose. Changes in the expression of renal Oats were associated with enhanced OTA accumulation in tissue and excretion in urine, whereas the indicators of oxidative stress either remained unchanged (malondialdehyde, glutathione, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine) or became deranged (microtubules). While OTA accumulation and downregulation of rOats in the kidney are consistent with the previously reported impaired renal PAH secretion in rodents intoxicated with high OTA doses, the post-transcriptional upregulation of Oats at low OTA doses may contribute to OTA accumulation and development of nephrotoxicity.

  5. Drilling ban yields verdict

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nation, L.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper briefly reviews a lawsuit which is under appeal by the State of Michigan regarding a takings claim filed over a petroleum exploration site. The dispute arose as a result of a 1987 decision by the Michigan Department of Natural Resources forbidding the property owners from developing the mineral rights leased to Miller Brothers in the Huron/Manistee National Forest. This area is bisected by a trend of Silurian Niagaran reef complexes which has a known production history throughout the State. The dunes area of the national forest has been deemed a wilderness area. As a result of the State's decision, the courts have awarded a sum of 71 million dollars to the developer to cover damages and lost resources. The reserve estimates were taken from adjacent areas which showed that the Niagaran reefs are relatively consistent in their yield.

  6. Sustainable Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

  7. Acid soil infertility effects on peanut yields and yield components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blamey, F.P.C.

    1983-01-01

    The interpretation of soil amelioration experiments with peanuts is made difficult by the unpredictibility of the crop and by the many factors altered when ameliorating acid soils. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of lime and gypsum applications on peanut kernel yield via the three first order yield components, pods per ha, kernels per pod, and kernel mass. On an acid medium sandy loam soil (typic Plinthustult), liming resulted in a highly significant kernel yield increase of 117% whereas gypsum applications were of no significant benefit. As indicated by path coefficient analysis, an increase in the number of pods per ha was markedly more important in increasing yield than an increase in either the number of kernels per pod or kernel mass. Furthermore, exch. Al was found to be particularly detrimental to pod number. It was postulated that poor peanut yields resulting from acid soil infertility were mainly due to the depressive effect of exch. Al on pod number. Exch. Ca appeared to play a secondary role by ameliorating the adverse effects of exch. Al.

  8. The Air-Fluorescence Yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Arqueros; F. Blanco; D. Garcia-Pinto; M. Ortiz; J. Rosado

    2008-07-30

    Detection of the air-fluorescence radiation induced by the charged particles of extensive air showers is a well-established technique for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Fluorescence telescopes provide a nearly calorimetric measure of the primary energy. Presently the main source of systematic uncertainties comes from our limited accuracy in the fluorescence yield, that is, the number of fluorescence photons emitted per unit of energy deposited in the atmosphere by the shower particles. In this paper the current status of our knowledge on the fluorescence yield both experimental an theoretical will be discussed.

  9. UNCONVENTIONAL METHODS FOR YIELD IMPROVEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    AND RENEWABLE ENERGY · U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Listed in order of statistical significance in influencing CASTING THROUGH DIRECTIONAL SOLIDIFICATION OFFICE OF INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Project Fact Sheet BENEFITS · Increase in casting yield on current practices by 10% · Develop techniques

  10. Navigation strategies of motor proteins on decorated tracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertalan, Zsolt; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Motor proteins display widely different stepping patterns as they move on microtubule tracks, from the deterministic linear or helical motion performed by the protein kinesin to the uncoordinated random steps made by dynein. How these different strategies produce an efficient navigation system needed to ensure correct cellular functioning is still unclear. Here, we show by numerical simulations that deterministic and random motor steps yield different outcomes when random obstacles decorate the microtubule tracks: kinesin moves faster on clean tracks but its motion is strongly hindered on decorated tracks, while dynein is slower on clean tracks but more efficient in avoiding obstacles. Further simulations indicate that dynein's advantage on decorated tracks is due to its ability to step backwards. Our results explain how different navigation strategies are employed by the cell to optimize motor driven cargo transport.

  11. Navigation strategies of motor proteins on decorated tracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zsolt Bertalan; Zoe Budrikis; Caterina A. M. La Porta; Stefano Zapperi

    2015-09-08

    Motor proteins display widely different stepping patterns as they move on microtubule tracks, from the deterministic linear or helical motion performed by the protein kinesin to the uncoordinated random steps made by dynein. How these different strategies produce an efficient navigation system needed to ensure correct cellular functioning is still unclear. Here, we show by numerical simulations that deterministic and random motor steps yield different outcomes when random obstacles decorate the microtubule tracks: kinesin moves faster on clean tracks but its motion is strongly hindered on decorated tracks, while dynein is slower on clean tracks but more efficient in avoiding obstacles. Further simulations indicate that dynein's advantage on decorated tracks is due to its ability to step backwards. Our results explain how different navigation strategies are employed by the cell to optimize motor driven cargo transport.

  12. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    tracial transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the transport element . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Free Transport . . . . . . . . . . . .

  13. Momentum Transport in Granular Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg Lois; Anael Lemaitre; Jean M. Carlson

    2006-02-10

    We investigate the error induced by only considering binary collisions in the momentum transport of hard-sphere granular materials, as is done in kinetic theories. In this process, we first present a general microscopic derivation of the momentum transport equation and compare it to the kinetic theory derivation, which relies on the binary collision assumption. These two derivations yield different microscopic expressions for the stress tensor, which we compare using simulations. This provides a quantitative bound on the regime where binary collisions dominate momentum transport and reveals that most realistic granular flows occur in the region of phase space where the binary collision assumption does not apply.

  14. Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Decision Models for Bulk Energy Transportation Networks James D. McCalley August 23, 2005 #12, and Electric Transportation Systems (1) What energy flow patterns would yield significantly improved energy (ISU - Randy Larabee) · City of Ames (Ames - Merlin Hove) · MidAmerican Energy (Des Moines - Alan O

  15. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  16. Determination of thermal neutron capture gamma yields.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Thomas Lawrence

    1969-01-01

    A method of analysing Ge(Li) thermal neutron capture gamma spectra to obtain total gamma yields has been developed. Tie method determines both the yields from the well resolved gamma peaks in a spectrum as well as the gamma ...

  17. Engineering Mammalian Cells for Improved Recombinant Protein Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Niki S.C.

    The production of recombinant glycoproteins from mammalian cell cultures requires robust processes that can achieve high protein yield while ensuring the efficacy of these proteins as human therapeutics. We describe two ...

  18. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  19. Environment-Assisted Quantum Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Rebentrost; Masoud Mohseni; Ivan Kassal; Seth Lloyd; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2009-02-10

    Transport phenomena at the nanoscale are of interest due to the presence of both quantum and classical behavior. In this work, we demonstrate that quantum transport efficiency can be enhanced by a dynamical interplay of the system Hamiltonian with pure dephasing induced by a fluctuating environment. This is in contrast to fully coherent hopping that leads to localization in disordered systems, and to highly incoherent transfer that is eventually suppressed by the quantum Zeno effect. We study these phenomena in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein complex as a prototype for larger photosynthetic energy transfer systems. We also show that disordered binary tree structures exhibit enhanced transport in the presence of dephasing.

  20. The impact of supplemental L-threonine in laying hen diets on egg component yield, composition, and functionality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Paige Reynolds

    2005-11-01

    yield, protein, and functionality. In experiments 1 and 2, egg production increased with increasing dietary threonine levels up to 0.76% Thr in the diet and subsequently decreased suggesting a production threshold for the amino acid. Shell cracking...

  1. Essays on the Effect of Climate Change on Agriculture and Agricultural Transportation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attavanich, Witsanu

    2012-02-14

    This dissertation analyzes the impact of climate, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) on crop yields and grain transportation. The analysis of crop yields endeavors to advance the literature by statistically estimating ...

  2. From Protein Structure to Function: Ring Cycle for Dilating and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pore Print Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) act as the central gatekeepers for selective transport between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. They allow the exchange of selected proteins...

  3. Structural studies of large architectural nucleoporins and coat proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittle, James Richardson Ross

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Pore Complex (NPC) is a ~50 MDa protein complex that forms the sole conduit for macromolecular transport across the nuclear envelope. It assembles from ~30 proteins, termed nucleoporins or nups, symmetrically ...

  4. Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Bigoni; Andrea Piccolroaz

    2010-10-09

    A new yield/damage function is proposed for modelling the inelastic behaviour of a broad class of pressure-sensitive, frictional, ductile and brittle-cohesive materials. The yield function allows the possibility of describing a transition between the shape of a yield surface typical of a class of materials to that typical of another class of materals. This is a fundamental key to model the behaviour of materials which become cohesive during hardening (so that the shape of the yield surface evolves from that typical of a granular material to that typical of a dense material), or which decrease cohesion due to damage accumulation. The proposed yield function is shown to agree with a variety of experimental data relative to soil, concrete, rock, metallic and composite powders, metallic foams, porous metals, and polymers. The yield function represents a single, convex and smooth surface in stress space approaching as limit situations well-known criteria and the extreme limits of convexity in the deviatoric plane. The yield function is therefore a generalization of several criteria, including von Mises, Drucker-Prager, Tresca, modified Tresca, Coulomb-Mohr, modified Cam-clay, and --concerning the deviatoric section-- Rankine and Ottosen. Convexity of the function is proved by developing two general propositions relating convexity of the yield surface to convexity of the corresponding function. These propositions are general and therefore may be employed to generate other convex yield functions.

  5. Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boreo, Andrea; Li, Wei; Wunnenbuger, Douglas; Giusti, Cecilia; Cooper, John T.; Masterson, Jaimie

    2015-01-01

    Mobility throughout a community ensures freedom of movement and enhances quality of life. Traffic congestion, pollution, urban sprawl, social exclusion, safety and health can decrease mobility and should be a part of a sustainable transportation...

  6. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

  7. Olefins from High Yield Autothermal Reforming Process

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2012-03-06

    The autothermal reforming method employs an improved dehydrogenation process for olefin production, utilizing platinum based dehydrogenation catalysts in the presence of oxygen. The autothermal process requires no external energy input following ignition and produces high conversions and yields from the gaseous hydrocarbon feeds. Autothermal reforming is an effective solution that meets the high demands of the chemical market industry by producing high yields...

  8. Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Modeling of the interactions between forest vegetation, disturbances, and sediment yields Erkan on the frequency and magnitude of sediment delivery from a small watershed ($3.9 km2 ) in the Idaho batholith weathering and the divergence of diffusive sediment transport on hillslopes. Soil removal is due to episodic

  9. Transport on a Lattice with Dynamical Defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Turci; Andrea Parmeggiani; Estelle Pitard; M. Carmen Romano; Luca Ciandrini

    2013-01-10

    Many transport processes in nature take place on substrates, often considered as unidimensional lanes. These unidimensional substrates are typically non-static: affected by a fluctuating environment, they can undergo conformational changes. This is particularly true in biological cells, where the state of the substrate is often coupled to the active motion of macromolecular complexes, such as motor proteins on microtubules or ribosomes on mRNAs, causing new interesting phenomena. Inspired by biological processes such as protein synthesis by ribosomes and motor protein transport, we introduce the concept of localized dynamical sites coupled to a driven lattice gas dynamics. We investigate the phenomenology of transport in the presence of dynamical defects and find a novel regime characterized by an intermittent current and subject to severe finite-size effects. Our results demonstrate the impact of the regulatory role of the dynamical defects in transport, not only in biology but also in more general contexts.

  10. NH Timber Yield Tax Overview (RSA 79)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    land. The bond is usually equal to the amount of expected yield tax. When can you appeal: If a taxpayer denies the appeal then the taxpayer may appeal to the Department of Revenue within 180 days of the tax

  11. Soft photon yield in nuclear interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokoulina, E

    2015-01-01

    First results of study of a soft photon yield at Nuclotron (LHEP, JINR) in nucleus-nucleus collisions at 3.5 GeV per nucleon are presented. These photons are registered by an BGO electromagnetic calorimeter built by SVD-2 Collaboration. The obtained spectra confirm the excessive yield in the energy region less than 50 MeV in comparison with theoretical estimations and agree with previous experiments at high-energy interactions.

  12. Salinity tolerance in plants: attempts to manipulate ion transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Volkov

    2014-11-06

    Ion transport is the major determining factor of salinity tolerance in plants. A simple scheme of a plant cell with ion fluxes provides basic understanding of ion transport and the corresponding changes of ion concentrations under salinity. The review describes in detail basic principles of ion transport for a plant cell, introduces set of transporters essential for sodium and potassium uptake and efflux, analyses driving forces of ion transport and compares ion fluxes measured by several techniques. Study of differences in ion transport between salt tolerant halophytes and salt-sensitive plants with an emphasis on transport of potassium and sodium via plasma membranes offers knowledge for increasing salinity tolerance. Effects of salt stress on ion transport properties of membranes show huge opportunities for manipulating ion transport. Several attempts to overexpress or knockout ion transporters for changing salinity tolerance are described. Future perspectives are questioned with more attention given to potential candidate ion channels and transporters for altered expression. The potential direction of increasing salinity tolerance by modifying ion channels and transporters is discussed and questioned. An alternative approach from synthetic biology is to modify the existing membrane transport proteins or create new ones with desired properties for transforming agricultural crops. The approach had not been widely used earlier and leads also to theoretical and pure scientific aspects of protein chemistry, structure-function relations of membrane proteins, systems biology and physiology of stress and ion homeostasis.

  13. Gene Fusion Technology NEW METHODS FOR ENHANCING FUNCTIONAL PROTEIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SUMOpro-3® Gene Fusion Technology NEW METHODS FOR ENHANCING FUNCTIONAL PROTEIN EXPRESSION packed globular fold with -sheets wrapped around an -helix. SUMO3 Fusions Human SUMO3 fused (ubiquitin or SUMO) at the N-terminus of a partner protein increases the recombinant fusion protein yield

  14. Gene Fusion Technology NEW METHODS FOR ENHANCING FUNCTIONAL PROTEIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SUMOpro® Gene Fusion Technology NEW METHODS FOR ENHANCING FUNCTIONAL PROTEIN EXPRESSION packed globular fold with -sheets wrapped around an -helix. Smt3 Fusions Yeast SUMO (Smt3) fused (ubiquitin or SUMO) at the N-terminus of a partner protein increases the recombinant fusion protein yield

  15. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolshov, L.

    2010-01-01

    models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

  16. Intelligent Transport Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

  17. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

  18. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Transportation Safety Transportation SafetyTara...

  19. Yield Stress Materials in Soft Condensed Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Bonn; Jose Paredes; Morton M. Denn; Ludovic Berthier; Thibaut Divoux; Sébastien Manneville

    2015-02-18

    We present a comprehensive review of the physical behavior of yield stress materials in soft condensed matter, which encompasses a broad range of soft materials from colloidal assemblies and gels to emulsions and non-Brownian suspensions. All these disordered materials display a nonlinear response to an external mechanical forcing, which results from the existence of a finite force threshold for flow to occur, the yield stress. We discuss both the physical origin and the rheological consequences associated with this nonlinear behavior. We give an overview of the different experimental techniques developed to measure the yield stress. We discuss extensively the recent progress concerning a microscopic description of the flow dynamics of yield stress materials, emphasizing in particular the role played by relaxation timescales, the interplay between shear flow and aging behavior, the existence of inhomogeneous shear flows and shear bands, wall slip, and non-local effects in confined geometries. We finally review the status of modeling of the shear rheology of yield stress materials in the framework of continuum mechanics.

  20. Directional interactions and cooperativity between mechanosensitive membrane proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph A. Haselwandter; Rob Phillips

    2013-05-24

    While modern structural biology has provided us with a rich and diverse picture of membrane proteins, the biological function of membrane proteins is often influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding lipid bilayer. Here we explore the relation between the shape of membrane proteins and the cooperative function of membrane proteins induced by membrane-mediated elastic interactions. For the experimental model system of mechanosensitive ion channels we find that the sign and strength of elastic interactions depend on the protein shape, yielding distinct cooperative gating curves for distinct protein orientations. Our approach predicts how directional elastic interactions affect the molecular structure, organization, and biological function of proteins in crowded membranes.

  1. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE;6 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS #12;1 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

  2. Inhibition of In Vitro Nuclear Transport by a Lectin that Binds to Nuclear Pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbes, Douglass

    Californiaat San Diego, LaJolla, California92093 Abstract. Selective transport of proteins is a major mechanismInhibition of In Vitro Nuclear Transport by a Lectin that Binds to Nuclear Pores Deborah R. Finlay to investigate the molecular mechanism of nuclear transport, we used an in vitro transport system com- posed

  3. External noise yields a What template?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Stanley

    External noise yields a surprise: What template? Stanley Klein, Dennis Levi, Suko Toyofuku Vision Science University of California, Berkeley #12;Overview Detection of patterns in noise Why noise masking is a powerful technique The Lu-Dosher framework: useful black boxes Graham-Nachmias experiment in noise (detect

  4. Yielding and flow of foamed metakaolin pastes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucie Ducloué; Olivier Pitois; Laurent Tocquer; Julie Goyon; Guillaume Ovarlez

    2015-10-01

    Metakaolin is a broadly used industrial raw material, with applications in the production of ceramics and geopolymers, and the partial replacement of Portland cement. The early stages of the manufacturing of some of these materials require the preparation and processing of a foamed metakaolin-based slurry. In this study, we propose to investigate the rheology of a foamed metakaolin-based fresh paste by performing well-controlled experiments. We work with a non-reactive metakaolin paste containing surfactant, in which we disperse bubbles of known radius at a chosen volume fraction. We perform rheometry measurements to characterize the minimum stress required for the foamed materials to flow (yield stress), and the dissipation occurring during flow. We show that the yield stress of the foamed samples is equal to the one of the metakaolin paste, and that dissipation during flow increases quadratically with the bubble volume fraction. Comparison with yielding and flow of model foamed yield stress fluids allows us to understand these results in terms of coupling between the bubbles' surface tension and the metakaolin paste's rheology.

  5. Comparison of oilseed yields: a preliminary review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.; Bagby, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    It was assumed that for most oilseed crops, 90% of the oil yield might be considered as profit. To compare oil seeds, pertinent portions of the yield and energy paragraphs from a summary published by Dr. Duke for DOE Grant No. 59-2246-1-6-054-0 with Dr. Bagby as ADODR were reproduced. The seed yields ranged from 200 to 14,000 kg/ha, the low one too low to consider and the high one suspiciously high. The yield of 14,000 kg oil per hectare is equivalent to more than 30 barrels of oil per hectare. The energy species included ambrette, tung-oil tree, cashew, wood-oil tree, mu-oil tree, peanut, mustard greens; rape, colza; black mustard, turnip, safflower, colocynth, coconut, crambe, African oil palm, soybean, cotton, sunflower, Eastern black walnut, Engligh walnut, meadow foam, flax, macadamia nuts, opium poppy, perilla, almond, castorbean, Chinese tallow tree, sesame, jojoba, yellow mustard, stokes' aster, and Zanzibar oilvine. 1 table. (DP)

  6. YIELD IMPROVEMENT CASE STUDY: STACKED SPRING CAPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    % of the caps cast from this design required welding for shrinkage defects, and all caps had some reoxidation the findings of a yield improvement study performed for a 3" spring cap cast from WCB steel. The original mold inclusions. The casting simulation software package MAGMAsoft was utilized to simulate alternate mold

  7. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  8. Stochastic Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!Transport in PPCD Discharges by

  9. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  10. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Biological Proton Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomes, R.

    1998-09-01

    Proton transport across lipid membranes is a fundamental aspect of biological energy transduction (metabolism). This function is mediated by a Grotthuss mechanism involving proton hopping along hydrogen-bonded networks embedded in membrane-spanning proteins. Using molecular simulations, the authors have explored the structural, dynamic, and thermodynamic properties giving rise to long-range proton translocation in hydrogen-bonded networks involving water molecules, or water wires, which are emerging as ubiquitous H{sup +}-transport devices in biological systems.

  12. Protein Assay Technical Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Protein Assay Technical Handbook #12;Table of Contents Total Protein Assays Quick Technical......................................................................6 Selection of a Protein Standard....................................................................7 Standards for Total Protein Assay

  13. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Researchers at...

  14. Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic Theory of Fission Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fragment Yields Calculated in a Time-Dependent Microscopic...

  15. Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yield Better Energy Efficiency Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy Efficiency March 23, 2015 - 1:05pm Addthis ORNL researchers are experimenting with...

  16. Ion transport through cell membrane channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan Gomulkiewicz; Jacek Miekisz; Stanislaw Miekisz

    2007-06-05

    We discuss various models of ion transport through cell membrane channels. Recent experimental data shows that sizes of ion channels are compared to those of ions and that only few ions may be simultaneously in any single channel. Theoretical description of ion transport in such channels should therefore take into account interactions between ions and between ions and channel proteins. This is not satisfied by macroscopic continuum models based on Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations. More realistic descriptions of ion transport are offered by microscopic Brownian and molecular dynamics. One should also take into account a dynamical character of the channel structure. This is not yet addressed in the literature

  17. Introduzione alle Proteine e al Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    Chapter 4 Introduzione alle Proteine e al Protein Folding 4.1 Proteine: propriet`a strutturali Le protein folding `e il cosiddetto modello HP, nel quale a ogni amino acido `e assegnata l'etichetta di

  18. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  19. Effect of inoculation and nitrogen addition on the yield and yield components of soybeans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambaudo, Sebastian Pedro

    1983-01-01

    this technique resulted in percentages of nitrogen fixed of 37, 27, and 13% for Coker 338, Cobb, and Dowling varieties. Estimates made using total nitrogen by difference were also variable due to variability in the yield data. Percentages of nitrogen fixed... were 20, 19, and 16% for Coker 338, Dowling, and Cobb using this method. A four variable regression model was developed which explained 68% of the variability in grain yield. These factors, in decreasing order of importance, were plant dry weight...

  20. Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book,Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data...

  1. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

  2. Can Naked Singularities Yield Gamma Ray Bursts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia

    1998-07-09

    Gamma-ray bursts are believed to be the most luminous objects in the Universe. There has been some suggestion that these arise from quantum processes around naked singularities. The main problem with this suggestion is that all known examples of naked singularities are massless and hence there is effectively no source of energy. It is argued that a globally naked singularity coupled with quantum processes operating within a distance of the order of Planck length of the singularity will probably yield energy burst of the order of M_pc^2\\approx2\\times 10^{16} ergs, where M_p is the Planck mass.

  3. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  4. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  5. Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hancock, William O.

    Enhancing the stability of kinesin motors for microscale transport applications{ Maruti Uppalapati714989a Biomolecular motors, such as kinesins, have great potential for micro-actuation and micro life of these motor proteins and their associated protein filaments is a barrier

  6. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fissionmore »yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.« less

  7. Testing actinide fission yield treatment in CINDER90 for use in MCNP6 burnup calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fensin, Michael Lorne; Umbel, Marissa

    2015-09-18

    Most of the development of the MCNPX/6 burnup capability focused on features that were applied to the Boltzman transport or used to prepare coefficients for use in CINDER90, with little change to CINDER90 or the CINDER90 data. Though a scheme exists for best solving the coupled Boltzman and Bateman equations, the most significant approximation is that the employed nuclear data are correct and complete. Thus, the CINDER90 library file contains 60 different actinide fission yields encompassing 36 fissionable actinides (thermal, fast, high energy and spontaneous fission). Fission reaction data exists for more than 60 actinides and as a result, fission yield data must be approximated for actinides that do not possess fission yield information. Several types of approximations are used for estimating fission yields for actinides which do not possess explicit fission yield data. The objective of this study is to test whether or not certain approximations of fission yield selection have any impact on predictability of major actinides and fission products. Further we assess which other fission products, available in MCNP6 Tier 3, result in the largest difference in production. Because the CINDER90 library file is in ASCII format and therefore easily amendable, we assess reasons for choosing, as well as compare actinide and major fission product prediction for the H. B. Robinson benchmark for, three separate fission yield selection methods: (1) the current CINDER90 library file method (Base); (2) the element method (Element); and (3) the isobar method (Isobar). Results show that the three methods tested result in similar prediction of major actinides, Tc-99 and Cs-137; however, certain fission products resulted in significantly different production depending on the method of choice.

  8. Effect of row spacing on yield and yield components of winter wheat cultivars 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Ross Jay

    1977-01-01

    was found at McGrego~ for this trait. Culms per m were increased by 2 decreased row width at all locations and in all cultivars except 'Coker 68-15' and 'TAM N-101' at McGregor. These cultivars decreased in culm number. Five hundred seed weight... width on cereals. He noted that reducing row width generally increased yields, particularly at high population levels. While culms per unit area behaved in a similar manner, data on other yield components were inconclusive or not mentioned. Holliday...

  9. Transport Equations Thomas Hillen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillen, Thomas

    Transport Equations Thomas Hillen supported by NSERC University of Alberta, Edmonton Transport V , V compact and symmetric. Transport Equations ­ p.2/33 #12;Directed Movement The equation pt(t, x of v. Transport Equations ­ p.3/33 #12;With Directional Changes µ: turning rate. T(v, v ): probability

  10. Motor Transport Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN Prepared by: The Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization In cooperation with: o City of Longview o City of White Oak o Gregg County o Harrison County o Texas Department of Transportation o U.S. Department... of Transportation o Federal Highway Administration o Federal Transit Administration Adopted November 12, 2009 TRANSPORTATION 2035 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...

  11. The optimization topography of exciton transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Scholak; Thomas Wellens; Andreas Buchleitner

    2011-08-26

    Stunningly large exciton transfer rates in the light harvesting complex of photosynthesis, together with recent experimental 2D spectroscopic data, have spurred a vivid debate on the possible quantum origin of such efficiency. Here we show that configurations of a random molecular network that optimize constructive quantum interference from input to output site yield systematically shorter transfer times than classical transport induced by ambient dephasing noise.

  12. Engineering novel fluorescent proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaner, Nathan Christopher

    2006-01-01

    to Choosing Fluorescent Proteins. Nat. Methods. 2 (12): 905-Dynamics of Z-band based proteins in developing skeletaland yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp.

  13. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  14. Protein design for pathway engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksen, DT; Lian, JZ; Zhao, HM

    2014-02-01

    Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. (C) 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Phenotypic Characterization of Self- Assembling Protein Fragments Using Negative Dominance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zweifel, Adrienne Elizabeth

    2011-08-08

    Zweifel, B.S., University of Missouri-Columbia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. James C. Hu Protein oligomerization provides a way for cells to modulate function in vivo. In this study, self-assembling protein fragments from ParC, DnaX, and proteins...-752 and ParC332-752) yielded filamentous cells with several different nucleoid segregation phenotypes. Another ParC fragment containing only the oligomerization domain of ParC (ranging from 333-485) yields a recA-dependent septation defect in a subset...

  16. Framework for the determination of yield limits In pharmaceutical operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liow, Yuh Han John

    2010-01-01

    The manufacturing production of active pharmaceutical ingredients often involve a series of processing stages in which yield limits are prescribed to ensure that the target yield has been achieved for a batch and that the ...

  17. Efficient vlsi yield prediction with consideration of partial correlations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varadan, Sridhar

    2009-05-15

    of the yield prediction problem (thus making it less time complex) without affecting the accuracy in yield. The efficiency of these two approaches is measured by comparing with the results obtained from Monte Carlo simulations. Compared to previous work...

  18. Forest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downing, Jim

    2015-01-01

    forests tend to yield more water. Further reading: Bales RC,et al. 2011. Forests and Water in the Sierra Nevada: SierraForest thinning may increase water yield from the Sierra

  19. Estimation of dibaryon (OO) yields at RHIC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong-Dao Lu

    2002-07-02

    The yields of dibaryon (Omega-Omega) in relativistic heavy ion collisions, especially at RHIC energies, are estimated by statistical model. The yields of hyperon Omega- and the ratio of dibaryon to Omega are also given.

  20. Systemsize dependence of associated yields in hadron-triggered jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, Betty

    2010-01-01

    in hadron-triggered jets B.I.Abelev (STARCollaboration)yields in hadron-triggered jets B. I. Abelev 8 , M. M.+Au collisions reveal similar jet-like correlation yields at

  1. Enhancing quantum transport in a photonic network using controllable decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devon N. Biggerstaff; René Heilmann; Aidan A. Zecevik; Markus Gräfe; Matthew A. Broome; Alessandro Fedrizzi; Stefan Nolte; Alexander Szameit; Andrew G. White; Ivan Kassal

    2015-04-23

    Transport phenomena on a quantum scale appear in a variety of systems, ranging from photosynthetic complexes to engineered quantum devices. It has been predicted that the efficiency of quantum transport can be enhanced through dynamic interaction between the system and a noisy environment. We report the first experimental demonstration of such environment-assisted quantum transport, using an engineered network of laser-written waveguides, with relative energies and inter-waveguide couplings tailored to yield the desired Hamiltonian. Controllable decoherence is simulated via broadening the bandwidth of the input illumination, yielding a significant increase in transport efficiency relative to the narrowband case. We show integrated optics to be suitable for simulating specific target Hamiltonians as well as open quantum systems with controllable loss and decoherence.

  2. Transport of metal salts by zwitterionic ligands; simple but highly efficient salicylaldoxime extractants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, S.; Tasker, Peter; White, Fraser J; Henderson, D.K.; Galbraith, S.G.; Davidson, J.E.; Forgan, Ross Stewart

    2008-09-01

    Attaching dialkylaminomethyl arms to commercial phenolic oxime copper extractants yields reagents which transport base metal salts very efficiently by forming neutral 1 : 1 or 1 : 2 complexes with zwitterionic forms of the ...

  3. Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport process for atmospheric water soluble carbonyls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsunaga, SN; Guenther, AB; Izawa, Y; Wiedinmyer, C; Greenberg, JP; Kawamura, K

    2007-01-01

    et al. , 2001). Wet precipitation samples contain almost alldeposition rate due to the precipitation Yield mg C m 2 h 1Importance of wet precipitation as a removal and transport

  4. Development of anomalous diffusion among crowding proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margaret R. Horton; Felix Höfling; Joachim O. Rädler; Thomas Franosch

    2010-03-19

    In cell membranes, proteins and lipids diffuse in a highly crowded and heterogeneous landscape, where aggregates and dense domains of proteins or lipids obstruct the path of diffusing molecules. In general, hindered motion gives rise to anomalous transport, though the nature of the onset of this behavior is still under debate and difficult to investigate experimentally. Here, we present a systematic study where proteins bound to supported lipid membranes diffuse freely in two dimensions, but are increasingly hindered by the presence of other like proteins. In our model system, the surface coverage of the protein avidin on the lipid bilayer is well controlled by varying the concentration of biotinylated lipid anchors. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), we measure the time correlation function over long times and convert it to the mean-square displacement of the diffusing proteins. Our approach allows for high precision data and a clear distinction between anomalous and normal diffusion. It enables us to investigate the onset of anomalous diffusion, which takes place when the area coverage of membrane proteins increases beyond approximately 5%. This transition region exhibits pronounced spatial heterogeneities. Increasing the packing fraction further, transport becomes more and more anomalous, manifested in a decrease of the exponent of subdiffusion.

  5. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  6. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-08-07

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/ Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Existing facilities were modified for evaluation of environmental assisted slow crack growth and creep in flexural mode. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition were continued for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment. These studies in parallel to those on the LSFCO composition is expect to yield important information on questions such as the role of cation segregation and the stability of the perovskite structure on crack initiation vs. crack growth. Studies have been continued on the La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} composition using neutron diffraction and TGA studies. A transition from p-type to n-type of conductor was observed at relative low pO{sub 2}, at which the majority carriers changed from the holes to electrons because of the valence state decreases in Fe due to the further loss of oxygen. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport. Data obtained at 850 C show that the stoichiometry in La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-x} vary from {approx}2.85 to 2.6 over the pressure range studied. From the stoichiometry a lower limit of 2.6 corresponding to the reduction of all Fe{sup 4+} to Fe{sup 3+} and no reduction of Cr{sup 3+} is expected.

  7. SGM Special Moving folded proteins across the bacterial cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Tracy

    -containing proteins are essential for most types of bacterial respiratory and photo- synthetic energy metabolism by the transmembrane proton electrochemical gradient. The TatA protein probably forms the transport channel while metabolism in most environments depends upon the bacterium being able to produce cofactor-containing pro

  8. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  9. Weather-based forecasts of California crop yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D B; Cahill, K N; Field, C B

    2005-09-26

    Crop yield forecasts provide useful information to a range of users. Yields for several crops in California are currently forecast based on field surveys and farmer interviews, while for many crops official forecasts do not exist. As broad-scale crop yields are largely dependent on weather, measurements from existing meteorological stations have the potential to provide a reliable, timely, and cost-effective means to anticipate crop yields. We developed weather-based models of state-wide yields for 12 major California crops (wine grapes, lettuce, almonds, strawberries, table grapes, hay, oranges, cotton, tomatoes, walnuts, avocados, and pistachios), and tested their accuracy using cross-validation over the 1980-2003 period. Many crops were forecast with high accuracy, as judged by the percent of yield variation explained by the forecast, the number of yields with correctly predicted direction of yield change, or the number of yields with correctly predicted extreme yields. The most successfully modeled crop was almonds, with 81% of yield variance captured by the forecast. Predictions for most crops relied on weather measurements well before harvest time, allowing for lead times that were longer than existing procedures in many cases.

  10. Yield and protein content of selected varieties of small grains and annual cool season grasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Mohammad Abdullah

    1951-01-01

    ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Sr@ Wligh4 o ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ e e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ o 24, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ e ~ o e ~ o o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ SNAN ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 30 SORSQO M4 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e o ~ ~ e e e ~ ~ e ~ e e ~ ~ e o ~ ~ 30 P?A4% OOCIN... fall ylaahlag of bbe as?all gssst?N ga oeooet4al fae obbatabsg hLgh yie14a of whAoe yssAaswgoi RA tho col wargeMee? whoa ~ ooely? nese often 4ofolLAs4 hf nwjAo La tho lat? faD befese tho ooaL wlates NAa %a. Sgsoe ylaeM 1al ~ Le tho fell? they agee...

  11. Altering the ribosomal subunit ratio in yeast maximizes recombinant protein yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonander, Nicklas; Darby, Richard A. J.; Grgic, Ljuban; Bora, Nagamani; Wen, Jikai; Brogna, Saverio; Poyner, David R.; O'Neill, Michael A. A.; Bill, Roslyn M.

    2009-01-29

    and HIS3 selection markers respectively. The gene was cloned into the BamH1 and HindIII sites and the vectors transformed into S. cerevisiae using the lithium acetate method. The GFP (GenBank U62636) and hA2aR [31] genes were amplified by PCR and cloned...

  12. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  13. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  14. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  15. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    also known there as sustainable mobility. This de?nition wasfor De?ning Sustainable Transport and Mobility. [cited 13Sustainable transporta- tion is de?ned as a means to satisfy current transport and mobility

  16. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  17. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  18. Transportation Conference Speakers - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  20. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01

    roads and parking facilities is exempt from rent and taxes,road transport relative to rail (which pays rent and taxesroad tolls, parking fees, and Litman, Transportation Market Distortions higher fuel taxes

  1. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 of City & Metropolitan Planning; Associate Dean, College of Architecture + Planning; former associate, social equity, fiscal health, and public health. Unfortunately, most transportation planning processes

  2. Transportation Conference Speakers - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Thiamin transport in Escherichia coli is a model system to establish the tolerance of derivatives for transport into the cell. Since little is known about what types of thiamin derivatives may be successfully taken into the cell through...

  3. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  4. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  5. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  6. Molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations resolve apparent diffusion rate differences for proteins confined in nanochannels

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Ileri, N.; Levie, H. W.; Stroeve, P.; Ustach, V.; Faller, R.; Renaud, P.

    2015-08-01

    We use Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to examine molecular transport phenomena in nanochannels, explaining four orders of magnitude difference in wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) protein diffusion rates observed by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and by direct imaging of fluorescently-labeled proteins. We first use the ESPResSo Molecular Dynamics code to estimate the surface transport distance for neutral and charged proteins. We then employ a Monte Carlo model to calculate the paths of protein molecules on surfaces and in the bulk liquid transport medium. Our results show that the transport characteristics depend strongly on the degree of molecular surface coverage.more »Atomic force microscope characterization of surfaces exposed to WGA proteins for 1000 s show large protein aggregates consistent with the predicted coverage. These calculations and experiments provide useful insight into the details of molecular motion in confined geometries.« less

  7. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  8. Method For Determining And Modifying Protein/Peptide Solubilty

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Espanola, NM)

    2005-03-15

    A solubility reporter for measuring a protein's solubility in vivo or in vitro is described. The reporter, which can be used in a single living cell, gives a specific signal suitable for determining whether the cell bears a soluble version of the protein of interest. A pool of random mutants of an arbitrary protein, generated using error-prone in vitro recombination, may also be screened for more soluble versions using the reporter, and these versions may be recombined to yield variants having further-enhanced solubility. The method of the present invention includes "irrational" (random mutagenesis) methods, which do not require a priori knowledge of the three-dimensional structure of the protein of interest. Multiple sequences of mutation/genetic recombination and selection for improved solubility are demonstrated to yield versions of the protein which display enhanced solubility.

  9. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    : 2011 #12;As a long-time leader in the areas of waste abatement, pollution reduction, energy management Metro Commuter Services Infinity Award ­ in recognition of alternative transportation programs. · 1996 to maintaining impressive and viable alternative transportation programs. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM DESIGNS

  10. Effect of microtubule-associated protein tau in dynamics of single-headed motor proteins KIF1A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Sparacino; M. G. Farías; P. W. Lamberti

    2013-02-11

    Intracellular transport based on molecular motors and its regulation are crucial to the functioning of cells. Filamentary tracks of the cells are abundantly decorated with non-motile microtubule-associated proteins, such as tau. Motivated by experiments on kinesin-tau interactions [Dixit et al. Science 319, 1086 (2008)] we developed a stochastic model of interacting single-headed motor proteins KIF1A that also takes into account the interactions between motor proteins and tau molecules. Our model reproduce experimental observations and predicts significant effects of tau on bound time and run length which suggest an important role of tau in regulation of kinesin-based transport.

  11. Dissipative Particle Dynamics with Energy Conservation: Dynamic and Transport Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josep Bonet Avalos; Allan D. Mackie

    2000-02-16

    Simulation results of the thermal conductivity ${\\cal L}$ of Dissipative Particle Dynamics model with Energy Conservation (DPDE) are reported. We also present an analysis of the transport equations and the transport coefficients for DPDE based on a local equilibrium approximation. This approach is valid when the particle-particle thermal conductivity $\\lambda$ and the friction coefficient $\\zeta$ are large. A qualitative derivation of the scaling form of the kinetic contribution of the transport of energy is derived, yielding two different forms for the kinetic contribution to the heat transport, depending on the value of $\\lambda$. We find agreement between the theoretically predicted value for ${\\cal L}$ and the simulation results, for large $\\lambda$ and many particles interacting at one time. Significant differences are found for small number of interacting particles, even with large $\\lambda$. For smaller values of $\\lambda$, the obtained macroscopic thermal conductivity is dominated by diffusive transport, in agreement with the proposed scaling form.

  12. Realization of Algae Potential Algae Biomass Yield Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Realization of Algae Potential Algae Biomass Yield Program March 25, 2015 Technology Area Review Peter Lammers, P.I. New Mexico State University -> Arizona State University This...

  13. Collaboration yields 'The Right Glasses' for observing mystery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observing mystery behavior In electrons Collaboration yields 'The Right Glasses' for observing mystery behavior in electrons The research may lead to a better understanding of...

  14. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in...

  15. VERIFI code optimization yields three-fold increase in engine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for parallel readwrite processes. (Click image to view larger.) VERIFI code optimization yields three-fold increase in engine simulation speed By Greg Cunningham * May 7,...

  16. Solar Decathlon house continues to yield data | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Decathlon house continues to yield data ORNL, University of Tennessee to continue lessons learned in DOE solar energy competition Courtesy of: UT College of Architecture and...

  17. Weather-based yield forecasts developed for 12 California crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobell, David; Cahill, Kimberly Nicholas; Field, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Weather-based yield forecasts developed fordepend largely on the weather, measurements from existingpredictions. We developed weather-based models of statewide

  18. Increasing Sugar Yields with IL-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionic Liquid Processing Increasing sugar yields from diverse biomass feedstock with ionic liquid processing and cultivation of renewable ionic liquids Liberating Sugars from...

  19. OPERATIONAL CHALLENGES IN MIXING AND TRANSFER OF HIGH YIELD STRESS SLUDGE WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, T.; Bhatt, P.

    2009-12-07

    The ability to mobilize and transport non-Newtonian waste is essential to advance the closure of highly radioactive storage tanks. Recent waste removal operations from Tank 12H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) encountered sludge mixtures with a yield stress too high to pump. The waste removal equipment for Tank 12H was designed to mobilize and transport a diluted slurry mixture through an underground 550m long (1800 ft) 0.075m diameter (3 inch) pipeline. The transfer pump was positioned in a well casing submerged in the sludge slurry. The design allowed for mobilized sludge to enter the pump suction while keeping out larger tank debris. Data from a similar tank with known rheological properties were used to size the equipment. However, after installation and startup, field data from Tank 12H confirmed the yield stress of the slurry to exceed 40 Pa, whereas the system is designed for 10 Pa. A revision to the removal strategy was required, which involved metered dilution, blending, and mixing to ensure effective and safe transfer performance. The strategy resulted in the removal of over 255,000 kgs of insoluble solids with four discrete transfer evolutions for a total transfer volume of 2400 m{sup 3} (634,000 gallons) of sludge slurry.

  20. Selective inhibition of CO sub 2 transport in a cyanobacterium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espie, G. (Concordia Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)); Miller, A.; Canvin, D. (Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-04-01

    As determined by mass spectrometry, the active transport of CO{sub 2} was reversibly inhibited by both hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and carbonyl sulfide (COS). Carbonyl sulfide was an alternate substrate for the CO{sub 2} transport system and its uptake was inhibited by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Uptake of H{sub 2}S was not detected and it was found that H{sub 2}S, rather than HS{sup {minus}}, inhibited CO{sub 2} transport. At concentrations which substantially inhibited CO{sub 2} transport (150 {mu}M), neither H{sub 2}S nor COS inhibited Na{sup +}-dependent HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} transport as judged by measurements of chlorophyll a fluorescence yield and photosynthesis. The inhibition of CO{sub 2} transport resulted in the extracellular (CO{sub 2}) rising far above its equilibrium level. This effect was dependent on the presence of Na{sup +} and ongoing HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} transport. Inhibition of CO{sub 2} transport by H{sub 2}S and COS was independent of Na{sup +}. These results are interpreted to indicate that CO{sub 2} and HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} are transported into the cell by separate carrier systems.

  1. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  2. CONVENIENCE YIELD MODEL WITH PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS AND EXPONENTIAL UTILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carmona, Rene

    CONVENIENCE YIELD MODEL WITH PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS AND EXPONENTIAL UTILITY REN´E CARMONA AND MICHAEL. We study the value function corresponding to utility pric- ing with exponential utility. Assuming of the full information case. convenience yield, filtering, partial observations, stochastic control, utility

  3. Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Critical Review Microbial Electrolysis Cells for High Yield Hydrogen Gas Production from Organic A S S E , , § A N D R E N ´E A . R O Z E N D A L | Hydrogen Energy Center, and Department of Civil.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield

  4. Magnetorheology in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al. 2001), precision polishing (Kordonski and Golini 1999), and drilling fluids (Zitha 2004). MR1 Magnetorheology in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid Jason P. Rich,a Patrick S. Doyle,a Gareth) suspensions in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid composed of an aqueous dispersion of Laponite® clay. Using

  5. TOWARDS STANDARDIZATION OF CSP YIELD ASSESSMENTS Richard Meyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    TOWARDS STANDARDIZATION OF CSP YIELD ASSESSMENTS Richard Meyer 1 , Hans Georg Beyer 2 , Jörg. In the field of concentrating solar power (CSP) standardized procedures for the assessment of energy yields funding for CSP. Other technologies such as wind energy or photovoltaics have already implemented many

  6. Culex quinquefasciatus Storage Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and hemolymph proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus . A and B:of typical storage proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus.Fourth-instar Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae and early pupae

  7. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  8. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  9. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    of the Fuel Cell in Transportation Applications Workshop,practical fuel cell for commercial or consumer applicationfuel cell system engineer- ing is made, vehicle applications

  10. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  11. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  12. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  13. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    gas vehicles Annual road tax differentiated by vintageand charges for road transport Tax/pricing measure Optimalannual circulation taxes, tolls and road charges and parking

  14. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  15. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  16. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    of reduction options/ AERO. Ministry of Transport, Publicfrom aviation with the AERO modeling system Part I.from aviation with the AERO modeling system. Montreal,

  17. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  19. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  20. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  1. High yield fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAHMAN, H. U; WESSEL, F. J; ROSTOKER, N.; NEY, P. H

    2009-01-01

    transport), pinch energy (kinetic and thermal), and systemconverted into plasma thermal energy. The ion energy beginsenergy, E k , ion-thermal energy, E i , scaled neutron

  2. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields under extreme warming scenarios were particularly affected by including DTR (up to 10%). Finally, based on the relatively poor performance of climate models in reproducing the magnitude of past DTR trends, it is possible that future DTR changes and associated yield responses will exceed the ranges considered here.

  3. How Molecular Motors Are Arranged on a Cargo Is Important for Vesicular Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Robert P; Jia, Zhiyuan; Gross, Steven P; Yu, Clare C; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities. Physof the cytoplasmic dynein motor. Nat Cell Biol 2: 20–24.of a cargo hauled by motor proteins along a microtubule. (

  4. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY Investigator CCIT Research Report UCB-ITS-CWP-2011-2 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works;CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

  5. Yield stress and shear-banding in granular suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdoulaye Fall; Francois Bertrand; Guillaume Ovarlez; Daniel Bonn

    2009-07-13

    We study the emergence of a yield stress in dense suspensions of non-Brownian particles, by combining local velocity and concentration measurements using Magnetic Resonance Imaging with macroscopic rheometric experiments. We show that the competition between gravity and viscous stresses is at the origin of the development of a yield stress in these systems at relatively low volume fractions. Moreover, it is accompanied by a shear banding phenomenon that is the signature of this competition. However, if the system is carefully density matched, no yield stress is encountered until a volume fraction of 62.7 0.3%.

  6. Transportation Todd Litman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumer cost savings. #12;11 Per Capita Transport EnergyPer Capita Transport Energy 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 D Problem? · Traffic congestion? · Road construction costs? · Parking congestion or costs? · Excessive costs to consumers? · Government costs? · Traffic crashes? · Lack of mobility for non-drivers? · Poor freight

  7. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  9. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  10. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  11. Protein Design Zhilei Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Protein Design Zhilei Chen Center for Biophysics and Computational Biology, University of Illinois of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Protein design refers to the ability to alter protein, and selectivity. To overcome this lim- itation, tailor-made biocatalysts must be developed by protein design

  12. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The project also tested a Caterpillar C15 engine certified to 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ January 2011 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption Improvement Illustration of a heavy-duty tractor-trailer modified to meet the SmartWayTM Equipment Standards for lower fuel

  13. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doorway for Letting Ammonia into Cells Like any factory, a biological cell takes in raw materials and energy and expels waste products. What goes in and out passes through the cell...

  14. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the hydrophobic bilayer, while NH3 is not. Passage of uncharged NH3 would not result in a net change of protons across the membrane nor would it change the membrane potential, thus...

  15. Biomimetic Materials for Protein Storage and Transport | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura|BilayerBiomimetic Dye Molecules for Solar

  16. Artificial oxygen transport protein (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnectJournal(Conference)Detectors (Journal Article)

  17. Artificial oxygen transport protein (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563AbuseConnectJournal(Conference)Detectors (Journal

  18. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.Food Drive HolidayHoursa Wind Turbine Works HowHow

  19. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighlandWorkshop-SummerHow is the Data QualityHowHow

  20. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighlandWorkshop-SummerHow is the Data

  1. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighlandWorkshop-SummerHow is the DataHow the Membrane

  2. How the Membrane Protein AmtB Transports Ammonia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energyHighlandWorkshop-SummerHow is the DataHow the

  3. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  4. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  5. Protein folding and protein metallocluster studies using synchrotron small angler X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliezer, D.

    1994-06-01

    Proteins, biological macromolecules composed of amino-acid building blocks, possess unique three dimensional shapes or conformations which are intimately related to their biological function. All of the information necessary to determine this conformation is stored in a protein`s amino acid sequence. The problem of understanding the process by which nature maps protein amino-acid sequences to three-dimensional conformations is known as the protein folding problem, and is one of the central unsolved problems in biophysics today. The possible applications of a solution are broad, ranging from the elucidation of thousands of protein structures to the rational modification and design of protein-based drugs. The scattering of X-rays by matter has long been useful as a tool for the characterization of physical properties of materials, including biological samples. The high photon flux available at synchrotron X-ray sources allows for the measurement of scattering cross-sections of dilute and/or disordered samples. Such measurements do not yield the detailed geometrical information available from crystalline samples, but do allow for lower resolution studies of dynamical processes not observable in the crystalline state. The main focus of the work described here has been the study of the protein folding process using time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements. The original intention was to observe the decrease in overall size which must accompany the folding of a protein from an extended conformation to its compact native state. Although this process proved too fast for the current time-resolution of the technique, upper bounds were set on the probable compaction times of several small proteins. In addition, an interesting and unexpected process was detected, in which the folding protein passes through an intermediate state which shows a tendency to associate. This state is proposed to be a kinetic molten globule folding intermediate.

  6. RADIATION CHEMISTRY OF HIGH ENERGY CARBON, NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE SOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christman, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    NEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATENEON AND ARGON IONS: INTEGRAL YIELDS FROM FERROUS SULFATE

  7. This may come as a surprise, but bigger yields

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may come as a surprise, but bigger yields are not always better. Nuclear weapons were generally designed not to be as powerful as possible-but to be as precise as possible. For...

  8. Renewable Energy Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency & Renewable Energy Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report INLEXT-10-18930 December 2009 The 2005 Billion-Ton Study a (BTS) esti- mates the amount...

  9. High yield fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAHMAN, H. U; WESSEL, F. J; ROSTOKER, N.; NEY, P. H

    2009-01-01

    z-pinch for controlled fusion. PHYSICS OF PLASMAS, 8:616,N. Rostoker. Thermonuclear fusion by a z-? pinch. In DenseHigh yield fusion in a Staged Z-pinch H. U. Rahman, F. J.

  10. Future Yield Growth: What Evidence from Historical Data?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitiaux, Xavier

    The potential future role of biofuels has become an important topic in energy legislation as it is seen as a potential low carbon alternative to conventional fuels. Hence, future yield growth is an important topic from ...

  11. Hierarchy of scales in B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-08-31

    We show that the naive factorization approach can accommodate the existence of the observed hierarchy of branching ratios for the B{yields}PS decays (P stands for pseudoscalar and S for scalar mesons respectively.

  12. Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payseur, Bret

    Genome sequence of the Brown Norway rat yields insights into mammalian evolution Rat Genome Norway (BN) rat strain. The sequence represents a high-quality `draft' covering over 90% of the genome

  13. Yield Enhancement of Reconfigurable Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Yield Enhancement of Reconfigurable Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using Interstitial Redundancy FEI SU and KRISHNENDU CHAKRABARTY Duke University Microfluidics-based biochips for biochemical analysis cumbersome equipment with minia- turized and integrated systems. As these microfluidics-based microsystems

  14. Plant-Wide Energy Conservation Program Yields Impressive Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlkes, R. P.; Zupko, A. J.; Adams, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    to heating system and process changes by Installing improved boiler control systems and Initiating operator training programs. ? When rebuilding heat treating equipment, ceramic fiber insulation was used, yielding reduced heat losses and faster...

  15. High yield fusion in a staged Z-pinch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAHMAN, H. U; WESSEL, F. J; ROSTOKER, N.; NEY, P. H

    2009-01-01

    D calculations the predicted fusion-energy yield was 70 MJ,implosion parameters, net-fusion energy is produced. In then x 0.248, and scaled fusion energy, E f x 0.199. Near peak

  16. SU-E-T-602: Beryllium Seeds Implant for Photo-Neutron Yield Using External Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koren, S; Veltchev, I; Furhang, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the Neutron yield obtained during prostate external beam irradiation. Methods: Neutrons, that are commonly a radiation safety concern for photon beams with energy above 10 MV, are induced inside a PTV from Beryllium implemented seeds. A high megavoltage photon beam delivered to a prostate will yield neutrons via the reaction Be-9(?,n)2?. Beryllium was chosen for its low gamma,n reaction cross-section threshold (1.67 MeV) to be combined with a high feasible 25 MV photon beam. This beam spectra has a most probable photon energy of 2.5 to 3.0 MeV and an average photon energy of about 5.8 MeV. For this feasibility study we simulated a Beryllium-made common seed dimension (0.1 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height) without taking into account encapsulation. We created a 0.5 cm grid loading pattern excluding the Urethra, using Variseed (Varian inc.) A total of 156 seeds were exported to a 4cm diameter prostate sphere, created in Fluka, a particle transport Monte Carlo Code. Two opposed 25 MV beams were simulated. The evaluation of the neutron dose was done by adjusting the simulated photon dose to a common prostate delivery (e.g. 7560 cGy in 42 fractions) and finding the corresponding neutron dose yield from the simulation. A variance reduction technique was conducted for the neutrons yield and transported. Results: An effective dose of 3.65 cGy due to neutrons was found in the prostate volume. The dose to central areas of the prostate was found to be about 10 cGy. Conclusion: The neutron dose yielded does not justify a clinical implant of Beryllium seeds. Nevertheless, one should investigate the Neutron dose obtained when a larger Beryllium loading is combined with commercially available 40 MeV Linacs.

  17. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  18. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  19. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  20. Yield stress and elasticity influence on surface tension measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loren Jørgensen; Marie Le Merrer; Hélène Delanoë-Ayari; Catherine Barentin

    2015-06-04

    We have performed surface tension measurements on carbopol gels of different concentrations and yield stresses. Our setup, based on the force exerted by a capillary bridge on two parallel plates, allows to measure an effective surface tension of the complex fluid and to investigate the influence of flow history. More precisely the effective surface tension measured after stretching the bridge is always higher than after compressing it. The difference between the two values is due to the existence of a yield stress in the fluid. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced with a simple elasto-plastic model. The shape of successive stretching-compression cycles can be described by taking into account the yield stress and the elasticity of the gel. We show that the surface tension $\\gamma_{LV}$ of yield stress fluids is the mean of the effective surface tension values only if the elastic modulus is high compared to the yield stress. This work highlights that thermodynamical quantities measurements are challenged by the fluid out-of-equilibrium state implied by jamming, even at small scales where the shape of the bridge is driven by surface energy. Therefore setups allowing deformation in opposite directions are relevant for measurements on yield stress fluids.

  1. Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan T. Moncaster, M. Welzl, D. Ros: dra5-moncaster-tsvwg-transport-services-00 h Reducing Internet Transport Latency Michael Welzl, with help from (alphabe/cal): Anna

  2. Proton transport along water chains in an electric field Karen Drukker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    Proton transport along water chains in an electric field Karen Drukker Department of Chemistry, Indiana 46556 Received 4 November 1997; accepted 23 January 1998 Proton transport along water chains is thought to be essential for the translocation of protons over large distances in proteins. In this paper

  3. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  4. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  5. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  6. Cotton Response to 1-Methylcyclopropene Under Different Light Regimes and Growth Stages: Lint Yield and Yield Components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carden, Charles Warren

    2010-10-12

    imposed at four developmental stages of growth: pinhead square (PHS), first flower (FF), peak flower (PF), and boll development (BD). Data pooled over both years indicated that there were no significant differences in yield for 1-MCP treatments; however...

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  8. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  9. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons,...

  10. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  11. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    IEA personnel (WBCSD, 2004b), the WEO 2004 and Mobility 2030are quite similar. The WEO 2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higherwhile the IEA’s more recent WEO 2006 projects transport

  12. Optimization of Maritime Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and Technology Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Enterprise and D. Ronen (2007). Maritime transportation. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science (consolidation in the manufacturing sector, increasing competition, profit margins reduced, mergers and pooling

  13. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  14. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  15. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  16. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  17. Transport in granular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  18. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  19. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  20. Density functional theory and optimal transportation with Coulomb cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codina Cotar; Gero Friesecke; Claudia Klüppelberg

    2011-04-04

    We present here novel insight into exchange-correlation functionals in density functional theory, based on the viewpoint of optimal transport. We show that in the case of two electrons and in the semiclassical limit, the exact exchange-correlation functional reduces to a very interesting functional of novel form, which depends on an optimal transport map $T$ associated with a given density $\\rho$. Since the above limit is strongly correlated, the limit functional yields insight into electron correlations. We prove the existence and uniqueness of such an optimal map for any number of electrons and each $\\rho$, and determine the map explicitly in the case when $\\rho$ is radially symmetric.

  1. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  2. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  3. Synergistic Anion and Metal Binding to the Ferric Ion-binding Protein from Neisseria gonorrhoeae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Maolin; Harvey, Ian; Yang, Weiping; Coghill, Lorraine; Campopiano, Dominic J; Parkinson, John A; MacGillivray, Ross T A; Harris, Wesley R; Sadler, Peter J

    2003-10-07

    The 34-kDa periplasmic iron-transport protein (FBP) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (nFBP) contains Fe(III) and (hydrogen)phosphate (synergistic anion). It has a characteristic ligand-to-metal charge-transfer absorption band ...

  4. Ligand binding proteins: roles in ligand transfer and activation of nuclear receptors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrescu, Anca Daniela

    2004-09-30

    Cholesterol and fatty acyl-coenzymeA thioesters are signalling molecules with role in regulation of genes involved in lipid and glucose transport and metabolism. The studies described herein focused on three proteins that ...

  5. Methane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumption 26 Milk yield 29 Weight 31 Feed intake and feeding level 31 #12;2 Discussion 32 Methane productionMethane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement and high quality;#12;Methane production of dairy cows fed cereals with or without protein supplement and high quality silage

  6. Protein content of grains of different size fractions in malting barley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    of the variation observed in protein content was explained by the ratio of nitrogen availability to grain yield content is not due to the presence of a high proportion of thin grains, because thin grains do not always requirements, barley grain must have a specific protein level and high grain size (i.e. a high proportion

  7. Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects of biological activity. Indeed, chloride transporters have direct medical potential as treatments for cystic

  8. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  9. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2010-4 This work was performed by the California Center for Innovative Transportation, a research group at the University of California, Berkeley, in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation

  10. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2011-6 ISSN 1557-2269 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works with researchers that improve the efficiency, safety, and security of the transportation system. #12;#12;CALIFORNIA CENTER

  11. Protein Science (1994), 3:2435-2446. Cambridge University Press. Printed in the USA. Copyright 0 1994The Protein Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatini, David M.

    1994-01-01

    21205 (RECEIVEDAugust 11, 1994; ACCEPTEDSeptember 30, 1994) Abstract We report on studies leading function of a mammalian protein to a yeast gene product with a well-characterized mutant phenotype) is now feasible, starting with initial yields well below 1 pmol. Keywords: chemical sequencing;in situ

  12. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martelino, Rafael Agcaoili

    1954-01-01

    TABLES Page 20 31 Analysis of variance of silage yields at Temple Analysis of variance of grain yields at Temple . Analysis of varianoe of lodging percentage at Temple. . . ~ 12 o ~ 12 ~ i 13 4, 5 ~ 6, 70 Silage yield, grain yield... and lodging percentage of four oorn bybrids and three spaoings, Temple . Analysis of variance of silage yields at Tyler . Analysis of varianoe of grain yields at Tyler Analysis of variance oi' lodging peroemtage at Tyler 13 16 16 ~ 0 17 Silage yield...

  13. A method for relating impacts with yielding and unyielding targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1991-01-01

    The public has questioned the severity of the regulatory 9 meter drop onto an unyielding target required for Type B radioactive material shipping packages since this drop height results in an impact velocity of only 13.3 m/s (30 MPH). It is the unyielding nature of the regulatory target which makes the 9 meter drop so severe. In this paper a method for relating higher velocity impacts with yielding targets to impacts onto an unyielding target is developed. The severity of impacts with yielding targets is decreased by the amount of the impact energy absorbed in damaging the target. There have been previous attempts to correlate impacts with yielding targets to lower velocity impacts onto an unyielding target, and this work is an expansion of those efforts.

  14. A method for relating impacts with yielding and unyielding targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.

    1991-12-31

    The public has questioned the severity of the regulatory 9 meter drop onto an unyielding target required for Type B radioactive material shipping packages since this drop height results in an impact velocity of only 13.3 m/s (30 MPH). It is the unyielding nature of the regulatory target which makes the 9 meter drop so severe. In this paper a method for relating higher velocity impacts with yielding targets to impacts onto an unyielding target is developed. The severity of impacts with yielding targets is decreased by the amount of the impact energy absorbed in damaging the target. There have been previous attempts to correlate impacts with yielding targets to lower velocity impacts onto an unyielding target, and this work is an expansion of those efforts.

  15. Yield Strength as a Thermodynamic Consequence of Information Erasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katira, Parag

    2015-01-01

    We observe that the yield strength of a variety of materials, including highly structured and densely packed metals, alloys and semi-crystalline polymers is reasonably approximated by the thermal energy density of the material. This suggests that it is related to the entropic cost of the irreversible work done during plastic deformation rather than the enthalpic cost that depends on the elastic modulus of the material. Here we propose that the entropic cost of material rearrangement in crystalline solids arises from the difference in the uncertainty in building block positions before and after yielding and estimate it using Landauer's principle for information processing. The yield strength thus obtained in given by the thermal energy density of the material multiplied by ln(2) and provides a guidepost in estimating the strength of materials complementary to the "theoretical strength of solids".

  16. Development of Na/sup +/-dependent hexose transport in cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK/sub 1/)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, E.R.; Amsler, K.; Dawson, W.D.; Cook, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    A number of factors were explored to analyze how they interact to yield the increasing transport capacity in differentiating cell populations. These factors include the number of functional transporters in the population, the distribution of these transporters among the individual cells, the Na/sup +/ chemical gradient, the transmembrane potential, the pathways and activities of these pathways for efflux of glucoside, and cell-cell coupling between accumulating and non-accumulating cells. 35 references, 9 figures, 2 tables. (ACR)

  17. Role of Water States on Water Uptake and Proton Transport in Nafion using Molecular Simulations and Bimodal Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Michigan; Hwang, Gi Suk; Kaviany, Massoud; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Kientiz, Brian; Weber, Adam Z.; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2010-11-19

    Using molecular simulations and a bimodal domain network, the role of water state on Nafion water uptake and water and proton transport is investigated. Although the smaller domains provide moderate transport pathways, their effectiveness remains low due to strong, resistive water molecules/domain surface interactions. The water occupancy of the larger domains yields bulk-like water, and causes the observed transition in the water uptake and significant increases in transport properties.

  18. Simulations of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Cahill; Mark Fleharty; Kevin Cahill

    1999-09-17

    We have developed a simple, phenomenological, Monte-Carlo code that predicts the three-dimensional structure of globular proteins from the DNA sequences that define them. We have applied this code to two small proteins, the villin headpiece (1VII) and cole1 rop (1ROP). Our code folds both proteins to within 5 A rms of their native structures.

  19. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccess StoriesTransportation

  20. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure Data

  1. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure

  2. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation

  3. Neutron source capability assessment for cumulative fission yields measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Descalle, M A; Dekin, W; Kenneally, J

    2011-04-06

    A recent analysis of high-quality cumulative fission yields data for Pu-239 published in the peer-reviewed literature showed that the quoted experimental uncertainties do not allow a clear statement on how the fission yields vary as a function of energy. [Prussin2009] To make such a statement requires a set of experiments with well 'controlled' and understood sources of experimental errors to reduce uncertainties as low as possible, ideally in the 1 to 2% range. The Inter Laboratory Working Group (ILWOG) determined that Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) would benefit from an experimental program with the stated goal to reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Following recent discussions between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), there is a renewed interest in developing a concerted experimental program to measure fission yields in a neutron energy range from thermal energy (0.025 eV) to 14 MeV with an emphasis on discrete energies from 0.5 to 4 MeV. Ideally, fission yields would be measured at single energies, however, in practice there are only 'quasi-monoenergetic' neutrons sources of finite width. This report outlines a capability assessment as of June 2011 of available neutron sources that could be used as part of a concerted experimental program to measure cumulative fission yields. In a framework of international collaborations, capabilities available in the United States, at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom and at the Commissariat Energie Atomique (CEA) in France are listed. There is a need to develop an experimental program that will reduce the measurement uncertainties significantly in order to make a definitive statement of the relationship of energy dependence to the cumulative fission yields. Fission and monoenergetic neutron sources are available that could support these fission yield experiments in the US, as well as at AWE and CEA. Considerations that will impact the final choice of experimental venues are: (1) Availability during the timeframe of interest; (2) Ability to accommodate special nuclear materials; (3) Cost; (4) Availability of counting facilities; and (5) Expected experimental uncertainties.

  4. Executive Summary High-Yield Scenario Workshop Series Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie Park Ovard; Thomas H. Ulrich; David J. Muth Jr.; J. Richard Hess; Steven Thomas; Bryce Stokes

    2009-12-01

    To get a collective sense of the impact of research and development (R&D) on biomass resource availability, and to determine the feasibility that yields higher than baseline assumptions used for past assessments could be achieved to support U.S. energy independence, an alternate “High-Yield Scenario” (HYS) concept was presented to industry experts at a series of workshops held in December 2009. The workshops explored future production of corn/agricultural crop residues, herbaceous energy crops (HECs), and woody energy crops (WECs). This executive summary reports the findings of that workshop.

  5. Estimation of neutron-induced spallation yields of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karol, P.J.; Tobin, M.J.; Shibata, S.

    1983-10-01

    A procedure is outlined for estimating cross sections for neutron-induced spallation products relative to those for proton-induced reactions. When combined with known proton spallation systematics, it is demonstrated that cumulative yields for cosmogenically-important stable /sup 84/Kr and /sup 86/Kr isotopes are approx.1.4 and approx.2.8 times greater, respectively, for incident neutrons compared to protons at 0.2< or =E< or =3.0 GeV for nearby medium mass targets. Yields for lighter kryptons are relatively insensitive to the identity of the incident nucleon.

  6. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, C; Wagner, S

    2015-01-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  7. Nanoscale Charge Transport in Excitonic Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Bommisetty, South Dakota State University

    2011-06-23

    Excitonic solar cells, including all-organic, hybrid organic-inorganic and dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), offer strong potential for inexpensive and large-area solar energy conversion. Unlike traditional inorganic semiconductor solar cells, where all the charge generation and collection processes are well understood, these excitonic solar cells contain extremely disordered structures with complex interfaces which results in large variations in nanoscale electronic properties and has a strong influence on carrier generation, transport, dissociation and collection. Detailed understanding of these processes is important for fabrication of highly efficient solar cells. Efforts to improve efficiency are underway at a large number of research groups throughout the world focused on inorganic and organic semiconductors, photonics, photophysics, charge transport, nanoscience, ultrafast spectroscopy, photonics, semiconductor processing, device physics, device structures, interface structure etc. Rapid progress in this multidisciplinary area requires strong synergetic efforts among researchers from diverse backgrounds. Such effort can lead to novel methods for development of new materials with improved photon harvesting and interfacial treatments for improved carrier transport, process optimization to yield ordered nanoscale morphologies with well defined electronic structures.

  8. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  9. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyn, Rodney K.; Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ; Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pezacki, John Paul

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  10. Keratin Dynamics: Modeling the Interplay between Turnover and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanie Portet; Anotida Madzvamuse; Andy Chung; Rudolf E. Leube; Reinhard Windoffer

    2015-04-01

    Keratin are among the most abundant proteins in epithelial cells. Functions of the keratin network in cells are shaped by their dynamical organization. Using a collection of experimentally-driven mathematical models, different hypotheses for the turnover and transport of the keratin material in epithelial cells are tested. The interplay between turnover and transport and their effects on the keratin organization in cells are hence investigated by combining mathematical modeling and experimental data. Amongst the collection of mathematical models considered, a best model strongly supported by experimental data is identified. Fundamental to this approach is the fact that optimal parameter values associated with the best fit for each model are established. The best candidate among the best fits is characterized by the disassembly of the assembled keratin material in the perinuclear region and an active transport of the assembled keratin. Our study shows that an active transport of the assembled keratin is required to explain the experimentally observed keratin organization.

  11. Rotational dynamics of cargos at pauses during axonal transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Yan; Sun, Wei; Wang, Gufeng; Jeftinija, Ksenija; Jeftinija, Srdija; Fang, Ning

    2012-08-28

    Direct visualization of axonal transport in live neurons is essential for our understanding of the neuronal functions and the working mechanisms of microtubule-based motor proteins. Here we use the high-speed single particle orientation and rotational tracking technique to directly visualize the rotational dynamics of cargos in both active directional transport and pausing stages of axonal transport, with a temporal resolution of 2 ms. Both long and short pauses are imaged, and the correlations between the pause duration, the rotational behaviour of the cargo at the pause, and the moving direction after the pause are established. Furthermore, the rotational dynamics leading to switching tracks are visualized in detail. These first-time observations of cargo's rotational dynamics provide new insights on how kinesin and dynein motors take the cargo through the alternating stages of active directional transport and pause.

  12. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM); Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Kiss, Csaba (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  13. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM); Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Kiss, Csaba (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  14. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM); Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Kiss, Csaba (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  15. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  16. Interaction between a plasma membrane-localized ankyrin-repeat protein ITN1 and a nuclear protein RTV1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakamoto, Hikaru; Sakata, Keiko; Kusumi, Kensuke; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Iba, Koh

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ITN1, a plasma membrane ankyrin protein, interacts with a nuclear DNA-binding protein RTV1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear transport of RTV1 is partially inhibited by interaction with ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RTV1 can promote the nuclear localization of ITN1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both overexpression of RTV1 and the lack of ITN1 increase salicylic acids sensitivity in plants. -- Abstract: The increased tolerance to NaCl 1 (ITN1) protein is a plasma membrane (PM)-localized protein involved in responses to NaCl stress in Arabidopsis. The predicted structure of ITN1 is composed of multiple transmembrane regions and an ankyrin-repeat domain that is known to mediate protein-protein interactions. To elucidate the molecular functions of ITN1, we searched for interacting partners using a yeast two-hybrid assay, and a nuclear-localized DNA-binding protein, RTV1, was identified as a candidate. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis revealed that RTV1 interacted with ITN1 at the PM and nuclei in vivo. RTV1 tagged with red fluorescent protein localized to nuclei and ITN1 tagged with green fluorescent protein localized to PM; however, both proteins localized to both nuclei and the PM when co-expressed. These findings suggest that RTV1 and ITN1 regulate the subcellular localization of each other.

  17. Protein folding tames chaos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Kelin

    2013-01-01

    Protein folding produces characteristic and functional three-dimensional structures from unfolded polypeptides or disordered coils. The emergence of extraordinary complexity in the protein folding process poses astonishing challenges to theoretical modeling and computer simulations. The present work introduces molecular nonlinear dynamics (MND), or molecular chaotic dynamics, as a theoretical framework for describing and analyzing protein folding. We unveil the existence of intrinsically low dimensional manifolds (ILDMs) in the chaotic dynamics of folded proteins. Additionally, we reveal that the transition from disordered to ordered conformations in protein folding increases the transverse stability of the ILDM. Stated differently, protein folding reduces the chaoticity of the nonlinear dynamical system, and a folded protein has the best ability to tame chaos. Additionally, we bring to light the connection between the ILDM stability and the thermodynamic stability, which enables us to quantify the disorderli...

  18. Defect Tolerance in VLSI Circuits: Techniques and Yield Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koren, Israel

    severity grows proportionally with the size and density of the chip. Consequently, the development and use as the proportion of operational circuits to the total number of fabricated circuits. A yield of 100% is unlikely, due to various manufacturing defects that exist even under mature manufacturing conditions. Continuous

  19. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling on Soot Yield for Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modelling on Soot Yield for Fire Engineering Assessment Yong S (CFD) Modelling is now widely used by fire safety engineers throughout the world as a tool of the smoke control design as part of the performance based fire safety design in the current industry

  20. Spot Convenience Yield Models for Energy Michael Ludkovski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    is more appropriate for energy commodities. Because a commodity can be consumed its price is a combinationSpot Convenience Yield Models for Energy Assets Michael Ludkovski and Ren´e Carmona August 2003 1 Introduction As the energy markets continue to evolve, valuation of energy-linked assets has been one

  1. Air Cushion Press for Excellent Uniformity, High Yield, and Fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Cushion Press for Excellent Uniformity, High Yield, and Fast Nanoimprint Across a 100 mm Field, air cushion press (ACP), in which the mold and substrate are pressed against each other by gas pressure rather than solid plates, and compared it with a common method, solid parallel-plate press (SPP

  2. Consistent scenario for B{yields}PS decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delepine, D.; Lucio M, J. L.; Mendoza S, J. A.; Ramirez, Carlos A.

    2008-12-01

    We consider B{yields}PS decays where P stands for pseudoscalar and S for a heavy (1500 MeV) scalar meson. We achieve agreement with available experimental data, which includes two orders of magnitude hierarchy, assuming the scalars mesons are two quark states. The contribution of the dipolar penguin operator O{sub 11} is quantified.

  3. Sediment Yield Response to Sediment Reduction Strategies Implemented for 10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    195 Sediment Yield Response to Sediment Reduction Strategies Implemented for 10 Years in Watersheds impact practices designed to reduce sediment delivery according to voluntary agreements and regulatory of sediment processes within the past 50 years when information is most reliable have created watershed

  4. Carbon Nanotube Correlation: Promising Opportunity for CNFET Circuit Yield Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Carbon Nanotube Correlation: Promising Opportunity for CNFET Circuit Yield Enhancement Jie Zhang1 Mitra1 1 Stanford University, Stanford, CA, U.S.A 2 LSI-EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland Abstract Carbon are very difficult to control. As a result, "small-width" Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors (CNFETs

  5. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates Elodie Blanc and Benjamin Sultan Report No. 279 March 2015 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global from two established MIT research centers: the Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) and the Center

  6. Z{yields}bb and chiral currents in Higgsless models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, Tomohiro; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Chivukula, R. Sekhar; Christensen, Neil D.; Hsieh, Ken; Simmons, Elizabeth H.; Matsuzaki, Shinya

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we compute the flavor-dependent chiral-logarithmic corrections to the decay Z{yields}bb in the three-site Higgsless model. We compute these corrections diagrammatically in the gaugeless limit in which the electroweak couplings vanish. We also compute the chiral-logarithmic corrections to the decay Z{yields}bb using a renormalization group equation analysis in effective field theory, and show that the results agree. In the process of this computation, we compute the form of the chiral current in the gaugeless limit of the three-site model, and consider the generalization to the N-site case. We elucidate the Ward-Takahashi identities which underlie the gaugeless limit calculation in the three-site model, and describe how the result for the Z{yields}bb amplitude is obtained in unitary gauge in the full theory. We find that the phenomenological constraints on the three-site Higgsless model arising from measurements of Z{yields}bb are relatively mild, requiring only that the heavy Dirac fermion be heavier than 1 TeV or so, and are satisfied automatically in the range of parameters allowed by other precision electroweak data.

  7. Bird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    richness and the density of total birds and SGCNs, suggesting that grassland bioenergy fields may be moreBird Communities and Biomass Yields in Potential Bioenergy Grasslands Peter J. Blank1 *, David W, Wisconsin, United States of America Abstract Demand for bioenergy is increasing, but the ecological

  8. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  9. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

  10. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  11. Intermodal passenger flows on London's public transport network : automated inference of full passenger journeys using fare-transaction and vehicle-location data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Jason B. (Jason Benjamin)

    2012-01-01

    Urban public transport providers have historically planned and managed their networks and services with limited knowledge of their customers' travel patterns. While ticket gates and bus fareboxes yield counts of passenger ...

  12. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  13. New reporters of protein trafficking and protein-protein interactions in live cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández Suárez, Marta

    2008-01-01

    Here, we describe our attempts to harness the exquisite specificity of natural protein and RNA enzymes to develop improved methods to study protein localization and protein-protein interactions in live cells. We first ...

  14. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of the Bartonella bacilliformis gene: alaS and leuS, which encode aminoacyl tRNA synthetases; pyrF, which encodes orotidine 5' monophosphate decarboxylase; and txpA, an ABC transporter-like protein similar to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens chvA gene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Upeslacis, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Biosynthetic genes, putatively identified as pyrf, alas and leus and the putative transport gene txpa, have been cloned and sequenced from the gram negative, hemotrophic, flagellated bacterium Barionella bacilliformis. The functions of the genes...

  15. Protein viscoelastic dynamics: a model system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig Fogle; Joseph Rudnick; David Jasnow

    2015-02-02

    A model system inspired by recent experiments on the dynamics of a folded protein under the influence of a sinusoidal force is investigated and found to replicate many of the response characteristics of such a system. The essence of the model is a strongly over-damped oscillator described by a harmonic restoring force for small displacements that reversibly yields to stress under sufficiently large displacement. This simple dynamical system also reveals unexpectedly rich behavior, exhibiting a series of dynamical transitions and analogies with equilibrium thermodynamic phase transitions. The effects of noise and of inertia are briefly considered and described.

  16. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldmann, Ole

    2011-01-01

    a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator O. Waldmann 1 , B.Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator ? O. Waldmann a and B.yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation

  17. Fig 1. First rotation biomass yield [Mg (oven dry) ha-1 ] of top 5 clones with biomass crop yield trials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Fig 1. First rotation biomass yield [Mg (oven dry) ha-1 yr-1 ] of top 5 clones with biomass crop about growing SRWCs for bioenergy is that SRWCs may not produce sufficient biomass as a feasible (Fig 1) is well below the required amount of biomass necessary to sustain feasibility of bioenergy

  18. A comparison of silage and grain yields of four corn hybrids at three locations in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spears, Ben Riley

    1953-01-01

    A))'I H. '" C I'I OH ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 40 AILNHIX o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o oo IT 42 1, Ccsibined silage yields grain yield and lodging percentage of the four hybrids for all locations? 2...? Ceabined silage yields grain yield and lodging percentage of the three plant spacdngs for all locations, TABLES Analysis of variance of silage yields at College Station. Analysis of vsr1mme of grain yields at GoUege Statics& 30 4. Analysis...

  19. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  20. Spin Transport Shingo Katsumoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    -1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan According to DARPA's definition, "Spintronics"[1] means "Spin Transport Electronics". The issue "Spin Trans- port" thus covers all the fields of spintronics and one devices. In semiconductor spintronics devices, we therefore utilize the differences in n, , m for up

  1. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  2. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  3. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    @virginia.edu http://cts.virginia.edu/Demetsky.htm Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works and Operations The mobility of freight is vital to the national economy. The growth in demand for freight

  4. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

  5. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  6. Protein Vivisection Reveals Elusive Intermediates in Folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Zhongzhou; Sosnick, Tobin R. (UC)

    2010-05-25

    Although most folding intermediates escape detection, their characterization is crucial to the elucidation of folding mechanisms. Here, we outline a powerful strategy to populate partially unfolded intermediates: A buried aliphatic residue is substituted with a charged residue (e.g., Leu {yields} Glu{sup -}) to destabilize and unfold a specific region of the protein. We applied this strategy to ubiquitin, reversibly trapping a folding intermediate in which the {beta}5-strand is unfolded. The intermediate refolds to a native-like structure upon charge neutralization under mildly acidic conditions. Characterization of the trapped intermediate using NMR and hydrogen exchange methods identifies a second folding intermediate and reveals the order and free energies of the two major folding events on the native side of the rate-limiting step. This general strategy may be combined with other methods and have broad applications in the study of protein folding and other reactions that require trapping of high-energy states.

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  8. A Transport Synthetic Acceleration method for transport iterations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramone, Gilles Lionel

    1996-01-01

    We present a family of Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA) methods to iteratively solve within-group scattering problems. A single iteration in these schemes consists of a transport sweep followed by a low-order calculation ...

  9. Protein folding and heteropolymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Garel; H. Orland; E. Pitard

    1997-06-12

    We present a statistical mechanics approach to the protein folding problem. We first review some of the basic properties of proteins, and introduce some physical models to describe their thermodynamics. These models rely on a random heteropolymeric description of these non random biomolecules. Various kinds of randomness are investigated, and the connection with disordered systems is discussed. We conclude by a brief study of the dynamics of proteins.

  10. Comparison of Fission Product Yields and Their Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Harrison

    2006-02-01

    This memorandum describes the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) Space Nuclear Power Program (SNPP) interest in determining the expected fission product yields from a Prometheus-type reactor and assessing the impact of these species on materials found in the fuel element and balance of plant. Theoretical yield calculations using ORIGEN-S and RACER computer models are included in graphical and tabular form in Attachment, with focus on the desired fast neutron spectrum data. The known fission product interaction concerns are the corrosive attack of iron- and nickel-based alloys by volatile fission products, such as cesium, tellurium, and iodine, and the radiological transmutation of krypton-85 in the coolant to rubidium-85, a potentially corrosive agent to the coolant system metal piping.

  11. Fusion neutron yield from high intensity laser-cluster interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Petrov, G.M.; Velikovich, A.L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Plasma Physics Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    The fusion neutron yield from a compact neutron source is studied. Laser-irradiated deuterium clusters serve as a precursor of high-energy deuterium ions, which react with the walls of a fusion reaction chamber and produce copious amounts of neutrons in fusion reactions. The explosion of deuterium clusters with initial radius of 50-200 A irradiated by a subpicosecond laser with intensity of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} is examined theoretically. We studied the conversion efficiency of laser energy to ion kinetic energy, the mean and maximum ion kinetic energy, and ion energy distribution function by a molecular dynamics model. A yield of {approx}10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} neutrons/J is obtainable for a peak laser intensity of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2} and clusters with an initial radius of 200-400 A.

  12. Direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; J. Vollmer; S. Herminghaus; M. Brinkmann

    2012-06-09

    We present a novel computational method for direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials. The method is well-suited for the measurement of jamming phase diagram of a wide range of discrete particle systems such as granular materials, foams, and colloids. We further successfully apply the method to evaluate the jamming phase diagram of wet granular material in order to demonstrates the applicability of the model.

  13. Bushland Management For Water Yield: Prospects for Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.; Griffin, Ronald C.; Kaiser, Ronald A.; Freeman, Lansingh S.; Blackburn, Wilbert H.; Jordan, Wayne R.

    1987-01-01

    [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] BRUSHLAND MANAGEMENT FOR WATER YIELD: PROSPECTS FOR TEXAS Bruce A. McCarl Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald C. Griffin Associate Professor- Agricultural Economics Ronald A. Kaiser Assistant Professor... management. The main categories of these actions are a) continue current policy-no new initiatives; b) subsidize brush management through low-interest loans; c) cost share with those managing brush; d) refine property rights to resultant water so...

  14. Irrigated Sugarbeets: Yield Response and Profit Implications, Texas High Plains. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansford, Vernon D.; Winter S.R.; Harman, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    ; Haddock, 1959; Erie and French, 1968; Parashar and Dastane, 1973; Carter, 1980b; Barbieri, 1982; Winter, 1989). Research indicates that excessively high levels of nitrogen lowers sugar content. Nicholson et al. (1974), in Colorado, developed a mul..., using experimental data from Arizona, Colorado, and Texas, developed production functions reflecting the yield-water-nitrogen relationships for sugar beets. The ability to explain these relationships varied from site to site and year to year. A range...

  15. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential means for diversifying an energy resource base for the transportation sector. Largely as a result, there is a potential for the entrance of an estimated one million alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the California35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS

  16. Self assembling proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeates, Todd O.; Padilla, Jennifer; Colovos, Chris

    2004-06-29

    Novel fusion proteins capable of self-assembling into regular structures, as well as nucleic acids encoding the same, are provided. The subject fusion proteins comprise at least two oligomerization domains rigidly linked together, e.g. through an alpha helical linking group. Also provided are regular structures comprising a plurality of self-assembled fusion proteins of the subject invention, and methods for producing the same. The subject fusion proteins find use in the preparation of a variety of nanostructures, where such structures include: cages, shells, double-layer rings, two-dimensional layers, three-dimensional crystals, filaments, and tubes.

  17. Calibrating transport lines using LOCO techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yves Roblin

    2011-09-01

    With the 12GeV upgrade underway at CEBAF, there is a need to re-characterize the beamlines after the modifications made to it to accommodate running at higher energies. We present a linear perturbation approach to calibrating the optics model of transport lines. This method is adapted from the LOCO method in use for storage rings. We consider the effect of quadrupole errors, dipole construction errors as well as beam position monitors and correctors calibrations. The ideal model is expanded to first order in Taylor series of the quadrupole errors. A set of difference orbits obtained by exciting the correctors along the beamline is taken, yielding the measured response matrix. An iterative procedure is invoked and the quadrupole errors as well as beam position monitors and corrector calibration factors are obtained. Here we present details of the method and results of first measurements at CEBAF in early 2011.

  18. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  19. Transport Properties of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Electrical spin injection and transport in germanium”. Phys.P. , Temperature- Dependent Transport in Suspended Graphene.Y. M. , Quantum Transport: Introduction to Nanoscience.

  20. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  1. Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haspel, Nurit

    Hierarchical Protein Folding Pathways: A Computational Study of Protein Fragments Nurit Haspel,1 folding model. The model postulates that protein folding is a hierarchical top-down pro- cess. The basic words: protein folding; building blocks; pro- tein structure prediction; hierarchical folding; protein

  2. EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 23 31.6 19.9 44.0 96.2 3.0 48.1 4.0 N00762 VISTA/MACKINAC//N94080 3 31.5 18.6 43;EXPERIMENT 5101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TRIAL PLANTING DATE 06/01/05 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS

  3. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  4. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  5. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  6. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuan, Hui-Shun

    2015-01-01

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center ...

  7. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  8. Recombinant Protein Purification Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Recombinant Protein Purification Handbook Principles and Methods GE Healthcare #12;GST Gene Fusion System Handbook 18-1157-58 Hydrophobic Interaction and Reversed Phase Chromatography Principles-6429-60 Microcarrier Cell Culture Principles and Methods 18-1140-62 Challenging Protein Purification Handbook 28

  9. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  10. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  11. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in the earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.

  12. Transgenic approaches to altering carbon and nitrogen partitioning in whole plants: assessing the potential to improve crop yields and nutritional quality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, Umesh P.; Ayre, Brian G.; Bush, Daniel R.

    2015-04-22

    The principal components of plant productivity and nutritional value, from the standpoint of modern agriculture, are the acquisition and partitioning of organic carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) compounds among the various organs of the plant. The flow of essential organic nutrients among the plant organ systems is mediated by its complex vascular system, and is driven by a series of transport steps including export from sites of primary assimilation, transport into and out of the phloem and xylem, and transport into the various import-dependent organs. Manipulating C and N partitioning to enhance yield of harvested organs is evident in themore »earliest crop domestication events and continues to be a goal for modern plant biology. Research on the biochemistry, molecular and cellular biology, and physiology of C and N partitioning has now matured to an extent that strategic manipulation of these transport systems through biotechnology are being attempted to improve movement from source to sink tissues in general, but also to target partitioning to specific organs. These nascent efforts are demonstrating the potential of applied biomass targeting but are also identifying interactions between essential nutrients that require further basic research. In this review, we summarize the key transport steps involved in C and N partitioning, and discuss various transgenic approaches for directly manipulating key C and N transporters involved. In addition, we propose several experiments that could enhance biomass accumulation in targeted organs while simultaneously testing current partitioning models.« less

  13. IEEE Transactions on Electronics Packaging Manufacturing, 2001 On the Use of Yielded Cost in Modeling Electronic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandborn, Peter

    that is independent of step order between steps that scrap defective product. Index Terms ­ cost, yield, yielded costIEEE Transactions on Electronics Packaging Manufacturing, 2001 1 On the Use of Yielded Cost and Systems Center University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Abstract ­ Yielded cost is defined as cost

  14. Emulating maize yields from global gridded crop models using statistical estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, E.

    This study estimates statistical models emulating maize yield responses to changes in temperature and

  15. Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement of the Fractional Thermonuclear Neutron Yield during Deuterium Neutral-Beam Injection into Deuterium Plasmas

  16. Crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae at 2.4;#8201;Å

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Zachary Lee; Cheong, Cheom-Gil; Lee, Seok-Yong (Duke)

    2012-07-11

    Nucleosides are required for DNA and RNA synthesis, and the nucleoside adenosine has a function in a variety of signalling processes. Transport of nucleosides across cell membranes provides the major source of nucleosides in many cell types and is also responsible for the termination of adenosine signalling. As a result of their hydrophilic nature, nucleosides require a specialized class of integral membrane proteins, known as nucleoside transporters (NTs), for specific transport across cell membranes. In addition to nucleosides, NTs are important determinants for the transport of nucleoside-derived drugs across cell membranes. A wide range of nucleoside-derived drugs, including anticancer drugs (such as Ara-C and gemcitabine) and antiviral drugs (such as zidovudine and ribavirin), have been shown to depend, at least in part, on NTs for transport across cell membranes. Concentrative nucleoside transporters, members of the solute carrier transporter superfamily SLC28, use an ion gradient in the active transport of both nucleosides and nucleoside-derived drugs against their chemical gradients. The structural basis for selective ion-coupled nucleoside transport by concentrative nucleoside transporters is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of a concentrative nucleoside transporter from Vibrio cholerae in complex with uridine at 2.4 {angstrom}. Our functional data show that, like its human orthologues, the transporter uses a sodium-ion gradient for nucleoside transport. The structure reveals the overall architecture of this class of transporter, unravels the molecular determinants for nucleoside and sodium binding, and provides a framework for understanding the mechanism of nucleoside and nucleoside drug transport across cell membranes.

  17. Transportation Energy Futures Analysis Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. The TEF project explores how combining multiple strategies could reduce GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. Researchers examined four key areas – lightduty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand – in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, technology and the energy and transportation infrastructure. The TEF reports support DOE long-term planning. The reports provide analysis to inform decisions about transportation energy research investments, as well as the role of advanced transportation energy technologies and systems in the development of new physical, strategic, and policy alternatives.

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  19. Yield improvement and defect reduction in steel casting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Carlson

    2004-03-16

    This research project investigated yield improvement and defect reduction techniques in steel casting. Research and technology development was performed in the following three specific areas: (1) Feeding rules for high alloy steel castings; (2) Unconventional yield improvement and defect reduction techniques--(a) Riser pressurization; and (b) Filling with a tilting mold; and (3) Modeling of reoxidation inclusions during filling of steel castings. During the preparation of the proposal for this project, these areas were identified by the High Alloy Committee and Carbon and Low Alloy Committee of the Steel Founders' Society of America (SFSA) as having the highest research priority to the steel foundry industry. The research in each of the areas involved a combination of foundry experiments, modeling and simulation. Numerous SFSA member steel foundries participated in the project through casting trials and meetings. The technology resulting from this project will result in decreased scrap and rework, casting yield improvement, and higher quality steel castings produced with less iteration. This will result in considerable business benefits to steel foundries, primarily due to reduced energy and labor costs, increased capacity and productivity, reduced lead-time, and wider use and application of steel castings. As estimated using energy data provided by the DOE, the technology produced as a result of this project will result in an energy savings of 2.6 x 10{sup 12} BTU/year. This excludes the savings that were anticipated from the mold tilting research. In addition to the energy savings, and corresponding financial savings this implies, there are substantial environmental benefits as well. The results from each of the research areas listed above are summarized.

  20. Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynick, Harry E.

    Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton transport in stellarators is presented. A primary deficiency of stellarators has been elevated transport this difficulty, developing a range of techniques for reducing transport, both neoclassical and, more recently

  1. Yield enhancement of VLSI/WSI array systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Peter Yunemo

    1989-01-01

    Xs X7 F1g. 12 Detection nf br1ciging faults between two output 11nes. Table V. Statistics of the proposed approach for 5-3-3 fault patter&i PLA input product output PCD, PD, PCD?PD, 3 F, adr4 lines lines lines 92. 13 0. 33 96 04 1 Or (%) 94... single wafer, tllils avoiding lugli manufacturing costs. In this research, vield enhancement of two typical VLSI/IVSI array systems, PLAs aud Pipeline 4rrays, is considered Yield enhancement of PLAs tluough reconfiguration is an important issue...

  2. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D. Title: ProfessorHigh-Pressure MOF Research Yields

  3. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energy neutronHigh-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural

  4. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energy neutronHigh-Pressure MOF Research Yields

  5. High-Pressure MOF Research Yields Structural Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHigh energy neutronHigh-Pressure MOF Research YieldsHigh-Pressure

  6. Simulations Yield Clues to How Cells Interact With Surroundings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|Sensitive Species3 Outlook forSimulations Yield Clues to How

  7. Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and- Energy InnovationLaser Seeding Yields

  8. Angular Momentum Transport in Particle and Fluid Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eliot Quataert; Eugene I. Chiang

    2000-08-23

    We examine the angular momentum transport properties of disks composed of macroscopic particles whose velocity dispersions are externally enhanced (``stirred''). Our simple Boltzmann equation model serves as an analogy for unmagnetized fluid disks in which turbulence may be driven by thermal convection. We show that interparticle collisions in particle disks play the same role as fluctuating pressure forces and viscous dissipation in turbulent disks: both transfer energy in random motions associated with one direction to those associated with another, and convert kinetic energy into heat. The direction of angular momentum transport in stirred particle and fluid disks is determined by the direction of external stirring and by the properties of the collision term in the Boltzmann equation (or its analogue in the fluid problem). In particular, our model problem yields inward transport for vertically or radially stirred disks, provided collisions are suitably inelastic; the transport is outwards in the elastic limit. Numerical simulations of hydrodynamic turbulence driven by thermal convection find inward transport; this requires that fluctuating pressure forces do little to no work, and is analogous to an externally stirred particle disk in which collisions are highly inelastic.

  9. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    nuclear energy, or with fossil energy coupled with carbon capture and storage, could yield much greater GHG reductions than with vehicle efficiency

  10. Update on EM Transportation Program Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organizations * DOE Orders, Policy, Guidance Transportation Risk Reduction * Motor Carrier Evaluations * Physical Protection * Transportation Compliance Reviews * Safety...

  11. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  12. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  13. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  14. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

  15. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  16. Collective transport of weakly interacting molecular motors with Langmuir kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sameep Chandel; Abhishek Chaudhuri; Sudipto Muhuri

    2015-01-09

    Filament based intracellular transport involves the collective action of molecular motor proteins. Experimental evidences suggest that microtubule (MT) filament bound motor proteins such as {\\it kinesins} weakly interact among themselves during transport and with the surrounding cellular environment. Motivated by these observations we study a driven lattice gas model for collective unidirectional transport of molecular motors on open filament, which incorporates the short-range interactions between the motors on filaments and couples the transport process on filament with surrounding cellular environment through adsorption-desorption Langmuir (LK) kinetics of the motors. We analyse this model within the framework of a Mean Field (MF) theory in the limit of {\\it weak} interactions between the motors. We point to the mapping of this model with the non-conserved version of Katz-Lebowitz-Spohn (KLS) model. The system exhibits rich phase behavior with variety of inhomogeneous phases including localized shocks in the bulk of the filament. We obtain the steady state density and current profiles and analyse their variation as function of the strength of interaction. We compare these MF results with Monte Carlo simulations and find that the MF analysis shows reasonably good agreement as long as the motors are weakly interacting. We also construct the non-equilibrium MF phase diagram.

  17. Interfacial rheology of globular proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaishankar, Aditya

    2011-01-01

    Protein-surfactant mixtures appear in many industrial and biological applications. Indeed, a fluid as vital as blood contains a mixture of serum albumin proteins with various other smaller surface-active components. Proteins ...

  18. Nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentile, T R; Breuer, H; Chupp, T E; Coakley, K J; Cooper, R L; Nico, J S; O'Neill, B

    2015-01-01

    We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. In addition one datum was obtained in a 4.6 T magnetic field based on the bismuth K x-ray escape peak produced by a continuum of background gamma rays in this apparatus. These measurements and comparison to prior results were motivated by an experiment to study the radiative decay mode of the free neutron. The combination of data taken under different conditions yields a reasonably consistent picture for BGO nonproportionality that should be useful for researchers employing BGO detectors at low gamma ray energies.

  19. Nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. R. Gentile; M. J. Bales; H. Breuer; T. E. Chupp; K. J. Coakley; R. L. Cooper; J. S. Nico; B. O'Neill

    2015-05-01

    We present measurements of nonproportionality in the scintillation light yield of bismuth germanate (BGO) for gamma-rays with energies between 6 keV and 662 keV. The scintillation light was read out by avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with both the BGO crystals and APDs operated at a temperature of approximately 90 K. Data were obtained using radioisotope sources to illuminate both a single BGO crystal in a small test cryostat and a 12-element detector in a neutron radiative beta-decay experiment. In addition one datum was obtained in a 4.6 T magnetic field based on the bismuth K x-ray escape peak produced by a continuum of background gamma rays in this apparatus. These measurements and comparison to prior results were motivated by an experiment to study the radiative decay mode of the free neutron. The combination of data taken under different conditions yields a reasonably consistent picture for BGO nonproportionality that should be useful for researchers employing BGO detectors at low gamma ray energies.

  20. Knoop Hardness - Apparent Yield Stress Relationship in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swab, Jeffrey J; LaSalvia, Jerry; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Strong, Kevin T; Danna, Dominic; Ragan, Meredith E; Ritt, Patrick J

    2012-01-01

    In Tabor's classical studies of the deformation of metals, the yield stress (Y) and hardness (H) were shown to be related according to H/Y {approx} 3 for complete or fully plastic deformation. Since then it has been anecdotally shown for ceramics that this ratio is <3. Interest exists to explore this further so Hertzian indentation was used to measure the apparent yield stress of numerous ceramics and metals and their results were compared with each material's load-dependent Knoop hardness. The evaluated ceramics included standard reference materials for hardness (silicon nitride and tungsten carbide), silicon carbide, alumina, and glass. Several steel compositions were also tested for comparison. Knoop hardness measurements at 19.6 N (i.e., toward 'complete or fully plastic deformation'), showed that 2 < H/Y < 3 for the metals and 0.8 < H/Y < 1.8 for the glasses and ceramics. Being that H/Y {ne} 3 for the ceramics indicates that Tabor's analysis is either not applicable to ceramics or that full plastic deformation is not achieved with a Knoop indentation or both.

  1. Uncertainty in Simulating Wheat Yields Under Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asseng, S.; Ewert, F.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jones, J.W.; Hatfield, Jerry; Ruane, Alex; Boote, K. J.; Thorburn, Peter; Rotter, R.P.; Cammarano, D.; Brisson, N.; Basso, B.; Martre, P.; Aggarwal, P.K.; Angulo, C.; Bertuzzi, P.; Biernath, C.; Challinor, AJ; Doltra, J.; Gayler, S.; Goldberg, R.; Grant, Robert; Heng, L.; Hooker, J.; Hunt, L.A.; Ingwersen, J.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Kersebaum, K.C.; Mueller, C.; Naresh Kumar, S.; Nendel, C.; O'Leary, G.O.; Olesen, JE; Osborne, T.; Palosuo, T.; Priesack, E.; Ripoche, D.; Semenov, M.A.; Shcherbak, I.; Steduto, P.; Stockle, Claudio O.; Stratonovitch, P.; Streck, T.; Supit, I.; Tao, F.; Travasso, M.; Waha, K.; Wallach, D.; White, J.W.; Williams, J.R.; Wolf, J.

    2013-09-01

    Anticipating the impacts of climate change on crop yields is critical for assessing future food security. Process-based crop simulation models are the most commonly used tools in such assessments1,2. Analysis of uncertainties in future greenhouse gas emissions and their impacts on future climate change has been increasingly described in the literature3,4 while assessments of the uncertainty in crop responses to climate change are very rare. Systematic and objective comparisons across impact studies is difficult, and thus has not been fully realized5. Here we present the largest coordinated and standardized crop model intercomparison for climate change impacts on wheat production to date. We found that several individual crop models are able to reproduce measured grain yields under current diverse environments, particularly if sufficient details are provided to execute them. However, simulated climate change impacts can vary across models due to differences in model structures and algorithms. The crop-model component of uncertainty in climate change impact assessments was considerably larger than the climate-model component from Global Climate Models (GCMs). Model responses to high temperatures and temperature-by-CO2 interactions are identified as major sources of simulated impact uncertainties. Significant reductions in impact uncertainties through model improvements in these areas and improved quantification of uncertainty through multi-model ensembles are urgently needed for a more reliable translation of climate change scenarios into agricultural impacts in order to develop adaptation strategies and aid policymaking.

  2. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA); Krupka, Heike I. (Livermore, CA); Rupp, Bernhard (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  3. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to academia and industry, progress in plant research and new crop development could accelerate and benefit the public.

  4. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  6. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  7. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-ForumTransportation

  8. Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkit Prototype Jump

  9. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently accounts for

  10. Transportation Representation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently

  11. Transportation and Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation

  12. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroicAward |Electron CorrelationHeat Transport

  13. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home Analysis Final

  14. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home

  15. Increasing Confidence of Protein-Protein Interactomes 1 Increasing Confidence of Protein-Protein Interactomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Limsoon

    associated with true-positive protein interactions--e.g., "new interaction gener- ality" (IG2) and "meso-scale comprises the "new interaction generality" (IG2) and "meso-scale motifs" (NeMoFinder) indices. This g

  16. Protein folding and cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz; C. L. Siguenza

    1997-06-04

    Protein denaturing induced by supercooling is interpreted as a process where some or all internal symmetries of the native protein are spontaneously broken. Hence, the free-energy potential corresponding to a folding-funnel landscape becomes temperature-dependent and describes a phase transition. The idea that deformed vortices could be produced in the transition induced by temperature quenching, from native proteins to unfolded conformations is discussed in terms of the Zurek mechanism that implements the analogy between vortices, created in the laboratory at low energy, and the cosmic strings which are thought to have been left after symmetry breaking phase transitions in the early universe. An experiment is proposed to test the above idea which generalizes the cosmological analogy to also encompass biological systems and push a step ahead the view that protein folding is a biological equivalent of the big bang.

  17. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  18. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  19. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  20. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  1. Evolutionary implications: myoglobin-like proteins found in ancient mic... http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2000-02/UoH-Eimp-0102100.php 1 of 2 3/5/2008 12:50 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Maqsudul

    in oxygen transport and storage. The newly identified proteins may be the evolutionary ancestors of proteins involved in oxygen sensing as well as transport and storage. The findings, which appear in the Feb. 3 issue vapor, nitrogen, methane and ammonia that made up Earth's atmosphere for food and energy, probably

  2. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  3. Collaboration yields 'The Right Glasses' for observing mystery behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAuditsCluster Compatibility Mode ClusterProtein structurein electrons

  4. MOLECULAR MODELING OF PROTEINS AND MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION OF PROTEIN STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    MOLECULAR MODELING OF PROTEINS AND MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION OF PROTEIN STRUCTURE ARNOLD NEUMAIER­called protein folding problem. The static aspect is concerned with how to predict the folded (native, tertiary) structure of a protein, given its sequence of amino acids. The dynamic aspect asks about the possible

  5. MOLECULAR MODELING OF PROTEINS AND MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION OF PROTEIN STRUCTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    MOLECULAR MODELING OF PROTEINS AND MATHEMATICAL PREDICTION OF PROTEIN STRUCTURE ARNOLD NEUMAIER-called protein folding problem. The static aspect is concerned with how to predict the folded (native, tertiary) structure of a protein, given its sequence of amino acids. The dynamic aspect asks about the possible

  6. Winter 2011 Evaluating Protein-Protein Docking Web Servers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nina Ly Winter 2011 Evaluating Protein-Protein Docking Web Servers Proteins are involved in many protein docking web servers: PIPER, GRAMM-X, 3D Garden, SmoothDock and PatchDock. I #12;will also perform structure. All of these web servers are freely available with no requirement to have an account

  7. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Nathanael S. (Berkeley, CA); Schultz, Peter (Oakland, CA); Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Meijer, Laurent (Roscoff, FR)

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  8. Calculated fission-fragment yield systematics in the region 74

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Möller, Peter; Randrup, Jørgen

    2015-04-01

    Background: In the seminal experiment by Schmidt et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 665, 221 (2000)] in which fission-fragment charge distributions were obtained for 70 nuclides, asymmetric distributions were seen above nucleon number A ? 226 and symmetric ones below. Because asymmetric fission had often loosely been explained as a preference for the nucleus to always exploit the extra binding of fragments near ¹³²Sn it was assumed that all systems below A ? 226 would fission symmetrically because available isotopes do not have a proton-to-neutron Z/N ratio that allows division into fragments near ¹³²Sn. But the finding by Andreyev et al.more »[Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 252502 (2010)] did not conform to this expectation because the compound system ¹??Hg was shown to fission asymmetrically. It was suggested that this was a new type of asymmetric fission, because no strong shell effects occur for any possible fragment division. Purpose: We calculate a reference database for fission-fragment mass yields for a large region of the nuclear chart comprising 987 nuclides. A particular aim is to establish whether ¹??Hg is part of a contiguous region of asymmetric fission, and if so, its extent, or if not, in contrast to the actinides, there are scattered smaller groups of nuclei that fission asymmetrically in this area of the nuclear chart. Methods: We use the by now well benchmarked Brownian shape-motion method and perform random walks on the previously calculated five-dimensional potential-energy surfaces. The calculated shell corrections are damped out with energy according to a prescription developed earlier. Results: We have obtained a theoretical reference database of fission-fragment mass yields for 987 nuclides. These results show an extended region of asymmetric fission with approximate extension 74 ? Z ? 85 and 100 ? N ? 120. The calculated yields are highly variable. We show 20 representative plots of these variable features and summarize the main aspects of our results in terms of “nuclear-chart” plots showing calculated degrees of asymmetry versus N and Z. Conclusions: Experimental data in this region are rare: only ten or so yield distributions have been measured, some with very limited statistics. We agree with several measurements with higher statistics. Regions where there might be differences between our calculated results and measurements lie near the calculated transition line between symmetric and asymmetric fission. To draw more definite conclusions about the accuracy of the present implementation of the Brownian shape-motion approach in this region experimental data, with reliable statistics, for a fair number of suitably located additional nuclides are clearly needed. Because the nuclear potential-energy structure is so different in this region compared to the actinide region, additional experimental data together with fission theory studies that incorporate additional, dynamical aspects should provide much new insight.« less

  9. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  10. Method and apparatus for sampling low-yield wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Last, George V. (Richland, WA); Lanigan, David C. (Kennewick, WA)

    2003-04-15

    An apparatus and method for collecting a sample from a low-yield well or perched aquifer includes a pump and a controller responsive to water level sensors for filling a sample reservoir. The controller activates the pump to fill the reservoir when the water level in the well reaches a high level as indicated by the sensor. The controller deactivates the pump when the water level reaches a lower level as indicated by the sensors. The pump continuously activates and deactivates the pump until the sample reservoir is filled with a desired volume, as indicated by a reservoir sensor. At the beginning of each activation cycle, the controller optionally can select to purge an initial quantity of water prior to filling the sample reservoir. The reservoir can be substantially devoid of air and the pump is a low volumetric flow rate pump. Both the pump and the reservoir can be located either inside or outside the well.

  11. Timescales in creep and yielding of attractive gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent Grenard; Thibaut Divoux; Nicolas Taberlet; Sébastien Manneville

    2013-11-27

    The stress-induced yielding scenario of colloidal gels is investigated under rough boundary conditions by means of rheometry coupled to local velocity measurements. Under an applied shear stress, the fluidization of gels made of attractive carbon black particles suspended in a mineral oil is shown to involve a previously unreported shear rate response $\\dot \\gamma (t)$ characterized by two well-defined and separated timescales $\\tau_c$ and $\\tau_f$. First $\\dot \\gamma(t)$ decreases as a weak power law strongly reminiscent of the primary creep observed in numerous crystalline and amorphous solids, coined the "Andrade creep." We show that the bulk deformation remains homogeneous at the micron scale, which demonstrates that if plastic events take place or if any shear transformation zone exists, such phenomena occur at a smaller scale. As a key result of this paper, the duration $\\tau_c$ of this creep regime decreases as a power law of the viscous stress, defined as the difference between the applied stress and the yield stress with an exponent ranging between 2 and 3 depending on the gel concentration. The end of this first regime is marked by a jump of the shear rate by several orders of magnitude, while the gel slowly slides as a solid block experiencing strong wall slip at both walls, despite rough boundary conditions. Finally, a second sudden increase of the shear rate is concomitant to the full fluidization of the material which ends up being homogeneously sheared. The corresponding fluidization time $\\tau_f$ robustly follows an exponential decay with the applied shear stress as already reported for smooth boundary conditions. Finally, we highlight a few features that are common to attractive colloidal gels and to solid materials by discussing our results in the framework of theoretical approaches of solid rupture (kinetic, fiber bundle, and transient network models).

  12. The Suppression of Energy Discretization Errors in Multigroup Transport Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The Objective of this project is to develop, implement, and test new deterministric methods to solve, as efficiently as possible, multigroup neutron transport problems having an extremely large number of groups. Our approach was to (i) use the standard CMFD method to "coarsen" the space-angle grid, yielding a multigroup diffusion equation, and (ii) use a new multigrid-in-space-and-energy technique to efficiently solve the multigroup diffusion problem. The overall strategy of (i) how to coarsen the spatial and energy grids, and (ii) how to navigate through the various grids, has the goal of minimizing the overall computational effort. This approach yields not only the fine-grid solution, but also coarse-group flux-weighted cross sections that can be used for other related problems.

  13. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    Summary of transportation greenhouse gas mitigation optionsof alternative fuels. Low greenhouse gas fuels Mixing ofMAC) refrigerant replacement. Greenhouse gas budgets for

  14. Heat transport within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2011-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to interpret Earth's dynamic processes based upon heat transport concepts derived from ordinary experience. But, ordinary experience can be misleading, especially when underlain by false assumptions. Geodynamic considerations traditionally have embraced three modes of heat transport: conduction, convection, and radiation. Recently, I introduced a fourth, "mantle decompression thermal tsunami" that, I submit, is responsible for emplacing heat at the base of the Earth's crust. Here, I review thermal transport within the Earth and speculate that there might be a fifth mode: "heat channeling", involving heat transport from the core to "hot-spots" such as those that power the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland.

  15. Transportation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    share of petroleum use, carbon dioxide (a primary greenhouse gas) emissions, and air pollution, advances in fuel cell power systems for transportation could substantially improve...

  16. Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, N.J.

    2010-01-01

    a critical role in combustion processes just as chemicalparameters are essential for combustion modeling; molecularwith Application to Combustion. Transport Theor Stat 2003;

  17. TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY DATA EXPANSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    in Transportation August 2007 #12;Table of Contents 1. Introduction and trip data associated with the households in that geographic area. The UTM coordinates belonging to each

  18. Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Alternative Transportation Technologies: Hydrogen, Biofuels, Advanced Efficiency, and Plug-in...

  19. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    thereby contributing to energy security. Most also reducesuch as improved energy security, many transport GHGincluding energy cost savings, oil security, and pollution

  20. Institute of Transport Studies PSU Transportation Seminar, 21 May 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    of Electric Bicycles Assoc. Prof. Geoff Rose Director, ITS (Monash) Transport Theme Leader, Monash expand the role of the bicycle in the context of urban transportation · This seminar examines electric Battery technology · Sealed lead acid (SLA) ­ Well understood and cheapest ­ Heavy ­ Modest life · Nickel

  1. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    on Transportation, Energy and Policy convened in 1988. Oilon Transportation, Energy and Policy has been held at theon Transportation, Energy and Policy in July 2009 was the

  2. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    cials (AASHTO), Transport Canada, the California DepartmentA case study of California. ” Transport. Res. Part D. West,smaller transport-related carbon footprint than California,

  3. Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

    2010-01-01

    California Department of Transportation, the California EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Climate and TransportationTransportation and Energy Policy, at Paci?c Grove, California.

  4. Computer Simulations of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Eric J.

    CHAPTER 8 Computer Simulations of Protein Folding VIJAY S. PANDE , ERIC J. SORIN , CHRISTOPHER D, CA 94305, USA 8.1 Introduction: Goals and Challenges of Simulating Protein Folding Computer as well as recent applications of this methodology. 8.1.1 Simulating Protein Folding Proteins play

  5. INVERSE PROTEIN FOLDING, HIERARCHICAL OPTIMISATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halligan, Daniel

    INVERSE PROTEIN FOLDING, HIERARCHICAL OPTIMISATION AND TIE KNOTS Thomas M. A. Fink st. john Introduction 3 1.1 Inverse Protein Folding 3 1.2 Hierarchical Optimisation 5 1.3 Tie Knots 6 1.4 Schematic Organisation 6 1.5 Publications 9 2 Protein Folding, Inverse Protein Folding and Energy Landscapes 10 2

  6. Maximizing the ExoEarth candidate yield from a future direct imaging mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, Christopher C.; Roberge, Aki; Mandell, Avi; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2014-11-10

    ExoEarth yield is a critical science metric for future exoplanet imaging missions. Here we estimate exoEarth candidate yield using single visit completeness for a variety of mission design and astrophysical parameters. We review the methods used in previous yield calculations and show that the method choice can significantly impact yield estimates as well as how the yield responds to mission parameters. We introduce a method, called Altruistic Yield Optimization, that optimizes the target list and exposure times to maximize mission yield, adapts maximally to changes in mission parameters, and increases exoEarth candidate yield by up to 100% compared to previous methods. We use Altruistic Yield Optimization to estimate exoEarth candidate yield for a large suite of mission and astrophysical parameters using single visit completeness. We find that exoEarth candidate yield is most sensitive to telescope diameter, followed by coronagraph inner working angle, followed by coronagraph contrast, and finally coronagraph contrast noise floor. We find a surprisingly weak dependence of exoEarth candidate yield on exozodi level. Additionally, we provide a quantitative approach to defining a yield goal for future exoEarth-imaging missions.

  7. Transport in holographic superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Nir Lisker; Piotr Surowka; Amos Yarom

    2011-01-17

    We construct a slowly varying space-time dependent holographic superfluid and compute its transport coefficients. Our solution is presented as a series expansion in inverse powers of the charge of the order parameter. We find that the shear viscosity associated with the motion of the condensate vanishes. The diffusion coefficient of the superfluid is continuous across the phase transition while its third bulk viscosity is found to diverge at the critical temperature. As was previously shown, the ratio of the shear viscosity of the normal component to the entropy density is 1/(4 pi). As a consequence of our analysis we obtain an analytic expression for the backreacted metric near the phase transition for a particular type of holographic superfluid.

  8. Heat transport system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  9. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2003-01-01

    In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

  10. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  11. EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS.9 50.0 4.1 #12;EXPERIMENT 6101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST DATE 06/06/06 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100*6/CN49-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 3 25.8 17.9 42.7 88.8 2.0 50.0 3.9 N05305 N00838/B98304//N00792 44 25

  12. Transport of secondary electrons and reactive species in ion tracks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surdutovich, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The transport of reactive species brought about by ions traversing tissue-like medium is analysed analytically. Secondary electrons ejected by ions are capable of ionizing other molecules; the transport of these generations of electrons is studied using the random walk approximation until these electrons remain ballistic. Then, the distribution of solvated electrons produced as a result of interaction of low-energy electrons with water molecules is obtained. The radial distribution of energy loss by ions and secondary electrons to the medium yields the initial radial dose distribution, which can be used as initial conditions for the predicted shock waves. The formation, diffusion, and chemical evolution of hydroxyl radicals in liquid water are studied as well.

  13. Plasma Viscosity with Mass Transport in Spherical ICF Implosion Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vold, Erik L; Ortega, Mario I; Moll, Ryan; Fenn, Daniel; Molvig, Kim

    2015-01-01

    The effects of viscosity and small-scale atomic-level mixing on plasmas in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) currently represent challenges in ICF research. Many current ICF hydrodynamic codes ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. We have implemented a Lagrange hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation. The code is used to study ICF implosion differences with and without plasma viscosity and to determine the impacts of viscosity on temperature histories and neutron yield. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, convergence ratio, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduc...

  14. Mechanism of transport of IFT particles in C-elegans cilia by the concerted action of kinesin-II and OSM-3 motors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    CONCERTED ACTION OF KINESIN-2 MOTORS IN IFT • PAN ET AL.intraflagellar transport motor OSM-3. J. Cell Biol. 174:931–subunit and the kinesin-2 motor protein, KIF17. Curr. Biol.

  15. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  16. Expression of Recombinant Proteins in Microalgae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, Stephen P.; Franklin, Scott E.

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Proteins in Microalgae Publications Stephen P.Recombinant Proteins in Microalgae Final Narrative for Sea

  17. Motor protein accumulation on antiparallel microtubule overlaps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hui-Shun Kuan; M. D. Betterton

    2015-09-24

    Biopolymers serve as one-dimensional tracks on which motor proteins move to perform their biological roles. Motor protein phenomena have inspired theoretical models of one-dimensional transport, crowding, and jamming. Experiments studying the motion of Xklp1 motors on reconstituted antiparallel microtubule overlaps demonstrated that motors recruited to the overlap walk toward the plus end of individual microtubules and frequently switch between filaments. We study a model of this system that couples the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) for motor motion with switches between antiparallel filaments and binding kinetics. We determine steady-state motor density profiles for fixed-length overlaps using exact and approximate solutions of the continuum differential equations and compare to kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The center region, far from the overlap ends, has a constant motor density as one would na\\"ively expect. However, rather than following a simple binding equilibrium, the center motor density depends on total overlap length, motor speed, and motor switching rate. The size of the crowded boundary layer near the overlap ends is also dependent on the overlap length and switching rate in addition to the motor speed and bulk concentration. The antiparallel microtubule overlap geometry may offer a novel mechanism for biological regulation of protein concentration and consequent activity.

  18. Co-solvent Pretreatment Reduces Costly Enzyme Requirements for High Sugar and Ethanol Yields from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Co-solvent Pretreatment Reduces Costly Enzyme Requirements for High Sugar and Ethanol Yields from limits potential sugar yields.[7] Thus, it is desirable We introduce a new pretreatment called co-solvent

  19. Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields Progress Toward Targets of Efficient NOx Control for Diesels Combining Low-Temperature Combustion with Lean-NOx Trap Yields...

  20. ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol Process Using High-Impact Feedstock for Commercialization ZeaChem Pilot Project: High-Yield Hybrid Cellulosic Ethanol...

  1. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  2. Coal Transportation Rate Sensitivity Analysis

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    On December 21, 2004, the Surface Transportation Board (STB) requested that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze the impact of changes in coal transportation rates on projected levels of electric power sector energy use and emissions. Specifically, the STB requested an analysis of changes in national and regional coal consumption and emissions resulting from adjustments in railroad transportation rates for Wyoming's Powder River Basin (PRB) coal using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). However, because NEMS operates at a relatively aggregate regional level and does not represent the costs of transporting coal over specific rail lines, this analysis reports on the impacts of interregional changes in transportation rates from those used in the Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005) reference case.

  3. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet containing detailed data and graphics for specific transportation modes.

  4. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 41904396 22-05-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua Transport Rodas de mudança Et si nos villes #12;Transportes em Revista.com País:

  5. NEANDC specialists meeting on yields and decay data of fission product nuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrien, R.E.; Burrows, T.W. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 29 papers presented. Workshop reports on decay heat, fission yields, beta- and gamma-ray spectroscopy, and delayed neutrons are included. An appendix contains a survey of the most recent compilations and evaluations containing fission product yield, fission product decay data, and delayed neutron yield information. (WHK)

  6. The Current State of Casting Yield: Results from the 1997 Steel Founders'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    The Current State of Casting Yield: Results from the 1997 Steel Founders' Society of America Casting Yield Survey Richard A. Hardin - Research Engineer Christoph Beckermann - Professor Solidification The results of a casting yield survey of steel foundries taken in the first quarter of 1997 are presented

  7. A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldmann, Ole

    2011-01-01

    permanent-magnet microwave ion source for the high-yield neutron generator.Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron GeneratorPermanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator ?

  8. What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells are generally considered wells that cannot meet the peak water demand for the home or farm. This fact sheet

  9. Yield Enhancement of Digital Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using Space Redundancy and Local Reconfiguration*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Yield Enhancement of Digital Microfluidics-Based Biochips Using Space Redundancy and Local to avoid faulty elements. Digital microfluidics- based biochips are also amenable to redundancy-based yield. As microfluidics-based biochips become more complex, manufacturing yield will have significant influence

  10. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570 ESTIMATION OF EFFORT, MAXIMUM SUSTAINABLE YIELD, AND MAXIMUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER KEITHLY, JR YIELD, AND MAXIMUM ECONOMIC YIELD IN THE SHRIMP FISHERY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO BY JAMES NANCE, WALTER in the shrimp fishery of the Gulf of Mexico. NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-SEFSC-570, 71P. Copies may

  11. Spatial stochastic processes for yield and reliability management with applications to nano electronics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Jung Yoon

    2005-02-17

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 IV YIELD MODELING OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS BASED ON SPATIAL NONHOMOGENEOUS POISSON PRO- CESS : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 31 IV.1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 IV.2. Yield model... and gamma distribution(? = 2) : : : : : : : : : : : : : 18 5 Yield models : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 6 Bathtub-shaped failure rate curve : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 26 7 Simulated defects...

  12. Plastic yield inception of an indented coated flat and comparison with a flattened coated sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    . Introduction In many engineering applications, such as cutting tools, hard disk drives and electrical circuitsPlastic yield inception of an indented coated flat and comparison with a flattened coated sphere Keywords: Spherical indentation Hard coating Yield inception a b s t r a c t The yield inception

  13. Yield inception of a soft coating on a flat substrate indented by a rigid sphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, Paul H.

    Yield inception of a soft coating on a flat substrate indented by a rigid sphere Wenping Song a indentation Soft coating Yield inception The yield inception of a deformable half space covered by a soft coating and indented by a rigid sphere is studied using the finite element method. A soft coating

  14. Protein Dynamics and Biocatalysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeedingProgramExemptionsProtein Dynamics Hit the Big Screen Protein Dynamics

  15. Predicting the Yields of Photometric Surveys for Transiting Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Beatty

    2008-07-01

    Observing extrasolar planetary transits is one of the only ways that we may infer the masses and radii of planets outside the Solar System. As such, the detections made by photometric transit surveys are one of the only foreseeable ways that the areas of planetary interiors, system dynamics, migration, and formation will acquire more data. Predicting the yields of these surveys therefore serves as a useful statistical tool. Predictions allows us to check the efficiency of transit surveys (``are we detecting all that we should?'') and to test our understanding of the relevant astrophysics (``what parameters affect predictions?''). Furthermore, just the raw numbers of how many planets will be detected by a survey can be interesting in its own right. Here, we look at two different approaches to modeling predictions (forward and backward), and examine three different transit surveys (TrES, XO, and Kepler). In all cases, making predictions provides valuable insight into both extrasolar planets and the surveys themselves, but this must be tempered by an appreciation of the uncertainties in the statistical cut-offs used by the transit surveys.

  16. The Start Of Ebullition In Quiescent, Yield-Stress Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, G. R.; Sherwood, David J.; Saez, A. Eduardo

    2012-08-30

    Non-Newtonian rheology is typical for the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) slurries processed in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Hydrogen and other flammable gases are generated in the aqueous phase by radiolytic and chemical reactions. HLW slurries have a capacity for retaining gas characterized by the shear strength holding the bubbles still. The sizes and degassing characteristics of flammable gas bubbles in the HLW slurries expected to be processed by the WTP are important considerations for designing equipment and operating procedures. Slurries become increasingly susceptible to degassing as the bubble concentration increases. This susceptibility and the process of ebullitive bubble enlargement are described here. When disturbed, the fluid undergoes localized flow around neighboring bubbles which are dragged together and coalesce, producing an enlarged bubble. For the conditions considered in this work, bubble size increase is enough to displace the weight required to overcome the fluid shear strength and yield the surroundings. The buoyant bubble ascends and accumulates others within a zone of influence, enlarging by a few orders of magnitude. This process describes how the first bubbles appear on the surface of a 7 Pa shear strength fluid a few seconds after being jarred.

  17. High-Yield Synthesis of Stoichiometric Boron Nitride Nanostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nocua, José E.; Piazza, Fabrice; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2009-01-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanostructures are structural analogues of carbon nanostructures but have completely different bonding character and structural defects. They are chemically inert, electrically insulating, and potentially important in mechanical applications that include the strengthening of light structural materials. These applications require the reliable production of bulk amounts of pure BN nanostructures in order to be able to reinforce large quantities of structural materials, hence the need for the development of high-yield synthesis methods of pure BN nanostructures. Using borazine ( B 3 N 3 H 6 ) asmore »chemical precursor and the hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique, pure BN nanostructures with cross-sectional sizes ranging between 20 and 50?nm were obtained, including nanoparticles and nanofibers. Their crystalline structure was characterized by (XRD), their morphology and nanostructure was examined by (SEM) and (TEM), while their chemical composition was studied by (EDS), (FTIR), (EELS), and (XPS). Taken altogether, the results indicate that all the material obtained is stoichiometric nanostructured BN with hexagonal and rhombohedral crystalline structure. « less

  18. Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

    2011-07-01

    In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

  19. Simple Model of Membrane Proteins Including Solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Pagan; A. Shiryayev; T. P. Connor; J. D. Gunton

    2006-03-04

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two dimensional model, similar to one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{114}, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Caro simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three dimensional model.

  20. The nonlinear characteristic scheme for X-Y geometry transport problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.F.; Wareing, T.A.; Marr, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Nonlinear Characteristic (NC) numerical scheme for solving the discrete ordinates form of the transport equation is derived for X-Y geometry. The NC scheme is based on the analytic solution of the discrete-ordinate transport equation in each mesh cell. The driving source for the transport equation is represented by a three-moment preserving, strictly positive, exponential distribution obtained using information theory methods. The analysis of two test problems demonstrates the superior behavior of the NC scheme as compared to other numerical schemes currently used to solve the transport equation. The NC scheme is found to be strictly positive and accurate on meshes where other methods yield either negative and/or remarkably inaccurate results.

  1. Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Milligen, Boudewijn

    Uphill transport and the probabilistic transport model B. Ph. van Milligen Asociacio´n EURATOM-CIEMAT

  2. Identification and Characterization of the Arabidopsis Orthologs of Nuclear Transport Factor 2, the Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meier, Iris

    Identification and Characterization of the Arabidopsis Orthologs of Nuclear Transport Factor 2, the Nuclear Import Factor of Ran1 Qiao Zhao2 , Sara Leung2 , Anita H. Corbett, and Iris Meier* Plant Cellular, and nuclear envelope formation. Nuclear import of Ran relies on a small RanGDP-binding protein, Nuclear

  3. The RCK Domain of the KtrAB K+ Transporter: Multiple Conformations of an Octameric Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright,R.; Vazquez Ibar, J.; Kim, C.; Gruner, S.; Morais-Cabral, J.

    2006-01-01

    The KtrAB ion transporter is a complex of the KtrB membrane protein and KtrA, an RCK domain. RCK domains regulate eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins involved in K{sup +} transport. Conflicting functional models have proposed two different oligomeric arrangements for RCK domains, tetramer versus octamer. Our results for the KtrAB RCK domain clearly show an octamer in solution and in the crystal. We determined the structure of this protein in three different octameric ring conformations that resemble the RCK-domain octamer observed in the MthK potassium channel but show striking differences in size and symmetry. We present experimental evidence for the association between one RCK octameric ring and two KtrB membrane proteins. These results provide insights into the quaternary organization of the KtrAB transporter and its mechanism of activation and show that the RCK-domain octameric ring model is generally applicable to other ion-transport systems.

  4. Adjusting flow station job to remote Nigerian location yields savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, R.; Williams, E.C. (OPI International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-05-02

    In September 1991, Chevron Nigeria Ltd. and Nigerian National Petroleum Crop. contracted Offshore Pipelines to design, procure, construct, install, and commission the Opuekeba 30,000 b/d crude-oil flow station on an offshore platform near Olero Creek, Nigeria, approximately 22 miles from the nearest deepwater access. Chevron's original project plan included bringing the flow station to the site in small packages and then assembling it in a lengthy field hook-up process. Offshore Pipelines developed a plan early in the project to maximize construction and hook-up in the fabrication yard, then transport the nearly complete structures to site by way of a newly dredged canal. What proved to be most difficult was the site location in Nigeria. Job planning and communication were important in the successful completion of the project. Keeping the components of the large and complex facility simple proved to be effective and efficient and played a key role in completing the project on time and within budget. The paper discusses overcoming obstacles, lift and depth constraints, dredging, fabrication, installation, and large-time problems.

  5. Design, operation factors can up coker liquid yields. [Delayed liquid cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J.D. (Foster Wheeler Corp., Clinton, NJ (US))

    1991-02-04

    Among refineries with delayed cokers, there is now major incentive to maximize coker fresh feed throughput while producing maximum possible liquid yields. There are design features and operating considerations that can increase liquid yields. Maximizing coke throughput is typically a necessity in overall refinery operations because coker capacity to process the bottom of the barrel can be a bottleneck to the entire refinery crude throughput. The incentive for achieving the maximum liquid yield from a coker is: clean distillates, even cracked distillates, are valuable while fuel grade coke is not. Another way to look at a maximum liquid yield coker operation is as a minimum coke yield operation.

  6. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, Oded (Karmey Yosef, IL); Shpiegl, Itai (Rehovot, IL); Goldstein, Marc (Davis, CA); Doi, Roy (Davis, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  7. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  8. Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Transport Survey 2008 (Staff and student) April 2008 Ramon Arigoni Ortiz Wan-Jung Chou Department................................................................................................6 2. Transport use and travel behaviour......................................................................10 2.1. Modes of transport

  9. co2-transport | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport Cost Model FENETL CO2 Transport Cost Model About the model: This model was developed to estimate the cost of transporting a user-specified mass rate of CO2 by pipeline...

  10. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  11. Transportes em Revista.com Pas: Portugal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Transportes em Revista.com País: Portugal Period.: Diária Âmbito: Online Pag.: 1 de 2ID: 44168021 10-10-2012 Receba gr átis a Transportes Online | Assinar a Transportes em Revista | Fazer da TR a sua

  12. Efficiency of Charge Transport in a Polypeptide Chain: The Isolated System Sheh-Yi Sheu, E. W. Schlag,*, Dah-Yen Yang, and H. L. Selzle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheu, Sheh-Yi

    Efficiency of Charge Transport in a Polypeptide Chain: The Isolated System Sheh-Yi Sheu, E. W and energy and hence provides a model for chemical reaction at a distance. The high efficiency of charge The protein interestingly shows a very much higher charge transport efficiency as an isolated molecule

  13. Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) Problem: more and more transport protocols available, with various features,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Protocol Services (TAPS) · Problem: more and more transport protocols that would not offer "TCP or UDP" but "transport services" ­ A transport system: transport-services@ifi.uio.no hXps://sympa.uio.no/ifi.uio.no/info/transport-services · Problem

  14. California’s Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    truck activity in California. Transport Policy. Volume 16,in California Travel Demand Reductions Decreasing transportCalifornia, USA. Transportation Research, Part D: Transport

  15. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    E?ects of Transportation Energy policy on Tra?c Crashes .e?ciency standards. Energy Policy, 33(3), 407–419. Blincoe,what’s necessary? Energy Policy, 34(9), 971–974. Bose, R.

  16. Protein knot server: detection of knots in protein structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolesov, Grigory

    KNOTS (http://knots.mit.edu) is a web server that detects knots in protein structures. Several protein structures have been reported to contain intricate knots. The physiological role of knots and their effect on folding ...

  17. Identifying protein-protein interactions of a cell cycle regulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amos, Joseph Edward

    2013-02-22

    The role of anachronism (ana) protein in stem cell division of Drosophila melanogaster was examined. Synthesis of identifiable ana protein was necessary. The identifying method exploited was that of antibody tagging using ...

  18. Structure-based algorithms for protein-protein interaction prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosur, Raghavendra

    2012-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) play a central role in all biological processes. Akin to the complete sequencing of genomes, complete descriptions of interactomes is a fundamental step towards a deeper understanding ...

  19. Mechanism of protein splicing of the Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Kevin M.; Schufreider, Ann K.; McGill, Melissa A.; O'Brien, Kathryn M.; Reitter, Julie N.; Mills, Kenneth V.

    2010-12-17

    Research highlights: {yields} The Pyrococcus abyssi lon protease intein promotes efficient protein splicing. {yields} Inteins with mutations that interfere with individual steps of splicing do not promote unproductive side reactions. {yields} The intein splices with Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His. {yields} The intein is flanked by a Gly-rich region at its C terminus that may increase the efficiency of the third step of splicing, Asn cyclization coupled to peptide bond cleavage. -- Abstract: Protein splicing is a post-translational process by which an intervening polypeptide, the intein, excises itself from the flanking polypeptides, the exteins, coupled to ligation of the exteins. The lon protease of Pyrococcus abyssi (Pab) is interrupted by an intein. When over-expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli, the Pab lon protease intein can promote efficient protein splicing. Mutations that block individual steps of splicing generally do not lead to unproductive side reactions, suggesting that the intein tightly coordinates the splicing process. The intein can splice, although it has Lys in place of the highly conserved penultimate His, and mutants of the intein in the C-terminal region lead to the accumulation of stable branched-ester intermediate.

  20. Comparing Kernels For Predicting Protein Binding Sites From Amino Acid Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honavar, Vasant

    in on all three tasks, with the substitution kernel based on amino acid substitution matrices that take into account structural or evolutionary conservation or physicochemical properties of amino acids yields modestComparing Kernels For Predicting Protein Binding Sites From Amino Acid Sequence Feihong Wu1

  1. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  2. Turbulence Induced Transport in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldas, I. L.; Marcus, F. A.; Heller, M. V. A. P.; Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Batista, A. M. [Departamento de Matematica e Estatistica, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Viana, R. L.; Lopes, S. R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Morrison, P. J.; Horton, W. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States); Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, 78712 (United States)

    2006-12-04

    This report is concerned with plasma edge turbulence and its relation to anomalous particle transport in tokamaks. First, experimental evidence of turbulence driven particle transport and measurements of the gradients of the equilibrium profiles in the Brazilian tokamaks TBR and TCABR are presented. Next, diffusion in a two drift-wave system is discussed. In this nonintegrable system, particle transport is associated with the onset of chaotic orbits. Finally, numerical evidence suggesting that a nonlinear three-mode interaction could contribute to the intermittent plasma fluctuations observed in tokamaks is presented.

  3. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  4. Texarkana Urban Transportation Study 2035 Metropolitan Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texarkana Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-01

    And Local Resource Agencies 1-7 Inclusion of Indian Tribes in the Transportation Process 1-8 2 SOCIO-ECONOMIC DATA 5 ROADS & BRIDGES Population Data 2-1 Road Performance 5-1 Housing Data 2... to increased motor fuels taxes or alternative revenue sources 4. Decaying infrastructure 5. Increasing demand for new infrastructure and access to alternative modes Starting with the Intermodal Surface Transportation Act of 1991 (ISTEA), the regulatory...

  5. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  6. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  7. Transportation Issues and Resolutions Compilation of Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of cladding (embrittled, high burnup cladding, loads applied to cladding during transport), criticality analyses of failed UNF within transport packages, moderator exclusion...

  8. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator...

  9. Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Magazine Current Edition: Coal Gasification and Transportation Fuels Quarterly News, Vol.1, Issue 4 (July 2015) Archived Editions: Coal...

  10. Nearly 200 Attend National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    national transportation coordination. BUFFALO, N.Y. - In his keynote address at the fourth-annual DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) meeting, EM Senior...

  11. Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Spring 2015 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New Mexico The Spring 2015 meeting of the National Transportation Stakeholders Forum will be held on May 12-14, 2015...

  12. Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Equipment (2010 MECS) Transportation Equipment (2010 MECS) Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Transportation Equipment Sector (NAICS 336) Energy use data source:...

  13. Transportation Safeguards & Security Test Bed (TSSTB) | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed May 30, 2013 The Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed consists of a test-bed vehicle and a monitoringlaboratorytraining...

  14. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

  15. We're All Transportation Planners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Melanie

    2006-01-01

    transportation ment, has had some success in London’sLondon, offering our individual contribution to them. obser vations on current transportation

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle...

  18. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety...

  19. QER - Comment of Electric Drive Transportation Association |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drive Transportation Association QER - Comment of Electric Drive Transportation Association From: Genevieve Cullen gcullen@electricdrive.org Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 11:58...

  20. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    On Closure Success 1 EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, Illinois May 26, 2010 Frank Marcinowski Acting Chief...

  1. Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of nanostructures. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assembly and electrical transport characterization of...

  2. EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Transportation EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation DOE's Radioactive Waste Management Priorities: Continue to manage waste inventories in a safe and compliant...

  3. Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects of Inter-Modal Coordination Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Seamless Transport Policy:...

  4. Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stakeholders Forum Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring...

  5. Mitochondrial Transport and Function in Axon Degeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Kelley

    2013-01-01

    OF CALIFORNIA Los Angeles Mitochondrial Transport andTransport and Function in Axon Degeneration by Kelley O’Donnell Doctor of Philosophy in Neuroscience University of California,

  6. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Agenda for the Transportation and...

  7. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister...

  8. Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon (Earthworm Phase) Mac Callaham Corey Babb in each treatment Sampling #12;Macrobiotic Vertical Transport of Litter Derived Carbon (millipede phase

  9. Triangular flow in hydrodynamics and transport theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alver, Burak Han [Laboratory for Nuclear Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307 (United States); Gombeaud, Clement; Luzum, Matthew; Ollitrault, Jean-Yves [CNRS, URA2306, IPhT, Institut de physique theorique de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2010-09-15

    In ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions, the Fourier decomposition of the relative azimuthal angle, {Delta}{phi}, distribution of particle pairs yields a large cos(3{Delta}{phi}) component, extending to large rapidity separations {Delta}{eta}>1. This component captures a significant portion of the ridge and shoulder structures in the {Delta}{phi} distribution, which have been observed after contributions from elliptic flow are subtracted. An average finite triangularity owing to event-by-event fluctuations in the initial matter distribution, followed by collective flow, naturally produces a cos(3{Delta}{phi}) correlation. Using ideal and viscous hydrodynamics and transport theory, we study the physics of triangular (v{sub 3}) flow in comparison to elliptic (v{sub 2}), quadrangular (v{sub 4}), and pentagonal (v{sub 5}) flow. We make quantitative predictions for v{sub 3} at RHIC and LHC as a function of centrality and transverse momentum. Our results for the centrality dependence of v{sub 3} show a quantitative agreement with data extracted from previous correlation measurements by the STAR collaboration. This study supports previous results on the importance of triangular flow in the understanding of ridge and shoulder structures. Triangular flow is found to be a sensitive probe of initial geometry fluctuations and viscosity.

  10. Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Takayoshi; Cell-Free Technology Application Laboratory, RIKEN Innovation Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045 ; Watanabe, Satoru; Kigawa, Takanori; Cell-Free Technology Application Laboratory, RIKEN Innovation Center, 1-7-22 Suehiro-cho, Tsurumi, Yokohama 230-0045; Department of Computational Intelligence and Systems Science, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8502

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ? Cell-free synthesis system suitable for disulfide-containing proteins is proposed. ? Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. ? DsbC catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds. ? Milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled BPTI and lysozyme C were obtained. ? Synthesized proteins were both catalytically functional and properly folded. -- Abstract: Many important therapeutic targets are secreted proteins with multiple disulfide bonds, such as antibodies, cytokines, hormones, and proteases. The preparation of these proteins for structural and functional analyses using cell-based expression systems still suffers from several issues, such as inefficiency, low yield, and difficulty in stable-isotope labeling. The cell-free (or in vitro) protein synthesis system has become a useful protein production method. The openness of the cell-free system allows direct control of the reaction environment to promote protein folding, making it well suited for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins. In this study, we developed the Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell lysate-based cell-free synthesis system for disulfide-containing proteins, which can produce sufficient amounts of functional proteins for NMR analyses. Disulfide bond formation was facilitated by the use of glutathione buffer. In addition, disulfide isomerase, DsbC, catalyzed the efficient shuffling of incorrectly formed disulfide bonds during the protein synthesis reaction. We successfully synthesized milligram quantities of functional {sup 15}N-labeled higher eukaryotic proteins, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) and human lysozyme C (LYZ). The NMR spectra and functional analyses indicated that the synthesized proteins are both catalytically functional and properly folded. Thus, the cell-free system is useful for the synthesis of disulfide-containing proteins for structural and functional analyses.

  11. Stabilization of Proteins against Aggregation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baynes, Brian M.

    Proteins degrade in vitro by a variety of routes, the most common of which is aggregation. In order to develop protein formulations that will limit aggregation, researchers use heuristic, experimental screening procedures. ...

  12. Stabilized polyacrylic saccharide protein conjugates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1996-02-20

    This invention is directed to water soluble protein polymer conjugates which are stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises a protein which is linked to an acrylic polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 16 figs.

  13. Seasonality in air transportation demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichard Megwinoff, H?tor Nicolas

    1988-01-01

    This thesis investigates the seasonality of demand in air transportation. It presents three methods for computing seasonal indices. One of these methods, the Periodic Average Method, is selected as the most appropriate for ...

  14. Washington: Integrated Transportation Programs & Coordinated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    trip planner site that pulls together all regional transportation options into one portal. The project has already resulted in a reduction of 5.9 million vehicle miles traveled...

  15. Aerosol penetration through transport lines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dileep, V.R.

    1996-01-01

    It is very important to minimize the losses in aerosol transport systems for the Continuous Air Monitors (CAM) to have a prompt and a meaningful alarm and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also Currently mandates continuous emissions...

  16. EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 05/31/07 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED DAYS TO DAYS TO LODGING HEIGHT DES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST PLANTING DATE 05/31/07 ENTRY NAMES NO. YIELD CWT 100 SEED49-242 NAVY GENTEC, VISTA 23 28.3 18.8 51.4 97.4 3.0 47.6 3.5 N01453 B98301/N97772 16 28.0 17.6 4900838/B98304//N00792 24 23.9 19.0 52.5 99.4 1.6 52.4 4.0 #12;EXPERIMENT 7101 STANDARD NAVY YIELD TEST

  17. IFITM Proteins Restrict Viral Membrane Hemifusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    M (2008) HIV-1 accessory proteins–ensuring viral survival intransmembrane genes and proteins. J Interferon Cytokine Reset al. (2009) The IFITM proteins mediate cellular resistance

  18. Hydrogen Bond Shaping of Membrane Protein Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Bowie JU (2011) Membrane protein folding: how important areRadford SE (2000) Protein folding mechanisms: new methodset al. (2003) Membrane protein folding: beyond the two stage

  19. Transportation scenarios for risk analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Ruth F.

    2010-09-01

    Transportation risk, like any risk, is defined by the risk triplet: what can happen (the scenario), how likely it is (the probability), and the resulting consequences. This paper evaluates the development of transportation scenarios, the associated probabilities, and the consequences. The most likely radioactive materials transportation scenario is routine, incident-free transportation, which has a probability indistinguishable from unity. Accident scenarios in radioactive materials transportation are of three different types: accidents in which there is no impact on the radioactive cargo, accidents in which some gamma shielding may be lost but there is no release of radioactive material, and accident in which radioactive material may potentially be released. Accident frequencies, obtainable from recorded data validated by the U.S. Department of Transportation, are considered equivalent to accident probabilities in this study. Probabilities of different types of accidents are conditional probabilities, conditional on an accident occurring, and are developed from event trees. Development of all of these probabilities and the associated highway and rail accident event trees are discussed in this paper.

  20. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.