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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines Agency/Company /Organization: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.egnret.ewg.apec.org/news/Alternative%20Transport%20Fuels%20Final%2 Cost: Free Language: English References: APEC-Alternative Transport Fuels: Implementation Guidelines[1] "Worldwide, there are at least 35 million vehicles already operating on some form of alternative transport fuel and many millions more that are fuelled by blends with conventional gasoline and diesel or powered by electricity. Many alternative fuel programs are being, or have been,

2

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Benefits, Challenges, and Implementation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation for the Clean Cities Website highlighting the benefits, challenges, and implementation considerations when utilizing natural gas as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modelling transport fuel demand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transport fuels account for an increasing share of oil ... interest to study the economics of the transport fuel market and thereby to evaluate the efficiency of the price mechanism as an instrument of policy in ...

Thomas Sterner; Carol A. Dahl

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

5

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign will identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign supports achievement of the overarching Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program mission and objectives. Activities will be sufficiently flexible to accommodate any of the potential fuel cycle options for used fuel management. Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan

6

Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

federal federal register Monday May 17, 1999 Part II Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-series Fuels; Final Rule 26822 Federal Register / Vol. 64, No. 94 / Monday, May 17, 1999 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 10 CFR Part 490 [Docket No. EE-RM-98-PURE] RIN 1904-AA99 Alternative Fuel Transportation Program; P-Series Fuels AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of final rulemaking. SUMMARY: In response to a petition filed by Pure Energy Corporation, DOE is amending the rules for the statutory program that requires certain alternative fuel providers and State government

7

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Public Transportation Vehicle Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

8

NREL: Transportation Research - Fuels Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about related NREL biomass research projects that focus on converting renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels, chemicals, and products. For more information, see...

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuel Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuel Standards The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers the Oregon

10

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuels for School Buses

11

Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation 1 SFTRA Overview Contents * Project and review teams * Purpose and goals * Basic methodology * Improvements relative to previous studies * Draft NUREG structure and format * Routine shipment analysis and results * Accident condition analysis and results * Findings and conclusions * Schedule 2 SFTRA Research and Review Teams * Sandia National Laboratory Research Team [$1.8M; 9/06-9/12] - Doug Ammerman - principal investigator - Carlos Lopez - thermal - Ruth Weiner - RADTRAN * NRC's SFTRA Technical Review Team - Gordon Bjorkman - structural

12

Fuel Cells for Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE R&D Activities Fuel Cells for Transportation Fuel Cells for Transportation Photo of Ford Focus fuel cell car in front of windmills The transportation sector is the single...

13

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Petitions to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Alternative Fuel Petitions Section 301(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) defines

14

Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation Perspectives Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2-B: End Use and Fuel...

15

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 2009 Focus Area: Propane Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eia.gov/renewable/alternative_transport_vehicles/pdf/afv-atf2009.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/alternatives-traditional-transportati Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report provides data on the number of alternative fuel vehicles produced, the number of alternative fuel vehicles in use and the amount of alternative transportation fuels consumed in the United States in 2009. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Alternatives_to_Traditional_Transportation_Fuels_2009&oldid=514311

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transportation System Transportation System Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework

17

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign International Activities Implementation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Activities International Activities Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign International Activities Implementation Plan The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through

20

NREL: Technology Deployment - Fuels, Vehicles, and Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technical experts, policymakers, and other transportation stakeholders in the public and private sectors Providing technical expertise on alternative fuel vehicles and fueling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Overview Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project...

22

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Breakout Session 1C-Fostering...

23

State of Indiana/GICC Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual...

24

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Transportation State Transportation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Transportation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Transportation Plan The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) must update the California Transportation Plan (Plan) by December 31, 2015, and every five

25

35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS IN CALIFORNIA INTRODUCTION The introduction of alternative fuels into California's transportation market has supply at low prices. But, with an uncertain long-term future for oil supplies and prices, alternative

26

Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation (5 Activities)  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Gasoline is the most commonly used fuel for transportation; however, there are multiple alternative fuels that are making their way to the market. These alternative fuels include propane, natural gas, electric hybrids, hydrogen fuel cells, and bio-diesel. Students will probably have heard of some of these alternative fuels, but they may not understand how and why they are better then ordinary gasoline.

28

INL Site Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management  

SciTech Connect

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

Ernest L. Fossum

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system that will facilitate fueling of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Services Fueling Operation Transportation Services has installed a software system into this system. All University vehicles that wish to fuel at UH M noa Transportation Services will be required the application below and submit your application to Transportation Services before attempting to fuel your

30

Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How To Implement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................................................................9 Crunch the numbers: Vehicle cost calculators to a hybrid electric vehicle (having both a gas engine and an electric motor), but is able to recharge its1 5/2014 Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How To Implement: Electric Vehicles Contents Introduction

31

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal...production of liquid hydrocarbons. Thus, the goal...sustainable production of hydrocarbon fuel for the transportation...The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat for the endothermic...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Sustainable Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provide an introduction to sustainable transportation. NREL research supports development of electric, hybrid,...

33

List of Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Fuels Incentives Transportation Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 30 Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 30) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy Bond Fund Program (Illinois) State Grant Program Illinois Commercial Industrial Solar Water Heat Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Landfill Gas Wind energy Biomass Hydroelectric energy Renewable Transportation Fuels Geothermal Electric No Alternative Fuel Transportation Grant Program (Indiana) State Grant Program Indiana Commercial Nonprofit Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cells No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion Rebate Program (Arkansas) State Rebate Program Arkansas Transportation Renewable Transportation Fuels No

34

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

35

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pittsburgh Livery Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh Livery Company Transports Customers in Alternative Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pittsburgh

37

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of liquid hydrocarbon fuels (16, 17). It can...conversion to liquid fuels using the FT process...support total current oil consumption of 13.8 Mbbl/d by the...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal, the...from the transportation engine. Therefore, for coal...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Alternative transportation fuels and air quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alternative transportation fuels and air quality ... Potential Air Quality Effects of Using Ethanol?Gasoline Fuel Blends: A Field Study in Albuquerque, New Mexico ... Potential Air Quality Effects of Using Ethanol?Gasoline Fuel Blends: A Field Study in Albuquerque, New Mexico ...

Tai Y. Chang; Robert H. Hammerle; Steven M. Japar; Irving T. Salmeen

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fuel Cells for Transportation- Research and Development: Program Abstracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of proton-exchange-membrane(PEM) fuel cell technology since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a significant developmental program in the early 1990s. This progress has stimulated enormous interest worldwide in developing fuel cell products for transportation as well as for stationary and portable power applications. The potential markets are huge, but so are the R&D risks. Given the potential for PEM fuel cells to deliver large economic and environmental benefits to the Nation, DOE continues to take a leadership role in developing and validating this technology. DOE’s strategy to implement its Fuel Cells for Transportation program has three components: an R&D strategy, a fuels strategy, and a management strategy.

40

Solid fuel applications to transportation engines  

SciTech Connect

The utilization of solid fuels as alternatives to liquid fuels for future transportation engines is reviewed. Alternative liquid fuels will not be addressed nor will petroleum/solid fuel blends except for the case of diesel engines. With respect to diesel engines, coal/oil mixtures will be addressed because of the high interest in this specific application as a result of the large number of diesel engines currently in transportation use. Final assessments refer to solid fuels only for diesel engines. The technical assessments of solid fuels utilization for transportation engines is summarized: solid fuel combustion in transportation engines is in a non-developed state; highway transportation is not amenable to solid fuels utilization due to severe environmental, packaging, control, and disposal problems; diesel and open-cycle gas turbines do not appear worthy of further development, although coal/oil mixtures for slow speed diesels may offer some promise as a transition technology; closed-cycle gas turbines show some promise for solid fuels utilization for limited applications as does the Stirling engine for use of cleaner solid fuels; Rankine cycle engines show good potential for limited applications, such as for locomotives and ships; and any development program will require large resources and sophisticated equipment in order to advance the state-of-the-art.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SEU43 fuel bundle shielding analysis during spent fuel transport  

SciTech Connect

The basic task accomplished by the shielding calculations in a nuclear safety analysis consist in radiation doses calculation, in order to prevent any risks both for personnel protection and impact on the environment during the spent fuel manipulation, transport and storage. The paper investigates the effects induced by fuel bundle geometry modifications on the CANDU SEU spent fuel shielding analysis during transport. For this study, different CANDU-SEU43 fuel bundle projects, developed in INR Pitesti, have been considered. The spent fuel characteristics will be obtained by means of ORIGEN-S code. In order to estimate the corresponding radiation doses for different measuring points the Monte Carlo MORSE-SGC code will be used. Both codes are included in ORNL's SCALE 5 programs package. A comparison between the considered SEU43 fuel bundle projects will be also provided, with CANDU standard fuel bundle taken as reference. (authors)

Margeanu, C. A.; Ilie, P.; Olteanu, G. [Inst. for Nuclear Research Pitesti, No. 1 Campului Street, Mioveni 115400, Arges County (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transportation Fuels: The Future is Today (6 Activities)  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

This teacher guide provides extensive background information on transportation fuels to help your students learn about conventional and alternative transportation fuels by evaluating their advantages and disadvantages.

43

Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST) Program Status Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST) Program Status Presentation made by...

44

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels AgencyCompany...

45

Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report Fuel Cells for Transportation - FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION 159.pdf More Documents &...

46

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are

47

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Zero Emissions Bus Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Zero Emissions Bus Implementation Plan As part of a state effort to identify strategies to expand the availability

48

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and water and air and for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel with water and air in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor.

Kumar, Romesh (Naperville, IL); Ahmed, Shabbir (Evanston, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fuel cell system for transportation applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A propulsion system is described for a vehicle having pairs of front and rear wheels and a fuel tank. An electrically driven motor having an output shaft operatively connected to at least one of said pair of wheels is connected to a fuel cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by an electrolyte for producing dc power to operate the motor. A partial oxidation reformer is connected both to the fuel tank and to the fuel cell and receives hydrogen-containing fuel from the fuel tank and uses water and air for partially oxidizing and reforming the fuel in the presence of an oxidizing catalyst and a reforming catalyst to produce a hydrogen-containing gas. The hydrogen-containing gas is sent from the partial oxidation reformer to the fuel cell negative electrode while air is transported to the fuel cell positive electrode to produce dc power for operating the electric motor. 3 figures.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Progress in fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

The current and projected states of development of fuel cells are described in terms of availability, performance, and cost. The applicability of various fuel cell types to the transportation application is discussed, and projections of power densities, weights, and volumes of fuel cell systems are made into the early 1990s. Research currently being done to advance fuel cells for vehicular application is described. A summary of near-term design parameters for a fuel cell transit line is given, including bus performance requirements, fuel cell power plant configuration, and battery peaking requirements. The objective of this paper is to determine a fuel cell technology suitable for near-term use as a vehicular power plant. The emphasis of the study is on indirect methanol fuel cell systems.

Murray, H.S.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Orleans Provides Orleans Provides Green Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Orleans Provides Green Transportation on AddThis.com... March 19, 2011 New Orleans Provides Green Transportation D iscover how New Orleans provides green transportation with electric street

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Transportation Tax Exclusion The California Alternative Energy and Advanced Transportation Financing

53

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biobased Biobased Transportation Research Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biobased Transportation Research Funding The Surface Transportation Research, Development, and Deployment (STRDD)

54

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gasoline and 6% of its diesel demand by converting...conversion to liquid fuels using the FT process...total current oil consumption of 13.8 Mbbl/d by...conversion of syngas to diesel is 100% selective...liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our proposal...the transportation engine. Therefore, for coal...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Local and Public Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Local and Public Transportation Fleet Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com...

56

Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; Jensen, Philip J.; England, Jeffery L.; LeDuc, Dan

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hickam Air Force Base Fuel Cell Vehicles: Early Implementation Experience  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report sumarizes early implementation experience from an evaluation of two prototype fuel cell vehicles operating at Hickam Air Force Base in Honolulu, Hawaii.

58

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Energy State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

59

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary objective of this report is to determine whether the existing Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) is sufficient for work to be performed in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and where the existing QAPD is not sufficient, supply recommendations for changes to the QAPD to accommodate the UFDC. The FCT QAPD provides a sound and useable foundation for the implementation of QA for UFDC R&D activities, including the application of QA in a graded approach. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan More Documents & Publications

60

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Quality Assurance Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary objective of this report is to determine whether the existing Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) is sufficient for work to be performed in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and where the existing QAPD is not sufficient, supply recommendations for changes to the QAPD to accommodate the UFDC. The FCT QAPD provides a sound and useable foundation for the implementation of QA for UFDC R&D activities, including the application of QA in a graded approach. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan More Documents & Publications Used Fuel Disposition Campaign International Activities Implementation Plan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuels Performance Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems  

SciTech Connect

Describes R&D and analysis in advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum-based transportation fuels done by NREL's Fuels Performance Group.

Not Available

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The supply security of hydrogen as transport fuel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The impact that hydrogen and fuel cell technology can have on the security of European transport fuel supply is addressed in this paper. This impact… (more)

Hansen, Anders Chr.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

17 - Hydrogen as a fuel in transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Hydrogen has attracted fresh attention in recent decades as an alternative renewable and sustainable transportation fuel. Hydrogen can fuel conventional or hybridized power trains, through highly efficient and low emission hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (H2ICE) and proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). High capacity and cost-effective onboard vehicle hydrogen storage remains a major challenge, along with the affordability of building out a distributed hydrogen production, distribution, and fueling infrastructure. Current practice is to store hydrogen onboard vehicles as a compressed gas, cryogenic liquid, or in chemical form for conversion on demand. Recent hydrogen demonstrations and field trials have advanced the technology, lowered costs, and improved public perception.

J.R. Anstrom

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fuel Cycle Technologies Near Term Planning for Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuels Storage Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project (NFST) Program Status Jeff Williams Project Director National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Buffalo, New York May 2013 2  "With the appropriate authorizations from Congress, the Administration currently plans to implement a program over the next 10 years that:  Sites, designs and licenses, constructs and begins operations of a pilot interim storage facility by 2021 with an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shut-down reactor sites;  Advances toward the siting and licensing of a larger interim storage facility to be available by 2025 that will have sufficient capacity to provide flexibility in the waste management system and allows for acceptance of enough used

65

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) supports achievement of the overarching mission and objectives of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Technologies Program The implementation plan begins with the assumption of target dates that are set out in the January 2013 DOE Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (http://energy.gov/downloads/strategy-management-and-disposal-used-nuclear-fuel-and-high-level-radioactive-waste). These target dates and goals are summarized in section III. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to progress in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign and the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program.

Jens Birkholzer; Robert MacKinnon; Kevin McMahon; Sylvia Saltzstein; Ken Sorenson; Peter Swift

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...replaced with gasoline hybrid electric vehicles...the use of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs...electricity from a PV grid could be directly used...current transportation fuel infrastructure, the efficiency improvement...through the proposed hybrid hydrogen-carbon economy...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with gasoline hybrid electric vehicles...of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles...electricity from a PV grid could be directly...by using solar energy. There are two...transportation fuel infrastructure, the efficiency...the proposed hybrid hydrogen-carbon...material and energy balances. The...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

69

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are reasonable compared to gasoline, especially if consumers take advantage of

70

Environmental and economic assessment of alternative transportation fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative fuels have the potential to mitigate transportation's impact on the environment and enhance energy security. In this work, we investigate two alternative fuels: liquefied natural gas (LNG) as an aviation fuel, ...

Withers, Mitch Russell

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Multi-Modal Multi-Modal Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Multi-Modal Transportation Using multiple modes of transportation is the best approach for some

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

SmartWay Transport SmartWay Transport Partnership to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: SmartWay Transport Partnership on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type SmartWay Transport Partnership The SmartWay Transport Partnership is a voluntary partnership between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the domestic freight

73

Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How to Implement: Biodiesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and even oils produced from algae, fungi, bacteria, molds, and yeast.3 While biodiesel (B100) can be used1 8/18/2014 Alternative Fuel Tool Kit How to Implement: Biodiesel Contents Introduction to Biodiesel

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Veolia Transportation Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane on AddThis.com... Aug. 17, 2013 Veolia Transportation Converts Taxi Fleet to Propane

75

Fuel Cycle Technologies Near Term Planning for Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear of Section 180(c) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, as amended National Transportation Stakeholder's Forum Buffalo, NY May 15, 2013 Section 180(c) Mandate "The Secretary shall provide technical assistance and funds to States for training for public safety officials of appropriate units of local government and Indian tribes through whose jurisdiction the Secretary plans to transport spent nuclear fuel or high-level radioactive waste [to an NWPA-authorized facility]. * The training shall cover procedures for safe routine transportation of these materials and procedures for dealing with emergency response situations. * Covers all modes of transport 2 Section 180(c) - Background  DOE nearly implemented Section 180(c) in the mid-

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Michigan Transports Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Transports Students in Hybrid Electric School Buses on AddThis.com...

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Truck Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree on AddThis.com... Dec. 31, 2009 Biodiesel Truck Transports Capitol Christmas Tree F ollow the Capitol Christmas Tree from Arizona to Washington, D.C., aboard

78

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Plans, Implementation, and Results The Fuel Cell Technologies Office carries out technology research, development, and deployment through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management process, and the results and public benefits that derive from it. Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities.

79

Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

More Documents & Publications U.S. Global Threat Reduction InitiativeU.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction...

80

Used fuel disposition campaign international activities implementation plan.  

SciTech Connect

The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through information exchange and a broader participation of experts in the field. U.S. participation in international UNF and HLW exchanges leads to safe management of nuclear materials, increased security through global oversight, and protection of the environment worldwide. Such interactions offer the opportunity to develop consensus on policy, scientific, and technical approaches. Dialogue to address common technical issues helps develop an internationally recognized foundation of sound science, benefiting the U.S. and participating countries. The UNF and HLW management programs in nuclear countries are at different levels of maturity. All countries utilizing nuclear power must store UNF, mostly in wet storage, and HLW for those countries that reprocess UNF. Several countries either utilize or plan to utilize dry storage systems for UNF, perhaps for long periods of time (several decades). Geologic disposal programs are at various different states, ranging from essentially 'no progress' to selected sites and pending license applications to regulators. The table below summarizes the status of UNF and HLW management programs in several countriesa. Thus, the opportunity exists to collaborate at different levels ranging from providing expertise to those countries 'behind' the U.S. to obtaining access to information and expertise from those countries with more mature programs. The U.S. fuel cycle is a once through fuel cycle involving the direct disposal of UNF, as spent nuclear fuel, in a geologic repository (previously identified at Yucca Mountain, Nevada), following at most a few decades of storage (wet and dry). The geology at Yucca Mountain, unsaturated tuff, is unique among all countries investigating the disposal of UNF and HLW. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of UNF at Yucca Mountain and possibly utilize very long term storage (approaching 100 years or more) while evaluating future fuel cycle alternatives for managing UNF, presents a different UNF and HLW management R&D portfolio that has been pursued in the U.S. In addition, the research and development activities managed by OCRWM have been transferred to DOE-NE. This requires a reconsideration of how the UFDC will engage in cooperative and collaborative activities with other countries. This report presents the UFDC implementation plan for international activities. The DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited OCRWM through the acquisition and exchange of information, database development, and peer reviews by experts from other countries. DOE-NE cooperates and collaborates with other countries in similar 'arenas' with similar objectives and realizing similar benefits. However the DOE-NE focus has not typically been in the area of UNF and HLW management. This report will first summarize these recent cooperative and collaborative activities. The manner that the UFDC will cooperate and collaborate in the future is expected to change as R&D is conducted regarding long-term storage and the potential disposal of UNF and HLW in different geolo

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimization of Microfluidic Fuel Cells Using Transport Principles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Optimization of Microfluidic Fuel Cells Using Transport Principles ... In this paper, we describe an approach to designing microfluidic fuel cells that optimizes the reaction?depletion boundary layer using transport principles. ... The data represented as ? or · in Figure 7 correspond to microfluidic fuel cells where the gap between consecutive electrodes was not optimized. ...

Jinkee Lee; Keng Guan Lim; G. Tayhas R. Palmore; Anubhav Tripathi

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing, Purifying, and Liquefying Landfill Gas for Transportation Fuel TRANSPORTATION ENERGY alternative fuel, and purified landfill gas could provide a renewable domestic source of it. Landfills from landfills and use it in natural gas applications such as fueling motor vehicles. Project

83

Reimagining liquid transportation fuels : sunshine to petrol.  

SciTech Connect

Two of the most daunting problems facing humankind in the twenty-first century are energy security and climate change. This report summarizes work accomplished towards addressing these problems through the execution of a Grand Challenge LDRD project (FY09-11). The vision of Sunshine to Petrol is captured in one deceptively simple chemical equation: Solar Energy + xCO{sub 2} + (x+1)H{sub 2}O {yields} C{sub x}H{sub 2x+2}(liquid fuel) + (1.5x+.5)O{sub 2} Practical implementation of this equation may seem far-fetched, since it effectively describes the use of solar energy to reverse combustion. However, it is also representative of the photosynthetic processes responsible for much of life on earth and, as such, summarizes the biomass approach to fuels production. It is our contention that an alternative approach, one that is not limited by efficiency of photosynthesis and more directly leads to a liquid fuel, is desirable. The development of a process that efficiently, cost effectively, and sustainably reenergizes thermodynamically spent feedstocks to create reactive fuel intermediates would be an unparalleled achievement and is the key challenge that must be surmounted to solve the intertwined problems of accelerating energy demand and climate change. We proposed that the direct thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O to CO and H{sub 2}, which are the universal building blocks for synthetic fuels, serve as the basis for this revolutionary process. To realize this concept, we addressed complex chemical, materials science, and engineering problems associated with thermochemical heat engines and the crucial metal-oxide working-materials deployed therein. By project's end, we had demonstrated solar-driven conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO, a key energetic synthetic fuel intermediate, at 1.7% efficiency.

Johnson, Terry Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; McDaniel, Anthony H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Dedrick, Daniel E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Miller, James Edward; Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Coker, Eric Nicholas; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Chen, Ken Shuang; Ermanoski, Ivan; Kellog, Gary L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge Presentation 3 A fuel cell vehicle would contain the PEMFC system modeled in this project along with additional

85

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Fuel Cycle Technologies » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project » Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Documents September 30, 2013 Preliminary Evaluation of Removing Used Nuclear Fuel From Shutdown Sites In January 2013, the Department of Energy issued the Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste. Among the elements contained in this strategy is an initial focus on accepting used nuclear fuel from shutdown reactor sites. February 22, 2013 Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal This report provides findings from a set of social science studies

86

Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation and Maintenance Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation and Maintenance Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Development Programme, Global Environment Facility Focus Area: Transportation Topics: Implementation, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.cyclingbotswana.org/fileadmin/Project_Documents/NMT%20Best%20Pract Cost: Free Best Practices in Non-Motorized Transport Planning, Implementation and Maintenance Screenshot

87

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Energy Information Administration Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools, Policy Impacts Website: www.eia.gov/renewable/afv/index.cfm This report provides annual data on the number of alternative fuel vehicles produced, the number of alternative fuel vehicles in use, and the amount of alternative transportation fuels consumed in the United States. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Shift - Change to low-carbon modes Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

88

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analyses Analyses Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analyses The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology, has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The Storage and Transportation activities within the UFDC are being developed to address issues regarding the extended storage of UNF and its subsequent

89

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nuclear Fuels Storage & Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Nuclear Fuels Storage & Transportation Planning Project Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel assemblies [412.3 metric ton heavy metal (MTHM)] and 3 canisters of greater-than-class-C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. Photo courtesy of Connecticut Yankee (http://www.connyankee.com/html/fuel_storage.html). Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) at the shutdown Connecticut Yankee site. The ISFSI includes 40 multi-purpose canisters, within vertical concrete storage casks, containing 1019 used nuclear fuel

90

NREL: Transportation Research - Alternative Fuel Fleet Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reduced particulate matter, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbon emissions. Regional Transportation District Biodiesel Transit Buses In partnership with the Regional Transportation...

91

Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With "Renewable Super Premium" Breakout...

92

Estimation of the Transportation Risks for the Spent Fuel in Korea for Various Transportation Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

According to the long term management strategy for spent fuels in Korea, they will be transported from the spent fuel pools in each nuclear power plant to the central interim storage facility (CISF) which is to start operation in 2016. Therefore, we have to determine the safe and economical logistics for the transportation of these spent fuels by considering their transportation risks and costs. In this study, we developed four transportation scenarios by considering the type of transportation casks and transport means in order to suggest safe and economical transportation logistics for the spent fuels in Korea. Also, we estimated and compared the transportation risks for these four transportation scenarios. From the results of this study, we found that these four transportation scenarios for spent fuels have a very low radiological risk activity with a manageable safety and health consequences. The results of this study can be used as basic data for the development of safe and economical logistics for a transportation of the spent fuels in Korea by considering the transportation costs for the four scenarios which will be needed in the near future. (authors)

Jongtae, Jeong; Cho, D.K.; Choi, H.J.; Choi, J.W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Brian West, Deputy Director, Engines and Emissions Research Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory

94

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

95

INL Site FY 2010 Executable Plan for Energy and Transportation Fuels Management with the FY 2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that sustainable energy and transportation fuels management will be integrated into DOE operations to meet obligations under Executive Order (EO) 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management," the Instructions for Implementation of EO 13423, as well as Guidance Documents issued in accordance thereto and any modifcations or amendments that may be issued from time to time. In furtherance of this obligation, DOE established strategic performance-based energy and transportation fuels goals and strategies through the Transformational Energy Action Management (TEAM) Initiative, which were incorporated into DOE Order 430.2B "Departmental Energy, Renewable energy, and Transportation Management" and were also identified in DOE Order 450.1A, "Environmental Protection Program." These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of energy and transportation fuels management into site Environmental Management Systems (EMS).

Ernest L. Fossum

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

97

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Recent Trends in Emerging Transportation Fuels and Energy Consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several recent trends indicate current developments in energy and transportation fuels. World trade in biofuels is developing in ethanol, wood chips, and vegetable oil / biodiesel with some countries being exp...

B. G. Bunting

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains

100

The Future of Low Carbon Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" Nuclear" Oil resources" Unconventional:" oil shale liquid, " oil sands" Coal resources" Transport! Elec

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Working Group Transport Modeling Working Group The Transport Modeling Working Group meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, share experimental and computational results, and collaboratively develop methodologies for and understanding of transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. Its members include principle investigators and supporting personnel from transport-related projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Learn more about DOE research activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Fuel cell operation relies on effective mass transport of species through individual components and across the interfaces between components. Among these species are hydrogen, oxygen, water, protons, and electrons. Transport behavior is a function of operating conditions and component properties such as microstructure and surface properties. Understanding and optimizing the controlling transport phenomena are critical to the efficient and cost-effective operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A better understanding of mass transport in the fuel cell, especially of water, has the potential to lead to improved designs and more efficient systems.

102

Comparative analyses of spent nuclear fuel transport modal options: Transport options under existing site constraints  

SciTech Connect

The movement of nuclear waste can be accomplished by various transport modal options involving different types of vehicles, transport casks, transport routes, and intermediate intermodal transfer facilities. A series of systems studies are required to evaluate modal/intermodal spent fuel transportation options in a consistent fashion. This report provides total life-cycle cost and life-cycle dose estimates for a series of transport modal options under existing site constraints. 14 refs., 7 figs., 28 tabs.

Brentlinger, L.A.; Hofmann, P.L.; Peterson, R.W.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Training implementation matrix, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)  

SciTech Connect

This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently.

EATON, G.L.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report  

SciTech Connect

DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...source of liquid hydrocarbon fuels (16, 17...gasification data provided in...produce liquid hydrocarbon fuel. In our...The resulting combustion energy not only provides heat for the endothermic...pass from the hydrocarbon conversion...well as other heat requirements...From the NRC data in Table E-23...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fuel cells for electric utility and transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

This review article presents: the current status and expected progress status of the fuel cell research and development programs in the USA, electrochemical problem areas, techno-economic assessments of fuel cells for electric and/or gas utilities and for transportation, and other candidate fuel cells and their applications. For electric and/or gas utility applications, the most likely candidates are phosphoric, molten carbonate, and solid electrolyte fuel cells. The first will be coupled with a reformer (to convert natural gas, petroleum-derived, or biomass fuels to hydrogen), while the second and third will be linked with a coal gasifier. A fuel cell/battery hybrid power source is an attractive option for electric vehicles with projected performance characteristics approaching those for internal combustion or diesel engine powered vehicles. For this application, with coal-derived methanol as the fuel, a fuel cell with an acid electrolyte (phosphoric, solid polymer electrolyte or super acid) is essential; with pure hydrogen (obtained by splitting of water using nuclear, solar or hydroelectric energy), alkaline fuel cells show promise. A fuel cell researcher's dream is the development of a high performance direct methanol-air fuel cell as a power plant for electric vehicles. For long or intermittent duty cycle load leveling, regenerative hydrogen-halogen fuel cells exhibit desirable characteristics.

Srinivasan, S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Alternative transport fuels for the future  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Petroleum fuels, which are not sustainable and which contribute substantially to greenhouse gas emissions, power nearly all light-duty vehicles. We review the North American literature on alternative fuels such as natural gas, ethanol from corn and biomass, and hydrogen and electricity from renewable resources, as well as propulsion systems including internal combustion engines, electric motors, and fuel cells. Vehicle characteristics including emissions, safety and consumer attributes such as range and power are examined. Results for greenhouse gas emissions and energy use for the well-to-wheel (fuel production and vehicle operation) aspects of the life cycles of the fuel/vehicle combinations are evaluated. While fuel cells and batteries might some day be attractive, in the near term they cannot replace the internal combustion engine. We focus on ethanol and explore its potential to replace nearly all gasoline used in the United States and Canada. We conclude that ethanol produced from biomass is an attractive near/midterm fuel among those that are sustainable.

Heather L. MacLean; Lester B. Lave; W. Michael Griffin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

ULTRACLEAN FUELS PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FOR THE TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY: ADVANCES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION FUELS  

SciTech Connect

Ultraclean fuels production has become increasingly important as a method to help decrease emissions and allow the introduction of alternative feed stocks for transportation fuels. Established methods, such as Fischer-Tropsch, have seen a resurgence of interest as natural gas prices drop and existing petroleum resources require more intensive clean-up and purification to meet stringent environmental standards. This review covers some of the advances in deep desulfurization, synthesis gas conversion into fuels and feed stocks that were presented at the 245th American Chemical Society Spring Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA in the Division of Energy and Fuels symposium on "Ultraclean Fuels Production and Utilization".

Fox, E.

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fuel Life-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen vs. Conventional Transportation Fuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fuel life-cycle analyses were performed to compare the affects of hydrogen on annual U.S. light-duty transportation emissions in future year 2030. Five scenarios were developed… (more)

DeGolyer, Jessica Suzanne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

NREL: Transportation Research - Alternative Fuels Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

compatibility with engines and emission control systems. Highly efficient heavy-duty diesel truck engines are the primary power source for global transportation of freight....

111

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2012/fiscal year 2013.

Not Available

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Systems Approach to New Transportation Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

113

Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Hydrogen as transport fuel in Iceland. The political, technological and commercial story of ECTOS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through the political, the technological and the commercial story of the early phases of the ECTOS project and its background, the implementation of hydrogen as transport fuel in Iceland is analysed. The presence of large amounts of geothermal energy is the resource basis for the governmental plans for converting Iceland into a hydrogen economy. Strong political commitment has established the framework for this transition. The goal of replacing the import of fossil fuels by 2030â??2040 has provided motivation and support for hydrogen R&D projects. The early public scepticism turned into general support when large multinational companies entered the scene.

Otto Andersen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Analysis Analysis Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis While both wet and dry storage have been shown to be safe options for storing used nuclear fuel (UNF), the focus of the program is on dry storage of commercial UNF at reactor or centralized locations. This report focuses on the knowledge gaps concerning extended storage identified in numerous domestic and international investigations and provides the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign"s (UFDC) gap description, any alternate gap descriptions, the rankings by the various organizations, evaluation of the priority assignment, and UFDC-recommended action based on the comparison. Review of Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Technical Gap Analysis More Documents & Publications

116

Dual fuel engine control systems for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

Microprocessor control systems have been developed for dual fuel diesel engines intended for transportation applications. Control system requirements for transportation engines are more demanding than for stationary engines, as the system must be able to cope with variable speed and load. Detailed fuel maps were determined for both normally aspirated and turbocharged diesel engines based on the criterion that the engine did not operate in the regimes where knock or incomplete combustion occurred. The control system was developed so that the engine would follow the detailed fuel map. The input variables to the control system are engine speed and load. Based on this, the system then controls the amount of natural gas and diesel fuel supplied to the engine. The performance of the system is briefly summarized.

Gettel, L.E.; Perry, G.C.; Boisvert, J.; O'Sullivan, P.J.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Background Background Since 1988, federal and state legislation has mandated the adoption of alternative transportation fuels, primarily because of environmental and energy security concerns. Recently, however, much of the alternative fuels activity has shifted. With the electoral revolution of 1992, Congress is rethinking environmental regulation and cutting federal appro- priations for alternative fueled vehi- cles (AFVs). The U.S. Enviromental Protection Agency (EPA) may delay implementation of stringent emission standards, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has delayed requirements for alternative fuel adoption that were set to go into effect on September 1, 1995. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, as federal and state legislation was being crafted across the country,

118

Solar Energy for Transportation Fuel (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Nate Lewis' talk looks at the challenge of capturing solar energy and storing it as an affordable transportation fuel - all on a scale necessary to reduce global warming. Overcoming this challenge will require developing new materials that can use abundant and inexpensive elements rather than costly and rare materials. He discusses the promise of new materials in the development of carbon-free alternatives to fossil fuel.

Lewis, Nate

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

SciTech Connect

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomass for the H 2 CAR process will always...improvement in PV cell and electrolyzer efficiencies...generate electricity or hydrogen from solar cells or an alternative...energy as synthetic fuels. Comparison with...requirement for the H 2 CAR process with the...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Liquid Transportation Fuels from Coal and Biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

factors that would enhance or impede development and deployment. · Review other alternative fuels MIT HAROLD SCHOBERT Pennsylvania State University CHRISTOPHER SOMERVILLE Energy BioSciences Institute biomass 085 072 Wheat straw 070 055 a2008 costs = baseline costs #12;BIOCHEMICAL CONVERSION STATUS

122

Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-Fueled Transportation System  

SciTech Connect

Report describes efforts to deploy alternative transportation fuels and how those experiences might apply to a hydrogen-fueled transportation system.

Melendez, M.; Theis, K.; Johnson, C.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Visualization of Fuel Cell Water Transport and Characterization under Freezing Conditions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell water transport, was given by Satish Kandlikar at a DOE fuel cell meeting in February 2007.

124

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Off-Highway Transportation-Related Fuel Use  

SciTech Connect

The transportation sector includes many subcategories--for example, on-highway, off-highway, and non-highway. Use of fuel for off-highway purposes is not well documented, nor is the number of off-highway vehicles. The number of and fuel usage for on-highway and aviation, marine, and rail categories are much better documented than for off-highway land-based use. Several sources document off-highway fuel use under specific conditions--such as use by application (e.g., recreation) or by fuel type (e.g., gasoline). There is, however, no single source that documents the total fuel used off-highway and the number of vehicles that use the fuel. This report estimates the fuel usage and number of vehicles/equipment for the off-highway category. No new data have been collected nor new models developed to estimate the off-highway data--this study is limited in scope to using data that already exist. In this report, unless they are being quoted from a source that uses different terminology, the terms are used as listed below. (1) ''On-highway/on-road'' includes land-based transport used on the highway system or other paved roadways. (2) ''Off-highway/off-road'' includes land-based transport not using the highway system or other paved roadways. (3) ''Non-highway/non-road'' includes other modes not traveling on highways such as aviation, marine, and rail. It should be noted that the term ''transportation'' as used in this study is not typical. Generally, ''transportation'' is understood to mean the movement of people or goods from one point to another. Some of the off-highway equipment included in this study doesn't transport either people or goods, but it has utility in movement (e.g., a forklift or a lawn mower). Along these lines, a chain saw also has utility in movement, but it cannot transport itself (i.e., it must be carried) because it does not have wheels. Therefore, to estimate the transportation-related fuel used off-highway, transportation equipment is defined to include all devices that have wheels, can move or be moved from one point to another, and use fuel. An attempt has been made to exclude off-highway engines that do not meet all three of these criteria (e.g., chain saws and generators). The following approach was used to determine the current off-highway fuel use. First, a literature review was conducted to ensure that all sources with appropriate information would be considered. Secondly, the fuel use data available from each source were compiled and compared in so far as possible. Comparable data sets (i.e., same fuel type; same application) were evaluated. Finally, appropriate data sets were combined to provide a final tally.

Davis, S.C.

2004-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...United States alone, oil consumption in the transportation...kPa), the lower heating value (LHV) of H...rise in the petroleum price has refocused the...accounts, conventional oil production is predicted...support 67% of US oil consumption equals yr Hkg...the form of its high heating value (HHV). For...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sustainable fuel for the transportation sector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the internal combustion engine will be highly beneficial. Clearly, the proposed...Transportation 1 SI Appendix General information and Assumption Total...of CH4 = 891 kJ/mol LHV of diesel assuming C15H32 = 43.987 MJ/kg. This...the gasifier. 5. Amount of diesel produced from ASPEN model using...

Rakesh Agrawal; Navneet R. Singh; Fabio H. Ribeiro; W. Nicholas Delgass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Cathode porous transport irreversibility model for PEM fuel cell design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence is studied of slip-irreversibility at the interface between the gas diffusion layer, also referred to here as the porous transport layer, and the catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A two-dimensional cathode ... Keywords: catalyst layer, exergy, gas diffusion layer, slip flow irreversibility

E. O. B. Ogedengbe; M. A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

130

Transportation fuels from biomass via fast pyrolysis and hydroprocessing  

SciTech Connect

Biomass is a renewable source of carbon, which could provide a means to reduce the greenhouse gas impact from fossil fuels in the transportation sector. Biomass is the only renewable source of liquid fuels, which could displace petroleum-derived products. Fast pyrolysis is a method of direct thermochemical conversion (non-bioconversion) of biomass to a liquid product. Although the direct conversion product, called bio-oil, is liquid; it is not compatible with the fuel handling systems currently used for transportation. Upgrading the product via catalytic processing with hydrogen gas, hydroprocessing, is a means that has been demonstrated in the laboratory. By this processing the bio-oil can be deoxygenated to hydrocarbons, which can be useful replacements of the hydrocarbon distillates in petroleum. While the fast pyrolysis of biomass is presently commercial, the upgrading of the liquid product by hydroprocessing remains in development, although it is moving out of the laboratory into scaled-up process demonstration systems.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2013-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

132

Producing transportation fuels from algae: In search of synergy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study found that promising algae biofuels R&D breakthroughs (hydrothermal liquefaction technology, high-frequency magnetic impulse cavitation reactors, etc.) and industry milestones (technologies of hydrorefining and catalytic selective oxidation among others), in order to move forward, require for implementation of new synergies and further innovations needed to improve economical production of advanced biofuels that are not applicable today. It seems that already viable state-of-the-art findings must be re-examined extensively in all of the different aspects in order to hasten the commercialisation of algal biofuels production in sustainable biorefineries. The same could be said about the feedstock selection for algal biomass production and its cultivation. It is the first step to successful large-scale algae cultivation in new regions of the world. Based on the above mentioned we identified fourteen promising algae species that can successfully grow in various regions of Russia under local climatic conditions. Samples collected during expedition were analysed at Lomonosov Moscow State University. Providing predetermined alternate periods of light and darkness and for temperature control of the different mediums to improve photosynthetic responses we investigated two different microalgal production systems: open ponds of the volume V=500 l and closed bioreactors of the volume V=1.0 l. Later on, a review on interdisciplinary synergies between biology and technology to open up new avenues of R&D in the field of algae-for-transport was carried out by leading universities of Lithuania, Russia, and Ukraine. In summary, we found that it is already possible to reduce the price of the 3rd and 4th generation biodiesel fuel from algae by applying the synergistic approaches to sustainable energy production highlighted in this paper, and probably some other ones as well.

Laurencas Raslavi?ius; Vladimir G. Semenov; Nadezhda I. Chernova; Art?ras Keršys; Aleksandr K. Kopeyka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

4.12 - Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in Transport  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter reviews the several applications of hydrogen and fuel cells in transport. Early fuel cell markets have tested hydrogen for auxiliary power applications, but other fuels such as methanol, natural gas, and propane have been preferred because they are more available. Until now, the best successes have been forklifts where battery propulsion can be inflexible and hydrogen competes economically. However, the mainstream medium-term market is in buses, taxis, and fleet vehicles with passenger cars following close behind as the infrastructure of hydrogen filling stations becomes more widespread. It is becoming clear that the hybrid fuel cell/battery combination works best in such fleets because there is a need for batteries or supercapacitors providing pulse power and also for regenerative braking. Boats and ships represent a possible application in later years if the leisure market can be tapped and extended. In ports, fuel cell auxiliary power has already proved attractive in terms of emission reductions, and the same is true for airports. Aircraft applications will take longer to develop fully but small lightweight planes are using hydrogen at the present time because it can be generated via solar cells on the wings. Unmanned air vehicles driven by fuel cells are more likely to use propane because such lightweight fuel is easily available

K. Kendall; B.G. Pollet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains hydrocarbons such as ethane and propane and other gases such as nitrogen,

135

Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 Lessons Learned from Alternative Transportation Fuels: Modeling Transition Dynamics C. Welch Prepared under Task Nos. HS04.2000 and HS06.1002 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-39446 February 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

136

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transportation and Stationary Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop On October 27, 2008, more than 55 participants from industry, state and federal government, utilities, national laboratories, and other groups met to discuss the topic of integrating stationary fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) systems and hydrogen production infrastructure for vehicles. The workshop was co-hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Fuel Cell Council, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and was held in conjunction with the Fuel Cell Seminar in Phoenix, Arizona. Plenary presentations provided an overview of the integration concept and perspective on the opportunity from federal, state and industry organizations. Workshop participants met in breakout sessions to consider the potential to leverage early hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure requirements by co-producing hydrogen in stationary fuel cell CHP applications at select facilities (e.g., military bases, postal facilities, airports, hospitals, etc.). The efficiency, reliability, and emissions benefits of these CHP systems have the potential to offset the up-front capital costs and financial risks associated with producing hydrogen for early vehicle markets.

137

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

SciTech Connect

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry's faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

SciTech Connect

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry`s faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Salt transport extraction of transuranium elements from LWR fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating transuranium actinide values from uranium values present in spent nuclear oxide fuels which contain rare earth and noble metal fission products. The oxide fuel is reduced with Ca metal in the presence of CaCl[sub 2] and a Cu--Mg alloy containing not less than about 25% by weight Mg at a temperature in the range of from about 750 C to about 850 C to precipitate uranium metal and some of the noble metal fission products leaving the Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium actinide metals and rare earth fission product metals and some of the noble metal fission products dissolved therein. The CaCl[sub 2] having CaO and fission products of alkali metals and the alkali earth metals and iodine dissolved therein is separated and electrolytically treated with a carbon electrode to reduce the CaO to Ca metal while converting the carbon electrode to CO and CO[sub 2]. The Ca metal and CaCl[sub 2] is recycled to reduce additional oxide fuel. The Cu--Mg alloy having transuranium metals and rare earth fission product metals and the noble metal fission products dissolved therein is contacted with a transport salt including MgCl[sub 2] to transfer Mg values from the transport salt to the Cu--Mg alloy while transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product metals transfer from the Cu--Mg alloy to the transport salt. Then the transport salt is mixed with a Mg--Zn alloy to transfer Mg values from the alloy to the transport salt while the transuranium actinide and rare earth fission product values dissolved in the salt are reduced and transferred to the Mg--Zn alloy. 2 figs.

Pierce, R.D.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Miller, W.E.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Transportation Center Seminar... Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with life-cycle analysis (LCA). In fact, LCA of transportation fuels and vehicle systems has a history of more than 30 years. Over this period, LCA methodologies have evolved and critical data have become readily available. This is especially true in the past ten years when LCA has been applied extensively

Bustamante, Fabián E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce E [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1998 Major Subject: Political Science US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

Experience Implementing a User Service for Archived Intelligent Transportation Systems Data. Transportation Research Record  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and other regional partners, the Portland regional intelligent transportation systems (ITSs) data archive was recently inaugurated via a direct fiber-optic connection between ODOT and Portland State University (PSU). In July 2004, the Portland Regional Transportation Archive Listing was activated; it received 20-s data from the 436 inductive loop detectors composing the Portland area’s advanced traffic management system. PSU is designated as the region’s official data archiving entity, consistent with the ITS architecture being developed. This paper discusses the steps taken for successful implementation of the Portland region’s functional ITS data archive and plans for development and expansion. Included is a discussion of the archive structure, data storage, data processing, and user interface. An experiment involving Metro, the Portland region’s metropolitan planning organization, demonstrates that archived loop detector data can be used to improve travel demand forecasts for the Portland region. The data archive will

Robert L. Bertini; Steve Hansen; Andrew Byrd; Thareth Yin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Plans, Implementation, and Results  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

through an ongoing process of planning and analysis, implementation, and review. This Web page includes links to documents that support and document the program management...

145

Integrated Catalytic Conversion of ?-Valerolactone to Liquid Alkenes for Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for Transportation Fuels 10.1126/science...Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of...synthesis of renewable fuels remains a challenging...corn ethanol and biodiesel, have the capacity...of transportation fuels from biomass: chemistry...catalysts, and engineering. Chem. Rev. 106...

Jesse Q. Bond; David Martin Alonso; Dong Wang; Ryan M. West; James A. Dumesic

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

146

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

147

Atomistic Simulations of Mass and Thermal Transport in Oxide Nuclear Fuels  

SciTech Connect

In this talk we discuss simulations of the mass and thermal transport in oxide nuclear fuels. Redistribution of fission gases such as Xe is closely coupled to nuclear fuel performance. Most fission gases have low solubility in the fuel matrix, specifically the insolubility is most pronounced for large fission gas atoms such as Xe, and as a result there is a significant driving force for segregation of gas atoms to grain boundaries or dislocations and subsequently for nucleation of gas bubbles at these sinks. The first step of the fission gas redistribution is diffusion of individual gas atoms through the fuel matrix to existing sinks, which is governed by the activation energy for bulk diffusion. Fission gas bubbles are then formed by either separate nucleation events or by filling voids that were nucleated at a prior stage; in both cases their formation and latter growth is coupled to vacancy dynamics and thus linked to the production of vacancies via irradiation or thermal events. In order to better understand bulk Xe behavior (diffusion mechanisms) in UO{sub 2{+-}x} we first calculate the relevant activation energies using density functional theory (DFT) techniques. By analyzing a combination of Xe solution thermodynamics, migration barriers and the interaction of dissolved Xe atoms with U, we demonstrate that Xe diffusion predominantly occurs via a vacancy-mediated mechanism, though other alternatives may exist in high irradiation fields. Since Xe transport is closely related to diffusion of U vacancies, we have also studied the activation energy for this process. In order to explain the low value of 2.4 eV found for U migration from independent damage experiments (not thermal equilibrium) the presence of vacancy clusters must be included in the analysis. Next a continuum transport model for Xe and U is formulated based on the diffusion mechanisms established from DFT. After combining this model with descriptions of the interaction between Xe and grain boundaries derived from separate atomistic calculations, we simulate Xe redistribution for a few simple microstructures using finite element methods (FEM), as implemented in the MOOSE framework from Idaho National Laboratory. Thermal transport together with the power distribution determines the temperature distribution in the fuel rod and it is thus one of the most influential properties on nuclear fuel performance. The fuel thermal conductivity changes as function of time due to microstructure evolution (e.g. fission gas redistribution) and compositional changes. Using molecular dynamics simulations we have studied the impact of different types of grain boundaries and fission gas bubbles on UO{sub 2} thermal conductivity.

Andersson, Anders D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Uberuaga, Blas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du, Shiyu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Xiang-Yang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nerikar, Pankaj [IBM; Stanek, Christopher R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael [Idaho National Laboratory; Millet, Paul [Idaho National Laboratory; Biner, Bulent [Idaho National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Prospect of biofuels as an alternative transport fuel in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The prospect of biofuels as a transport alternative fuel in Australia is reviewed and discussed in this paper. The Australian transport sector is the second largest energy consuming sector which consumes about 24% of total energy consumption. A part of this energy demand can be met by ecofriendly biofuels. A wide array of different biofuels feedstocks including Australian native species, their distributions, oil content, traditional uses are reviewed and listed in the descending order of their oil content. The world biofuel scenario as well as the 20 largest biofuel production countries and their mandates on biofuels blending with petroleum diesel are presented. Australia’s biofuel production, consumption, production facilities and future investment projects are also reviewed and discussed. The study developed a biofuel supply chain for Australia and found that the second generation biofuels have better prospects as a future alternative transport fuel in Australia. These biofuel feedstocks are readily available and can overcome the shortcomings of the first generation biofuels, such as socio-economic, environmental and food versus land use challenges. Although some research is in progress, further study is needed on the process development of second generation biofuel production at commercial scale in Australia and abroad.

A.K. Azad; M.G. Rasul; M.M.K. Khan; Subhash C. Sharma; M.A. Hazrat

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the U.S.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Options for sustainable and/or energy-secure transportation L. Bromberg and W.K. Cheng Prepared by the Sloan Automotive Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 September 27, 2010 Finalized November 2, 2010 Revised November 28, 2010 Final report UT-Battelle Subcontract Number:4000096701 1 Abstract Methanol has been promoted as an alternative transportation fuel from time to time over the past forty years. In spite of significant efforts to realize the vision of methanol as a practical transportation fuel in the US, such as the California methanol fueling corridor of the 1990s, it did not succeed on a large scale. This white paper covers all important aspects of methanol as a transportation fuel.

150

Fact #699: October 31, 2011 Transportation Energy Use by Mode and Fuel Type, 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Highway vehicles are responsible for most of the energy consumed by the transportation sector. Most of the fuel used in light vehicles is gasoline, while most of the fuel used in med/heavy trucks...

151

Durability of Foam Insulation for LH2 Fuel Tanks of Future Subsonic Transports  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential short-supply of petroleum-based fuels has led to activities by NASA to establish technical characteristics of air transportation systems that would use hydrogen-fueled aircraft. These activities ...

E. L. Sharpe; R. G. Helenbrook

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Conversion of Residual Biomass into Liquid Transportation Fuel: An Energy Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Conversion of Residual Biomass into Liquid Transportation Fuel: An Energy Analysis ... An energy balance, in broad outline, is presented for the production of a high-quality liquid transportation fuel from residual crop biomass. ... That is, 40% of the initial energy in the biomass will be found in the final liquid fuel after subtracting out external energy supplied for complete processing, including transportation as well as material losses. ...

J. Manganaro; B. Chen; J. Adeosun; S. Lakhapatri; D. Favetta; A. Lawal; R. Farrauto; L. Dorazio; D. J. Rosse

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Agenda for the Transitioning the Transportation Sector--Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles workshop held September 9, 2014.

154

Optimal Intercity Transportation Services with Heterogeneous Demand and Variable Fuel Price.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis we examine how fuel price variation affects the optimal mix of services in intercity transportation. Towards this end, we make two main… (more)

Ryerson, Megan Smirti

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

156

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Implement and Monitor | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Actions/Implement and Monitor Actions/Implement and Monitor < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit‎ | Key Actions Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Key Actions for Low-Emission Development in Transportation Although no single approach or fixed process exists for low-emission development strategies (LEDS), the following key actions are necessary steps for implementing LEDS in the transportation sector. Undertaking these actions requires flexibility to adapt to dynamic societal conditions in a way that complements existing climate and development goals in other sectors. Planners, researchers, and decision-makers should customize this LEDS implementation framework for the specific conditions of their transport sector, choosing from relevant resources to achieve a comprehensive action

157

LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Implement and Monitor | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » LEDSGP/Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Implement and Monitor < LEDSGP‎ | Transportation Toolkit‎ | Key Actions(Redirected from Transportation Toolkit/Key Actions/Implement and Monitor) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Transportation Toolkit Home Tools Training Contacts Key Actions for Low-Emission Development in Transportation Although no single approach or fixed process exists for low-emission development strategies (LEDS), the following key actions are necessary steps for implementing LEDS in the transportation sector. Undertaking these actions requires flexibility to adapt to dynamic societal conditions in a

158

NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

159

NREL - Advanced Vehicles and Fuels Basics - Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems 2010  

SciTech Connect

We can improve the fuel economy of our cars, trucks, and buses by designing them to use the energy in fuels more efficiently. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are helping the nation achieve these goals by developing transportation technologies like: advanced vehicle systems and components; alternative fuels; as well as fuel cells, hybrid electric, and plug-in hybrid vehicles. For a text version of this video visit http://www.nrel.gov/learning/advanced_vehicles_fuels.html

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel-Mix, Fuel Efficiency, and Transport Demand Affect Prospects for Biofuels in Northern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumption structure parameters describe how the four road transport processes are being consumed, such as, for example, the amount of car-sharing and private vehicle ownership per capita—and are based on country-specific trend extrapolation using data provided by national statistical agencies and other research institutions (13-17, 35). ... As Ohrogge et al. point out, although there are uncertainties in the pace of electric car development and market penetration, future strategies aimed at promoting bioelectricity instead of ethanol for substituting conventional fuels like gasoline in cars and promoting more diesel engines in heavier vehicles may be the best route to the goal of reducing petroleum consumption and CO2 emissions (69). ... In the case of Sweden, where forest operations are highly and efficiently mechanized, this stage consumes more fossil fuels than other elements of the wood supply chain (such as silviculture and logging operations). ...

Ryan M. Bright; Anders Hammer Strømman

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Implementation of direct LSC method for diesel samples on the fuel market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The European Union develops common EU policy and strategy on biofuels and sustainable bio-economy through several documents. The encouragement of biofuel?s consumption is therefore the obligation of each EU member state. The situation in Slovenian fuel market is presented and compared with other EU countries in the frame of prescribed values from EU directives. Diesel is the most common fuel for transportation needs in Slovenia. The study was therefore performed on diesel. The sampling net was determined in accordance with the fuel consumption statistics of the country. 75 Sampling points were located on different types of roads. The quantity of bio-component in diesel samples was determined by direct LSC method through measurement of C-14 content. The measured values were in the range from 0 up to nearly 6 mass percentage of bio-component in fuel. The method has proved to be appropriate, suitable and effective for studies on the real fuel market.

Romana Krištof; Marko Hirsch; Jasmina Kožar Logar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Regulatory Perspective on Potential Fuel Reconfiguration and Its Implication to High Burnup Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation - 13042  

SciTech Connect

The recent experiments conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on high burnup fuel cladding material property show that the ductile to brittle transition temperature of high burnup fuel cladding is dependent on: (1) cladding material, (2) irradiation conditions, and (3) drying-storage histories (stress at maximum temperature) [1]. The experiment results also show that the ductile to brittle temperature increases as the fuel burnup increases. These results indicate that the current knowledge in cladding material property is insufficient to determine the structural performance of the cladding of high burnup fuel after it has been stored in a dry cask storage system for some time. The uncertainties in material property and the elevated ductile to brittle transition temperature impose a challenge to the storage cask and transportation packaging designs because the cask designs may not be able to rely on the structural integrity of the fuel assembly for control of fissile material, radiation source, and decay heat source distributions. The fuel may reconfigure during further storage and/or the subsequent transportation conditions. In addition, the fraction of radioactive materials available for release from spent fuel under normal condition of storage and transport may also change. The spent fuel storage and/or transportation packaging vendors, spent fuel shippers, and the regulator may need to consider this possible fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the packages' ability to meet the safety requirements of Part 72 and Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is working with the scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to assess the impact of fuel reconfiguration on the safety of the dry storage systems and transportation packages. The NRC Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation has formed a task force to work on the safety and regulatory concerns in relevance to high burnup fuel storage and transportation. This paper discusses the staff's preliminary considerations on the safety implication of fuel reconfiguration with respect to nuclear safety (subcriticality control), radiation shielding, containment, the performance of the thermal functions of the packages, and the retrievability of the contents from regulatory perspective. (authors)

Li, Zhian; Rahimi, Meraj; Tang, David; Aissa, Mourad; Flaganan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission - NRC, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and pilot manufacturing processes to facilitate

165

A SHARP INTERFACE REDUCTION FOR MULTIPHASE TRANSPORT IN A POROUS FUEL CELL ELECTRODE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A SHARP INTERFACE REDUCTION FOR MULTIPHASE TRANSPORT IN A POROUS FUEL CELL ELECTRODE KEITH exchange membrane fuel cell is a highly porous material which acts to distribute reactant gases uniformly perturbation, fuel cell electrodes, free surface. AMS subject classifications. 35B40, 35K55, 76R99, 76S05 1

Stockie, John

166

Hybrid Life-Cycle Assessment of Natural Gas Based Fuel Chains for Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The end use is passenger transportation with a sub-compact car that has an internal combustion engine for the natural gas case and a fuel cell for the methanol and hydrogen cases. ... Then, trucks are used to transport the fuels to a fueling station in Geneva, Switzerland. ... In evaluating fuel/vehicle options with the potential to improve the greenness of cars [diesel (direct injection) and ethanol in internal combustion engines, battery-powered, gasoline hybrid elec., and hydrogen fuel cells], we find no option dominates the others on all dimensions. ...

Anders Hammer Strømman; Christian Solli; Edgar G. Hertwich

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This Guide provides information concerning the use of current principles and practices, including regulatory guidance from the U. S. Department of Transportation and the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, where available, to establish and implement effective packaging and transportation safety programs.

1997-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, Inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, mixed proton/electron conductivity and hydrogen transport was measured as a function of metal phase content for a range of ceramic/metal (cermet) compositions. It was found that optimum performance occurred at 44 wt.% metal content for all compositions tested. Although each cermet appeared to have a continuous metal phase, it is believed that hydrogen transport increased with increasing metal content partially due to beneficial surface catalyst characteristics resulting from the metal phase. Beyond 44 wt.% there was a reduction in hydrogen transport most likely due to dilution of the proton conducting ceramic phase. Hydrogen separation rates for 1-mm thick cermet membranes were in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which corresponded to ambipolar conductivities between 1 x 10{sup -3} and 8 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Similar results were obtained for multiphase ceramic membranes comprised of a proton-conducting perovskite and electron conducting metal oxide. These multi-phase ceramic membranes showed only a slight improvement in hydrogen transport upon addition of a metal phase. The highest hydrogen separation rates observed this quarter were for a cermet membrane containing a hydrogen transport metal. A 1-mm thick membrane of this material achieved a hydrogen separation rate of 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at only 700 C, which increased to 0.6 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Alexandra Z. LaGuardia; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, ceramic, cermet (ceramic/metal), and thin film membranes were prepared, characterized, and evaluated for H{sub 2} transport. For selected ceramic membrane compositions an optimum range for transition metal doping was identified, and it was determined that highest proton conductivity occurred for two-phase ceramic materials. Furthermore, a relationship between transition metal dopant atomic number and conductivity was observed. Ambipolar conductivities of {approx}6 x 10{sup -3} S/cm were achieved for these materials, and {approx} 1-mm thick membranes generated H{sub 2} transport rates as high as 0.3 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Cermet membranes during this quarter were found to have a maximum conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm, which occurred at a metal phase contact of 36 vol.%. Homogeneous dense thin films were successfully prepared by tape casting and spin coating; however, there remains an unacceptably high difference in shrinkage rates between the film and support, which led to membrane instability. Further improvements in high pressure membrane seals also were achieved during this quarter, and a maximum pressure of 100 psig was attained. CoorsTek optimized many of the processing variables relevant to manufacturing scale production of ceramic H{sub 2} transport membranes, and SCI used their expertise to deposit a range of catalysts compositions onto ceramic membrane surfaces. Finally, MTI compiled relevant information regarding Vision 21 fossil fuel plant operation parameters, which will be used as a starting point for assessing the economics of incorporating a H{sub 2} separation unit.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

170

Emissions of greenhouse gases from the use of transportation fuels and electricity. Volume 1, Main text  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of full fuel-cycle emissions of greenhouse gases from using transportation fuels and electricity. The data cover emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, nitrogen oxides, and nonmethane organic compounds resulting from the end use of fuels, compression or liquefaction of gaseous transportation fuels, fuel distribution, fuel production, feedstock transport, feedstock recovery, manufacture of motor vehicles, maintenance of transportation systems, manufacture of materials used in major energy facilities, and changes in land use that result from using biomass-derived fuels. The results for electricity use are in grams of CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions per kilowatt-hour of electricity delivered to end users and cover generating plants powered by coal, oil, natural gas, methanol, biomass, and nuclear energy. The transportation analysis compares CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions, in grams per mile, from base-case gasoline and diesel fuel cycles with emissions from these alternative- fuel cycles: methanol from coal, natural gas, or wood; compressed or liquefied natural gas; synthetic natural gas from wood; ethanol from corn or wood; liquefied petroleum gas from oil or natural gas; hydrogen from nuclear or solar power; electricity from coal, uranium, oil, natural gas, biomass, or solar energy, used in battery-powered electric vehicles; and hydrogen and methanol used in fuel-cell vehicles.

DeLuchi, M.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Dynamic analysis and application of fuel elements pneumatic transportation in a pebble bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Almost 10,000 spherical fuel elements are transported pneumatically one by one in the pipeline outside the core of a pebble bed reactor every day. Any failure in the transportation will lead to the shutdown of the reactor, even safety accidents. In order to ensure a stable and reliable transportation, it's of great importance to analyze the motion and force condition of the fuel element. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic analysis of the pneumatic transportation of the fuel element and derive kinetic equations. Then we introduce the design of the transportation pipeline. On this basis we calculate some important data such as the velocity of the fuel element, the force between the fuel element and the pipeline and the efficiency of the pneumatic transportation. Then we analyze these results and provide some suggestions for the design of the pipeline. The experiment was carried out on an experimental platform. The velocities of the fuel elements were measured. The experimental results were consistent with and validated the theoretical analysis. The research may offer the basis for the design of the transportation pipeline and the optimization of the fuel elements transportation in a pebble bed reactor.

Hongbing Liu; Dong Du; Zandong Han; Yirong Zou; Jiluan Pan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NREL: Transportation Research - Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline direct injection piston with injector. NREL studies the effects of new fuel properties on performance and emissions in...

173

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Alternative Fuels -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fischer-Tropsch Fuels Fischer-Tropsch Fuels SunDiesel fuel This Sun Diesel BTL fuel, made from wood chips, results in lower particulate matter and nitrogen oxide emissions. Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) fuels are synthetic diesel fuels produced by converting gaseous hydrocarbons, such as natural gas and gasified coal or biomass, into liquid fuel. These fuels are commonly categorized into the following groups: Biomass to liquids (BTL) Gas to liquids (GTL) Coal to liquids (CTL) Argonne engineers are investigating the performance and emissions data of F-T fuels for both older and newer vehicles. The goal is to provide this data to the U.S. Department of Energy, the auto industry and energy suppliers. Part of the lab's strategy also includes publishing the data to solicit ideas and input from the fuels and combustion community.

174

Driving it home: choosing the right path for fueling North America's transportation future  

SciTech Connect

North America faces an energy crossroads. With the world fast approaching the end of cheap, plentiful conventional oil, we must choose between developing ever-dirtier sources of fossil fuels -- at great cost to our health and environment -- or setting a course for a more sustainable energy future of clean, renewable fuels. This report explores the full scale of the damage done by attempts to extract oil from liquid coal, oil shale, and tar sands; examines the risks for investors of gambling on these dirty fuel sources; and lays out solutions for guiding us toward a cleaner fuel future. Table of contents: Executive Summary; Chapter 1: Transportation Fuel at a Crossroads; Chapter 2: Canadian Tar Sands: Scraping the Bottom of the Barrel in Endangered Forests; Chapter 3: Oil Shale Extraction: Drilling Through the American West; Chapter 4: Liquid Coal: A 'Clean Fuel' Mirage; Chapter 5: The Investment Landscape: Dirty Fuels Are Risky Business; Chapter 6: The Clean Path for Transportation and Conclusion.

Ann Bordetsky; Susan Casey-Lefkowitz; Deron Lovaas; Elizabeth Martin-Perera; Melanie Nakagawa; Bob Randall; Dan Woynillowicz

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks Award#: DE-EE0000472 US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington, DC September 30, 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to optimize the efficiency of a stack technology meeting DOE cost targets. As cost reduction is of central importance in commercialization, the objective of this program addresses all fuel cell applications. AURORA C. Performance Technical Barriers Premise: DOE cost targets can be met by jointly exceeding both the Pt loading (1.0 W/cm2) targets.

176

Reversible Bending Fatigue Test System for Investigating Vibration Integrity of Spent Nuclear Fuel during Transportation  

SciTech Connect

Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading during road or rail shipment. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve the understanding of the impacts on SNF integrity due to vibration loading, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet the nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety and security of spent nuclear fuel storage and transport operations. The ORNL developed test system can perform reversible-bending fatigue testing to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The testing apparatus is also designed to meet the challenges of hot-cell operation, including remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, in-situ test specimen deformation measurement, and implementation of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. The system contains a U-frame set-up equipped with uniquely designed grip rigs, to protect SNF rod and to ensure valid test results, and use of 3 specially designed LVDTs to obtain the in-situ curvature measurement. A variety of surrogate test rods have been used to develop and calibrate the test system as well as in performing a series of systematic cyclic fatigue tests. The surrogate rods include stainless steel (SS) cladding, SS cladding with cast epoxy, and SS cladding with alumina pellets inserts simulating fuel pellets. Testing to date has shown that the interface bonding between the SS cladding and the alumina pellets has a significant impact on the bending response of the test rods as well as their fatigue strength. The failure behaviors observed from tested surrogate rods provides a fundamental understanding of the underlying failure mechanisms of the SNF surrogate rod under vibration which has not been achieved previously. The newly developed device is scheduled to be installed in the hot-cell in summer 2013 to test high burnup SNF.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight logistics. This thesis explores the impact of fuel price volatility on supply ...

Kim, Eun Hie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Transportation Policies and Programs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Policies and Programs State and local governments can support reduced petroleum use by implementing policies and programs that promote the use of alternative fuel...

182

Transportation Fuel Cell R&D Needs (Presentation)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop held January 23-24, 2008 in Golden, Colorado.

183

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

184

Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

185

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Camelina Algae Gasoline Diesel Jet Fuel Liquefied Petroleum Gas Naphtha Residual Oil Hydrogen Fischer Coke Nuclear Energy Hydrogen #12;GREET examines more than 80 vehicle/fuel systems Conventional Spark-Tropsch diesel 4 Dimethyl ether 4 Biodiesel Fuel Cell Vehicles 4 On-board hydroge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

187

The economics of liquid transportation fuels from coal: Past, present and future  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the technologies for producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and traces their evolution. Estimates of how their economics have changed with continuing research and development are also given.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.; ElSawy, A. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Cost analysis of air cargo transport and effects of fluctuations in fuel price  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study developed a model with cost functions formulated for different stages of cargo transport operation. A case analysis was performed with actual data from four air cargo traffic routes and eight aircraft types to validate the applicability of the model. The results show that the optimal payloads for various aircraft types vary with fuel price fluctuations. Furthermore, this study determined optimal types of freighter aircraft for different routes. Freight rates increase with rises in fuel price due to the corresponding increase in the fuel surcharge, thus bringing in higher total revenue. When the increase in total revenue exceeds the rise in fuel cost, the optimal payload will drop. Not only can the cost functions reveal the impact of fuel price fluctuations on different aspects of air cargo transport, they can also assist airlines in selecting the aircraft type with the best fuel economy for different route distances and cargo volumes.

Ching-Cheng Chao; Ching-Wen Hsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc. and their team members are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, new cermet compositions were tested that demonstrated similar performance to previous materials. A 0.5-mm thick membrane achieved at H{sub 2} transport rate of 0.2 mL/min/cm{sup 2} at 950 C, which corresponded to an ambipolar conductivity of 3 x 10{sup -3} S/cm. Although these results were equivalent to those for other cermet compositions, this new composition might be useful if it demonstrates improved chemical or mechanical stability. Ceramic/ceramic composite membranes also were fabricated and tested; however, some reaction did occur between the proton- and electron-conducting phases, which likely compromised conductivity. This sample only achieved a H{sub 2} transport rate of {approx} 0.006 mL/min/cm{sup 2} and an ambipolar conductivity of {approx}4 x 10{sup -4} S/cm. Chemical stability tests were continued, and candidate ceramic membranes were found to react slightly with carbon monoxide under extreme testing conditions. A cermet compositions did not show any reaction with carbon monoxide, but a thick layer of carbon formed on the membrane surface. The most significant technical accomplishment this quarter was a new high-pressure seal composition. This material maintained a pressure differential across the membrane of {approx} 280 psi at 800 C, and is still in operation.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; M.K. Ferber; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

GREET 1.0 -- Transportation fuel cycles model: Methodology and use  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel-cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, Co, NOx, SOx, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydropower, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NREL: Transportation Research - Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

greenhouse gas and pollutant emissions by advancing the development of new fuels and engines that deliver both high efficiency and reduced emissions. Emissions that result in...

192

Alternative Fuels Used in Transportation: Science Projects in...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

with a hydroxyl radical (OH). Methanol can be produced from natural gas, coal, residual oil, or biomass. Although vehicles can operate on pure methanol fuel (M100), methanol...

193

The impact of fuel price volatility on transportation mode choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, the price of oil has driven large fluctuations in the price of diesel fuel, which is an important cost component in freight… (more)

Nsiah-Gyimah, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Transportation Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO Sector Energy Use by Fuel Type Within a Mode from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary Description Supplemental Table 46 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Source EIA Date Released December 08th, 2010 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Annual Energy Outlook EIA Energy Information Administration Fuel mode TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures Data text/csv icon Transportation_Sector_Energy_Use_by_Fuel_Type_Within_a_Mode.csv (csv, 144.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote

196

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass efficient energy production has long been sought to solve energy and environmental problems. Fuel cells

Zhao, Tianshou

197

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Transportation and Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

online animation that shows the variables of filling a fuel tank with compressed natural gas. NREL created an online tool to help drivers learn more about filling a tank with...

199

Recent Developments on the Production of Transportation Fuels via Catalytic Conversion of Microalgae: Experiments and Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize “food versus fuel” concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

Shi, Fan; Wang, Ping; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Decline of Fuel Taxes and New Transportation Funding Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Regardless of the original intent, fuel taxes expanded on the paradigm shift introduced by tolling by creating a system that effectively correlated vehicle usage to tax collected, all while driving down collection costs. In 1932, a federal gas tax of 1... cent was introduced (Tax Foundation, 2012). However, unlike state fuel taxes, which were earmarked for road projects, the federal gas tax was credited to the federal government’s general fund, where congressional lawmakers could divert this revenue...

Manning, Kevin M.

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District; Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Preliminary Evaluation Results  

SciTech Connect

Report provides preliminary results from an evaluation of prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA) in San Jose, California.

Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District -- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results  

SciTech Connect

This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority in San Jose, California.

Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority and San Mateo County Transit District-- Fuel Cell Transit Buses: Evaluation Results  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report provides evaluation results for prototype fuel cell transit buses operating at Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority in San Jose, California.

204

Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Forum 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting 2011 Annual Meeting May 11, 2011 May 11, 2011 Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & & & & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Evaluation of Shortline Railroads Task: Task: Task: Task: Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants Identify Shortline Railroads Serving Nuclear Power Plants

205

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Mobility and Carbon: The Blind Side of Transport Fuel Demand in the Developed and Developing World Speaker(s): Lee Schipper Date: February 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Anita Estner James McMahon A new "Great Wall" has emerged in China, this one a string of miles of cars stuck in traffic. Emissions from road transport in developing countries are expected to rise sharply in the coming decades if current trends continue. Projections of passenger and freight activity, vehicle use, and CO2 emissions push up overall CO2 emissions by a factor of three in Latin American and five in Asia by 2030, even with fuel economy improvements. The increase in car use is in part a result of growing incomes and economic activity, but it also reflects the poor quality of transit and

206

Thermodynamic and transport properties of thoria–urania fuel of Advanced Heavy Water Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High temperature thermochemistry of thoria–urania fuel for Advanced Heavy Water Reactor was investigated. Oxygen potential development within the matrix and distribution behaviors of the fission products (fps) in different phases were worked out with the help of thermodynamic and transport properties of the fps as well as fission generated oxygen and the detailed balance of the elements. Some of the necessary data for different properties were generated in this laboratory while others were taken from literatures. Noting the behavior of poor transports of gases and volatile species in the thoria rich fuel (thoria–3 mol% urania), the evaluation shows that the fuel will generally bear higher oxygen potential right from early stage of burnup, and Mo will play vital role to buffer the potential through the formation of its oxygen rich chemical states. The problems related to the poor transport and larger retention of fission gases (Xe) and volatiles (I, Te, Cs) are discussed.

M. Basu (Ali); R. Mishra; S.R. Bharadwaj; D. Das

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Economical production of transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, and other carbonaceous feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

The Nation`s economy and security will continue to be vitally linked to an efficient transportation system of air, rail, and highway vehicles that depend on a continuous supply of liquid fuels at a reasonable price and with characteristics that can help the vehicle manufacturers meet increasingly strict environmental regulations. However, an analysis of US oil production and demand shows that, between now and 2015, a significant increase in imported oil will be needed to meet transportation fuel requirements. One element of an overall Department of Energy`s (DOE) strategy to address this energy security issue while helping meet emissions requirements is to produce premium transportation fuels from non-petroleum feedstocks, such as coal, natural gas, and biomass, via Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) and other synthesis gas conversion technologies.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Winslow, J.C.; Venkataraman, V.K.; Driscoll, D.J. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

A method for determining the spent-fuel contribution to transport cask containment requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report examines containment requirements for spent-fuel transport containers that are transported under normal and hypothetical accident conditions. A methodology is described that estimates the probability of rod failure and the quantity of radioactive material released from breached rods. This methodology characterizes the dynamic environment of the cask and its contents and deterministically models the peak stresses that are induced in spent-fuel cladding by the mechanical and thermal dynamic environments. The peak stresses are evaluated in relation to probabilistic failure criteria for generated or preexisting ductile tearing and material fractures at cracks partially through the wall in fuel rods. Activity concentrations in the cask cavity are predicted from estimates of the fraction of gases, volatiles, and fuel fines that are released when the rod cladding is breached. Containment requirements based on the source term are calculated in terms of maximum permissible volumetric leak rates from the cask. Calculations are included for representative cask designs.

Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rashid, Y.R.; Barrett, P.R. [ANATECH Research Corp., La Jolla, CA (United States); Malinauskas, A.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Einziger, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, H. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Duffey, T.A.; Sutherland, S.H. [APTEK, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States); Reardon, P.C. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

SciTech Connect

Evaluates opportunities to integrate hydrogen into the fueling stations of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor--an existing network of LNG fueling stations in California and Nevada.

Gladstein, Neandross and Associates

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

The role of natural gas as a vehicle transportation fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis analyzes pathways to directly use natural gas, as compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquefied natural gas (LNG), in the transportation sector. The thesis focuses on identifying opportunities to reduce market ...

Murphy, Paul Jarod

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

SciTech Connect

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Argonne Transportation - Clean Cities Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Cities Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Download Clean Cities Area of Interest 4 Emissions Benefit Tool (Excel 57 KB) This tool has been created for the Clean Cities Funding Opportunity Announcement for Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The tool is based off the AirCRED model's methodology using EPA's MOBILE6 model and light duty vehicle and heavy duty engine certification data to generate criteria air pollutant emission credits. However, for this tool, the GREET model is also used to generate data for vehicles not certified and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions. This tool requires the user to input: The number of vehicles planned to be purchased

214

Vehicle Technologies Office: Transitioning the Transportation Sector- Exploring the Intersection of H2 Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The "Transitioning the Transportation Sector: Exploring the Intersection of Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Natural Gas Vehicles" workshop report by Sandia National Laboratory summarizes a workshop that discussed common opportunities and challenges in expanding the use of hydrogen (H2) and natural gas (CNG or LNG) as transportation fuels.

215

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2008/fiscal year 2009.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The \\{LCAs\\} of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

Jamie Ally; Trevor Pryor

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Criteria for selection of components for surrogates of natural gas and transportation fuels q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Criteria for selection of components for surrogates of natural gas and transportation fuels q reserved. Keywords: Kerosene reaction mechanism; Gasoline reaction mechanism; Natural gas reaction found in minor amounts in natural gas [4]. The widely studied heptane reaction set [5,6] is often used a

Utah, University of

218

Synthesis of energy technology medium-term projections Alternative fuels for transport and low carbon electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon electricity generation: A technical note Robert Gross Ausilio Bauen ICEPT October 2005 #12;Alternative fuels for transport and electricity generation: A technical note on costs and cost projections ................................................................................................................. 3 Current and projected medium-term costs of electricity generating technologies....... 4 Biofuels

219

Cathode and electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel cathode, electrolyte and oxygen separation materials are disclosed that operate at intermediate temperatures for use in solid oxide fuel cells and ion transport membranes based on oxides with perovskite related structures and an ordered arrangement of A site cations. The materials have significantly faster oxygen kinetics than in corresponding disordered perovskites.

Jacobson, Allan J; Wang, Shuangyan; Kim, Gun Tae

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect

For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D. [Mitre Corp, McLean, VA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Overview of Options to Integrate Stationary Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Power Generation from Fuel Cells with Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Hydrogen Demand for the Transportation Sector Sector Fred Joseck U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Transportation and Stationary Power Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop (TSPI) Integration Workshop (TSPI) Phoenix, Arizona October 27, 2008 2 Why Integration? * Move away from conventional thinking...fuel and power generation/supply separate * Make dramatic change, use economies of scale,

223

Mesoscopic modeling of liquid water transport in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A key performance limitation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), manifested in terms of mass transport loss, originates from liquid water transport and resulting flooding phenomena in the constituent components. Liquid water leads to the coverage of the electrochemically active sites in the catalyst layer (CL) rendering reduced catalytic activity and blockage of the available pore space in the porous CL and fibrous gas diffusion layer (GDL) resulting in hindered oxygen transport to the active reaction sites. The cathode CL and the GDL therefore playa major role in the mass transport loss and hence in the water management of a PEFC. In this article, we present the development of a mesoscopic modeling formalism coupled with realistic microstructural delineation to study the profound influence of the pore structure and surface wettability on liquid water transport and interfacial dynamics in the PEFC catalyst layer and gas diffusion layer.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Chao Yang [PENNSTATE UNIV.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fuel-Neutral Studies of PM Transportation Emissions  

SciTech Connect

New gasoline engine technologies such as Spark Ignition Direct Injection (SIDI), Gasoline Direct Injection Compression Ignition (GDICI), and Reaction Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) offer the possibility of dramatically increasing the fuel efficiency of future vehicles. One drawback to these advanced engines is that they have the potential to produce higher levels of exhaust particulates than current Port Fuel Injection (PFI) engines. Regulation of engine particulate emissions in Europe is moving from mass-based standards toward number-based standards. Due to growing health concerns surrounding nano-aerosols, it is likely that similar standards will eventually be applied in the United States. This would place more emphasis on the reliable removal of smaller particles, which make up the vast majority of the particulates generated on a number basis. While Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) have become standard, different filter systems would likely be required for advanced gasoline vehicles, due to factors such as differing particulate properties and higher exhaust temperatures. High exhaust temperatures can limit the accumulation of a soot cake, which performs most of the actual filtration in a typical DPF system.

Stewart, Mark L.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Howden, Ken

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ET AL. : FOSSIL FUEL CO 2 TRANSPORT IN CALIFORNIA health,fossil fuel combustion, with consequent impacts to human health [health. [ 45 ] Model predictions indicated that some areas within California had higher near-surface fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R. Ahluwalia, V. Novick and S. Ahmed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reforming of Diesel Fuel for Transportation Applications J. P. Kopasz, S. Lottes, D-J. Liu, R · Produce fuel (H2-rich gas) for PEM and/or solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) · Reduce NOx emissions through

227

MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions relevant to the experiments, and (3) to explore whether the corresponding predictions can explain the experimentally-observed behavior of the rise and dispersion of oil droplets in isotropic turbulence. A brief summary of results is presented in Section 4.

Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

228

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, McDermott Technology, inc., Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; George Farthing; Dan Rowley; Tim R. Armstrong; R.D. Carneim; P.F. Becher; C-H. Hsueh; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Sustainable Transportation: Accelerating Widespread Adoption of Energy Efficient Vehicles & Fuels (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

While energy efficient transportation strategies have the potential to simultaneously slash oil consumption and reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, a truly sustainable solution will require more than just putting drivers behind the wheels of new fuel-efficient cars. As the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) accelerates widespread adoption of high-performance, low-emission, energy-efficient passenger and freight vehicles, as well as alternative fuels and related infrastructure. Researchers collaborate closely with industry, government, and research partners, using a whole-systems approach to design better batteries, drivetrains, and engines, as well as thermal management, energy storage, power electronic, climate control, alternative fuel, combustion, and emission systems. NREL's sustainable transportation research, development, and deployment (RD&D) efforts are not limited to vehicles, roads, and fueling stations. The lab also explores ways to save energy and reduce GHGs by integrating transportation technology advancements with renewable energy generation, power grids and building systems, urban planning and policy, and fleet operations.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Effect of a sudden fuel shortage on freight transport in the United States: an overview  

SciTech Connect

A survey was made of the potential effects of a sudden reduction of fuel supplies on freight transport via truck, rail, water, and pipeline. After a brief discussion of the energy characteristics of each of these modes of transport, short-term strategies for making better use of fuel in a crisis are investigated. Short-term is taken to mean something on the order of six months, and a crisis is taken to be the result of something on the order of a 20% drop in available fuel. Although no succinct or well-established conclusions are drawn, the gist of the paper is that the potential for short-term conservation, without a serious disruption of service, exists but does not appear to be large. It is remarked that it is possible, through further study, to obtain a fairly accurate reckoning of the physical ability of the freight transport network to weather a fuel crisis, but that it is impossible to say in advance what freight carriers will in fact do with the network.

Hooker, J N

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A Preliminary Evaluation of Using Fill Materials to Stabilize Used Nuclear Fuel During Storage and Transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a preliminary evaluation of potential fill materials that could be used to fill void spaces in and around used nuclear fuel contained in dry storage canisters in order to stabilize the geometry and mechanical structure of the used nuclear fuel during extended storage and transportation after extended storage. Previous work is summarized, conceptual descriptions of how canisters might be filled were developed, and requirements for potential fill materials were developed. Elements of the requirements included criticality avoidance, heat transfer or thermodynamic properties, homogeneity and rheological properties, retrievability, material availability and cost, weight and radiation shielding, and operational considerations. Potential fill materials were grouped into 5 categories and their properties, advantages, disadvantages, and requirements for future testing were discussed. The categories were molten materials, which included molten metals and paraffin; particulates and beads; resins; foams; and grout. Based on this analysis, further development of fill materials to stabilize used nuclear fuel during storage and transportation is not recommended unless options such as showing that the fuel remains intact or canning of used nuclear fuel do not prove to be feasible.

Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Lahti, Erik A.; Richmond, David J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Water Footprint of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

If energy use is split into two categories, stationary and transportation, it is clear from the breakdown in ref 14 that water already plays a major role in stationary energy production: thermoelectric power generation is responsible for approximately 49% of total freshwater withdrawals in the United States (see the Supporting Information (SI) Figure S1 for complete breakdown). ... These more GHG-intensive water supplies serve a variety of users: in California, 18% of total desalination capacity provides freshwater for power plants with closed-loop cooling systems, 23% serves industrial facilities, 1% goes to crop irrigation, 57% goes to municipal customers, and 1% goes to other users. ... Fthenakis, V.; Kim, H. C.Life-Cycle Uses of Water in U.S. Electricity Generation Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev. 2010, 14 ( 7) 2039– 2048 ...

Corinne D. Scown; Arpad Horvath; Thomas E. McKone

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Mass transport in gas-diffusion electrodes: A diagnostic tool for fuel-cell cathodes  

SciTech Connect

Two mathematical models of gas-diffusion electrodes, one for liquid electrolytes and one for ion-exchange polymer electrolytes, are presented to investigate the effects of mass-transport limitations on the polarization characteristics of a reaction obeying Tafel kinetics. The focus is on low-temperature fuel-cell cathodes, and in particular, contrasting two limiting cases that may be encountered at high current densities: control by kinetics and dissolved oxygen mass transport vs. control by kinetics and ionic mass transport. It is shown that two distinct double Tafel slopes may arise from these two limiting cases. The former is first order, and the latter is half-order with respect to oxygen concentration. How the modeling results may be applied to diagnose the performance of fuel-cell cathodes is also presented. Since the ionic-mass-transport-limited case has generally been neglected in previous gas-diffusion electrode models, specific examples of fuel-cell cathode data from the literature which display the behavior predicted by the models in this case are given and briefly discussed.

Perry, M.L.; Newman, J.; Cairns, E.J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

Wang, M.Q.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc. and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, Argonne National Laboratory, and NORAM are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative, which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. Currently, this project is focusing on four basic categories of dense membranes: (1) mixed conducting ceramic/ceramic composites, (2) mixed conducting ceramic/metal (cermet) composites, (3) cermets with hydrogen permeable metals, and (4) layered composites containing hydrogen permeable alloys. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this final quarter of the no cost extension several planar membranes of a cermet composition referred to as EC101 containing a high permeability metal and a ceramic phase were prepared and permeability testing was performed.

Carl R. Evenson; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

236

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute  

SciTech Connect

Today, carbon-rich fossil fuels, primarily oil, coal, and natural gas, provide 85% of the energy consumed in the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become rapidly depleted. Fossil fuel use increases CO{sub 2} emissions and raises the risk of global warming. The high energy content of liquid hydrocarbon fuels makes them the preferred energy source for all modes of transportation. In the U.S. alone, transportation consumes >13.8 million barrels of oil per day and generates 0.5 gigatons of carbon per year. This release of greenhouse gases has spurred research into alternative, nonfossil energy sources. Among the options (nuclear, concentrated solar thermal, geothermal, hydroelectric, wind, solar, and biomass), only biomass has the potential to provide a high-energy-content transportation fuel. Biomass is a renewable resource that can be converted into carbon-neutral transporation fuels. Currently, biofuels such as ethanol are produced largely from grains, but there is a large, untapped resource (estimated at more than a billion tons per year) of plant biomass that could be utilized as a renewable, domestic source of liquid fuels. Well-established processes convert the starch content of the grain into sugars that can be fermented to ethanol. The energy efficiency of starch-based biofuels is however not optimal, while plant cell walls (lignocellulose) represent a huge untapped source of energy. Plant-derived biomass contains cellulose, which is more difficult to convert to sugars; hemicellulose, which contains a diversity of carbohydrates that have to be efficiently degraded by microorganisms to fuels; and lignin, which is recalcitrant to degradation and prevents cost-effective fermentation. The development of cost-effective and energy-efficient processes to transform lignocellulosic biomass into fuels is hampered by significant roadblocks, including the lack of specifically developed energy crops, the difficulty in separating biomass components, low activity of enzymes used to deconstruct biomass, and the inhibitory effect of fuels and processing byproducts on organisms responsible for producing fuels from biomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Research Center that will address these roadblocks in biofuels production. JBEI draws on the expertise and capabilities of three national laboratories (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)), two leading U.S. universities (University of California campuses at Berkeley (UCB) and Davis (UCD)), and a foundation (Carnegie Institute for Science, Stanford) to develop the scientific and technological base needed to convert the energy stored in lignocellulose into transportation fuels and commodity chemicals. Established scientists from the participating organizations are leading teams of researchers to solve the key scientific problems and develop the tools and infrastructure that will enable other researchers and companies to rapidly develop new biofuels and scale production to meet U.S. transportation needs and to develop and rapidly transition new technologies to the commercial sector. JBEI's biomass-to-biofuels research approach is based in three interrelated scientific divisions and a technologies division. The Feedstocks Division will develop improved plant energy crops to serve as the raw materials for biofuels. The Deconstruction Division will investigate the conversion of this lignocellulosic plant material to sugar and aromatics. The Fuels Synthesis Division will create microbes that can efficiently convert sugar and aromatics into ethanol and other biofuels. JBEI's cross-cutting Technologies Division will develop and optimize a set of enabling technologies including high-throughput, chipbased, and omics platforms; tools for synthetic biology; multi-scale imaging facilities; and integrated data analysis to support and integrate JBEI's scientific program.

Blanch, Harvey; Adams, Paul; Andrews-Cramer, Katherine; Frommer, Wolf; Simmons, Blake; Keasling, Jay

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Scaling the Water Percolation in PEM Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A typical polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) consist of a series of non?wetting porous layers comprised between the bipolar plates: the porous transport anode and cathode layers with their catalyst layer and the proton exchange membrane. The cathode porous transport layer (PTL) also known as gas diffusion layer has the dual role of facilitating the access of the reactants to the catalyst layer while removing the generated water. Water percolation through the PTL will evolve on one of the drainage flow patterns (either capillary fingering or stable displacement) depending on the injection flow rate.

E. F. Medici; J. S. Allen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

239

Nanoscale study of reactive transport in catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cells with precious and non-precious catalysts using lattice Boltzmann method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-resolution porous structures of catalyst layer (CL) with multicomponent in proton exchange membrane fuel cells are reconstructed using a reconstruction method called quartet structure generation set. Characterization analyses of nanoscale structures are implemented including pore size distribution, specific area and phase connectivity. Pore-scale simulation methods based on the lattice Boltzmann method are developed and used to predict the macroscopic transport properties including effective diffusivity and proton conductivity. Nonuniform distributions of ionomer in CL generates more tortuous pathway for reactant transport and greatly reduces the effective diffusivity. Tortuosity of CL is much higher than conventional Bruggeman equation adopted. Knudsen diffusion plays a significant role in oxygen diffusion and significantly reduces the effective diffusivity. Reactive transport inside the CL is also investigated. Although the reactive surface area of non-precious metal catalyst (NPMC) CL is much higher t...

Chen, Li; Kang, Qinjun; Holby, Edward F; Tao, Wen-Quan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members, are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying single-phase and composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize proton and electron conductivity without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, it was demonstrated that increasing the transition metal loading in a model perovskite composition resulted in an increase in hydrogen flux. Improved flux corresponded to the emergence of additional phases in the ceramic membrane, and highest flux was achieved for a composite consisting of pseudo-cubic and rhombohedral perovskite phases. A 0.9-mm thick membrane of this material generated a hydrogen flux in excess of 0.1 mL/min/cm{sup 2}, which was approximately 35 times greater than analogs with lower transition metal levels. The dopant level and crystal structure also correlated with membrane density and coefficient of thermal expansion, but did not appear to affect grain size or shape. Additionally, preliminary ceramic-metal (cermet) composite membranes demonstrated a 10-fold increase in flux relative to analogous membranes composed of only the ceramic component. The hydrogen flux for these cermet samples corresponded to a conductivity of {approx} 10{sup -3} S/cm, which was consistent with the predicted proton conductivity of the ceramic phase. Increasing the sweep gas flow rate in test reactors was found to significantly increase hydrogen flux, as well as apparent material conductivity for all samples tested. Adding humidity to the feed gas stream produced a small increase in hydrogen flux. However, the catalyst on ceramic membrane surfaces did not affect flux, which suggested that the process was membrane-diffusion limited. Representative samples and fabrication processes were evaluated on the basis of manufacturing practicality. it was determined that optimum membrane densification occurs over a very narrow temperature range for the subject ceramics. Additionally, calcination temperatures currently employed result in powders that are difficult mill and screen. These issues must be addressed to improve large-scale fabricability.

Shane E. Roark; Tony F. Sammells; Adam E. Calihman; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Pamela M. Van Calcar; Richard A. Mackay; Tom F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Tim R. Armstrong; Mike J. Holmes; Aaron L. Wagner

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ADVANCED HYDROGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES FOR VISION 21 FOSSIL FUEL PLANTS  

SciTech Connect

Eltron Research Inc., and team members CoorsTek, Sued Chemie, and Argonne National Laboratory are developing an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. This project was motivated by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Vision 21 initiative which seeks to economically eliminate environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels. This objective is being pursued using dense membranes based in part on Eltron-patented ceramic materials with a demonstrated ability for proton and electron conduction. The technical goals are being addressed by modifying composite membrane composition and microstructure to maximize hydrogen permeation without loss of material stability. Ultimately, these materials must enable hydrogen separation at practical rates under ambient and high-pressure conditions, without deactivation in the presence of feedstream components such as carbon dioxide, water, and sulfur. During this quarter, a composite metal membrane based on an inexpensive hydrogen permeable metal achieved permeation rates in excess of 25 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Preliminary attempts to incorporate this metal into a cermet were successful, and a thick cermet membrane (0.83 mm) with 40 vol.% metal phase achieved a permeation rate of nearly 0.4 mL/min/cm{sup 2}. Increasing the metal phase content and decreasing membrane thickness should significantly increase permeation, while maintaining the benefits derived from cermets. Two-phase ceramic/ceramic composite membranes had low hydrogen permeability, likely due to interdiffusion of constituents between the phases. However, these materials did demonstrate high resistance to corrosion, and might be good candidates for other composite membranes. Temperature-programmed reduction measurements indicated that model cermet materials absorbed 2.5 times as much hydrogen than the pure ceramic analogs. This characteristic, in addition to higher electron conductivity, likely explains the relatively high permeation for these cermets. Incorporation of catalysts with ceramics and cermets increased hydrogen uptake by 800 to more than 900%. Finally, new high-pressure seals were developed for cermet membranes that maintained a pressure differential of 250 psi. This result indicated that the approach for high-pressure seal development could be adapted for a range of compositions. Other items discussed in this report include mechanical testing, new proton conducting ceramics, supported thin films, and alkane to olefin conversion.

Shane E. Roark; Anthony F. Sammells; Richard A. Mackay; Lyrik Y. Pitzman; Thomas A. Zirbel; Stewart R. Schesnack; Thomas F. Barton; Sara L. Rolfe; U. (Balu) Balachandran; Richard N. Kleiner; James E. Stephan; Frank E. Anderson; Aaron L. Wagner; Jon P. Wagner

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcontract Report Subcontract Report Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell NREL/SR-560-39104 Systems for Transportation December 2005 September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: K. Wipke Prepared under Subcontract No. KACX-5-44452-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-39104 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

243

Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University Daren E. Daugaard ConocoPhillips Company David D. Hsu National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-46586 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Techno-Economic Analysis of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis to Transportation Fuels Mark M. Wright, Justinus A. Satrio, and Robert C. Brown Iowa State University

244

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Minority and poor households: patterns of travel and transportation fuel use  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the travel behavior and transportation fuel use of minority and poor households in the US, using information from numerous national-level sources. The resulting data base reveals distinctive patterns of household vehicle availability and use, travel, and fuel use and enables us to relate observed differences between population groups to differences in their demographic characteristics and in the attributes of their household vehicles. When income and residence location are controlled, black (and to a lesser extent, Hispanic and poor) households have fewer vehicles regularly available than do comparable white or nonpoor households; moreover, these vehicles are older and larger and thus have significantly lower fuel economy. The net result is that average black, Hispanic, and poor households travel fewer miles per year but use more fuel than do average white and nonpoor households. Certain other findings - notably, that of significant racial differences in vehicle availability and use by low-income households - challenge the conventional wisdom that such racial variations arise solely because of differences in income and residence location. Results of the study suggest important differences - primarily in the yearly fluctuation of income - between black and white low-income households even when residence location is controlled. These variables are not captured by cross-sectional data sets (either the national surveys used in our analysis or the local data sets that are widely used for urban transportation planning).

Millar, M.; Morrison, R.; Vyas, A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,AND FUEL CONSUMPTION FOR DIESEL - POWERED NONROAD FORKLIFT ENGINES ,

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

is defined as a renewable transportation fuel, transportation fuel additive, heating oil, or jet fuel that meets the definition of either biodiesel or non-ester renewable...

248

CONTAINMENT ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF BREACHED CLAD ALUMINUM SPENT FUEL  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors (FRR/DRR) is being shipped to the Savannah River Site and placed in interim storage in a water basin. To enter the United States, a cask with loaded fuel must be certified to comply with the requirements in the Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The requirements include demonstration of containment of the cask with its contents under normal and accident conditions. Many Al-SNF assemblies have suffered corrosion degradation in storage in poor quality water, and many of the fuel assemblies are 'failed' or have through-clad damage. A methodology was developed to evaluate containment of Al-SNF even with severe cladding breaches for transport in standard casks. The containment analysis methodology for Al-SNF is in accordance with the methodology provided in ANSI N14.5 and adopted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG/CR-6487 to meet the requirements of 10CFR71. The technical bases for the inputs and assumptions are specific to the attributes and characteristics of Al-SNF received from basin and dry storage systems and its subsequent performance under normal and postulated accident shipping conditions. The results of the calculations for a specific case of a cask loaded with breached fuel show that the fuel can be transported in standard shipping casks and maintained within the allowable release rates under normal and accident conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effects of modifying assumptions and to assess options for fuel at conditions that are not bounded by the present analysis. These options would include one or more of the following: reduce the fuel loading; increase fuel cooling time; reduce the degree of conservatism in the bounding assumptions; or measure the actual leak rate of the cask system. That is, containment analysis for alternative inputs at fuel-specific conditions and at cask-loading-specific conditions could be performed to demonstrate that release is within the allowable leak rates of the cask.

Vinson, D.

2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

250

State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

251

Probabilistic assessment of spent fuel shipping cask response to severe transportation accident conditions. Report summary  

SciTech Connect

The licensing of commercial nuclear spent shipping casks in the United States is regulated by 10CFR71. In order to be licensed, casks must be designed not to fail under hypothetical test conditions specified in Appendix B of this regulation. Questions have been raised about the suitability of these tests in simulating actual transportation accident conditions. Our study addresses the adequacy of current regulations by comparing real-world accident conditions with regulatory test specifications using more complete accident statistics and more sophisticated structural analyses than have been used in studies to date. Our objective is to evaluate the protection provided by current regulations against severe accident conditions for commercial spent nuclear fuel casks that are transported by truck or rail. The complete spectrum of truck and rail accidents will be reviewed in order to determine the frequency (or infrequency) of cask failures during transportation accidents. 3 references, 1 figure.

Fischer, L.E.; Kimura, C.Y.; Witte, M.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Developing and Implementing a Simple, Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Laboratory in Introductory Chemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This laboratory involves a PEM fuel cell that uses hydrogen gas to power a small cell phone vibrator and a model car. ... It is necessary to have an affordable and high-throughput fuel cell laboratory that works well with limited lab and lecture hours; introduces students to cutting-edge research and technology, such as hydrogen fuel cells, FCVs, and clean energy concepts; and stimulates their interest in science. ... goals consisted of design, fabrication, and operation of a hydrogen fueled, 10 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell driving a one-third scale locomotive pulling two passenger coaches. ...

Kristina Klara; Ning Hou; Allison Lawman; Liheng Wu; Drew Morrill; Alfred Tente; Li-Qiong Wang

2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Calculation of the Local Neutronic Parameters for CANDU Fuel Bundles Using Transport Methods  

SciTech Connect

For a realistic neutronic evaluation of the CANDU reactor core it is important to accurately perform the local neutronic parameters (i.e. multigroup macroscopic cross sections for the core materials) calculation. This means using codes that allow a good geometric representation of the CANDU fuel bundle and then solving the transport equation. The paper reported here intends to study in detail the local behavior for two types of CANDU fuel, NU{sub 3}7 (Natural Uranium, 37 elements) and SEU{sub 4}3 (Slightly Enriched Uranium, 43 elements, with 1.1 wt% enrichment). The considered fuel types represent fresh and used bundles. The two types of CANDU super-cells are reference NU{sub 3}7, perturbed NU{sub 3}7, reference SEU{sub 4}3 and perturbed SEU{sub 4}3. The perturbed super-cells contain a Mechanical Control Absorber (a very strong reactivity device). For reaching the proposed objective a methodology is used based on WIMS and PIJXYZ codes. WIMS is a standard lattice-cell code, based on transport theory and it is used for producing fuel cell multigroup macroscopic cross sections. For obtaining the fine local neutronic parameters in the CANDU super-cells (k-eff values, local MCA reactivity worth, flux distributions and reaction rates), the PIJXYZ code is used. PIJXYZ is a 3D integral transport code using the first collision probability method and it has been developed for CANDU cell geometry. It is consistent with WIMS lattice-cell calculations and allows a good geometrical representation of the CANDU bundle in three dimensions. The analysis of the neutronic parameters consists of comparing the obtained results with the similar results calculated with the DRAGON code. This comparison shows a good agreement between these results. (authors)

Balaceanu, Victoria; Rizoiu, Andrei; Hristea, Viorel [Institute for Nuclear Research, PO Box 78, PITESTI (Romania)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.  

SciTech Connect

The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Response to the Caldecott Tunnel Fire Scenario  

SciTech Connect

On April 7, 1982, a tank truck and trailer carrying 8,800 gallons of gasoline was involved in an accident in the Caldecott tunnel on State Route 24 near Oakland, California. The tank trailer overturned and subsequently caught fire. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), one of the agencies responsible for ensuring the safe transportation of radioactive materials in the United States, undertook analyses to determine the possible regulatory implications of this particular event for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel by truck. The Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) code developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was used to determine the thermal environment in the Caldecott tunnel during the fire. The FDS results were used to define boundary conditions for a thermal transient model of a truck transport cask containing spent nuclear fuel. The Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) Legal Weight Truck (LWT) transportation cask was selected for this evaluation, as it represents a typical truck (over-the-road) cask, and can be used to transport a wide variety of spent nuclear fuels. Detailed analysis of the cask response to the fire was performed using the ANSYS® computer code to evaluate the thermal performance of the cask design in this fire scenario. This report describes the methods and approach used to assess the thermal response of the selected cask design to the conditions predicted in the Caldecott tunnel fire. The results of the analysis are presented in detail, with an evaluation of the cask response to the fire. The staff concluded that some components of smaller transportation casks resembling the NAC LWT, despite placement within an ISO container, could degrade significantly. Small transportation casks similar to the NAC LWT would probably experience failure of seals in this severe accident scenario. USNRC staff evaluated the radiological consequences of the cask response to the Caldecott tunnel fire. Although some components heated up beyond their service temperatures, the staff determined that there would be no significant release as a result of the fire for the NAC LWT and similar casks.

Adkins, Harold E.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Cuta, Judith M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................................................................................4 PROPOSED CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION FUEL PRICE FORECASTS......... 6 Summary....................................................................................................6 Petroleum Transportation Fuel Price Forecast Assumptions .............................................................6 California Transportation Fuel Price Forecasts

257

Integrated System for Retrieval, Transportation and Consolidated Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel in the US - 13312  

SciTech Connect

The current inventory of used nuclear fuel assemblies (UNFAs) from commercial reactor operations in the United States totals approximately 65,000 metric tons or approximately 232,000 UNFAs primarily stored at the 104 operational reactors in the US and a small number of decommissioned reactors. This inventory is growing at a rate of roughly 2,000 to 2,400 metric tons each year, (Approx. 7,000 UNFAs) as a result of ongoing commercial reactor operations. Assuming an average of 10 metric tons per storage/transportation casks, this inventory of commercial UNFAs represents about 6,500 casks with an additional of about 220 casks every year. In January 2010, the Blue Ribbon Commission (BRC) [1] was directed to conduct a comprehensive review of policies for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle and recommend a new plan. The BRC issued their final recommendations in January 2012. One of the main recommendations is for the United States to proceed promptly to develop one or more consolidated storage facilities (CSF) as part of an integrated, comprehensive plan for safely managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Based on its extensive experience in storage and transportation cask design, analysis, licensing, fabrication, and operations including transportation logistics, Transnuclear, Inc. (TN), an AREVA Subsidiary within the Logistics Business Unit, is engineering an integrated system that will address the complete process of commercial UNFA management. The system will deal with UNFAs in their current storage mode in various configurations, the preparation including handling and additional packaging where required and transportation of UNFAs to a CSF site, and subsequent storage, operation and maintenance at the CSF with eventual transportation to a future repository or recycling site. It is essential to proceed by steps to ensure that the system will be the most efficient and serve at best its purpose by defining: the problem to be resolved, the criteria to evaluate the solutions, and the alternative solutions. The complexity of the project is increasing with time (more fuel assemblies, new storage systems, deteriorating logistics infrastructure at some sites, etc.) but with the uncertainty on the final disposal path, flexibility and simplicity will be critical. (authors)

Bracey, William; Bondre, Jayant; Shelton, Catherine [Transnuclear, Inc., 7135 Minstrel Way Suite 300, Columbia MD 21045 (United States)] [Transnuclear, Inc., 7135 Minstrel Way Suite 300, Columbia MD 21045 (United States); Edmonds, Robert [AREVA Federal Services, 7207 IBM Drive, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)] [AREVA Federal Services, 7207 IBM Drive, Charlotte NC 28262 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative Fuels Implementation Team (AFIT) for North Carolina  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by North Carolina State University at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Alternative...

259

Urban airshed modeling of air quality impacts of alternative transportation fuel use in Los Angeles and Atlanta  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of NREL in supporting this study is to determine the relative air quality impact of the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as an alternative transportation fuel when compared to low Reid vapor pressure (RVP) gasoline and reformulated gasoline (RFG). A table lists the criteria, air toxic, and greenhouse gas pollutants for which emissions were estimated for the alternative fuel scenarios. Air quality impacts were then estimated by performing photochemical modeling of the alternative fuel scenarios using the Urban Airshed Model Version 6.21 and the Carbon Bond Mechanism Version IV (CBM-IV) (Geary et al., 1988) Using this model, the authors examined the formation and transport of ozone under alternative fuel strategies for motor vehicle transportation sources for the year 2007. Photochemical modeling was performed for modeling domains in Los Angeles, California, and Atlanta, Georgia.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fuel cells for future transportation: The Department of Energy OTT/OUT partnership  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is currently engaged in the development and integration R and D activities which will make it possible to reduce oil imports, and move toward a sustainable transportation future. Within OTT, the Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies is supporting development of highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems as an alternative to internal combustion engines. The objectives of the program are: By 2000, develop and validate fuel cell stack system technologies that are greater than 51% energy efficient at 40 kW (maximum net power); more than 100 times cleaner than EPA Tier II emissions; and capable of operating on gasoline, methanol, ethanol, natural gas, and hydrogen gas or liquid. By 2004, develop and validate fuel cell power system technologies that meet vehicle requirements in terms of: cost--competitive with internal combustion engines; and performance, range, safety and reliability. The research, development, and validation of fuel cell technology is integrally linked to the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) and other major US policy objectives, such as the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Established in 1993, PNGV is a research and development initiative involving seven Federal agencies and the three US automobile manufacturers to strengthen US competitiveness. The PNGV will develop technologies for vehicles with a fuel efficiency of 80 miles per gallon, while maintaining such attributes as size, performance, safety, and cost. To help address the critical issue of fuel and fuel infrastructure development for advanced vehicles, the DOE Office of Utility Technologies (OUT) has directed the Hydrogen Program to provide national leadership in the research, development, and validation of advanced technologies to produce, store, and use hydrogen. An objective of the Program is to work in partnership with industry to advance hydrogen systems to the point where they are cost effective and integrated into the energy economy. This integration will enable the Program to reach its objectives of displacing 10 quads per year by 2030 in all end-use sectors, which will represent about a 10% penetration into the total US energy market.

Patil, P.G.; Milliken, J.; Gronich, S.; Rossmeissl, N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies; Ohi, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Pore-Scale Investigation of Mass Transport and Electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode  

SciTech Connect

The development and validation of a model for the study of pore-scale transport phenomena and electrochemistry in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) anode are presented in this work. This model couples mass transport processes with a detailed reaction mechanism, which is used to model the electrochemical oxidation kinetics. Detailed electrochemical oxidation reaction kinetics, which is known to occur in the vicinity of the three-phase boundary (TPB) interfaces, is discretely considered in this work. The TPB regions connect percolating regions of electronic and ionic conducting phases of the anode, nickel (Ni) and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), respectively; with porous regions supporting mass transport of the fuel and product. A two-dimensional (2D), multi-species lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to describe the diffusion process in complex pore structures that are representative of the SOFC anode. This diffusion model is discretely coupled to a kinetic electrochemical oxidation mechanism using localized flux boundary conditions. The details of the oxidation kinetics are prescribed as a function of applied activation overpotential and the localized hydrogen and water mole fractions. This development effort is aimed at understanding the effects of the anode microstructure within TPB regions. This work describes the methods used so that future studies can consider the details of SOFC anode microstructure.

Grew, K. N.; Joshi, A. S.; Peracchio, A. A.; Chiu, W. K. S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Effective Transport Properties Accounting for Electrochemical Reactions of Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layers  

SciTech Connect

There has been a rapidly growing interest in three-dimensional micro-structural reconstruction of fuel cell electrodes so as to derive more accurate descriptors of the pertinent geometric and effective transport properties. Due to the limited accessibility of experiments based reconstruction techniques, such as dual-beam focused ion beam-scanning electro microscopy or micro X-Ray computed tomography, within sample micro-structures of the catalyst layers in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), a particle based numerical model is used in this study to reconstruct sample microstructure of the catalyst layers in PEMFCs. Then the reconstructed sample structure is converted into the computational grid using body-fitted/cut-cell based unstructured meshing technique. Finally, finite volume methods (FVM) are applied to calculate effective properties on computational sample domains.

Pharoah, Jon; Choi, Hae-Won; Chueh, Chih-Che; Harvey, David

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Road Transport Elasticity: How Fuel Price Changes can Affect Traffic Demand on a Toll Motorway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The crisis beginning in late 2008 in Greece, and still in progress, led the Greek Government to undertake a particularly harsh program under the joint auspices of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the European Union and the European Central Bank, aimed at restoring the primary budget surplus. The implementation of such a financial program has dramatically increased fuel taxes - about 82% for unleaded and 31% for diesel – also producing a serious impact on road traffic demand. Starting from the above framework, this paper describes the main outcomes of a study aimed at identifying, assessing and forecasting the effects of fuel prices and tax changes on traffic flows along a 365 km toll motorway corridor project connecting Athens to Tsakona, in the South-West of the Peloponnese.

Antonio Musso; Cristiana Piccioni; Michele Tozzi; Gilles Godard; Alexandre Lapeyre; Kostas Papandreou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

The history of alternative fuels in transportation: The case of electric and hybrid cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes and presents a critical analysis of the long history of alternative fuels and propulsion technologies, particularly in automobile applications. Cases are electric and hybrid cars. The term “critical analysis” refers to the analysis of the various alternative technologies in relation to their societal contexts. In particular, these are the varying contexts of energy security, energy policy, environmental problems, sustainability, and also the later more explicit climate change context. This approach gives some knowledge with relevance to the current discussions on implementation issues. The work is first of all founded on the knowledge field of “Social Studies of Technological Systems”.

Karl Georg Høyer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Zero Emission Power Plants Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells and Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. (SWPC) is engaged in the development of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell stationary power systems. SWPC has combined DOE Developmental funds with commercial customer funding to establish a record of successful SOFC field demonstration power systems of increasing size. SWPC will soon deploy the first unit of a newly developed 250 kWe Combined Heat Power System. It will generate electrical power at greater than 45% electrical efficiency. The SWPC SOFC power systems are equipped to operate on lower number hydrocarbon fuels such as pipeline natural gas, which is desulfurized within the SOFC power system. Because the system operates with a relatively high electrical efficiency, the CO2 emissions, {approx}1.0 lb CO2/ kW-hr, are low. Within the SOFC module the desulfurized fuel is utilized electrochemically and oxidized below the temperature for NOx generation. Therefore the NOx and SOx emissions for the SOFC power generation system are near negligible. The byproducts of the power generation from hydrocarbon fuels that are released into the environment are CO2 and water vapor. This forward looking DOE sponsored Vision 21 program is supporting the development of methods to capture and sequester the CO2, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system. To accomplish this, SWPC is developing a SOFC module design, to be demonstrated in operating hardware, that will maintain separation of the fuel cell anode gas, consisting of H2, CO, H2O and CO2, from the vitiated air. That anode gas, the depleted fuel stream, containing less than 18% (H2 + CO), will be directed to an Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) Afterburner that is being developed by Praxair, Inc.. The OTM is supplied air and the depleted fuel. The OTM will selectively transport oxygen across the membrane to oxidize the remaining H2 and CO. The water vapor is then condensed from the totally 1.5.DOC oxidized fuel stream exiting the afterburner, leaving only the CO2 in gaseous form. That CO2 can then be compressed and sequestered, resulting in a Zero Emission power generation system operating on hydrocarbon fuel that adds only water vapor to the environment. Praxair has been developing oxygen separation systems based on dense walled, mixed electronic, oxygen ion conducting ceramics for a number of years. The oxygen separation membranes find applications in syngas production, high purity oxygen production and gas purification. In the SOFC afterburner application the chemical potential difference between the high temperature SOFC depleted fuel gas and the supplied air provides the driving force for oxygen transport. This permeated oxygen subsequently combusts the residual fuel in the SOFC exhaust. A number of experiments have been carried out in which simulated SOFC depleted fuel gas compositions and air have been supplied to either side of single OTM tubes in laboratory-scale reactors. The ceramic tubes are sealed into high temperature metallic housings which precludes mixing of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel and air streams. In early tests, although complete oxidation of the residual CO and H2 in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel was achieved, membrane performance degraded over time. The source of degradation was found to be contaminants in the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream. Following removal of the contaminants, stable membrane performance has subsequently been demonstrated. In an ongoing test, the dried afterburner exhaust composition has been found to be stable at 99.2% CO2, 0.4% N2 and 0.6%O2 after 350 hours online. Discussion of these results is presented. A test of a longer, commercial demonstration size tube was performed in the SWPC test facility. A similar contamination of the simulated SOFC depleted fuel stream occurred and the performance degraded over time. A second test is being prepared. Siemens Westinghouse and Praxair are collaborating on the preliminary design of an OTM equipped Afterburner demonstration unit. The intent is to test the afterburner in conjunction with a reduced size SOFC test module that has the anode gas separati

Shockling, Larry A.; Huang, Keqin; Gilboy, Thomas E. (Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation); Christie, G. Maxwell; Raybold, Troy M. (Praxair, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

268

Antidegredation Implementation Methods (Mississippi) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Antidegredation Implementation Methods (Mississippi) Antidegredation Implementation Methods (Mississippi) Antidegredation Implementation Methods (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality

269

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Heat and water transport in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell electrode  

SciTech Connect

In the present scenario of a global initiative toward a sustainable energy future, the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) has emerged as one of the most promising alternative energy conversion devices for various applications. Despite tremendous progress in recent years, a pivotal performance limitation in the PEFC comes from liquid water transport and the resulting flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the open pore space in the electrode and the fibrous diffusion layer leading to hindered oxygen transport. The electrode is also the only component in the entire PEFC sandwich which produces waste heat from the electrochemical reaction. The cathode electrode, being the host to several competing transport mechanisms, plays a crucial role in the overall PEFC performance limitation. In this work, an electrode model is presented in order to elucidate the coupled heat and water transport mechanisms. Two scenarios are specifically considered: (1) conventional, Nafion{reg_sign} impregnated, three-phase electrode with the hydrated polymeric membrane phase as the conveyer of protons where local electro-neutrality prevails; and (2) ultra-thin, two-phase, nano-structured electrode without the presence of ionomeric phase where charge accumulation due to electro-statics in the vicinity of the membrane-CL interface becomes important. The electrode model includes a physical description of heat and water balance along with electrochemical performance analysis in order to study the influence of electro-statics/electro-migration and phase change on the PEFC electrode performance.

Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rod L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ranjan, Devesh [TEXAS A& M UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Lake Michigan Corridor Alternative Fuel Implementation Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Institute of Gas Technology at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Lake Michigan...

272

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Mid-America Collaborative for Alternative Fuels Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Metropolitan Energy Center, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Mid-America...

273

Implementation of a digital signal processing (DSP) boost inverter for fuel cell energy generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates and implements the use of a microprocessor called Digital Signal Processors (DSP) as a controller in the design of a low power… (more)

Claveria, Joevis J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

DUSCOBS - a depleted-uranium silicate backfill for transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

A Depleted Uranium Silicate COntainer Backfill System (DUSCOBS) is proposed that would use small, isotopically-depleted uranium silicate glass beads as a backfill material inside storage, transport, and repository waste packages containing spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The uranium silicate glass beads would fill all void space inside the package including the coolant channels inside SNF assemblies. Based on preliminary analysis, the following benefits have been identified. DUSCOBS improves repository waste package performance by three mechanisms. First, it reduces the radionuclide releases from SNF when water enters the waste package by creating a local uranium silicate saturated groundwater environment that suppresses (1) the dissolution and/or transformation of uranium dioxide fuel pellets and, hence, (2) the release of radionuclides incorporated into the SNF pellets. Second, the potential for long-term nuclear criticality is reduced by isotopic exchange of enriched uranium in SNF with the depleted uranium (DU) in the glass. Third, the backfill reduces radiation interactions between SNF and the local environment (package and local geology) and thus reduces generation of hydrogen, acids, and other chemicals that degrade the waste package system. In addition, the DUSCOBS improves the integrity of the package by acting as a packing material and ensures criticality control for the package during SNF storage and transport. Finally, DUSCOBS provides a potential method to dispose of significant quantities of excess DU from uranium enrichment plants at potential economic savings. DUSCOBS is a new concept. Consequently, the concept has not been optimized or demonstrated in laboratory experiments.

Forsberg, C.W.; Pope, R.B.; Ashline, R.C.; DeHart, M.D.; Childs, K.W.; Tang, J.S.

1995-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of steady state engine fuel consumption and emission maps.affecting engine load and consequently fuel consumption. Theand engine speed which it then relates to fuel consumption

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiative forcing from bio- fuel and gasoline GHG emissions,directly to additional bio- fuel feedstocks. The averagelife cycle GHGs from bio- fuels highlights the limitations

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

Steven Markovich

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Novel Fuel/Reactor Cycle to Implement the 300 Years Nuclear Waste Policy Approach - 12377  

SciTech Connect

A thorium-based fuel cycle system can effectively burn the currently accumulated commercial used nuclear fuel and move to a sustainable equilibrium where the actinide levels in the high level waste are low enough to yield a radiotoxicity after 300 years lower than that of the equivalent uranium ore. The second step of the Westinghouse approach to solving the waste 'problem' has been completed. The thorium fuel cycle has indeed the potential of burning the legacy TRU and achieve the waste objective proposed. Initial evaluations have been started for the third step, development and selection of appropriate reactors. Indications are that the probability of show-stoppers is rather remote. It is, therefore, believed that development of the thorium cycle and associated technologies will provide a permanent solution to the waste management. Westinghouse is open to the widest collaboration to make this a reality. (authors)

Carelli, M.D.; Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E.J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Petrovic, B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Implementation Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 1 The SLP System: An Implementation.09.2002 The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 4 SLP Interpreter (1) Negation Semantics Brass Dagstuhl, 16.09.2002 #12; The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 5 SLP

Brass, Stefan

280

Implementation Implementation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The SLP System: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 1 The SLP System: An Implementation: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 2 Super Logic Programs (1) #15; Arbitrarily nested propositional: An Implementation of Super Logic Programs 3 Super Logic Programs (2) #15; Default negation can be used only

Brass, Stefan

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281

Review of Energy Balances and Emissions Associated with Biomass-Based Transport Fuels Relevant to the United Kingdom Context  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A numerical evaluation of the energy available from biomass-derived transport fuels, including biodiesel, bioethanol, and biomethane has been undertaken based on the available literature. ... Biomethane from the anaerobic digestion of crops was found to have a more favorable energy balance for the production of transport fuel than biodiesel or bioethanol (maximum 237?011 MJ/ha compared to 24?185 and 77?264 MJ/ha, respectively). ... To make the most efficient use of the limited land available for production of biofuels, it is recommended that further development of gaseous biofuels, such as biomethane and biohydrogen, are encouraged. ...

Tim Patterson; Richard Dinsdale; Sandra Esteves

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

282

Two-phase flow and transport in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase flow and transport of reactants and products in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is studied analytically and numerically. Four regimes of water distribution and transport are classified by defining three threshold current densities and a maximum current density. They correspond to first appearance of liquid water at the membrane/cathode interface, extension of the gas-liquid two-phase zone to the cathode/channel interface, saturated moist air exiting the gas channel, and complete consumption of oxygen by the electrochemical reaction. When the cell operates above the first threshold current density, liquid water appears and a two-phase zone forms within the porous cathode. A two-phase, multi-component mixture model in conjunction with a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is applied to simulate the cathode operation in this regime. The model is able to handle the situation where a single-phase region co-exists with a two-phase zone in the air cathode. For the first time, the polarization curve as well as water and oxygen concentration distributions encompassing both single- and two-phase regimes of the air cathode are presented. Capillary action is found to be the dominant mechanism for water transport inside the two-phase zone. The liquid water saturation within the cathode is predicted to reach 6.3% at 1.4 A/cm{sup 2}.

WANG,Z.H.; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

283

Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report  

SciTech Connect

Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Implementation of focused ion beam (FIB) system in characterization of nuclear fuels and materials  

SciTech Connect

Beginning in 2007, a program was established at the Idaho National Laboratory to update key capabilities enabling microstructural and micro-chemical characterization of highly irradiated and/or radiologically contaminated nuclear fuels and materials at scales that previously had not been achieved for these types of materials. Such materials typically cannot be contact handled and pose unique hazards to instrument operators, facilities, and associated personnel. One of the first instruments to be acquired was a Dual Beam focused ion beam (FIB)-scanning electron microscope (SEM) to support preparation of transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography samples. Over the ensuing years, techniques have been developed and operational experience gained that has enabled significant advancement in the ability to characterize a variety of fuel types including metallic, ceramic, and coated particle fuels, obtaining insights into in-reactor degradation phenomena not obtainable by any other means. The following article describes insights gained, challenges encountered, and provides examples of unique results obtained in adapting Dual Beam FIB technology to nuclear fuels characterization.

A. Aitkaliyeva; J. W. Madden; B. D. Miller; J I Cole; T A Hyde

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Experimental and numerical analysis of transport phenomena in an internal indirect fuel reforming type Solid Oxide Fuel Cells using Ni/SDC as a catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental and numerical studies on the fuel reforming process on an Ni/SDC catalyst. To optimize the reforming reactors, detailed data about the entire reforming process is required. In the present paper kinetics of methane/steam reforming on the Ni/SDC catalyst was experimentally investigated. Measurements including different thermal boundary conditions, the fuel flow rate and the steam-to-methane ratios were performed. The reforming rate equation derived from experimental data was implemented in into numerical model which was numerically solved in order to discuss this process in details.

G Brus; S Kimijima; J S Szmyd

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels will continue to play a significant role in the transportation sector in the future of both the world and the United States because of the their convenience, high energy density, and vast existing infrastructure. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports by developing overseas economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be alleviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology is expected to significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically at a much earlier date than previously forecast.

Srivastava, R.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D.; Klunder, E.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Elephant in the Room: Dealing with Carbon Emissions from Synthetic Transportation Fuels Production  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide (CO2), produced by conversion of hydrocarbons to energy, primarily via fossil fuel combustion, is one of the most ubiquitous and significant greenhouse gases (GHGs). Concerns over climate change precipitated by rising atmospheric GHG concentrations have prompted many industrialized nations to begin adopting limits on emissions to inhibit increases in atmospheric CO2 levels. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change states as a key goal the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 at a level that prevents “dangerous anthropogenic interference” with the planet’s climate systems. This will require sharply reducing emissions growth rates in developing nations, and reducing CO2 emissions in the industrialized world to half current rates in the next 50 years. And ultimately, stabilization will require that annual emissions drop to almost zero.Recently, there has been interest in producing synthetic transportation fuels via coal-to-liquids (CTL) production, particularly in countries where there is an abundant supply of domestic coal, including the United States. This paper provides an overview of the current state of CTL technologies and deployment, a discussion of costs and technical requirements for mitigating the CO2 impacts associated with a CTL facility, and the challenges facing the CTL industry as it moves toward maturity.

Parker, Graham B.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation of fission product silver transport through TRISO fuel particle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) model developed to investigate the diffusion of silver through the pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide containment layers of a TRISO fuel particle is described. The release of radioactive silver from TRISO particles has been studied for nearly three decades, yet the mechanisms governing silver transport are not fully understood. This model atomically resolves Ag, but provides a mesoscale medium of carbon and silicon carbide, which can include a variety of defects including grain boundaries, reflective interfaces, cracks, and radiation-induced cavities that can either accelerate silver diffusion or slow diffusion by acting as traps for silver. The key input parameters to the model (diffusion coefficients, trap binding energies, interface characteristics) are determined from available experimental data, or parametrically varied, until more precise values become available from lower length scale modeling or experiment. The predicted results, in terms of the time/temperature dependence of silver release during post-irradiation annealing and the variability of silver release from particle to particle have been compared to available experimental data from the German HTR Fuel Program (Gontard and Nabielek [1]) and Minato and co-workers (Minato et al. [2]).

G. Méric de Bellefon; B.D. Wirth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Food or fuel? What European farmers can contribute to Europe's transport energy requirements and the Doha Round  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Food or fuel? What European farmers can contribute to Europe's transport energy requirements and the Doha Round Jennifer Baka a , David Roland-Holst b,Ã? a Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies agricultural production constant, we find that the EU has the potential to reduce oil imports between 6% and 28

Kammen, Daniel M.

292

Research on Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation in CRIEPI (Part 2 Concrete Cask Storage)  

SciTech Connect

Concrete cask storage has been implemented in the world. At a later stage of storage period, the containment of the canister may deteriorate due to stress corrosion cracking phenomena in a salty air environment. High resistant stainless steels against SCC have been tested as compared with normal stainless steel. Taking account of the limited time-length of environment with certain level of humidity and temperature range, the high resistant stainless steels will survive from SCC damage. In addition, the adhesion of salt from salty environment on the canister surface will be further limited with respect to the canister temperature and angle of the canister surface against the salty air flow in the concrete cask. Optional countermeasure against SCC with respect to salty air environment has been studied. Devices consisting of various water trays to trap salty particles from the salty air were designed to be attached at the air inlet for natural cooling of the cask storage building. Efficiency for trapping salty particles was evaluated. Inspection of canister surface was carried out using an optical camera inserted from the air outlet through the annulus of a concrete cask that has stored real spent fuel for more than 15 years. The camera image revealed no gross degradation on the surface of the canister. Seismic response of a full-scale concrete cask with simulated spent fuel assemblies has been demonstrated. The cask did not tip over, but laterally moved by the earthquake motion. Stress generated on the surface of the spent fuel assemblies during the earthquake motion were within the elastic region.

Koji Shirai; Jyunichi Tani; Taku Arai; Masumi Watatu; Hirofumi Takeda; Toshiari Saegusa; Philip L. Winston

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the technical details of RISIUND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, semiinteractive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer. The program language is FORTRAN-77. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incidentfree models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionudide inventory and dose conversion factors.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y, Orchard Park, NY (United States); Chen, S.Y.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rothman, R. [USDOE Idaho Field Office, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Intensity of Transportation. Environmental Science &and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) Model, Version 1.5.Water Intensity of Transportation. Environmental Science &

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97 BTUs of refinery energy per BTU of dieseland hydrogen) per BTU of diesel produced, depending onof refinery energy per BTU of diesel fuel In the real world

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

297

Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-Fueled Transportation System  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Lessons Learned from the Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen- Fueled Transportation System M. Melendez, K. Theis, and C. Johnson Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-560-40753 August 2007 Lessons Learned from the Alternative Fuels Experience and How They Apply to the Development of a Hydrogen-

298

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature MarketProjected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUELS Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A Study Sponsored by U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy 2013 Prepared by NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Golden, Colorado 80401-3305 managed by Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DC-A36-08GO28308 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or

299

Modeling Gas-Phase Transport in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy, Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cell, and InfrastructureIN POLYMER-ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELLS A. Z. Weber and J. Newmandiffusion of gases in a fuel-cell gas-diffusion layer are

Weber, A.Z.; Newman, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

Ashcraft, James Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fact #634: August 2, 2010 Off-highway Transportation-related Fuel Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Protection Agency's NONROAD2008a model estimates fuel use for off-highway equipment. Construction and mining equipment using diesel fuel account for the majority of this fuel use....

302

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel-Neutral Studies of Particulate Matter Transport Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about fuel...

303

Optimal Intercity Transportation Services with Heterogeneous Demand and Variable Fuel Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 Figure 1.2 U.S. jet fuel price (dollars pertravel and U.S. jet fuel price paid by airlines (dollars perfuel price. ..

Ryerson, Megan S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Implementation Guide for Use with DOE O 460.2 Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The purpose of this guide is to assist those responsible for transporting and packaging Department materials, and to provide an understanding of Department policies on activities which supplement regulatory requirements.

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Pore-Scale Modeling of Two-Phase Transport in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells - Progress and Perspective  

SciTech Connect

Recent years have witnessed an explosion of research and development efforts in the area of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFC), perceived as the next generation clean energy source for automotive, portable and stationary applications. Despite significant progress, a pivotal performance/durability limitation in PEFCs centers on two-phase transport and mass transport loss originating from suboptimal liquid water transport and flooding phenomena. Liquid water blocks the porous pathways in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) and the catalyst layer (CL), thus hindering oxygen transport from the flow field to the electrochemically actives sites in the catalyst layer. Different approaches have been examined to model the underlying transport mechanisms in the PEFC with different levels of complexities. Due to the macroscopic nature, these two-phase models fail to resolve the underlying structural influence on the transport and performance. Mesoscopic modeling at the pore-scale offers great promise in elucidating the underlying structure-transport-performance interlinks in the PEFC porous components. In this article, a systematic review of the recent progress and prospects of pore-scale modeling in the context of two-phase transport in the PEFC is presented. Specifically, the efficacy of lattice Boltzmann (LB), pore morphology (PM) and pore network (PN) models coupled with realistic delineation of microstructures in fostering enhanced insight into the underlying liquid water transport in the PEFC GDL and CL is highlighted.

Mukherjee, Partha P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Isotope Program Transportation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Isotope Program Transportation Isotope Program Transportation Isotope Program Transportation More Documents & Publications Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project...

307

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Reductions under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? Americanto Implement the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta?Paper Series Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Use and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Requirements State-owned vehicle fleets must implement petroleum displacement plans to increase the use of alternative fuels and fuel-efficient...

309

U.S. Refinery Efficiency: Impacts Analysis and Implications for Fuel Carbon Policy Implementation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rapid influx of domestically sourced tight light oil and relative demand shifts for gasoline and diesel will impose challenges on the ability of the U.S. refining industry to satisfy both demand and quality requirements. ... For this study Jacobs developed these models in a Generalized Refining Transportation Marketing and Planning System (GRTMPS) format (licensed by Haverly Systems) which were combined with Jacobs’ proprietary refinery technology database. ... The product slate was developed based on knowledge of the markets being served by each refinery, making use of EIA data for regional refined product output and product movements between Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs), as well as information on product imports. ...

Grant S. Forman; Vincent B. Divita; Jeongwoo Han; Hao Cai; Amgad Elgowainy; Michael Wang

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toward Novel Hybrid Biomass, Coal, and Natural Gas Processes for Satisfying Current Transportation Fuel Demands, 1: Process Alternatives, Gasification Modeling, Process Simulation, and Economic Analysis ... This paper, which is the first part of a series of papers, introduces a hybrid coal, biomass, and natural gas to liquids (CBGTL) process that can produce transportation fuels in ratios consistent with current U.S. transportation fuel demands. ... Steady-state process simulation results based on Aspen Plus are presented for the seven process alternatives with a detailed economic analysis performed using the Aspen Process Economic Analyzer and unit cost functions obtained from literature. ...

Richard C. Baliban; Josephine A. Elia; Christodoulos A. Floudas

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

314

ZERO EMISSION POWER PLANTS USING SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS AND OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

Over 16,700 hours of operational experience was gained for the Oxygen Transport Membrane (OTM) elements of the proposed SOFC/OTM zero-emission power generation concept. It was repeatedly demonstrated that OTMs with no additional oxidation catalysts were able to completely oxidize the remaining depleted fuel in a simulated SOFC anode exhaust at an O{sub 2} flux that met initial targets. In such cases, neither residual CO nor H{sub 2} were detected to the limits of the gas chromatograph (<10 ppm). Dried OTM afterburner exhaust streams contained up to 99.5% CO{sub 2}. Oxygen flux through modified OTMs was double or even triple that of the standard OTMs used for the majority of testing purposes. Both the standard and modified membranes in laboratory-scale and demonstration-sized formats exhibited stable performance over extended periods (2300 to 3500 hours or 3 to 5 months). Reactor contaminants, were determined to negatively impact OTM performance stability. A method of preventing OTM performance degradation was developed and proven to be effective. Information concerning OTM and seal reliability over extended periods and through various chemical and thermal shocks and cycles was also obtained. These findings were used to develop several conceptual designs for pilot (10 kWe) and commercial-scale (250 kWe) SOFC/OTM zero emission power generation systems.

G. Maxwell Christie; Troy M. Raybold

2003-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

The selective catalytic cracking of Fischer-Tropsch liquids to high value transportation fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Amoco Oil Company, investigated a selective catalytic cracking process (FCC) to convert the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) gasoline and wax fractions to high value transportation fuels. The primary tasks of this contract were to (1) optimize the catalyst and process conditions of the FCC process for maximum conversion of F-T wax into reactive olefins for later production of C{sub 4}{minus}C{sub 8} ethers, and (2) use the olefin-containing light naphtha obtained from FCC processing of the F-T wax as feedstock for the synthesis of ethers. The catalytic cracking of F-T wax feedstocks gave high conversions with low activity catalysts and low process severities. HZSM-5 and beta zeolite catalysts gave higher yields of propylene, isobutylene, and isoamylenes but a lower gasoline yield than Y zeolite catalysts. Catalyst selection and process optimization will depend on product valuation. For a given catalyst and process condition, Sasol and LaPorte waxes gave similar conversions and product selectivities. The contaminant iron F-T catalyst fines in the LaPorte wax caused higher coke and hydrogen yields.

Schwartz, M.M.; Reagon, W.J.; Nicholas, J.J.; Hughes, R.D.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the technoeconomic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2002 through September 30, 2002.

Unknown

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the sixteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that the vendor for the pressure vessel for above atmospheric testing now plans to deliver it by November 20, 2006 instead of October 20, 2006 as previously reported. MEFOS performed a hazardous operation review of pressurized testing. The current schedule anticipates above atmospheric pressure testing to begin during the week of April 16, 2007. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 3 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Transportation Risk Assessment Tool for Analyzing the Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste to the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Transportation Database was developed as a data management tool for assembling and integrating data from multiple sources to compile the potential transportation impacts presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada (DEIS). The database uses the results from existing models and codes such as RADTRAN, RISKIND, INTERLINE, and HIGHWAY to estimate transportation-related impacts of transporting spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from commercial reactors and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to Yucca Mountain. The source tables in the database are compendiums of information from many diverse sources including: radionuclide quantities for each waste type; route and route characteristics for rail, legal-weight truck, heavy haul. truck, and barge transport options; state-specific accident and fatality rates for routes selected for analysis; packaging and shipment data by waste type; unit risk factors; the complex behavior of the packaged waste forms in severe transport accidents; and the effects of exposure to radiation or the isotopic specific effects of radionclides should they be released in severe transportation accidents. The database works together with the codes RADTRAN (Neuhauser, et al, 1994) and RISKlND (Yuan, et al, 1995) to calculate incident-free dose and accident risk. For the incident-free transportation scenario, the database uses RADTRAN and RISKIND-generated data to calculate doses to offlink populations, onlink populations, people at stops, crews, inspectors, workers at intermodal transfer stations, guards at overnight stops, and escorts, as well as non-radioactive pollution health effects. For accident scenarios, the database uses RADTRAN-generated data to calculate dose risks based on ingestion, inhalation, resuspension, immersion (cloudshine), and groundshine as well as non-radioactive traffic fatalities. The Yucca Mountain EIS Transportation Database was developed using Microsoft Access 97{trademark} software and the Microsoft Windows NT{trademark} operating system. The database consists of tables for storing data, forms for selecting data for querying, and queries for retrieving the data in a predefined format. Database queries retrieve records based on input parameters and are used to calculate incident-free and accident doses using unit risk factors obtained from RADTRAN results. The next section briefly provides some background that led to the development of the database approach used in preparing the Yucca Mountain DEIS. Subsequent sections provide additional details on the database structure and types of impacts calculated using the database.

Ralph Best; T. Winnard; S. Ross; R. Best

2001-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Parallel Multi-Domain Solution Methodology Applied to Nonlinear Thermal Transport Problems in Nuclear Fuel Pins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes an efficient and nonlinearly consistent parallel solution methodology for solving coupled nonlinear thermal transport problems that occur in nuclear reactor applications over hundreds of individual 3D physical subdomains. Efficiency is obtained by leveraging knowledge of the physical domains, the physics on individual domains, and the couplings between them for preconditioning within a Jacobian Free Newton Krylov method. Details of the computational infrastructure that enabled this work, namely the open source Advanced Multi-Physics (AMP) package developed by the authors is described. Details of verification and validation experiments, and parallel performance analysis in weak and strong scaling studies demonstrating the achieved efficiency of the algorithm are presented. Furthermore, numerical experiments demonstrate that the preconditioner developed is independent of the number of fuel subdomains in a fuel rod, which is particularly important when simulating different types of fuel rods...

Philip, Bobby; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P; Sampath, Rahul S; Clarno, Kevin T; Dilts, Gary A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cycle Assessment 10(1), 68–76. NETL (2008). Development offossil carbon in the fuel (NETL, 2008). The upstream portionof the carbon in the fuel (NETL, 2008), which is directly

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Investigation of the performance and water transport of a polymer electrolyte membrane (pem) fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell performance was obtained as functions of the humidity at the anode and cathode sites, back pressure, flow rate, temperature, and channel depth. The fuel cell used in this work included a membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) which...

Park, Yong Hun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Making Better Use of Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel With “Renewable Super Premium”  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–B: End Use and Fuel Certification Brian West, Deputy Director for the Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

324

Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Some of the biggest challenges in transportation come from things you can't control: the price of fuel, regulatory requirements, highway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the biggest challenges in transportation come from things you can't control: the price of fuel, regulatory requirements, highway safety, customer expectations or even the number of hours the information you need when you need it. Real-time information you can put to work to cut fuel costs, avoid non

Fisher, Kathleen

326

Clean Cities Now, Vol. 10, No. 4; Official Publication of Clean Cities and the Alternative Fuels Data Center (Newsletter)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Take the Lead by Developing Alternative Fuel Policies States Take the Lead by Developing Alternative Fuel Policies Biofuels incentives in Ohio, state tax credits for truck stop electrification in Washington, a hybrid rebate program in Pennsylvania. A clear trend is emerging and states are becoming key to implementing alternative fuel and advanced transportation policies. In fact, from January through September of this year, Clean Cities estimates that 66 alternative fuel or advanced transportation laws and regulations have been added to state

327

RISKIND: A computer program for calculating radiological consequences and health risks from transportation of spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the technical details of RISKIND, a computer code designed to estimate potential radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel. RISKIND is a user-friendly, interactive program that can be run on an IBM or equivalent personal computer under the Windows{trademark} environment. Several models are included in RISKIND that have been tailored to calculate the exposure to individuals under various incident-free and accident conditions. The incident-free models assess exposures from both gamma and neutron radiation and can account for different cask designs. The accident models include accidental release, atmospheric transport, and the environmental pathways of radionuclides from spent fuels; these models also assess health risks to individuals and the collective population. The models are supported by databases that are specific to spent nuclear fuels and include a radionuclide inventory and dose conversion factors. In addition, the flexibility of the models allows them to be used for assessing any accidental release involving radioactive materials. The RISKIND code allows for user-specified accident scenarios as well as receptor locations under various exposure conditions, thereby facilitating the estimation of radiological consequences and health risks for individuals. Median (50% probability) and typical worst-case (less than 5% probability of being exceeded) doses and health consequences from potential accidental releases can be calculated by constructing a cumulative dose/probability distribution curve for a complete matrix of site joint-wind-frequency data. These consequence results, together with the estimated probability of the entire spectrum of potential accidents, form a comprehensive, probabilistic risk assessment of a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident.

Yuan, Y.C. [Square Y Consultants, Orchard Park, NY (US); Chen, S.Y.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol transportation fuels Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resources demands new... and better production paths. One of these is using biogas to create alcohol as a fuel. Higher... Characterization of Catalysts for Synthesis of...

329

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute Harvey W. Blanch †,‡,§,¶, * † Joint BioEnergy Institute, ‡ Department of Chemicalbiomass monomers. The Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) is a

Blanch, Harvey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: EPAct State and Alternative Fuel Transportation Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about EPAct...

331

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Livestock Fuel for Water Pumping Motor Efficiency GW EnergyRequired for Water Pumps Using Electric Motors (AdaptedGasoline motors typically used for water pumps are

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cellulosic biomass could help meet California’s transportation fuel needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. 2006. Ethanol can contribute to energy and environmentalan unfavorable energy balance preclude biomass ethanol fromethanol and other organic liquid fuels can improve energy

Wyman, Charles E.; Yang, Bin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fuel transportation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuels: Future alternatives and development of surrogate... concerns due to the greenhouse effect of anthropogenic CO2 require that future ... Source: Fisher, Frank - Department...

334

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

Li, Mo

335

Characterization of a Stochastic Procedure for the Generation and Transport of Fission Fragments within Nuclear Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the ever-increasing demands of the nuclear power community to extend fuel cycles and overall core-lifetimes in a safe and economic manner, it is becoming more necessary to extend the working knowledge of nuclear fuel performance. From...

Hackemack, Michael Wayne

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Algae: The Source of Reliable, Scalable, and Sustainable Liquid Transportation Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

At the February 12, 2009 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Brian Goodall (Sapphire Energy) spoke on Continental Airlines’ January 7th Biofuels Test. The flight was fueled, in part, by Sapphire’s algae-based jet fuel.

337

Direct Internal Reformation and Mass Transport in the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode: A Pore-Scale Lattice Boltzmann Study with Detailed Reaction Kinetics  

SciTech Connect

The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) allows the conversion of chemical energy that is stored in a given fuel, including light hydrocarbons, to electrical power. Hydrocarbon fuels, such as methane, are logistically favourable and provide high energy densities. However, the use of these fuels often results in a decreased efficiency and life. An improved understanding of the reactive flow in the SOFC anode can help address these issues. In this study, the transport and heterogeneous internal reformation of a methane based fuel is addressed. The effect of the SOFC anode's complex structure on transport and reactions is shown to exhibit a complicated interplay between the local molar concentrations and the anode structure. Strong coupling between the phenomenological microstructures and local reformation reaction rates are recognised in this study, suggesting the extension to actual microstructures may provide new insights into the reformation processes.

Grew, Kyle N.; Joshi, Abhijit S.; Chiu, W. K. S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Alternative Fuel Implementation Toolkit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and propane - are a smart choice for fleets looking to save money, improve air quality, and comply with air agency thereof. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy under Award Number DE-EE0006083. Prepared by the North Carolina Solar Center in collaboration with: Centralina Clean

339

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power & Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-00NT40693 with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the United States to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase I is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase II is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase III updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase II, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from July 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003. The DOE/WMPI Cooperative Agreement was modified on May 2003 to expand the project team to include Shell Global Solutions, U.S. and Uhde GmbH as the engineering contractor. The addition of Shell and Uhde strengthen both the technical capability and financing ability of the project. Uhde, as the prime EPC contractor, has the responsibility to develop a LSTK (lump sum turnkey) engineering design package for the EECP leading to the eventual detailed engineering, construction and operation of the proposed concept. Major technical activities during the reporting period include: (1) finalizing contractual agreements between DOE, Uhde and other technology providers, focusing on intellectual-property-right issues, (2) Uhde's preparation of a LSTK project execution plan and other project engineering procedural documents, and (3) Uhde's preliminary project technical concept assessment and trade-off evaluations.

John W. Rich

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

none,

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

342

AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

submitted manuscript has been submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE- AC05-96OR22464. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a non- exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." ORNL/TM-1999/258 AN ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE USE OF GAS-TO-LIQUID FUELS IN TRANSPORTATION David L. Greene Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory November 1999 Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-96OR22464 iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . .

343

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation (GREET) Model, Version 1.5. Argonne NationalLaboratory: Argonne, IL, 1999; http://and Petroleum Gasoline. Argonne National Laboratory:

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ? ?) and ? respectively. GHG emissions per unit of blend1 ? ?)? i + ?? i Reduction in GHG emissions with respect toSeries Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation 

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Removing Barriers, Implementing Policies and Advancing Alternative Fuels Markets in New England  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by Greater Portland Council of Governments at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

346

Renewable Liquid Transportation Fuels: The Cornerstone of the Success of Brazilian Bioenergy Program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the 1970s OPEC decided to raise the oil price by 70 %. Countries depending on this fuel were forced to develop new sources of energy. As one of those countries, Brazil began the intensification of programs...

Veronica de Araujo Bruno; Adilson Roberto Gonçalves

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Life-Cycle Water Impacts of U.S. Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact Analysis for a Shale Oil Complex at Parachute Creek,of Paraho Crude Shale Oil Into Military Specification Fuels.CO, 1974; An Assessment of Oil Shale Technologies. Office of

Scown, Corinne Donahue

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The impact of aircraft design reference mission on fuel efficiency in the air transportation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing commercial aircraft are designed for high mission flexibility, which results in decreased fuel efficiency throughout the operational life of an aircraft. The objective of this research is to quantify the impact ...

Yutko, Brian M. (Brian Matthew)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Life Cycle Regulation of Transportation Fuels: Uncertainty and its Policy Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in several earlier corn ethanol energy analysis is thatR. (2006). Ethanol’s energy return on investment: A surveyD. (1991). Ethanol fuels - energy security, economics, and

Plevin, Richard Jay

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

352

Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation Corridor Project: 22 April 2004--31 August 2005  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Subcontract Report Strategy for the Integration of NREL/SR-540-38720� Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into September 2005 � the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle � Fueling Infrastructure of the � Interstate Clean Transportation � Corridor Project � April 22, 2004 - August 31, 2005 Gladstein, Neandross & Associates � Santa Monica, California � NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Strategy for the Integration of Hydrogen as a Vehicle Fuel into the Existing Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure of the Interstate Clean Transportation

353

Evaluation of Storage for Transportation Equipment, Unfueled Convertors, and Fueled Convertors at the INL for the Radioisotope Power Systems Program  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an evaluation of the storage conditions required for several key components and/or systems of the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These components/systems (transportation equipment, i.e., type ‘B’ shipping casks and the radioisotope thermo-electric generator transportation systems (RTGTS), the unfueled convertors, i.e., multi-hundred watt (MHW) and general purpose heat source (GPHS) RTGs, and fueled convertors of several types) are currently stored in several facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site. For various reasons related to competing missions, inherent growth of the RPS mission at the INL and enhanced efficiency, it is necessary to evaluate their current storage situation and recommend the approach that should be pursued going forward for storage of these vital RPS components and systems. The reasons that drive this evaluation include, but are not limited to the following: 1) conflict with other missions at the INL of higher priority, 2) increasing demands from the INL RPS Program that exceed the physical capacity of the current storage areas and 3) the ability to enhance our current capability to care for our equipment, decrease maintenance costs and increase the readiness posture of the systems.

S. G. Johnson; K. L. Lively

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

fuel. Liquefied petroleum gas (propane) is exempt from LCFS requirements, as are non-biomass-based alternative fuels that are supplied in California for use in transportation at...

355

Modelling microscale fuel cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this work is to investigate transport phenomena in recently developed microscale fuel cell designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Two microscale fuel… (more)

Bazylak, Aimy Ming Jii

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994). D. E. Gushee, Alternative Fuels for Automobiles: AreElectric/Hybrid and Alternative Fuel Challenge, Florence,Replacing Gasoline: Alternative Fuels for Light-Duty

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

medium- and heavy-duty vehicles must implement strategies to reduce petroleum consumption and emissions by using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fleet fuel...

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Eligible projects include powertrains and energy storageconversion devices (e.g., fuel cells and batteries), and implementation of clean fuels (e.g., natural gas, propane, and...

359

Are the transport fuel retail markets regionally integrated in Spain? Evidence from price transmission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper we explore whether the Spanish retail fuel markets are integrated at the regional level. We perform a comparative analysis of the transmission of international wholesale fuel prices to retail fuel prices. Our results are in favor of market segmentation, since the degree of cost pass-through differs noticeably across provinces (NUTS 3) and this outcome is clearly robust to the exclusion of the island provinces. We also found that cost pass-through is more similar for those provinces belonging to the same autonomous community (NUTS 2). It is suggested that different regulations and criteria regarding the granting of administrative authorizations from the autonomous communities could be hindering the integration of geographical markets.

Jacint Balaguer; Jordi Ripollés

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Investigating the strategic impacts of natural gas on transportation fuel diversity and vehicle flexibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The near-total dependence of the U.S. transportation system on oil has been attributed to exposing consumers to price volatility, increasing the trade imbalance, weakening U.S. foreign policy options, and raising climate ...

Chao, Alice K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Numerical simulations of ion transport membrane oxy-fuel reactors for CO? capture applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the key features of oxygen permeation and hydrocarbon conversion in ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors. ITM reactors have been suggested as a novel technology to enable ...

Hong, Jongsup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste to Yucca Mountain: The Next Step in Nevada  

SciTech Connect

In the U.S. Department of Energy's ''Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Geologic Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada,'' the Department states that certain broad transportation-related decisions can be made. These include the choice of a mode of transportation nationally (mostly legal-weight truck or mostly rail) and in Nevada (mostly rail, mostly legal-weight truck, or mostly heavy-haul truck with use of an associated intermodal transfer station), as well as the choice among alternative rail corridors or heavy-haul truck routes with use of an associated intermodal transfer station in Nevada. Although a rail line does not service the Yucca Mountain site, the Department has identified mostly rail as its preferred mode of transportation, both nationally and in the State of Nevada. If mostly rail is selected for Nevada, the Department would then identify a preference for one of the rail corridors in consultation with affected stakeholders, particularly the State of Nevada. DOE would then select the rail corridor and initiate a process to select a specific rail alignment within the corridor for the construction of a rail line. Five proposed rail corridors were analyzed in the Final Environmental Impact Statement. The assessment considered the impacts of constructing a branch rail line in the five 400-meter (0.25mile) wide corridors. Each corridor connects the Yucca Mountain site with an existing mainline railroad in Nevada.

Sweeney, Robin L,; Lechel, David J.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

364

Hydrogen Fueling Systems and Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infrastructure Development TIAX Sunline LAX, Praxair · Fuels Choice · Renewable Energy Transportation System

365

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

366

Nuclear fuel scoping: implementation of a four node per assembly algorithm as the neutronic module for microscope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, . APPENDIX B INPUT FOR TEST CASES . SAMPLE INPUT FOR ONE NODE PER ASSEMBLY. . . . SAMPLE INPUT FOR FOUR NODES PER ASSEMBLY. . . APPENDIX C OUTPUT FOR TEST CASES SAMPLE OUTPUT FOR ONE NODE PER ASSEMBLY. . . SAMPLE OUTPUT FOR FOUR NODES PER ASSEMBLY... on which to simulate and test out some of his ideas or intuitions regarding ways of enhancing fuel procurement and bumup. It allows him to easily and cheaply experiment with the decision variables associated with fuel procurement and burnup, and to see...

Shofolu, Babatunde Olayemi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the sixth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. This 2012 update will cover current status technology updates since the 2011 report, as well as introduce a 2012 bus system analysis considered alongside the automotive system.

368

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

SciTech Connect

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Vehicle and Fuel Use | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle and Fuel Use Vehicle and Fuel Use Vehicle and Fuel Use Mission The team evaluates and incorporates, as deemed appropriate for LM operations, the requirements for vehicle and fuel use as defined in Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, and approved by LM. The Vehicle and Fuel Use Team advocates natural resource sustainability by evaluating vehicle and fuel use. Scope The team evaluates the vehicle and fuel use goals included in Executive Orders 13423 and 13514, establishes metrics, and develops and implements a plan of action to meet these goals. These goals may include increasing

370

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0: Residual Fuel Oil Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Transportation...

371

Multipurpose Transportation, Aging, and Disposal Canisters for Used Nuclear Fuel - Getting From Here to There and Beyond  

SciTech Connect

The idea of a universal canister system, in which used fuel can be placed at reactor sites, transported and - without ever needing to be re-opened -, disposed of in a geologic repository, is certainly not new. Originally proposed by DOE in the early 1990's as the Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) system, this common sense idea has always had considerable appeal as a means to reduce used fuel handling and simplify repository surface facility operations. However, difficulties in launching the development of such a system, in the face of large uncertainties in repository design and limited program funding, caused the original MPC project to be abandoned in 1997. Then, after eight years of inactivity in this area, DOE, while experiencing difficulty completing the repository surface facility design and having missed a December 2004 deadline for submittal of a repository license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), re-proposed the concept. Under this renewed initiative, the MPC systems were renamed as Transportation, Aging, and Disposal or TAD canister systems. DOE's repository design had advanced significantly at this point and industry, having gained considerable experience through the design, licensing, manufacture, and loading of over 800 used fuel dry storage systems, was well positioned to provide DOE with the meaningful technical input that would be necessary to bring the TAD concept to reality. With a firm foundation on which to build, industry actively engaged DOE in an extensive series of interactions to facilitate TAD development. This paper describes the evolution of the TAD concept through the industry/DOE dialogue that occurred over an 18 month period beginning in January 2006. It discusses the technical issues that were addressed and resolved through this collaboration. Successful completion of this dialogue led to the issuance, by DOE, of a final TAD design specification in July, 2007. This specification is being used by DOE as a fundamental input to the Yucca Mountain license application that DOE expects to submit to the NRC no later than June 2008. DOE is now in the process completing a procurement of TAD demonstrations. As part of these demonstrations, DOE expects industry vendors to seek and obtain storage and transportation licenses for the TADs by 2010 and for utilities to deploy them at reactor sites by 2012. (authors)

McCullum, R. [Nuclear Energy Institute, Washington, DC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

Green, J.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

374

Implementing for Implementing Executive Order 13423  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management" March 29, 2007 0 Contents I. Introduction ......................................................................................................................1 A. Purpose..................................................................................................................1 B. Authority ...............................................................................................................1 C. Organization and Oversight ..................................................................................1 D. Overarching Policy and Directives .......................................................................4

375

Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

Harms, Gary A.; Helmick, Paul H.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon A.; Berry, Donald T.; Pickard, Paul S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Dynamic competition between plug-in hybrid and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles for personal transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article addresses the issue of the diffusion of hydrogen cars in the market, particularly the competition with electric cars for the replacement of conventional vehicles. Using the multi-technological competition model developed by Le Bas and Baron-Sylvester’s (Diffusion technologique non binaire et schéma épidémiologique. Une reconsidération. Economie Appliquée 1995; tome XLVIII(3):71–101), it is shown that the early deployment of plug-in hybrid vehicles—the only electric technology which can compete with fuel cell cars in the multipurpose vehicle field—risks closing the market for hydrogen in the future. Moreover, the advent of the hydrogen vehicle depends on the rapid advancements in fuel cell technologies, as well as on the existence of an infrastructure with a sufficient coverage.

Nuno Bento

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Applications of a transportable spent-fuel measurement system. [Ion-I/fork detection system  

SciTech Connect

A portable tool for making measurements on irradiated fuel has been developed to where in-plant installations having a 1 to 2% measurement uncertainty of relative exposure are feasible. The measurement uses a passive gross neutron signal and data from a gross gamma measurement as a consistency check of the neutron result and the operators declaration of cooling time. The uncertainties are about the same as those obtained using high-resolution gamma-ray techniques without the instrumentation being as obtrusive. The battery-operated microprocessor-based electronics package used with the irradiated fuel measurement system can also be used with single channel pulse counting detectors for other applications. This feature together with the large dynamic range of its current-mode ion chamber channel makes ION-I a good building block to be used in emergencies with an arsenal of detectors at a variety of nuclear plants. 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Halbig, J.K.; Bosler, G.E.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Rinard, P.M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

POTENTIAL IMPACT OF INTERFACIAL BONDING EFFICIENCY ON USED NUCLEAR FUEL VIBRATION INTEGRITY DURING NORMAL TRANSPORTATION  

SciTech Connect

Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on surrogate of used nuclear fuel (UNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reversible bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and cohesion influence on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. FEA models will be further used to study UNF vibration integrity.

Jiang, Hao [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuel Use to Biodiesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) may purchase biodiesel for use in IDOT vehicles through the biodiesel fuel revolving fund created in the state treasury. The fund consists of money received from the sale of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use to Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The South Dakota Department of Transportation and employees using state diesel vehicles must stock and use fuel blends containing a minimum of 2% biodiesel (B2) that meets or exceeds the most current ASTM specification

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use All state employees operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation Services Bureau and

383

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Hydrogen and Fuel Cells EERE leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through...

384

Transportation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The romantic rides in Sandburg’s “eagle-car” changed society. On the one hand, motor vehicle transportation is an integral thread of society’s fabric. On the other hand, excess mobility fractures old neighborh...

David Hafemeister

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice by Commercial Fleets: Lessons in Transportation Choices, and Public Agencies' Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990). “The Economics of Alternative Fuel Use: SubstitutingAn Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice byFleet Demand for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles,” with T. Golob,

Crane, Soheila Soltani

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Internal electrolyte supply system for reliable transport throughout fuel cell stacks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved internal electrolyte supply system in a fuel cell stack employs a variety of arrangements of grooves and passages in bipolar plates of the multiplicity of repeating fuel cells to route gravity-assisted flowing electrolyte throughout the stack. The grooves route electrolyte flow along series of first paths which extend horizontally through the cells between the plates thereof. The passages route electrolyte flow along series of second paths which extend vertically through the stack so as to supply electrolyte to the first paths in order to expose the electrolyte to the matrices of the cells. Five different embodiments of the supply system are disclosed. Some embodiments employ wicks in the grooves for facilitating transfer of the electrolyte to the matrices as well as providing support for the matrices. Additionally, the passages of some embodiments by-pass certain of the grooves and supply electrolyte directly to other of the grooves. Some embodiments employ single grooves and others have dual grooves. Finally, in some embodiments the passages are connected to the grooves by a step which produces a cascading electrolyte flow.

Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA); Downs, Robert E. (Monroeville, PA); King, Robert B. (Westlake, OH)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Transport in PEMFC Stacks - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Cortney Mittelsteadt (Primary Contact), Hui Xu, Junqing Ma (GES); John Van Zee, Sirivatch Shimpalee, Visarn Lilavivat (USC); James E. McGrath Myoungbae Lee, Nobuo Hara, Kwan-Soo Lee, Chnng Hyun (VT); Don Conners, Guy Ebbrell (Ballard); Kevin Russell (Tech Etch) Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0529 Email: cmittelsteadt@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000471 Subcontractors: * Tech-Etch, Plymouth, MA * Ballard Material Products, Inc., Lowell, MA

388

Effect of oxygen on performance and mass transport in a single-cell thermionic fuel element  

SciTech Connect

The introduction of tracer amounts of oxygen into the interelectrode gap of a thermionic converter has been shown to improve converter performance. Excess oxygen, however, increases the loss rate of emitter material, reducing the converter performance and shortening its lifetime, owing to the increase in the effective emissivity of the electrodes, the change in the collector work function, and the deposition of emitter material oxides on spacers and insulators. In this paper, a model was developed, which calculated the emitter material loss rate, composition of the emitter material deposits on the collector surface and investigated the effect on performance of a single-cell Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) in the presence of oxygen and cesium oxides in the interelectrode gap. The amount of oxygen and the cesium pressure in the interelectrode gap were varied parametrically and the TFE volt-ampere characteristics, and axial distributions of current density and emitter material loss rate along the TFE were calculated.

Paramonov, D.V.; El-Genk, M.S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas and diesel fuel used in buildings is used in residential furnaces or similar combustors.

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report, May 10, 1994--December 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report encompasses the first year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on LNG research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (i) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (ii) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. Since this work was for fundamental research in a number of related areas to the use of LNG as a transportation fuel for long haul trucking, many of those results have appeared in numerous refereed journal and conference papers, and significant graduate training experiences (including at least one M.S. thesis and one Ph.D. dissertation) in the first year of this project. In addition, a potential new utilization of LNG fuel has been found, as a part of this work on the fundamental nature of adsorption of LNG vent gases in higher hydrocarbons; follow on research for this and other related applications and transfer of technology are proceeding at this time.

Sutton, W.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Computational fluid dynamics model development on transport phenomena coupling with reactions in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 3D model is developed to describe an anode-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) by ANSYS/Fluent evaluating reactions including methane steam reforming (MSR)/water-gas shift (WGSR) reactions in thick anode layer and H2-O2/CO-O2 electrochemical reactions in anode active layer coupled with heat mass species momentum and ion/electron charges transport processes in SOFC. The predicted results indicate that electron/ion exchange appears in the very thin region in active layers (0.018?mm in anode and 0.01?mm in cathode) based on three phase boundary operating temperature and concentration of reactants (mainly H2). Active polarization happening in active layers dominates over concentration and ohmic losses. High gradient of current density exists near interface between electrode and solid conductor due to the block by gas channel. It is also found the reaction rates of MSR and WGSR along main flow direction and cell thickness direction decrease due to low concentration of fuel (CH4) caused by mass consumption. With increasing operating temperature from 978?K to 1088?K the current density and the reaction rate of MSR are increased by 10.8% and 5.4% respectively. While ion current density is 52.9% higher than in standard case and H2 is consumed by 5.1% more when ion conductivity is doubled. CO-O2 has been considered in charge transfer reaction in anode active layer and it is found that the current density and species distributions are not sensitive but WGSR reaction will be forced backwards to supply more CO for CO-O2 electrochemical reaction.

Chao Yang; Guogang Yang; Danting Yue; Jinliang Yuan; Bengt Sunden

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation field: solid oxide fuel cells require highto solid oxide, alkaline, and direct alcohol fuel cells.

Alia, Shaun Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Design and implementation of a five-hp, switched reluctance, fuel-lube, pump motor drive for a gas turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A new switched reluctance (SR) fuel/lube (F/L) pump system has been developed for a gas turbine engine application. The system is rated at 5 hp, 270 Vdc, 12.5 krpm maximum operating speed, and consists of a SR machine mounted on the F/L pump shaft, an inverter, and an electronic controller. This paper focuses on the design, implementation, and performance of the system. The system can use one of two methods for rotor position sensing, either a resolver or electronic position sensing (EPS). The F/L pump system has undergone extensive performance testing with the resolver. Currently, testing is underway using electronic position sensing. Test results are given to validate the system design and compare the performance using both approaches to position sensing. System efficiency is about 82% at full load.

Ferreira, C.A.; Jones, S.R.; Drager, B.T.; Heglund, W.S. (Sundstrand Aerospace, Rockford, IL (United States))

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT-DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases. Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report covers the period performance from April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002.

Unknown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT--DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

SciTech Connect

Waste Processors Management, Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors Texaco Power and Gasification (now ChevronTexaco), SASOL Technology Ltd., and Nexant Inc. entered into a Cooperative Agreement with the USDOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US to produce ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch (FT) transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co--product. The EECP design includes recovery and gasification of low-cost coal waste (culm) from physical coal cleaning operations and will assess blends of the culm with coal or petroleum coke. The project has three phases: Phase 1 is the concept definition and engineering feasibility study to identify areas of technical, environmental and financial risk. Phase 2 is an experimental testing program designed to validate the coal waste mixture gasification performance. Phase 3 updates the original EECP design based on results from Phase 2, to prepare a preliminary engineering design package and financial plan for obtaining private funding to build a 5,000 barrel per day (BPD) coal gasification/liquefaction plant next to an existing co-generation plant in Gilberton, Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. The current report is WMPI's third quarterly technical progress report. It covers the period performance from October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001.

John W. Rich

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect

Uses for structured catalytic supports, such as ceramic straight-channel monoliths and ceramic foams, have been established for a long time. One of the most prominent examples is the washcoated ceramic monolith as a three-way catalytic converter for gasoline-powered automobiles. A distinct alternative to the ceramic monolith is the metal foam, with potential use in fuel cell-powered automobiles. The metal foams are characterized by their pores per inch (ppi) and density ({rho}). In previous research, using 5 wt% platinum (Pt) and 0.5 wt% iron (Fe) catalysts, washcoated metal foams, 5.08 cm in length and 2.54 cm in diameter, of both varying and similar ppi and {rho} were tested for their activity (X{sub CO}) and selectivity (S{sub CO}) on a CO preferential oxidation (PROX) reaction in the presence of a H{sub 2}-rich gas stream. The variances in these metal foams' activity and selectivity were much larger than expected. Other structured supports with 5 wt% Pt, 0-1 wt% Fe weight loading were also examined. A theory for this phenomenon states that even though these structured supports have a similar nominal catalyst weight loading, only a certain percentage of the Pt/Fe catalyst is exposed on the surface as an active site for CO adsorption. We will use two techniques, pulse chemisorption and temperature programmed desorption (TPD), to characterize our structured supports. Active metal count, metal dispersion, and other calculations will help clarify the causes for the activity and selectivity variations between the supports. Results on ceramic monoliths show that a higher Fe loading yields a lower dispersion, potentially because of Fe inhibition of the Pt surface for CO adsorption. This theory is used to explain the reason for activity and selectivity differences for varying ppi and {rho} metal foams; less active and selective metal foams have a lower Fe loading, which justifies their higher metal dispersion. Data on the CO desorption temperature and average metal crystallite size for TPD are also collected.

Paul Chin; George W. Roberts; James J. Spivey

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Evaluation of Effect of Fuel Assembly Loading Patterns on Thermal and Shielding Performance of a Spent Fuel Storage/Transportation Cask  

SciTech Connect

The licensing of spent fuel storage casks is generally based on conservative analyses that assume a storage system being uniformly loaded with design basis fuel. The design basis fuel typically assumes a maximum assembly enrichment, maximum burn up, and minimum cooling time. These conditions set the maximum decay heat loads and radioactive source terms for the design. Recognizing that reactor spent fuel pools hold spent fuel with an array of initial enrichments, burners, and cooling times, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of load pattern on peak cladding temperature and cask surface dose rate. Based on the analysis, the authors concluded that load patterns could be used to reduce peak cladding temperatures in a cask without adversely impacting the surface dose rates.

Cuta, Judith M.; Jenquin, Urban P.; McKinnon, Mikal A.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

400

"Cumulated Vehicle Acceleration": An Attribute of GPS Probe Vehicle Traces for On-Line Assessment of Vehicle Fuel Consumption in Traffic and Transportation Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To perform a reliable on-line assessment of fuel consumption in vehicles, we introduce "cumulated vehicle acceleration" as an attribute of GPS probe vehicle traces. The objective of the calculation of the attribute "cumulated vehicle acceleration" in the GPS probe vehicle data is to perform a reliable on-line dynamic traffic assignment for the reduction of vehicle consumption in traffic and transportation networks.

Kerner, Boris S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrificati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Transportation Sector Electrification Advanced Vehicle Electrification & Transportation Sector Electrification 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies...

402

Oxygen transport resistance correlated to liquid water saturation in the gas diffusion layer of PEM fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22 November 2013 Accepted 24 December 2013 Keywords: Fuel cells PEM Diffusion Saturation Neutron than 0.15 gPt kWÃ?1 will not be cost competitive. As a result, fuel cell researchers are exploring fuel cells Jon P. Owejan a,b, , Thomas A. Trabold c , Matthew M. Mench b a SUNY Alfred State College

Mench, Matthew M.

403

Emissions of Criteria Pollutants, Toxic Air Pollutants, and Greenhouse Gases, From the Use of Alternative Transportation Modes and Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel, or about 46,200 BTUs of diesel fuel per mile. 4.1.8BTU/bbl 3575 g/gal Diesel fuel 106 BTU/gal 106 BTU/bbl 3192gasoline or diesel vehicles (g/106-BTU) E NMOG = emissions

Delucchi, Mark

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

9th AIAA Aviation Technology, Integration, and Operations Conference (ATIO) Effects of Fuel Prices on Air Transportation Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fluctuations in terms of fuel prices, seasonality, distance flown, competition, and other economic impacts, La Guardia. I. Introduction Fuel prices have increased 131% over the past four years as shown by the average air carrier cost factors shown in figure 1. This fluctuation of fuel prices, followed

405

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuels Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about related NREL biomass research projects that focus on converting renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels, chemicals, and products. Facilities NREL conducts...

406

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuels Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

about related NREL biomass research projects that focus on converting renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels, chemicals, and products. For more information, see...

407

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

408

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

409

EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report, Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2009/FY 2010 (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2009/fiscal year 2010.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

411

Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

xTL Fuels to someone xTL Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels xTL Fuels Synthetic liquid transportation fuels, collectively known as xTL fuels, are produced through specialized conversion processes. These production methods, including the Fischer-Tropsch process, produce fuels from carbon-based feedstocks, such as biomass, coal, or natural gas, and can

412

Climate and Transportation Solutions: Findings from the 2009 Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from 15 years of alternative fuels experience—1988–2003. ”Learned from 15 Years of Alternative Fuels Experience: 1988-Challenges for Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Transportation

Sperling, Daniel; Cannon, James S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Sustainable Transportation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Transportation Sustainable Transportation Sustainable Transportation Bioenergy Read more Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Read more Vehicles Read more The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive vehicles on the road and replace oil with clean domestic fuels. Through our Vehicle, Bioenergy, and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices, EERE advances the development of next-generation technologies to improve plug-in electric and other alternative-fuel vehicles, advanced combustion engine and vehicle efficiency, and produce low-carbon domestic transportation fuels. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION Vehicles Bioenergy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Vehicles Bioenergy

414

Transportation Efficiency Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Transportation efficiency reduces travel demand as measured by vehicle miles traveled (VMT). While transportation efficiency policies are often implemented under local governments, national and...

415

Assessment of potential life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emission effects from using corn-based butanol as a transportation fuel.  

SciTech Connect

Since advances in the ABE (acetone-butanol-ethanol) fermentation process in recent years have led to significant increases in its productivity and yields, the production of butanol and its use in motor vehicles have become an option worth evaluating. This study estimates the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. It employs a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis tool: the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The estimates of life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are based on an Aspen Plus(reg. sign) simulation for a corn-to-butanol production process, which describes grain processing, fermentation, and product separation. Bio-butanol-related WTW activities include corn farming, corn transportation, butanol production, butanol transportation, and vehicle operation. In this study, we also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. Our study shows that driving vehicles fueled with corn-based butanol produced by the current ABE fermentation process could result in substantial fossil energy savings (39%-56%) and avoid large percentage of the GHG emission burden, yielding a 32%-48% reduction relative to using conventional gasoline. On energy basis, a bushel of corn produces less liquid fuel from the ABE process than that from the corn ethanol dry mill process. The coproduction of a significant portion of acetone from the current ABE fermentation presents a challenge. A market analysis of acetone, as well as research and development on robust alternative technologies and processes that minimize acetone while increase the butanol yield, should be conducted.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Which is the preferable biogas utilisation technology for anaerobic digestion of agricultural crops in Ireland: Biogas to CHP or biomethane as a transport fuel?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The utilisation of anaerobic digestion to produce biogas as an energy source is a mature technology in many European countries but is yet to be developed in Ireland. In 2009, the EU issued the Renewable Energy Source Directive 2009/28/EC which requires a 20% share of renewable energy sources (heat and electricity) in final energy consumption for all member states, respectively, including a 10% share of biofuels in the transport sector by 2020. The introduction of biogas to produce power and electricity in the form of CHP technology and biomethane as a transport fuel can help Ireland achieve the mandatory targets set by the directive. The key focus of the paper is to determine the optimum small to medium scale biogas technology and the impact the introduction of that technology infrastructure will have on renewable energy targets for Ireland. In terms of feedstock, agricultural sources such as energy crops and slurry offer a sustainable input to the anaerobic digestion process. The crop rotations under consideration consist of different arrangements of grass silage, maize silage and barley. Grass silage is found to be the most suitable crop for biogas energy production while biogas upgrading to biomethane as a transport fuel has the optimum technology potential in Ireland. To fuel a car operating on biomethane, 0.22 ha of grass land is required annually. Full scale national development of 5% of the area under grass in Ireland will contribute 11.4% of renewable energy to the total final transport energy demand by 2020, surpassing the target set by the Renewable Energy Source Directive 2009/28/EC.

D. Goulding; N. Power

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

This document was prepared as part of the Alternative Fuel Implementation Team project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program. The U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the us  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Data Center (AFDC). Clean Cities coordinators in each of the profiledThis document was prepared as part of the Alternative Fuel Implementation Team project, sponsored of Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Technology Incentives, Policies, & Programs in Georgia, Kentucky, North

419

Fuel Cell Systems Annual Progress Report | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Progress Report Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program Abstracts...

420

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the seventh annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. The 2013 update covers fuel cell cost analysis of both light duty vehicle (automotive) and transit bus applications for only the current year (i.e., 2013).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fleet Compliance Results for MY 2010/FY 2011, EPAct Alternative Fuel Transportation Program: State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Compliance Annual Report (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This annual report summarizes the compliance results of state and alternative fuel provider fleets covered by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) for model year 2010/fiscal year 2011. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state and alternative fuel provider (SFP) fleets under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. For model year (MY) 2010, the compliance rate for the 2911 covered SFP fleets was 100%. Fleets used either Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. The 279 fleets that used Standard Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 acquisition requirements by 61%. The 12 covered fleets that complied using Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2010 petroleum-use-reduction requirements by 89%. Overall, DOE saw modest decreases from MY 2009 in biodiesel fuel use credits earned and in the number of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) acquired. Compared to years before MY 2009, these rates were far lower. Because covered fleets acquired fewer new vehicles overall in MY 2010, the requirement for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), which is proportional to new acquisitions, also dropped.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Transport modeling in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes modeling of radionuclide transport in the unsaturated and saturated zone conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One dimensional (1-D) transport for a single porosity media without lateral dispersion was solved in both the saturated zone (SZ) and unsaturated zone (UZ) for the first assessment in 1984 but progressed to a dual-porosity formulation for the UZ in the second assessment in 1991. By the time of the viability assessment, a dual-permeability transport formulation was used in the UZ. With the planned switch to a dose performance measure, individual dose from a drinking water pathway was evaluated for the third assessment in 1993 and from numerous pathways for the viability assessment in 1998 and thereafter. Stream tubes for transport in the SZ were initially developed manually but progressed to particle tracking in 1991. For the viability assessment, particle tracking was used to solve the transport equations in the 3-D UZ and SZ flow fields. To facilitate calculations, the convolution method was also used in the SZ for the viability assessment. For the site recommendation in 2001 and licensing compliance analysis in 2008, the 3-D transport results of the SZ were combined with 1-D transport results, which evaluated decay of radionuclides, in order to evaluate compliance with groundwater protection requirements. Uncertainty in flow within the unsaturated and saturated zone was generally important to explaining the spread in the individual dose performance measure.

Rob P. Rechard; Bill W. Arnold; Bruce A. Robinson; James E. Houseworth

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy. “Alternative Fuels Data Center (HomeMotor Fuels: the Alternative Fuels Trade Model. Oak Ridge,Challenges for Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Transportation

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy. “Alternative Fuels Data Center (HomeMotor Fuels: the Alternative Fuels Trade Model. Oak Ridge,Challenges for Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Transportation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (Department) must evaluate the cost, efficiency, and commercial availability of alternative fuels for automotive purposes...

426

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biogas Production Sales Tax Exemption Biogas production systems, including sales and storage systems, that create a transportation fuel or renewable natural gas, are exempt from...

427

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F8: Distillate Fuel Oil Price and Expenditure Estimates, 2012 State Prices Expenditures Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial...

428

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Infrastructure Grant Program The Colorado Energy Office (CEO), the Regional Air Quality Council (RAQC), and the Colorado Department of Transportation...

429

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Feasibility Study The North Carolina State Energy Office, Department of Administration, Department of Public Instruction, and Department of Transportation...

430

NREL: Transportation Research - Sustainable Transportation Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC) provide an introduction to sustainable transportation. NREL research supports development of electric, hybrid,...

431

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Carbon Fuel Low Carbon Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Carbon Fuel Standard Low Carbon Fuel Standard California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) Program requires a reduction in the carbon intensity of transportation

432

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

transportation corporation to fuel a vehicle used for public transportation is exempt from the state gross retail tax until December 31, 2017. (Reference Indiana Code 6-2.5-5-27...

433

Fuels - Biodiesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Biodiesel * Biodiesel * Butanol * Ethanol * Hydrogen * Natural Gas * Fischer-Tropsch Batteries Cross-Cutting Assessments Engines GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Clean Diesel Fuels Background Reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil and the rising costs of crude oil are primary reasons for a renewed interest in alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Stringent emissions regulations and public concern about mobile sources of air pollution provide additional incentives to develop fuels that generate fewer emissions, potentially reducing the need for sophisticated, expensive exhaust after-treatment devices.

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

with state agencies, must set and implement fuel economy goals for the state automobile fleet, including expanding the number of AFVs and hybrid electric vehicles in the...

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

implementation of minimum biodiesel content requirements, including information about the price and supply of biodiesel fuel. (Reference House File 2746, 2014, and Minnesota...

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Energy Plan Alternative Fuel Requirements The Department for Energy Development and Independence (Department) oversees the development and implementation of Kentucky's...

437

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

Townsend, Harold E. (Campbell, CA); Barbanti, Giancarlo (Cupertino, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Fuels, Engines, Emissions Transportation Analysis Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Propulsion Materials Lightweight Materials Bioenergy Fuel Cell Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Transportation SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their effects on the combustion process in an internal combustion engine. Oak Ridge National Laboratory brings together science and technology experts from across scientific disciplines to partner with government and industry in addressing transportation challenges. Research objectives are

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis A person using alternative fuel to operate a taxi used to transport

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1° distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Transportation Energy and Alternatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Station in Indonesia Hydrogen refueling in Munich, Germany "You will never see widespread use of the fuel fuels" Potentially used for Transportation · Biogas (primarily for onsite electrical generation) LFG

Handy, Susan L.

443

Quantification of Artifacts in Scanning Electron Microscopy Tomography: Improving the Reliability of Calculated Transport Parameters in Energy Applications such as Fuel Cell and Battery Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Focused ion beam and scanning electron microscopy tomography (FIB-SEMt) is commonly used to extract reactant transport relevant parameters from nano-porous materials in energy applications, such as fuel cells or batteries. Here we present an approach to virtually model the errors in FIB-SEMt which are caused by the FIB cutting distance. The errors are evaluated in terms of connectivity, solid volume fraction (SVF), conductivity, diffusivity, as well as mean grain and pore sizes. For state-of-the-art FIB-SEMt experiments, where a hydrogen fuel cell catalyst layer with 60 nm mean grain size and 40 % SVF is sectioned with a cutting distance of 15 nm, the error in our simulation ranges up to 51 % (conductivity), whereas other parameters remain largely unaffected (Laplace diffusivity, 4 %). We further present a method, employing virtual coarsening and back interpolation, to reduce FIB cutting distance errors in all investigated parameters. Both error evaluation and correction are applicable to sphere based porous materials with relevance for the energy conversion and storage sector such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst layer (PEMFC CL), battery carbon binder domain (CBD) or supercapacitor electrodes.

Matthias Klingele; Roland Zengerle; Simon Thiele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media  

SciTech Connect

For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Risk-based performance analysis for regional hybrid fuel with compressed natural gas option  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Compressed natural gas is widely used for transportation due to its competitive price and less environmental impacts compared with traditional gasoline. With the recent push to implement electric vehicles, it became important to evaluate the current transportation fuelling status and identify best scenarios to move towards greener transportation. This paper presents analysis of hybrid transportation with compressed natural gas as a fuelling option to determine the most effective way to implement regional green transportation. Intelligent modelling and simulation techniques are proposed to model transportation and fuelling process and used as basis for performance modelling and analysis for different scenarios. Compressed natural gas is found to be a superior fuel to gasoline based on given scenario conditions and criteria for regional green hybrid transportation. The proposed scenarios are applied on case studies in Ontario to confirm the high value of compressed natural gas as viable fuelling scenarios.

Hossam A. Gabbar; Raymond Bedard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Advancements and Opportunities for Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advancements and Opportunities for Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition Reuben Sarkar U.S. Department of Energy Deputy Assistant Secretary Sustainable Transportation...

447

Implementation of a cell-wise Block-Gauss-Seidel iterative method for SN transport on a hybrid parallel computer architecture  

SciTech Connect

We have implemented a cell-wise, block-Gauss-Seidel (bGS) iterative algorithm, for the solution of the S{sub n} transport equations on the Roadrunner hybrid, parallel computer architecture. A compute node of this massively parallel machine comprises AMD Opteron cores that are linked to a Cell Broadband Engine{trademark} (Cell/B.E.). LAPACK routines have been ported to the Cell/B.E. in order to make use of its parallel Synergistic Processing Elements (SPEs). The bGS algorithm is based on the LU factorization and solution of a linear system that couples the fluxes for all S{sub n} angles and energy groups on a mesh cell. For every cell of a mesh that has been parallel decomposed on the higher-level Opteron processors, a linear system is transferred to the Cell/B.E. and the parallel LAPACK routines are used to compute a solution, which is then transferred back to the Opteron, where the rest of the computations for the S{sub n} transport problem take place. Compared to standard parallel machines, a hundred-fold speedup of the bGS was observed on the hybrid Roadrunner architecture. Numerical experiments with strong and weak parallel scaling demonstrate the bGS method is viable and compares favorably to full parallel sweeps (FPS) on two-dimensional, unstructured meshes when it is applied to optically thick, multi-material problems. As expected, however, it is not as efficient as FPS in optically thin problems.

Rosa, Massimiliano [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Warsa, James S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perks, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

448

INSTRUCTIONS FOR IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 29, 2007 INSTRUCTIONS FOR IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13423 "Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management" i Contents I. Introduction ......................................................................................................................1 A. Purpose..................................................................................................................1 B. Authority ...............................................................................................................1 C. Organization and Oversight ..................................................................................1 D. Overarching Policy and Directives .......................................................................4

449

Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jon P. Owejan (Primary Contact), Matthew Mench, Michael Hickner, Satish Kandlikar, Thomas Trabold, Jeffrey Gagliardo, Anusorn Kongkanand, Wenbin Gu, Paul Nicotera General Motors 10 Carriage Street Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 Phone: (585) 953-5558 Email: jon.owejan@gm.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor John Kopasz Phone: (630) 252-7531 Email: kopasz@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000470 Subcontractors: * Penn State University, University Park, PA * University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Fueling Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) engages in public-private

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Offering Requirement The Massachusetts Department of Transportation may not enter into, renew,

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel-Efficient Tire Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development The California Energy Commission (CEC) must adopt and implement a

453

Economic Feasibility of Converting Landfill Gas to Natural Gas for Use as a Transportation Fuel in Refuse Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approximately 136,000 refuse trucks were in operation in the United States in 2007. These trucks burn approximately 1.2 billion gallons of diesel fuel a year, releasing almost 27 billion pounds of greenhouse gases. In addition to contributing...

Sprague, Stephen M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

454

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Ethanol Usage in Urban Public Transportation - Presentation of Results Agency/Company /Organization: BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: cenbio.iee.usp.br/download/publicacoes/SAE_BEST_2010.pdf This paper presents the BioEthanol for Sustainable Transport (BEST) project in Brazil, its partners, and the results from the demonstration tests performed in field, as well as the proposals of public policies that were elaborated and are being implemented. The BEST project was implemented in Sao Paulo as well as eight other cities located in Europe and Asia. How to Use This Tool

455

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

456

PWR Fuel Shipping Limits & RNP Core Design  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Fuel Transportation Experience Steven Edwards, Progress Energy September 21, 2005 2 Discussion Topics Progress Energy Transportation History Success Factors Shipment Security Dedicated Trains Emergency Response Public Communication/Participation Summary 3 Brunswick Harris Crystal River Robinson Progress Energy Nuclear Plants 4 Spent Fuel Management Strategy Maintain operating reserve at all nuclear units Spent fuel shipping program to reduce inventories at Brunswick and Robinson Maximize use of Harris spent fuel pools 5 Transportation Experience 191 shipments 1,000 MTU transported 4,541 spent fuel assemblies transported 6 Transportation Experience First Shipment - 1977 Active spent fuel transportation program since 1989 12 to 15 shipments per year

457

Potential Impact of Interfacial Bonding Efficiency on High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity during Normal Transportation  

SciTech Connect

Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) vibration integrity. The FEA simulation results were also validated and benchmarked with reverse bending fatigue test results on surrogate rods consisting of stainless steel (SS) tubes with alumina-pellet inserts. Bending moments (M) are applied to the FEA models to evaluate the system responses of the surrogate rods. From the induced curvature, , the flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI=M/ . The impacts of interfacial bonding efficiency on SNF vibration integrity include the moment carrying capacity distribution between pellets and clad and the impact of cohesion on the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod system. The result also indicates that the immediate consequences of interfacial de-bonding are a load carrying capacity shift from the fuel pellets to the clad and a reduction of the composite rod flexural rigidity. Therefore, the flexural rigidity of the surrogate rod and the bending moment bearing capacity between the clad and fuel pellets are strongly dependent on the efficiency of interfacial bonding at the pellet pellet and pellet clad interfaces. The above-noted phenomenon was calibrated and validated by reverse bending fatigue testing using a surrogate rod system.

Jiang, Hao [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

459

Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells: 2000 Annual Progress Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000.

460

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Projected Biomass Utilization...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market TRANSPORTATION ENERGY FUTURES SERIES: Projected Biomass Utilization for Fuels and Power in a Mature Market A...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport fuels implementation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

The California Department of General Services (DGS) and California Department of Transportation (DOT) must develop and implement AFV parking incentive programs in public parking...

462

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Energy Plan Transportation Requirements The Vermont Agency of Administration developed and oversees the implementation of the State Agency Energy Plan (Plan). The...

463

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Publications Publications Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Find publications about alternative transportation, including alternative fuels, advanced vehicles, and regulated fleets. Keyword Category alternative fuel price report Search more search options close × Filter by Document Category

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Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary objective of this report is to...

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Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Quality The Regulations of the Arkansas Plan of Implementation for Air Pollution Control are applicable to any stationary source that has the potential to emit any federally regulated air pollutant. The purpose and intent of Regulation 19, as amended, is to provide a clear delineation of those

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Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?  

SciTech Connect

Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transportation, stationary, and portable applications. Learn about our projects: Fuel cells Hydrogen production and delivery Hydrogen storage Manufacturing Market transformation...

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