National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transport component includes

  1. Nuclear reactor heat transport system component low friction support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wade, Elman E. (Ruffs Dale, PA)

    1980-01-01

    A support column for a heavy component of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor heat transport system which will deflect when the pipes leading coolant to and from the heavy component expand or contract due to temperature changes includes a vertically disposed pipe, the pipe being connected to the heavy component by two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles and the pipe being supported through two longitudinally spaced cycloidal dovetail joints wherein the distal end of each of the dovetails constitutes a part of the surface of a large diameter cylinder and the centerlines of these large diameter cylinders intersect at right angles, each of the cylindrical surfaces bearing on a flat and horizontal surface.

  2. Road Transport Informatics -Conceptual Framework and Technologica Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    Road Transport Informatics - Conceptual Framework and Technologica Components Dr. Techn. Mads Nyg of informationtech- nology within the road transport field. The main motivation for our investigation framework for road transport informatics in order to estab- lish a common basis for researchers from both

  3. On Perturbation Components Correspondence between Diffusion and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Palmiotti

    2012-11-01

    We have established a correspondence between perturbation components in diffusion and transport theory. In particular we have established the correspondence between the leakage perturbation component of the diffusion theory to that of the group self scattering in transport theory. This has been confirmed by practical applications on sodium void reactivity calculations of fast reactors. Why this is important for current investigations? Recently, there has been a renewed interest in designing fast reactors where the sodium void reactivity coefficient is minimized. In particular the ASTRID8,9 reactor concept has been optimized with this goal in mind. The correspondence on the leakage term that has been established here has a twofold implication for the design of this kind of reactors. First, this type of reactor has a radial reflector; therefore, as shown before, the sodium void reactivity coefficient calculation requires the use of transport theory. The minimization of the sodium reactivity coefficient is normally done by increasing the leakage component that has a negative sign. The correspondence established in this paper allows to directly look at this component in transport theory. The second implication is related to the uncertainty evaluation on sodium void reactivity. As it has shown before, the total sodium void reactivity effect is the result of a large compensation (opposite sign) between the scattering (called often spectral) component and the leakage one. Consequently, one has to evaluate separately the uncertainty on each separate component and then combine them statistically. If one wants to compute the cross section sensitivity coefficients of the two different components, the formulation established in this paper allows to achieve this goal by playing on the contribution to the sodium void reactivity coming from the group self scattering of the sodium cross section.

  4. Nonlocal transport model in equilibrium two-component plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhen; Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2J1 (Canada); Bychenkov, V. Yu.; Brantov, A. V. [P. N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Science, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Capjack, C. E. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2009-10-15

    The full set of linearized Fokker-Planck kinetic equations with Landau collision terms have been solved as an initial-value problem for equilibrium electron-ion plasmas. This work is a generalization of the nonlocal transport theory by Bychenkov et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 4405 (1995)] to both electron and ion components with frequency-dependent responses. Transport closure relations have been obtained for the complete set of electron and ion fluid equations which are valid over the full range of particle collisionality and for an arbitrary ionic charge. The well-known limits of collisionless and strongly collisional plasma transport theory have been recovered. Practical fits based on the numerical calculations have been introduced for nonlocal and frequency-dependent ion transport coefficients.

  5. Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TDG Transportation of Dangerous Goods Anyone involved with the Transportation of Dangerous Goods must be trained. This includes shipping and receiving. All receiving of Dangerous Goods for the Science in Departmental Offices or labs. How do you know if the package is a dangerous goods shipment? Parcels containing

  6. A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

    A non-isothermal PEM fuel cell model including two water transport mechanisms in the membrane K Freiburg Germany A dynamic two-phase flow model for proton exchange mem- brane (PEM) fuel cells and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations

  7. A Two-component Transport Model for Solar Wind Fluctuations: Waves plus Quasi-2D Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughton, Sean

    component. Thus, it would seem appropriate, and advantageous, to develop an energy-containing style modelA Two-component Transport Model for Solar Wind Fluctuations: Waves plus Quasi-2D Turbulence Sean for the transport of solar wind fluctuations, based on the assumption that they can be well-represented using two

  8. Benchmarking a Visual-Basic based multi-component one-dimensional reactive transport modeling tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Benchmarking a Visual-Basic based multi-component one-dimensional reactive transport modeling tool Jagadish Torlapati 1 , T. Prabhakar Clement n Department of Civil Engineering, Auburn University, Auburn transport Bioremediation Geochemical transport Numerical model a b s t r a c t We present the details

  9. Heat and moisture transfer through building envelope components subjected to outdoor weather conditions including rain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayamaha, S.E.G. [National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Singapore experiences a warm and humid climate with abundant rainfall during the entire year. Such conditions are typical of tropical climates where many of today`s metropolitan cities are situated. Rain has been found to affect the thermal performance of building components in two ways, namely, by cooling the surface during rain and thereafter by drying of the absorbed moisture after rain. However, existing software used for predicting the thermal performance of building components do not consider such effects and are therefore inadequate for accurate estimation of the thermal performance of building components in tropical climates. To overcome these limitations, this study was carried out to investigate the simultaneous heat and moisture flow through porous building materials exposed to outdoor conditions such as solar radiation and rain.

  10. Atomic Transport in Dense, Multi-Component Metallic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Meyer

    2002-06-27

    Pd43Ni10Cu27P0 has been investigated in its equilibrium liquid state with incoherent, inelastic neutron scattering. As compared to simple liquids, liquid PdNiCuP is characterized by a dense packing with a packing fraction above 0.5. The intermediate scattering function exhibits a fast relaxation process that precedes structural relaxation. Structural relaxation obeys a time-temperature superposition that extends over a temperature range of 540K. The mode-coupling theory of the liquid to glass transition (MCT) gives a consistent description of the dynamics which governs the mass transport in liquid PdNiCuP alloys. MCT scaling laws extrapolate to a critical temperature Tc at about 20% below the liquidus temperature. Diffusivities derived from the mean relaxation times compare well with Co diffusivities from recent tracer diffusion measurements and diffsuivities calculated from viscosity via the Stokes-Einstein relation. In contrast to simple metallic liquids, the atomic transport in dense, liquid PdNiCuP is characterized by a drastical slowing down of dynamics on cooling, a q^{-2} dependence of the mean relaxation times at intermediate q and a vanishing isotope effect as a result of a highly collective transport mechanism. At temperatures as high as 2Tc diffusion in liquid PdNiCuP is as fast as in simple liquids at the melting point. However, the difference in the underlying atomic transport mechanism indicates that the diffusion mechanism in liquids is not controlled by the value of the diffusivity but rather by that of the packing fraction.

  11. Packaging and Transporting of Nuclear Explosives, Nuclear Components and Special Assemblies

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1979-09-09

    The order establishes Department of Energy (DOE) policy and assigns responsibilities and authorities for the packaging and transporting of nuclear explosives, nuclear components, and special assemblies. Cancels ERDA directive 0561, dated 9-15-75

  12. CSR induced microbunching gain estimation including transient effects in transport and recirculation arcs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsai, Cheng; Douglas, David R.; Li, Rui

    2015-09-01

    The coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of a high brightness electron beam traversing a series of dipoles, such as transport or recirculation arcs, may result in the microbunching instability (?BI). To accurately quantify the direct consequence of this effect, we further extend our previously developed semi-analytical Vlasov solver to include more relevant coherent radiation models than the steady-state free-space CSR impedance, such as the entrance and exit transient effects derived from upstream beam entering to and exiting from individual dipoles. The resultant microbunching gain functions and spectra for our example lattices are presented and compared with particle tracking simulation. Some underlying physics with inclusion of these effects are also discussed.

  13. Open literature review of threats including sabotage and theft of fissile material transport in Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, John Russell; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2005-06-01

    This report is a review of open literature concerning threats including sabotage and theft related to fissile material transport in Japan. It is intended to aid Japanese officials in the development of a design basis threat. This threat includes the external threats of the terrorist, criminal, and extremist, and the insider threats of the disgruntled employee, the employee forced into cooperation via coercion, the psychotic employee, and the criminal employee. Examination of the external terrorist threat considers Japanese demographics, known terrorist groups in Japan, and the international relations of Japan. Demographically, Japan has a relatively homogenous population, both ethnically and religiously. Japan is a relatively peaceful nation, but its history illustrates that it is not immune to terrorism. It has a history of domestic terrorism and the open literature points to the Red Army, Aum Shinrikyo, Chukaku-Ha, and Seikijuku. Japan supports the United States in its war on terrorism and in Iraq, which may make Japan a target for both international and domestic terrorists. Crime appears to remain low in Japan; however sources note that the foreign crime rate is increasing as the number of foreign nationals in the country increases. Antinuclear groups' recent foci have been nuclear reprocessing technology, transportation of MOX fuel, and possible related nuclear proliferation issues. The insider threat is first defined by the threat of the disgruntled employee. This threat can be determined by studying the history of Japan's employment system, where Keiretsu have provided company stability and lifetime employment. Recent economic difficulties and an increase of corporate crime, due to sole reliability on the honor code, have begun to erode employee loyalty.

  14. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Shuo; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zheng, Liange; Mayer, Bernhard

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modifiedmore »to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.« less

  15. Reactive transport modeling of stable carbon isotope fractionation in a multi-phase multi-component system during carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shuo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DePaolo, Donald J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mayer, Bernhard [Univ. of Calgary (Canada). Dept. of Geosciences

    2014-12-31

    Carbon stable isotopes can be used in characterization and monitoring of CO2 sequestration sites to track the migration of the CO2 plume and identify leakage sources, and to evaluate the chemical reactions that take place in the CO2-water-rock system. However, there are few tools available to incorporate stable isotope information into flow and transport codes used for CO2 sequestration problems. We present a numerical tool for modeling the transport of stable carbon isotopes in multiphase reactive systems relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The code is an extension of the reactive transport code TOUGHREACT. The transport module of TOUGHREACT was modified to include separate isotopic species of CO2 gas and dissolved inorganic carbon (CO2, CO32-, HCO3-,…). Any process of transport or reaction influencing a given carbon species also influences its isotopic ratio. Isotopic fractionation is thus fully integrated within the dynamic system. The chemical module and database have been expanded to include isotopic exchange and fractionation between the carbon species in both gas and aqueous phases. The performance of the code is verified by modeling ideal systems and comparing with theoretical results. Efforts are also made to fit field data from the Pembina CO2 injection project in Canada. We show that the exchange of carbon isotopes between dissolved and gaseous carbon species combined with fluid flow and transport, produce isotopic effects that are significantly different from simple two-component mixing. These effects are important for understanding the isotopic variations observed in field demonstrations.

  16. Extended three-dimensional ADCIRC hydrodynamic model to include baroclinic flow and sediment transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandoe, Wahyu Widodo

    2004-09-30

    provides a basis for determining how the water circulation three-dimensionally controls the hydrodynamics of the system and ultimately transports the suspended and soluble materials due to combined currents and waves. A three-dimensional circulation model...

  17. Transport of Intensity Phase Retrieval of Arbitrary Wave Fields Including Vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Lubk; Giulio Guzzinati; Felix Börrnert; Jo Verbeeck

    2014-12-05

    The phase problem can be considered as one of the cornerstones of quantum mechanics intimately connected to the detection process and the uncertainty relation. The latter impose fundamental limits on the manifold phase reconstruction schemes invented to date in particular at small magnitudes of the quantum wave. Here, we show that a rigorous solution of the Transport of Intensity Reconstruction (TIE) scheme in terms of a linear elliptic partial differential equation for the phase provides reconstructions even in the presence of wave zeros if particular boundary conditions (BCs) are given. We furthermore discuss how partial coherence hampers phase reconstruction and show that a modified version of the TIE reconstructs the curl-free current density at arbitrary (in-)coherence. This opens the way for a large variety of new applications in fields as diverse as astrophysics, geophysics, photonics, acoustics, and electron microscopy, where zeros in the respective wave field are a ubiquitous feature.

  18. Eddy transport as a key component of the Antarctic overturning circulation1 Andrew F. Thompson, California Institute of Technology3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Andrew

    Eddy transport as a key component of the Antarctic overturning circulation1 2 Andrew F. Thompson, California Institute of Technology3 Karen J. Heywood, University of East Anglia4 Sunke Schmitdtko, University of East Anglia & GEOMAR5 Andrew L. Stewart, California Institute of Technology & University of California

  19. Using moisture transport properties of rice seed components for identifying fissure resistance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Audrey Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Fissure resistance was related to the moisture transport properties of Cypress, Lemont, LaGrue, and Teqing rice varieties. The moisture transport properties, moisture diffusivity and resistance, were calculated using a three-dimensional moisture...

  20. Long-Range Atmospheric Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: A Global 3-D Model Analysis Including Evaluation of Arctic Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Carey

    We use the global 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem to simulate long-range atmospheric transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To evaluate the model’s ability to simulate PAHs with different volatilities, ...

  1. Parallel detection and elimination of strongly connected components for radiation transport sweeps 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLendon, William Clarence

    2001-01-01

    Discrete ordinate methods are commonly used to simulate radiation transport for fire or weapons modeling. The computation proceeds by sweeping the flux across a grid. A particular cell cannot be computed until all the cells immediately upwind...

  2. Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on Transportation, 1984-2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The overall share of annual household expenditures for transportation was lower in 2010 than it was in 1984, reaching its lowest point in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices...

  3. Application of Chebyshev Formalism to Identify Nonlinear Magnetic Field Components in Beam Transport Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Spata

    2012-08-01

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a beam-based technique for characterizing the extent of the nonlinearity of the magnetic fields of a beam transport system. Horizontally and vertically oriented pairs of air-core kicker magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the beam orbit relative to the unperturbed reference orbit. Fourier decomposition of the position data at eight different points along the beamline was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the kickers with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. Chebyshev polynomials and their unique properties allow one to directly quantify the magnitude of the nonlinearity with the minimum error. A calibration standard was developed using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline. The technique was then applied to a pair of Arc 1 dipoles and then to the magnets in the Transport Recombiner beamline to measure their multipole content as a function of transverse position within the magnets.

  4. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  5. flray Transport in Type Ia In order to solve the rate equations in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, Peter

    in a consistent manner, PHOENIX must include the effects of non­thermal ionization. In Type Ia supernovae the non

  6. Agenda of critical issues: coal price and availability. Final report. [Includes effect of legislation, sulfur content and rail transport costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennican, M.L.; Wayland, R.E.; Weinstein, D.M.

    1984-10-01

    Temple, Barker, and Sloane, Inc. developed an agenda of critical issues regarding future coal prices and coal availability for EPRI. TBS interviewed nearly 50 utility, coal company, and railroad officials, academic experts, and coal consultants; held a one-day participatory workshop; and conducted a literature review and follow-up interviews with selected utilities. TBS found four causes of uncertainty in the utility industry over future coal prices. First, the acid deposition proposals in Congress vary in terms of the structure of the legislation, the costs of compliance, and the impact on coal prices; in turn these uncertainties impede utility fuel planning and decision making. Second, powerplant-specific factors will have a major impact on whether utilities switch or scrub in response to acid deposition legislation; existing analyses do not capture these factors. The most important powerplant-specific factors are matching unit characteristics with coal specifications, retrofit scrubber costs, and differing state regulatory environments. Third, TBS found that utility fuel managers have great uncertainty over the availability and future cost of compliance coal. TBS estimated that the existing production capacity of eastern compliance coal is at least twice as high as current production. Fourth, TBS concluded that uncertainty over future coal transportation rates was a major reason for utilities' uncertainty over future delivered prices of coal. Critical transportation-related issues are the strategic and tactical response of eastern coal producers to the Staggers Act; the impact on rail rates of the sale of Conrail, of possible transcontinental mergers, and of multi-modal mergers; and the future pricing policies that eastern railroads will adopt in response to imports of Colombian coal. 21 references.

  7. The principal component analysis method used with polynomial Chaos expansion to propagate uncertainties through critical transport problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rising, M. E.; Prinja, A. K.

    2012-07-01

    A critical neutron transport problem with random material properties is introduced. The total cross section and the average neutron multiplicity are assumed to be uncertain, characterized by the mean and variance with a log-normal distribution. The average neutron multiplicity and the total cross section are assumed to be uncorrected and the material properties for differing materials are also assumed to be uncorrected. The principal component analysis method is used to decompose the covariance matrix into eigenvalues and eigenvectors and then 'realizations' of the material properties can be computed. A simple Monte Carlo brute force sampling of the decomposed covariance matrix is employed to obtain a benchmark result for each test problem. In order to save computational time and to characterize the moments and probability density function of the multiplication factor the polynomial chaos expansion method is employed along with the stochastic collocation method. A Gauss-Hermite quadrature set is convolved into a multidimensional tensor product quadrature set and is successfully used to compute the polynomial chaos expansion coefficients of the multiplication factor. Finally, for a particular critical fuel pin assembly the appropriate number of random variables and polynomial expansion order are investigated. (authors)

  8. New Observations of Extra-Disk Molecular Gas in Interacting Galaxy Systems, Including a Two-Component System in Stephan's Quintet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Smith; C. Struck

    2000-11-03

    We present new CO (1 - 0) observations of eleven extragalactic tails and bridges in nine interacting galaxy systems, almost doubling the number of such features with sensitive CO measurements. Eight of these eleven features were undetected in CO to very low CO/HI limits, with the most extreme case being the NGC 7714/5 bridge. This bridge contains luminous H II regions and has a very high HI column density (1.6 X 10^21 cm^-2 in the 55" CO beam), yet was undetected in CO to rms T(R)* = 2.4 mK. The HI column density is higher than standard H2 and CO self-shielding limits for solar-metallicity gas, suggesting that the gas in this bridge is metal-poor and has an enhanced N(H2)/I(CO) ratio compared to the Galactic value. Only one of the eleven features in our sample was unambiguously detected in CO, a luminous HI-rich star formation region near an optical tail in the compact group Stephan's Quintet. We detect CO at two widely separated velocities in this feature, at ~6000 km/s and ~6700 km/s. Both of these components have HI and H-alpha counterparts. These velocities correspond to those of galaxies in the group, suggesting that this gas is material that has been removed from two galaxies in the group. The CO/HI/H-alpha ratios for both components are similar to global values for spiral galaxies.

  9. Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-Forum Sign InTransportation

  10. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  11. WASTE PACKAGE TRANSPORTER DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Weddle; R. Novotny; J. Cron

    1998-09-23

    The purpose of this Design Analysis is to develop preliminary design of the waste package transporter used for waste package (WP) transport and related functions in the subsurface repository. This analysis refines the conceptual design that was started in Phase I of the Viability Assessment. This analysis supports the development of a reliable emplacement concept and a retrieval concept for license application design. The scope of this analysis includes the following activities: (1) Assess features of the transporter design and evaluate alternative design solutions for mechanical components. (2) Develop mechanical equipment details for the transporter. (3) Prepare a preliminary structural evaluation for the transporter. (4) Identify and recommend the equipment design for waste package transport and related functions. (5) Investigate transport equipment interface tolerances. This analysis supports the development of the waste package transporter for the transport, emplacement, and retrieval of packaged radioactive waste forms in the subsurface repository. Once the waste containers are closed and accepted, the packaged radioactive waste forms are termed waste packages (WP). This terminology was finalized as this analysis neared completion; therefore, the term disposal container is used in several references (i.e., the System Description Document (SDD)) (Ref. 5.6). In this analysis and the applicable reference documents, the term ''disposal container'' is synonymous with ''waste package''.

  12. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  13. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  14. Performance and production requirements for the optical components in a high-average-power laser system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, R.; Doss, F.W.; Taylor, J.R.; Wong, J.N.

    1999-07-02

    Optical components needed for high-average-power lasers, such as those developed for Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS), require high levels of performance and reliability. Over the past two decades, optical component requirements for this purpose have been optimized and performance and reliability have been demonstrated. Many of the optical components that are exposed to the high power laser light affect the quality of the beam as it is transported through the system. The specifications for these optics are described including a few parameters not previously reported and some component manufacturing and testing experience. Key words: High-average-power laser, coating efficiency, absorption, optical components

  15. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  16. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister...

  17. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  18. UFD Storage and Transportation - Transportation Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Ross, Steven B.

    2011-08-01

    The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Transportation Task commenced in October 2010. As its first task, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) compiled a list of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of transportation systems and their possible degradation mechanisms during extended storage. The list of SSCs and the associated degradation mechanisms [known as features, events, and processes (FEPs)] were based on the list of used nuclear fuel (UNF) storage system SSCs and degradation mechanisms developed by the UFD Storage Task (Hanson et al. 2011). Other sources of information surveyed to develop the list of SSCs and their degradation mechanisms included references such as Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel (NWTRB 2010), Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification, Revision 1 (OCRWM 2008), Data Needs for Long-Term Storage of LWR Fuel (EPRI 1998), Technical Bases for Extended Dry Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EPRI 2002), Used Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Extended Storage Collaboration Program (EPRI 2010a), Industry Spent Fuel Storage Handbook (EPRI 2010b), and Transportation of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, Issues Resolution (EPRI 2010c). SSCs include items such as the fuel, cladding, fuel baskets, neutron poisons, metal canisters, etc. Potential degradation mechanisms (FEPs) included mechanical, thermal, radiation and chemical stressors, such as fuel fragmentation, embrittlement of cladding by hydrogen, oxidation of cladding, metal fatigue, corrosion, etc. These degradation mechanisms are discussed in Section 2 of this report. The degradation mechanisms have been evaluated to determine if they would be influenced by extended storage or high burnup, the need for additional data, and their importance to transportation. These categories were used to identify the most significant transportation degradation mechanisms. As expected, for the most part, the transportation importance was mirrored by the importance assigned by the UFD Storage Task. A few of the more significant differences are described in Section 3 of this report

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

  20. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  1. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

    2000-10-30

    This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

  2. Supply chain management (SCM) involves the management of materials and information across the entire supply chain. This includes raw material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    the entire supply chain. This includes raw material suppliers, component producers, final assemblySupply chain management (SCM) involves the management of materials and information across this concentration will be required to take three core courses: Materials and Supply Chain Management, Transportation

  3. Methods of making transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Mo, Weijian (Sugar Land, TX); Muylle, Michel Serge Marie (Houston, TX); Mandema, Remco Hugo (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX)

    2012-04-10

    A method for producing alkylated hydrocarbons is disclosed. Formation fluid is produced from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process. The formation fluid is separated to produce a liquid stream and a first gas stream. The first gas stream includes olefins. The liquid stream is fractionated to produce at least a second gas stream including hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3. The first gas stream and the second gas stream are introduced into an alkylation unit to produce alkylated hydrocarbons. At least a portion of the olefins in the first gas stream enhance alkylation. The alkylated hydrocarbons may be blended with one or more components to produce transportation fuel.

  4. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  5. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-05-14

    The order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of DOE, including NNSA, offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials and for modal transportation. Supersedes DOE O 460.1B.

  6. Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

  7. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yuan, Thomas; Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald

    2010-10-26

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  8. Solid state lighting component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keller, Bernd; Ibbetson, James; Tarsa, Eric; Negley, Gerald; Yuan, Thomas

    2012-07-10

    An LED component comprising an array of LED chips mounted on a planar surface of a submount with the LED chips capable of emitting light in response to an electrical signal. The LED chips comprise respective groups emitting at different colors of light, with each of the groups interconnected in a series circuit. A lens is included over the LED chips. Other embodiments can comprise thermal spreading structures included integral to the submount and arranged to dissipate heat from the LED chips.

  9. Injection molded component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

    2014-09-30

    An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

  10. Chemistry research and development. Progress report, December 1978-May 1979. [Component, pilot plant, instrumentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miner, F. J.

    1980-06-30

    Progress and activities are reported on component development, pilot plant development, and instrumentation and statistical systems. Specific items studied include processing of pond sludge, transport of radioactive materials and wastes, corrosion, decontamination and cleaning, fluidized-bed incineration, Pu contamination of soils, chemical analysis, radiometric analysis, security. (DLC)

  11. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  12. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

    2011-01-25

    Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

  14. EM Removes Radioactive Components from Former Reactor at Oak...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    contractor employees who worked on the project to remove irradiated components from a reactor pool gather to watch the transport of the shipment offsite for disposition. Employees...

  15. Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) Component Evaluation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LEESS; COMPONENT EVALUATION; LITHIUM ION; CAPACITORS; Transportation Alternate hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) energy storage systems (ESS) such as lithium-ion capacitors (LICs)...

  16. Heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-05-22

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material is disclosed. The system typically includes an insulating vessel placed within a microwave applicator chamber. A moderating material is positioned inside the insulating vessel so that a substantial portion of the exterior surface of each component for heat treating is in contact with the moderating material.

  17. Sustainable Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Melvin

    2006-01-01

    THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

  18. Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mucina, Ladislav

    Parking and Transport Policy Page 1 Parking and Transport Policy Category: Facilities, Campus Life 1. PURPOSE To standardise and manage parking and transport on the Curtin Bentley campus including that support both State Government and University objectives in a manner that encourages public transport use

  19. Multi-component assembly casting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W.

    2015-10-13

    Multi-component vane segment and method for forming the same. Assembly includes: positioning a pre-formed airfoil component (12) and a preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) in a mold, wherein the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18) each comprises an interlocking feature (24); preheating the mold; introducing molten structural material (46) into the mold; and solidifying the molten structural material such that it interlocks the pre-formed airfoil component (12) with respect to the preformed shroud heat resistant material (18) and is effective to provide structural support for the shroud heat resistant material (18). Surfaces between the airfoil component (12) and the structural material (46), between the airfoil component (12) and the shroud heat resistant material (18), and between the shroud heat resistant material (18) and the structural material (46) are free of metallurgical bonds.

  20. Energy Transport in the Vaidya System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

    2005-03-21

    Energy transport mechanisms can be generated by imposing relations between null tetrad Ricci components. Several kinds of mass and density transport generated by these relations are studied for the generalized Vaidya system.

  1. Method of using infrared radiation for assembling a first component with a second component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Whitson, Barry G. (Corryton, TN); Blue, Craig A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method of assembling a first component for assembly with a second component involves a heating device which includes an enclosure having a cavity for inserting a first component. An array of infrared energy generators is disposed within the enclosure. At least a portion of the first component is inserted into the cavity, exposed to infrared energy and thereby heated to a temperature wherein the portion of the first component is sufficiently softened and/or expanded for assembly with a second component.

  2. 3D face recognition with wireless transportation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, Le

    2009-05-15

    , we consider the wireless transportation problem of range images, which are captured by scattered sensor nodes from target objects and are forwarded to the core components (i.e., feature extraction and classi?cation components) of the face recognition...

  3. Methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake; Domeier, Linda; Woo, Noble; Shepodd, Timothy; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2014-08-19

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity, which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate, which may include microchannels or other features.

  4. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  5. Preliminary Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.A Kouts

    2006-11-22

    This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. A list of system specified components and ancillary components are included in Section 1.2. The TAD canister, in conjunction with specialized overpacks will accomplish a number of functions in the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Some of these functions will be accomplished at purchaser sites where commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) is stored, and some will be performed within the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) transportation and disposal system. This document contains only those requirements unique to applications within Department of Energy's (DOE's) system. DOE recognizes that TAD canisters may have to perform similar functions at purchaser sites. Requirements to meet reactor functions, such as on-site dry storage, handling, and loading for transportation, are expected to be similar to commercially available canister-based systems. This document is intended to be referenced in the license application for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). As such, the requirements cited herein are needed for TAD system use in OCRWM's disposal system. This document contains specifications for the TAD canister, transportation overpack and aging overpack. The remaining components and equipment that are unique to the OCRWM system or for similar purchaser applications will be supplied by others.

  6. UZ Colloid Transport Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. McGraw

    2000-04-13

    The UZ Colloid Transport model development plan states that the objective of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the development of a model for simulating unsaturated colloid transport. This objective includes the following: (1) use of a process level model to evaluate the potential mechanisms for colloid transport at Yucca Mountain; (2) Provide ranges of parameters for significant colloid transport processes to Performance Assessment (PA) for the unsaturated zone (UZ); (3) Provide a basis for development of an abstracted model for use in PA calculations.

  7. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    IEA personnel (WBCSD, 2004b), the WEO 2004 and Mobility 2030are quite similar. The WEO 2006 (IEA, 2006b) includes higherwhile the IEA’s more recent WEO 2006 projects transport

  8. Model to Predict Temperature and Capillary Pressure Driven Water Transport in PEFCs After Shutdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    Model to Predict Temperature and Capillary Pressure Driven Water Transport in PEFCs After Shutdown-912 Korea To enhance durability and cold-start performance of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs in the PEFC components after shutdown, which for the first time includes thermo-osmotic flow in the membrane

  9. Features, Events, and Processes in UZ Flow and Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.E. Houseworth

    2001-04-10

    Unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and radionuclide transport is a component of the natural barriers that affects potential repository performance. The total system performance assessment (TSPA) model, and underlying process models, of this natural barrier component capture some, but not all, of the associated features, events, and processes (FEPs) as identified in the FEPs Database (Freeze, et al. 2001 [154365]). This analysis and model report (AMR) discusses all FEPs identified as associated with UZ flow and radionuclide transport. The purpose of this analysis is to give a comprehensive summary of all UZ flow and radionuclide transport FEPs and their treatment in, or exclusion from, TSPA models. The scope of this analysis is to provide a summary of the FEPs associated with the UZ flow and radionuclide transport and to provide a reference roadmap to other documentation where detailed discussions of these FEPs, treated explicitly in TSPA models, are offered. Other FEPs may be screened out from treatment in TSPA by direct regulatory exclusion or through arguments concerning low probability and/or low consequence of the FEPs on potential repository performance. Arguments for exclusion of FEPs are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from the UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which the FEPs are included in the UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document. This report has been prepared in accordance with the technical work plan for the unsaturated zone subproduct element (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). The purpose of this report is to document that all FEPs are either included in UZ flow and transport models for TSPA, or can be excluded from UZ flow and transport models for TSPA on the basis of low probability or low consequence. Arguments for exclusion are presented in this analysis. Exclusion of specific FEPs from UZ flow and transport models does not necessarily imply that the FEP is excluded from the TSPA. Similarly, in the treatment of included FEPs, only the way in which FEPs are included in UZ flow and transport models is discussed in this document.

  10. Transportation Baseline Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kramer, George Leroy Jr.

    1999-12-01

    The National Transportation Program 1999 Transportation Baseline Report presents data that form a baseline to enable analysis and planning for future Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) waste and materials transportation. In addition, this Report provides a summary overview of DOE’s projected quantities of waste and materials for transportation. Data presented in this report were gathered as a part of the IPABS Spring 1999 update of the EM Corporate Database and are current as of July 30, 1999. These data were input and compiled using the Analysis and Visualization System (AVS) which is used to update all stream-level components of the EM Corporate Database, as well as TSD System and programmatic risk (disposition barrier) information. Project (PBS) and site-level IPABS data are being collected through the Interim Data Management System (IDMS). The data are presented in appendices to this report.

  11. Nuclear reactor shield including magnesium oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rouse, Carl A. (Del Mar, CA); Simnad, Massoud T. (La Jolla, CA)

    1981-01-01

    An improvement in nuclear reactor shielding of a type used in reactor applications involving significant amounts of fast neutron flux, the reactor shielding including means providing structural support, neutron moderator material, neutron absorber material and other components as described below, wherein at least a portion of the neutron moderator material is magnesium in the form of magnesium oxide either alone or in combination with other moderator materials such as graphite and iron.

  12. to the PORTAL servers, including count, occupancy, and time mean speeds in each lane. PORTAL also includes incident and variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    measures are temperature, visibility, wind speed, and rainfall. From the basic sensor data PORTAL computes and is often broken into three component areas: environmental, economic, and social (3). Environmental consumption of nonrenewable fossil fuels. Economic Sustainability The cost of fuel consumed for transportation

  13. Component Fragility Research Program: Phase 1 component prioritization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holman, G.S.; Chou, C.K.

    1987-06-01

    Current probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods for nuclear power plants utilize seismic ''fragilities'' - probabilities of failure conditioned on the severity of seismic input motion - that are based largely on limited test data and on engineering judgment. Under the NRC Component Fragility Research Program (CFRP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed and demonstrated procedures for using test data to derive probabilistic fragility descriptions for mechanical and electrical components. As part of its CFRP activities, LLNL systematically identified and categorized components influencing plant safety in order to identify ''candidate'' components for future NRC testing. Plant systems relevant to safety were first identified; within each system components were then ranked according to their importance to overall system function and their anticipated seismic capacity. Highest priority for future testing was assigned to those ''very important'' components having ''low'' seismic capacity. This report describes the LLNL prioritization effort, which also included application of ''high-level'' qualification data as an alternate means of developing probabilistic fragility descriptions for PRA applications.

  14. Non-Tracial Free Transport and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Brent Andrew

    2015-01-01

    tracial transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the transport element . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Free Transport . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Reactor component automatic grapple

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenaway, Paul R. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A grapple for handling nuclear reactor components in a medium such as liquid sodium which, upon proper seating and alignment of the grapple with the component as sensed by a mechanical logic integral to the grapple, automatically seizes the component. The mechanical logic system also precludes seizure in the absence of proper seating and alignment.

  16. Transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R; Fox, Joe R

    2006-05-30

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. The transmission element may include an annular housing forming a trough, an electrical conductor disposed within the trough, and an MCEI material disposed between the annular housing and the electrical conductor.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    life cycle analysis of biofuels continue to improve 2 Feedstock Production Feedstock Logistics, Storage and Transportation Feedstock Conversion Fuel Transportation and...

  18. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  19. Downhole component with a pressure equalization passageway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, David R.; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Reynolds, Jay T.; Breihan, James W.; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2006-08-22

    The present invention includes a downhole component adapted for transmitting downhole data. The downhole component includes a threaded end on a downhole component. The threaded end furthermore includes an interior region, and exterior region, and a mating surface wherein a cavity is formed. A data transmission element is disposed in the cavity and displaces a volume of the cavity. At least one passageway is formed in the threaded region between interior and exterior regions. The passageway is in fluid communication with both the interior and exterior regions and thereby relieves pressure build up of thread lubricant upon tool joint make up.

  20. Abstract --We describe the core components of a mobile RFID system, and they include components such as mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    there are several kinds of mobile RFID readers in the market, we will propose specially designed mobile RFID scenario, and, code resolution mechanism. We will analyze the characteristics of the proposed technologies are designed in the WIPI C API: They are reader control, tag control, buffer control and filter control

  1. Countries Gasoline Prices Including Taxes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and...

  2. Graphene-based spintronic components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Minggang; Su, Haibin; Zhou, Miao; Zhang, Chun; Feng, Yuanping

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge of spintronics is in generating, controlling and detecting spin-polarized current. Manipulation of spin-polarized current, in particular, is difficult. We demonstrate here, based on calculated transport properties of graphene nanoribbons, that nearly +-100% spin-polarized current can be generated in zigzag graphene nanoribbons (ZGNRs) and tuned by a source-drain voltage in the bipolar spin diode, in addition to magnetic configurations of the electrodes. This unusual transport property is attributed to the intrinsic transmission selection rule of the spin subbands near the Fermi level in ZGNRs. The simultaneous control of spin current by the bias voltage and the magnetic configurations of the electrodes provides an opportunity to implement a whole range of spintronics devices. We propose theoretical designs for a complete set of basic spintronic devices, including bipolar spin diode, transistor and logic gates, based on ZGNRs.

  3. A new iterative approach to solving the transport equation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslowski Olivares, Alexander Enrique

    2009-05-15

    We present a new iterative approach to solving neutral-particle transport problems. The scheme divides the transport solution into its particular and homogeneous or “source-free” components. The particular problem is solved ...

  4. Decomposing global light transport using time of flight imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Di

    Global light transport is composed of direct and indirect components. In this paper, we take the first steps toward analyzing light transport using high temporal resolution information via time of flight (ToF) images. The ...

  5. Sustainable Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  6. Apparatus and methods for high resolution separation of sample components on microfabricated channel devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A.; Paegel, Brian; Simpson, Peter C.; Hutt, Lester

    2005-07-05

    Sample component separation apparatus and methods are described. An exemplary sample component separation apparatus includes a separation channel having a turn portion configured to reduce band-broadening caused by passage of a sample through the turn portion. To reduce band broadening caused by passage of a sample through a turn portion, the turn portion may be constructed and arranged to have a sample transport characteristic that is different from the corresponding sample transport characteristic of a substantially straight portion of the separation channel. For example, the turn portion may be configured with an effective channel width that is smaller than the effective channel widths of the substantially straight portion of the separation channel. The actual channel width of the turn portion may be smaller than the channel widths of the substantially straight portion; the effective channel width of the turn portion may be reduced by placing one or more sample transport barriers or constrictions in the turn portion of the channel. Alternatively, the sample velocity through the turn portion may be controlled so as to reduce band broadening. For example, sample transport barriers may be disposed in the turn portion so that sample components of a given band travel through the turn portion at substantially the same effective rate, whereby the band orientation remains substantially aligned along radial directions characteristic of the turn portion. Other a sample transport characteristics, such as electrical resistance or fluid flow resistance, of the turn portion may be adapted to reduce band broadening caused by passage of the sample through the turn portion.

  7. Neutralino relic density including coannihilations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Gondolo; Joakim Edsjo

    1997-11-25

    We give an overview of our precise calculation of the relic density of the lightest neutralino, in which we included relativistic Boltzmann averaging, subthreshold and resonant annihilations, and coannihilation processes with charginos and neutralinos.

  8. Office of Secure Transportation Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct...

  9. Hot gas path component cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

    2014-02-18

    A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

  10. Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.

    2007-10-01

    This report provides a detailed description of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) Meteorological Component. The Meteorological Component includes four surface meteorological stations, miniSODAR, laptop computers, and communications equipment. This report describes the equipment that is used, explains the operation of the network, and gives instructions for setting up the Component and replacing defective parts. A detailed description of operation and use of the individual sensors, including the data loggers is not covered in the current document, and the interested reader should refer to the manufacturer’s documentation.

  11. Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culkin, Gerald W.; Lawler, Desmond F.

    1991-01-01

    -averaged, unsteady particle transport were developed to approximate the size-dependent particle transport processes, which included advection, dispersion, and settling. Coupled exchange of discrete particles between the water column and sediment bed was modeled using...

  12. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-11-18

    Establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration, materials transportation and packaging and ensures the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and non-hazardous.

  13. Instantaneous symmetrical components 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salehfar, Hossein

    1984-01-01

    in faulted power systems, and to the study of the transient behavior of synchronous machines. iV Ky Family ACKNOWLEDGENENTS The author wishes Co express his sincere gracitude to his thesis advisor, Dr. A. K. Ayoub. Dr. Ayoub's guidance, encouragement... Three-Phase Systems XII. POWER SYSTEM TRANSIENT RESPONSE USING INSTANTANEOUS SYMMETRICAL COMPONENTS Nature of Short-Circuit currents Physical Interpretation of the Short- Circuit Phenomenon Use of Instantaneous Symmetrical Components Method I Lum...

  14. Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

  15. Transport, meiotic arrest, and biphasic maturation of canine oocytes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Carol Bailey McCormick

    2001-01-01

    factors regarding canine IVM, including in vitro oocyte transport conditions and oocyte arrest before IVM. Nine transport conditions were assessed for the ability to maintain oocyte viability during transport and subsequent in vitro culture. Whole...

  16. Development of three-dimensional passive components for power electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

    2005-01-01

    As component and power densities have increased, printed circuit boards (PCBs) have taken on additional functionality including heatsinking and forming constituent parts of electrical components. PCBs are not well suited ...

  17. Artificial oxygen transport protein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutton, P. Leslie

    2014-09-30

    This invention provides heme-containing peptides capable of binding molecular oxygen at room temperature. These compounds may be useful in the absorption of molecular oxygen from molecular oxygen-containing atmospheres. Also included in the invention are methods for treating an oxygen transport deficiency in a mammal.

  18. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Supersedes DOE M 460.2-1.

  19. Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boreo, Andrea; Li, Wei; Wunnenbuger, Douglas; Giusti, Cecilia; Cooper, John T.; Masterson, Jaimie

    2015-01-01

    Mobility throughout a community ensures freedom of movement and enhances quality of life. Traffic congestion, pollution, urban sprawl, social exclusion, safety and health can decrease mobility and should be a part of a sustainable transportation...

  20. electrifyingthefuture transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

  1. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  2. Method and apparatus for component separation using microwave energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN); Schechter, Donald E. (Ten Mile, TN); Calhoun, Jr., Clyde L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-04-03

    A method for separating and recovering components includes the steps of providing at least a first component bonded to a second component by a microwave absorbent adhesive bonding material at a bonding area to form an assembly, the bonding material disposed between the components. Microwave energy is directly and selectively applied to the assembly so that substantially only the bonding material absorbs the microwave energy until the bonding material is at a debonding state. A separation force is applied while the bonding material is at the debonding state to permit disengaging and recovering the components. In addition, an apparatus for practicing the method includes holders for the components.

  3. Magnetic Processing of Structural Components for Transportation Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G. M.; Fleming, S.; del Prado Villasana, J.

    2011-09-30

    The specific goal of this project was to develop and evaluate the effect of magnetic processing as a viable and new technology to manufacture side?rails for heavy trucks; and to demonstrate the applicability of this technology for an industrial truck/automotive process. The targeted performance enhancements for this project were to increase the hardness or strength of two families of alloys (comparable carbon contents but one alloy system incorporating hardenability improving additions of titanium and boron) by 15 to 20%. Thermomagnetic processing has been shown to make significant and unprecedented, simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength with no loss of ductility for the truck rail application investigated in this project. Improvements in the ultimate tensile strength and yield strength in the range 20 to 30% have been measured even for the lower hardenability alloy samples that only received a very low magnetic field tempering treatment at a tempering temperature that was 67% lower than the current non-magnetic field enhanced commercial process and for a brief tempering time of 20% of the time required in their current process at the higher temperature. These significant developments, that require further demonstration and investigation on current commercial and other alloy systems, promise the evolution of a much more energy efficient and lower-carbon footprint process to be used in the future to produce stronger, tougher, and lighter weight truck rails. The property increases in the truck rails themselves will enable lighter weight truck side-rails to be produced which will reduce the overall weight of heavy duty trucks which will reduce fuel consumption and be an enabler of the goals of the DOE EERE SuperTruck Program where fuel consumption reductions of 50% are targeted for the future generation of trucks.

  4. Arrangement of electron transport chain components in bovine mitochondrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the proton gradient for ATP synthesis, and assemble into a supercomplex. A 19-A° 3D map of the 1.7-MDa.2011.324; Published online 9 September 2011 Subject Categories: cellular metabolism; structural biology out of the matrix across the inner membrane. The resulting proton gradient powers the synthesis of ATP

  5. Components in the Pipeline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorton, Ian; Wynne, Adam S.; Liu, Yan; Yin, Jian

    2011-02-24

    Scientists commonly describe their data processing systems metaphorically as software pipelines. These pipelines input one or more data sources and apply a sequence of processing steps to transform the data and create useful results. While conceptually simple, pipelines often adopt complex topologies and must meet stringent quality of service requirements that place stress on the software infrastructure used to construct the pipeline. In this paper we describe the MeDICi Integration Framework, which is a component-based framework for constructing complex software pipelines. The framework supports composing pipelines from distributed heterogeneous software components and provides mechanisms for controlling qualities of service to meet demanding performance, reliability and communication requirements.

  6. Transportation Packages to Support Savannah River Site Missions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opperman, E.

    2001-08-20

    The Savannah River Site's missions have expanded from primarily a defense mission to one that includes environmental cleanup and the stabilization, storage, and preparation for final disposition of nuclear materials. The development of packaging and the transportation of radioactive materials are playing an ever-increasing role in the successful completion of the site's missions. This paper describes the Savannah River Site and the three strategic mission areas of (1) nuclear materials stewardship, (2) environmental stewardship, and (3) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship. The materials and components that need to be shipped, and associated packaging, will be described for each of the mission areas. The diverse range of materials requiring shipment include spent fuel, irradiated target assemblies, excess plutonium and uranium materials, high level waste canisters, transuranic wastes, mixed and low level wastes, and nuclear weapons stockpile materials and components. Since many of these materials have been in prolonged storage or resulted from disassembly of components, the composition, size and shape of the materials present packaging and certification challenges that need to be met. Over 30 different package designs are required to support the site's missions. Approximately 15 inbound shipping-legs transport materials into the Savannah River Site and the same number (15) of outgoing shipment-legs are carrying materials from the site for further processing or permanent disposal.

  7. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

  8. Friction welded battery component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, G.K.; Zagrodnik, J.P.

    1990-07-31

    This patent describes a battery component for use in a flow battery containing fluid electrolyte. It comprises: first and second bond ribs disposed on opposite sides of and defining a channel and respective primary flash traps disposed adjacent the bond ribs opposite the channel.

  9. Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN) [Greenback, TN; Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-01-05

    A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover definining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to an extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivitization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

  10. Microfluidic structures and methods for integrating a functional component into a microfluidic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simmons, Blake (San Francisco, CA); Domeier, Linda (Danville, CA); Woo, Noble (San Gabriet, CA); Shepodd, Timothy (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    2008-04-01

    Injection molding is used to form microfluidic devices with integrated functional components. One or more functional components are placed in a mold cavity which is then closed. Molten thermoplastic resin is injected into the mold and then cooled, thereby forming a solid substrate including the functional component(s). The solid substrate including the functional component(s) is then bonded to a second substrate which may include microchannels or other features.

  11. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

    1996-01-16

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

  12. Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

    1996-01-01

    Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

  13. Micro-fabrication Techniques for Target Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, R; Hamilton, J; Crawford, J; Ratti, S; Trevino, J; Graff, T; Stockton, C; Harvey, C

    2008-06-10

    Micro-fabrication techniques, derived from the semi-conductor industry, can be used to make a variety of useful mechanical components for targets. A selection of these components including supporting cooling arms for prototype cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets, stepped and graded density targets for materials dynamics experiments are described. Micro-fabrication enables cost-effective, simultaneous fabrication of multiple high-precision components with complex geometries. Micro-fabrication techniques such as thin-film deposition, photo-lithographic patterning and etch processes normally used in the semi-conductor manufacture industry, can be exploited to make useful mechanical target components. Micro-fabrication processes have in recent years been used to create a number of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) components such as pressure sensors, accelerometers, ink jet printer heads, microfluidics platforms and the like. These techniques consist primarily of deposition of thin films of material, photo-lithographic patterning and etching processes performed sequentially to produce three dimensional structures using essentially planar processes. While the planar technology can be limiting in terms of the possible geometries of the final product, advantages of using these techniques include the ability to make multiple complex structures simultaneously and cost-effectively. Target components fabricated using these techniques include the supporting cooling arms for cryogenic prototype fusion ignition targets, stepped targets for equation-of-state experiments, and graded density reservoirs for material strength experiments.

  14. Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koon, Wang Sang

    Transport in Dynamical Astronomy and Multibody Problems Michael Dellnitz, Oliver Junge, Wang Sang key dynamical features, including almost invariant sets, resonance regions as well as transport rates of these different numerical tools and their applicability. In particular, we compute transport rates between two

  15. Energetic component treatability study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gildea, P.D.; Brandon, S.L.; Brown, B.G. [and others

    1997-11-01

    The effectiveness of three environmentally sound processes for small energetic component disposal was examined experimentally in this study. The three destruction methods, batch reactor supercritical water oxidation, sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff were selected based on their potential for producing a clean solid residue and minimum release of toxic gases after component detonation. The explosive hazard was destroyed by all three processes. Batch supercritical water oxidation destroyed both the energetics and organics. Further development is desired to optimize process parameters. Sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff results indicated the potential for scrubbing gaseous detonation products. Further study and testing are needed to quantify the effectiveness of these later two processes for full-scale munition destruction. The preliminary experiments completed in this study have demonstrated the promise of these three processes as environmentally sound technologies for energetic component destruction. Continuation of these experimental programs is strongly recommended to optimize batch supercritical water oxidation processing, and to fully develop the sodium hydroxide base hydrolysis and calcium carbonate cookoff technologies.

  16. Generic theory of colloidal transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Julicher; Jacques Prost

    2008-12-16

    We discuss the motion of colloidal particles relative to a two component fluid consisting of solvent and solute. Particle motion can result from (i) net body forces on the particle due to external fields such as gravity; (ii) slip velocities on the particle surface due to surface dissipative phenomena. The perturbations of the hydrodynamic flow field exhibits characteristic differences in cases (i) and (ii) which reflect different patterns of momentum flux corresponding to the existence of net forces, force dipoles or force quadrupoles. In the absence of external fields, gradients of concentration or pressure do not generate net forces on a colloidal particle. Such gradients can nevertheless induce relative motion between particle and fluid. We present a generic description of surface dissipative phenomena based on the linear response of surface fluxes driven by conjugate surface forces. In this framework we discuss different transport scenarios including self-propulsion via surface slip that is induced by active processes on the particle surface. We clarify the nature of force balances in such situations.

  17. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osterman, Robert A. (Canonsburg, PA); Cox, Robert (West Mifflin, PA)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  18. Dualmode transportation - impact on the electric grid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azcarate Lara, Francisco Javier

    2008-10-10

    with numerous challenges including traffic congestion, environmental pollution, safety and energy dependence. Texas particularly, has a challenge to grow transportation capacity at a pace adequate to meet the demand driven by population increases. The Texas... the most cost effective energy source for transportation. Cleaner alternatives do not have access to the transportation market. This thesis follows the style of the Journal of the Transportation Research Record. 2 On the safety front...

  19. #include #include

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Christoph

    ] (where a[n] = +infty). C's * bsearch() can't be used, it requires a[j]==key. */ int findloc( void *key Combine­CRCW BSP­Quicksort * variant by Gerbessiotis/Valiant JPDC 22(1994) * implemented in NestStep­C. */ int N=10; // default value /** findloc(): find largest index j in [0..n­1] with * a[j

  20. Preface: Nonclassical Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolshov, L.

    2010-01-01

    models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

  1. Intelligent Transport Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

  2. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

  3. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transportation Safety Home Stationary Power Nuclear Fuel Cycle Nuclear Energy Safety Technologies Risk and Safety Assessment Transportation Safety Transportation SafetyTara...

  4. Data transmission element for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2006-01-31

    A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

  5. Stationary turbine component with laminated skin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-08-14

    A stationary turbine engine component, such as a turbine vane, includes a internal spar and an external skin. The internal spar is made of a plurality of spar laminates, and the external skin is made of a plurality of skin laminates. The plurality of skin laminates interlockingly engage the plurality of spar laminates such that the external skin is located and held in place. This arrangement allows alternative high temperature materials to be used on turbine engine components in areas where their properties are needed without having to make the entire component out of such material. Thus, the manufacturing difficulties associated with making an entire component of such a material and the attendant high costs are avoided. The skin laminates can be made of advanced generation single crystal superalloys, intermetallics and refractory alloys.

  6. Progress in photovoltaic system and component improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, H.P.; Kroposki, B.; McNutt, P.; Witt, C.E.; Bower, W.; Bonn, R.; Hund, T.D.

    1998-07-01

    The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project is a partnership between the US government (through the US Department of Energy [DOE]) and the PV industry. Part of its purpose is to conduct manufacturing technology research and development to address the issues and opportunities identified by industry to advance photovoltaic (PV) systems and components. The project was initiated in 1990 and has been conducted in several phases to support the evolution of PV industrial manufacturing technology. Early phases of the project stressed PV module manufacturing. Starting with Phase 4A and continuing in Phase 5A, the goals were broadened to include improvement of component efficiency, energy storage and manufacturing and system or component integration to bring together all elements for a PV product. This paper summarizes PV manufacturers` accomplishments in components, system integration, and alternative manufacturing methods. Their approaches have resulted in improved hardware and PV system performance, better system compatibility, and new system capabilities. Results include new products such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL)-listed AC PV modules, modular inverters, and advanced inverter designs that use readily available and standard components. Work planned in Phase 5A1 includes integrated residential and commercial roof-top systems, PV systems with energy storage, and 300-Wac to 4-kWac inverters.

  7. Microelectromechanical components in electrical metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manninen, Antti; Pesonen, Nadine; Oja, Aarne; Seppa, Heikki

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) can offer a competitive alternative for conventional technology in electrical precision measurements. This article summarises recent work in development of MEMS solutions for electrical metrology. MEMS-based voltage references, RMS-to-DC converters, high frequency power sensors, and reference oscillators are discussed. The main principle of operation of the components is the balance between electrical forces and mechanical spring forces in micromachined silicon structures. In RMS sensors and RMS-to-DC converters, the quadratic voltage dependence of the force between plates of a moving-plate capacitor is utilised, and the operation of the MEMS voltage reference is based on the pull-in phenomenon of a moving-plate capacitor. Advantages of MEMS devices compared to more conventional solutions include small size, low power consumption, low price in mass production, and stability. The drift caused by electrostatic charging effects has turned out to be a major problem. This prob...

  8. Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phil WInston

    2011-09-01

    A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  9. Sprayed skin turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, David B

    2013-06-04

    Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

  10. General Car Use Policies Ground Transportation Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    contracts with several transportation companies which include shuttle services and private sedans. The complete listing of these companies is available at the RU travel website http is intended to cover all operating costs including depreciation, repairs, gasoline, insurance, towage

  11. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS A Research Summary for Decision Makers Edited by Joan Ogden and Lorraine Anderson #12;SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS #12;SUSTAINABLE;6 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS #12;1 SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORTATION ENERGY PATHWAYS

  12. Microwave heat treating of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2007-01-09

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  13. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-González, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  14. Conversion of geothermal waste to commercial products including silica

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A process for the treatment of geothermal residue includes contacting the pigmented amorphous silica-containing component with a depigmenting reagent one or more times to depigment the silica and produce a mixture containing depigmented amorphous silica and depigmenting reagent containing pigment material; separating the depigmented amorphous silica and from the depigmenting reagent to yield depigmented amorphous silica. Before or after the depigmenting contacting, the geothermal residue or depigmented silica can be treated with a metal solubilizing agent to produce another mixture containing pigmented or unpigmented amorphous silica-containing component and a solubilized metal-containing component; separating these components from each other to produce an amorphous silica product substantially devoid of metals and at least partially devoid of pigment. The amorphous silica product can be neutralized and thereafter dried at a temperature from about 25.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. The morphology of the silica product can be varied through the process conditions including sequence contacting steps, pH of depigmenting reagent, neutralization and drying conditions to tailor the amorphous silica for commercial use in products including filler for paint, paper, rubber and polymers, and chromatographic material.

  15. Beam Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintockSecurityBeam Transport Beam

  16. Stochastic Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541C.3X-rays3 Prepared by:'!Transport in PPCD Discharges by

  17. Greening Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSC GettingGraphene's 3DGreenGreenTransportation

  18. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

  19. A publication of the Airport Technical Assistance Program of the Center for Transportation Studies at the University of Minnesota Winter 2014 Vol. 14, No. 1 For more on the Fall Forum, including video highlights, see www.AirTAP.umn.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    at the University of Minnesota Winter 2014 Vol. 14, No. 1 Briefings For more on the Fall Forum, including video department. That full-time staff is augmented with 28 heavy equipment operators in the winter who work got a look at how the airport handles the snow and ice that's part of a typical Minnesota winter

  20. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  1. Parallel Transports in Webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Fleischhack

    2003-07-17

    For connected reductive linear algebraic structure groups it is proven that every web is holonomically isolated. The possible tuples of parallel transports in a web form a Lie subgroup of the corresponding power of the structure group. This Lie subgroup is explicitly calculated and turns out to be independent of the chosen local trivializations. Moreover, explicit necessary and sufficient criteria for the holonomical independence of webs are derived. The results above can even be sharpened: Given an arbitrary neighbourhood of the base points of a web, then this neighbourhood contains some segments of the web whose parameter intervals coincide, but do not include 0 (that corresponds to the base points of the web), and whose parallel transports already form the same Lie subgroup as those of the full web do.

  2. Data Transmission System For A Downhole Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

    2005-01-18

    The invention is a system for transmitting data through a string of downhole components. In accordance with one aspect of the invention, the system includes a plurality of downhole components, such as sections of pipe in a drill string. Each component has a first and second end, with a first communication element located at the first end and a second communication element located at the second end. Each communication element includes a first contact and a second contact. The system also includes a coaxial cable running between the first and second communication elements, the coaxial cable having a conductive tube and a conductive core within it. The system also includes a first and second connector for connecting the first and second communication elements respectively to the coaxial cable. Each connector includes a conductive sleeve, lying concentrically within the conductive tube, which fits around and makes electrical contact with the conductive core. The conductive sleeve is electrically isolated from the conductive tube. The conductive sleeve of the first connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the first communication element, the conductive sleeve of the second connector is in electrical contact with the first contact of the second communication element, and the conductive tube is in electrical contact with both the second contact of the first communication element and the second contact of the second communication element.

  3. Transport in holographic superfluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Nir Lisker; Piotr Surowka; Amos Yarom

    2011-01-17

    We construct a slowly varying space-time dependent holographic superfluid and compute its transport coefficients. Our solution is presented as a series expansion in inverse powers of the charge of the order parameter. We find that the shear viscosity associated with the motion of the condensate vanishes. The diffusion coefficient of the superfluid is continuous across the phase transition while its third bulk viscosity is found to diverge at the critical temperature. As was previously shown, the ratio of the shear viscosity of the normal component to the entropy density is 1/(4 pi). As a consequence of our analysis we obtain an analytic expression for the backreacted metric near the phase transition for a particular type of holographic superfluid.

  4. Turbine engine component with cooling passages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arrell, Douglas J. (Oviedo, FL); James, Allister W. (Orlando, FL)

    2012-01-17

    A component for use in a turbine engine including a first member and a second member associated with the first member. The second member includes a plurality of connecting elements extending therefrom. The connecting elements include securing portions at ends thereof that are received in corresponding cavities formed in the first member to attach the second member to the first member. The connecting elements are constructed to space apart a first surface of the second member from a first surface of the first member such that at least one cooling passage is formed between adjacent connecting elements and the first surface of the second member and the first surface of the first member.

  5. Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for biodiesel components methyl stearate and methyl oleate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional;1. Introduction Biofuels have the potential to supplement conventional petroleumbased transportation fuels emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons, and soot [14]. The principal components of both soy and rapeseed

  6. Vapor Transport in Dry Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2001-11-16

    Water-vapor movement in soils is a complex process, controlled by both diffusion and advection and influenced by pressure and thermal gradients acting across tortuous flow paths. Wide-ranging interest in water-vapor transport includes both theoretical and practical aspects. Just how pressure and thermal gradients enhance water-vapor flow is still not completely understood and subject to ongoing research. Practical aspects include dryland farming (surface mulching), water harvesting (aerial wells), fertilizer placement, and migration of contaminants at waste-sites. The following article describes the processes and practical applications of water-vapor transport, with emphasis on unsaturated (dry) soil systems.

  7. Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    APPETIZERS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen tablecloths for the food tables.ucdavis.edu. BUTTERNUT SQUASH & BLACK BEAN ENCHILADAS #12;BUFFETS Prices include compostable serviceware and linen

  8. Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data Book,Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and VT Fact of the Week Transportation Data Programs:Transportation Energy Data...

  9. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  10. The Implementation of Photon Polarization into the Mercury Transport Code 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Windsor, Ethan

    2014-06-04

    Polarization effects have been ignored in most photon transport codes to date, but new technology has created a need for portable, massively parallel, versatile transport codes that include the effects of polarization. In ...

  11. Risk Assessment Techniques and Survey Method for COTS Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rashmi

    2012-01-01

    The Rational Unified Process a software engineering process is gaining popularity nowadays. RUP delivers best software practices for component software Development life cycle It supports component based software development. Risk is involved in every component development phase .neglecting those risks sometimes hampers the software growth and leads to negative outcome. In Order to provide appropriate security and protection levels, identifying various risks is very vital. Therefore Risk identification plays a very crucial role in the component based software development This report addresses incorporation of component based software development cycle into RUP phases, assess several category of risk encountered in the component based software. It also entails a survey method to identify the risk factor and evaluating the overall severity of the component software development in terms of the risk. Formula for determining risk prevention cost and finding the risk probability is also been included. The overall go...

  12. Erosion and Optimal Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

  13. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  14. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

  15. Defining Change Management Properties for Component Interoperability Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, R. F.

    1 Defining Change Management Properties for Component Interoperability Assessment T. Gamble R In this paper, we leverage software architecture analysis techniques to codify change management properties is to extend component-based systems analysis to include change management concerns so that clearer designs

  16. Fuel and fuel blending components from biomass derived pyrolysis oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCall, Michael J.; Brandvold, Timothy A.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2012-12-11

    A process for the conversion of biomass derived pyrolysis oil to liquid fuel components is presented. The process includes the production of diesel, aviation, and naphtha boiling point range fuels or fuel blending components by two-stage deoxygenation of the pyrolysis oil and separation of the products.

  17. 1 Computer Architecture hardware components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Computer Architecture hardware components programming environments 2 Getting Started January 2015 Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) Computer Architecture L-2 14 January 2015 1 / 23 #12;Computer Architecture Hardware & Software A computer system consists of 1 Hardware: physical components

  18. Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saikin, Semion

    Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics Yuriy V. Pershin,1,2 Semion Saikin1 spintronic device modeling. These include drift-diffusion models, kinetic transport equations and Monte Carlo in semiconductor structures have moved the state of the art closer to the realiza- tion of novel spintronic devices

  19. Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Privman, Vladimir

    Semiclassical Transport Models for Semiconductor Spintronics Yuriy V. Pershin,1,2 Semion Saikin1 spintronic device modeling. These include drift-diffusion models, kinetic transport equations and Monte Carlo in semiconductor structures have moved the state of the art closer to the realization of novel spintronic devices

  20. Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-12-22

    The Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for management of Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), materials transportation and packaging to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials, both hazardous and nonhazardous. Cancels DOE O 460.2 and DOE O 460.2 Chg 1

  1. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  2. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Elton J.; Hietbrink, Earl H.

    1981-01-01

    This section includes some historical background of the rise and fall and subsequent rebirth of the electric vehicle; and a brief discussion of current transportation needs, and environmental and energy utilization issues that resulted in the renewed interest in applying electrochemical energy conversion technology to electric vehicle applications. Although energy utilization has evolved to be the most significant and important issue, the environmental issue will be discussed first in this section only because of its chronological occurrence. The next part of the chapter is a review of passenger and commercial electric vehicle technology with emphasis on vehicle design and demonstrated performance of vehicles with candidate power sources being developed. This is followed by a discussion of electrochemical power source requirements associated with future electric vehicles that can play a role in meeting modern transportation needs. The last part of the chapter includes first a discussion of how to identify candidate electrochemical systems that might be of interest in meeting electric vehicle power source requirements. This is then followed by a review of the current technological status of these systems and a discussion of the most significant problems that must be resolved before each candidate system can be a viable power source.

  3. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, C.M. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  4. Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent, Multiphase H2O Systems of Planetary Interest, cryogenic systems, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, clathrates, Mars, Enceladus, sound speed Abstract Heat of the noncondensible components can greatly alter the thermodynamic properties of the phases and their flow properties

  5. FLUKA: A Multi-Particle Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.; /CERN /INFN, Milan; Fasso, A.; /SLAC; Ranft, J.; /Siegen U.

    2005-12-14

    This report describes the 2005 version of the Fluka particle transport code. The first part introduces the basic notions, describes the modular structure of the system, and contains an installation and beginner's guide. The second part complements this initial information with details about the various components of Fluka and how to use them. It concludes with a detailed history and bibliography.

  6. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  7. Transportation Electrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendeman, Lawrence; Crouch, Alan

    2013-12-17

    This project has accomplished the following objectives: to address the critical need for technician training in new and emerging propulsion technologies by developing new courses, including information and training on electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel cell vehicles; to integrate the new certificate with the existing Associate of Applied Science Degree and Certificate automotive degrees; to disseminate these leading edge courses throughout the Commonwealth of Virginia and neighboring Mid-Atlantic States; and to provide training opportunities for displaced workers and underrepresented populations seeking careers in the automotive industry.

  8. Coal Transportation Issues (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Most of the coal delivered to U.S. consumers is transported by railroads, which accounted for 64% of total domestic coal shipments in 2004. Trucks transported approximately 12% of the coal consumed in the United States in 2004, mainly in short hauls from mines in the East to nearby coal-fired electricity and industrial plants. A number of minemouth power plants in the West also use trucks to haul coal from adjacent mining operations. Other significant modes of coal transportation in 2004 included conveyor belt and slurry pipeline (12%) and water transport on inland waterways, the Great Lakes, and tidewater areas (9%).

  9. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  10. Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2005-2030 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Midland-Odessa Transportation Organization

    2004-12-08

    This study evaluated the effect of typical production practices during transport of cattle on the resulting incidence of pathogenic bacteria in cattle and their resulting carcasses. Various factors, including type of animal, body condition score...

  11. Megacities : sustainability, transport, and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias, Justin Charles, 1980-

    2005-01-01

    The connections between sustainability, transport, and economic development are and will remain essential in the governance of cities. Sustainability concepts include valuing and preserving the earth's resources so that ...

  12. Multiphase transport model for relativistic nuclear collisions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, B.; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba; Lin, ZW.

    2000-01-01

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. ...

  13. innovation.asu.edu air transportation management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovation.asu.edu air transportation management aeronautical management technology the polytechnic school #12;undergraduate degree program B.S., aeronautical management technology, concentration in air in Aeronautical Management Technology, provides students with a strong foundation of aviation concepts, including

  14. Transport Equations Thomas Hillen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillen, Thomas

    Transport Equations Thomas Hillen supported by NSERC University of Alberta, Edmonton Transport V , V compact and symmetric. Transport Equations ­ p.2/33 #12;Directed Movement The equation pt(t, x of v. Transport Equations ­ p.3/33 #12;With Directional Changes µ: turning rate. T(v, v ): probability

  15. Motor Transport Co. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    METROPOLITAN TRANSPORTATION PLAN Prepared by: The Longview Metropolitan Planning Organization In cooperation with: o City of Longview o City of White Oak o Gregg County o Harrison County o Texas Department of Transportation o U.S. Department... of Transportation o Federal Highway Administration o Federal Transit Administration Adopted November 12, 2009 TRANSPORTATION 2035 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION...

  16. Investigations into High Temperature Components and Packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlino, L.D.; Seiber, L.E.; Scudiere, M.B.; M.S. Chinthavali, M.S.; McCluskey, F.P.

    2007-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document the work that was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the development of high temperature power electronics and components with monies remaining from the Semikron High Temperature Inverter Project managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). High temperature electronic components are needed to allow inverters to operate in more extreme operating conditions as required in advanced traction drive applications. The trend to try to eliminate secondary cooling loops and utilize the internal combustion (IC) cooling system, which operates with approximately 105 C water/ethylene glycol coolant at the output of the radiator, is necessary to further reduce vehicle costs and weight. The activity documented in this report includes development and testing of high temperature components, activities in support of high temperature testing, an assessment of several component packaging methods, and how elevated operating temperatures would impact their reliability. This report is organized with testing of new high temperature capacitors in Section 2 and testing of new 150 C junction temperature trench insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBTs) in Section 3. Section 4 addresses some operational OPAL-GT information, which was necessary for developing module level tests. Section 5 summarizes calibration of equipment needed for the high temperature testing. Section 6 details some additional work that was funded on silicon carbide (SiC) device testing for high temperature use, and Section 7 is the complete text of a report funded from this effort summarizing packaging methods and their reliability issues for use in high temperature power electronics. Components were tested to evaluate the performance characteristics of the component at different operating temperatures. The temperature of the component is determined by the ambient temperature (i.e., temperature surrounding the device) plus the temperature increase inside the device due the internal heat that is generated due to conduction and switching losses. Capacitors and high current switches that are reliable and meet performance specifications over an increased temperature range are necessary to realize electronics needed for hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs), fuel cell (FC) and plug-in HEVs (PHEVs). In addition to individual component level testing, it is necessary to evaluate and perform long term module level testing to ascertain the effects of high temperature operation on power electronics.

  17. Effectiveness-weighted control of cooling system components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Levi A.; Chu, Richard C.; David, Milnes P.; Ellsworth Jr., Michael J.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Simmons, Robert E.

    2015-12-22

    Energy efficient control of cooling system cooling of an electronic system is provided based, in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components. The control includes automatically determining speed control settings for multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The automatically determining is based, at least in part, on weighted cooling effectiveness of the components of the cooling system, and the determining operates to limit power consumption of at least the cooling system, while ensuring that a target temperature associated with at least one of the cooling system or the electronic system is within a desired range by provisioning, based on the weighted cooling effectiveness, a desired target temperature change among the multiple adjustable cooling components of the cooling system. The provisioning includes provisioning applied power to the multiple adjustable cooling components via, at least in part, the determined control settings.

  18. Automating component reuse and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Perry; Morel, B.

    2004-09-01

    framework for automating specification-based component retrieval and adaptation that has been successfully applied to synthesis of software for embedded and digital signal processing systems. Using specifications to abstractly represent implementations...

  19. SATURATED ZONE FLOW AND TRANSPORT MODEL ABSTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.W. ARNOLD

    2004-10-27

    The purpose of the saturated zone (SZ) flow and transport model abstraction task is to provide radionuclide-transport simulation results for use in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for license application (LA) calculations. This task includes assessment of uncertainty in parameters that pertain to both groundwater flow and radionuclide transport in the models used for this purpose. This model report documents the following: (1) The SZ transport abstraction model, which consists of a set of radionuclide breakthrough curves at the accessible environment for use in the TSPA-LA simulations of radionuclide releases into the biosphere. These radionuclide breakthrough curves contain information on radionuclide-transport times through the SZ. (2) The SZ one-dimensional (I-D) transport model, which is incorporated in the TSPA-LA model to simulate the transport, decay, and ingrowth of radionuclide decay chains in the SZ. (3) The analysis of uncertainty in groundwater-flow and radionuclide-transport input parameters for the SZ transport abstraction model and the SZ 1-D transport model. (4) The analysis of the background concentration of alpha-emitting species in the groundwater of the SZ.

  20. Introduction Transport in disordered graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Ballistic transport in disordered graphene P, Gornyi, Mirlin Ballistic transport in disordered graphene #12;Introduction Transport in disordered graphene Summary Outline 1 Introduction Model Experimental motivation Transport in clean graphene 2

  1. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

    2004-09-30

    The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

  2. Application of the smart portal in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Baylor, V.M.; Dress, W.B.; Hickerson, T.W.; Jatko, W.B.; Labaj, L.E.; Muhs, J.D.; Pack, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Under a program sponsored by the Department of Energy, the Oak Ridge complex is developed a ``Portal-of-the-Future``, or ``smart portal``. This is a security portal for vehicular traffic which is intended to quickly detect explosives, hidden passengers, etc. It uses several technologies, including microwaves, weigh-in-motion, digital image processing, and electroacoustic wavelet-based heartbeat detection. A novel component of particular interest is the Enclosed Space Detection System (ESDS), which detects the presence of persons hiding in a vehicle. The system operates by detecting the presence of a human ballistocardiographic signature. Each time the heart beats, it generates a small but measurable shock wave that propagates through the body. The wave, whose graph is called a ballistocardiogram, is the mechanical analog of the electrocardiogram, which is routinely used for medical diagnosis. The wave is, in turn, coupled to any surface or object with which the body is in contact. If the body is located in an enclosed space, this will result in a measurable deflection of the surface of the enclosure. Independent testing has shown ESDS to be highly reliable. The technologies used in the smart portal operate in real time and allow vehicles to be checked through the portal in much less time than would be required for human inspection. Although not originally developed for commercial transportation, the smart portal has the potential to solve several transportation problems. It could relieve congestion at international highway border crossings by reducing the time required to inspect each vehicle while increasing the level of security. It can reduce highway congestion at the entrance of secure facilities such as prisons. Also, it could provide security at intermodal transfer points, such as airport parking lots and car ferry terminals.

  3. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  4. INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interval technical basis document Chiaro, P.J. Jr. 44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; RADIATION DETECTORS; RADIATION MONITORS; DOSEMETERS;...

  5. Methods of producing transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

    2011-12-27

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

  6. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  7. Radiation transport. Progress report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the first half of FY 83 is reported. Included are tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transport.

  8. TTP 220 Transportation Planning and Policy Spring 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Susan L.

    and the multitude of problems that come with it ­ economic inefficiencies, poor air quality, other environmental-range transportation plans, transportation improvement programs, air quality conformity, project development, travel on a variety of demand-side strategies for addressing regional transportation problems, including pricing

  9. Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Components and Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Minihan; Ed Schmidt; Greg Enserro; Melissa Thompson

    2008-06-30

    The purpose of the project was to develop the processes for using commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts for WR production and to put in place a system for implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. Much of the effort was devoted to determining if the use of COTS parts was possible. A basic question: How does the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) begin to use COTS in the weapon Stockpile Life Extension Programs with high reliability, affordability, while managing risk at acceptable levels? In FY00, it was determined that a certain weapon refurbishment program could not be accomplished without the use of COTS components. The elements driving the use of COTS components included decreased cost, greater availability, and shorter delivery time. Key factors that required implementation included identifying the best suppliers and components, defining life cycles and predictions of obsolescence, testing the feasibility of using COTS components with a test contractor to ensure capability, as well as quality and reliability, and implementing the data management tools required to disseminate, store, track procurement, and qualify vendors. The primary effort of this project then was to concentrate on the risks involved in the use of COTS and address the issues of part and vendor selection, procurement and acceptance processes, and qualification of the parts via part and sample testing. The Enterprise Component Information System (eCIS) was used to manage the information generated by the COTS process. eCIS is a common interface for both the design and production of NWC components and systems integrating information between SNL National Laboratory (SNL) and the Kansas City Plant (KCP). The implementation of COTS components utilizes eCIS from part selection through qualification release. All part related data is linked across an unclassified network for access by both SNL and KCP personnel. The system includes not only NWC part information but also includes technical reference data for over 25 Million electronic and electromechanical commercial and military parts via a data subscription. With the capabilities added to the system through this project, eCIS provides decision support, parts list/BOM analysis, editing, tracking, workflows, reporting, and history/legacy information integrating manufacturer reference, company technical, company business, and design data.

  10. Heat transport system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harkness, Samuel D. (McMurray, PA)

    1982-01-01

    A falling bed of ceramic particles receives neutron irradiation from a neutron-producing plasma and thereby transports energy as heat from the plasma to a heat exchange location where the ceramic particles are cooled by a gas flow. The cooled ceramic particles are elevated to a location from which they may again pass by gravity through the region where they are exposed to neutron radiation. Ceramic particles of alumina, magnesia, silica and combinations of these materials are contemplated as high-temperature materials that will accept energy from neutron irradiation. Separate containers of material incorporating lithium are exposed to the neutron flux for the breeding of tritium that may subsequently be used in neutron-producing reactions. The falling bed of ceramic particles includes velocity partitioning between compartments near to the neutron-producing plasma and compartments away from the plasma to moderate the maximum temperature in the bed.

  11. Secure Transportation Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, P. W.

    2014-10-15

    Secure Transport Management Course (STMC) course provides managers with information related to procedures and equipment used to successfully transport special nuclear material. This workshop outlines these procedures and reinforces the information presented with the aid of numerous practical examples. The course focuses on understanding the regulatory framework for secure transportation of special nuclear materials, identifying the insider and outsider threat(s) to secure transportation, organization of a secure transportation unit, management and supervision of secure transportation units, equipment and facilities required, training and qualification needed.

  12. Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Water Transport Within the STack: Water Transport Exploratory Studies Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE...

  13. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  14. Method of making low work function component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, Vance (Niskayuna, NY); Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Michael, Joseph Darryl (Delmar, NY)

    2011-11-15

    A method for fabricating a component is disclosed. The method includes: providing a member having an effective work function of an initial value, disposing a sacrificial layer on a surface of the member, disposing a first agent within the member to obtain a predetermined concentration of the agent at said surface of the member, annealing the member, and removing the sacrificial layer to expose said surface of the member, wherein said surface has a post-process effective work function that is different from the initial value.

  15. Course may include: Research in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Course may include: Research in Education Statistics in Education Theories of Educational Admin Policy Analysis Sociological Aspects of Education Approaches to Literacy Development Information and Communication Technologies Issues in Education Final Project Seminar Master of Education Educational

  16. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  17. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  18. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  19. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  20. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Canceled by DOE 460.1A

  1. Sustainability and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2006-01-01

    also known there as sustainable mobility. This de?nition wasfor De?ning Sustainable Transport and Mobility. [cited 13Sustainable transporta- tion is de?ned as a means to satisfy current transport and mobility

  2. Linear Motor Powered Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Richard D.

    This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

  3. Transportation Conference Speakers - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Laboratory experiments were performed to study and improve longshore sediment transport rate predictions. Measured total longshore transport in the laboratory was approximately three times greater for plunging breakers than spilling breakers. Three...

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Transportation accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum consumption and 33% of total greenhouse gas emissions. The Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) study examines underexplored oil-savings and...

  5. Transportation Market Distortions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litman, Todd

    2006-01-01

    roads and parking facilities is exempt from rent and taxes,road transport relative to rail (which pays rent and taxesroad tolls, parking fees, and Litman, Transportation Market Distortions higher fuel taxes

  6. Introduction to Transportation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 of City & Metropolitan Planning; Associate Dean, College of Architecture + Planning; former associate, social equity, fiscal health, and public health. Unfortunately, most transportation planning processes

  7. Transportation Conference Speakers - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Thiamin transport in Escherichia coli is a model system to establish the tolerance of derivatives for transport into the cell. Since little is known about what types of thiamin derivatives may be successfully taken into the cell through...

  8. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-27

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials andor modal transport. Cancels DOE 1540.2 and DOE 5480.3

  9. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-10-02

    Establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1.

  10. Biofuels and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

  11. Application of European Large Component Technology in the United States - 12561

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Perry [Studsvik Processing Facility Memphis, Memphis, TN, 38113 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The European nuclear community currently has safer, more environmentally-friendly disposal options for large component disposal than the United States. The technology and innovation that makes these options viable will soon be available stateside. The removal and replacement of steam generators is a large and complicated task making volume reduction a vital service for the nuclear power industry. As plants age, the replacement of certain components is required in order to maintain plant efficiency and public safety. Currently in the United States, there are 3 options for the disposal of these items including: on-site storage, direct-disposal at a licensed (low-level radioactive waste) LLWR site, and volume reduction prior to disposal. If today's nuclear plants are to be used by future generations, waste stored on-site will eventually have to be disposed of to make room for newer, more advanced technology. Also, the space at LLWR disposal sites is finite, so all waste sent for disposal should be minimized whenever possible. Reducing the volume of decommissioned steam generators prior to final disposal shows the public that the nuclear industry is doing everything that it can to minimize its waste and conserve the environment. Additionally, many steam generators are massive and are not easily transported to a disposal site. When there is no practical transportation route, the size and weight of the component must be reduced. For various reasons including public safety, cost, and technical expertise, size reduction cannot be practically performed at the site of generation. However, since most facilities have some kind of access to a waterway, the components can be safely transported to another facility with barge access for size reduction. The size reduction process for steam generators has evolved over the past 5 years. Because of reductions to the amount of final waste, the dose to personnel, and the processing time, it is now an environmentally and economically friendly alternative to on-site storage and direct disposal. The major operations of this process include: - removal of the carbon steel steam generator dome; - removal of the channel head and majority of tube sheet to free the tubes from the tube sheet and gain access to all of the tubes for grit blasting; - grit blast decontamination of the steam generator tubes to allow disassembly; - removal of the U-Bend Section of the tubes to allow for tube pulling - tube pulling operations; - disassembly of the remainder of the steam generator shell and tube support assemblies; - size reduction of the steam generator resultant materials. All of the equipment for the American market is based on previous designs but has been adapted to meet the size requirements for processing of larger steam generators. This includes a large horizontal band saw, a tube pulling machine, tube blasting equipment, and a diamond wire saw frame. (authors)

  12. Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-12-01

    Fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of Indianapolis Public Transportation Corporation's (IndyGo's) hybrid electric buses.

  13. Updated July 2014 PROGRAM COMPONENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    with a Student Affairs administrator and meet at least three times per semester. Students learn from mentors what in various activities. Learning occurs in different ways and through different avenues, therefore it is important to complete all of the following components: RETREATS are all day interactive activities focused

  14. Parking & Transportation Services Sustainability &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    : 2011 #12;As a long-time leader in the areas of waste abatement, pollution reduction, energy management Metro Commuter Services Infinity Award ­ in recognition of alternative transportation programs. · 1996 to maintaining impressive and viable alternative transportation programs. TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM DESIGNS

  15. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-02-13

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  16. Scramjet including integrated inlet and combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutschenreuter, P.H. Jr.; Blanton, J.C.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes a scramjet engine. It comprises: a first surface including an aft facing step; a cowl including: a leading edge and a trailing edge; an upper surface and a lower surface extending between the leading edge and the trailing edge; the cowl upper surface being spaced from and generally parallel to the first surface to define an integrated inlet-combustor therebetween having an inlet for receiving and channeling into the inlet-combustor supersonic inlet airflow; means for injecting fuel into the inlet-combustor at the step for mixing with the supersonic inlet airflow for generating supersonic combustion gases; and further including a spaced pari of sidewalls extending between the first surface to the cowl upper surface and wherein the integrated inlet-combustor is generally rectangular and defined by the sidewall pair, the first surface and the cowl upper surface.

  17. Calculating a checksum with inactive networking components in a computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aho, Michael E; Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A; Gooding, Thomas M; Heidelberger, Philip; Tauferner, Andrew T

    2014-12-16

    Calculating a checksum utilizing inactive networking components in a computing system, including: identifying, by a checksum distribution manager, an inactive networking component, wherein the inactive networking component includes a checksum calculation engine for computing a checksum; sending, to the inactive networking component by the checksum distribution manager, metadata describing a block of data to be transmitted by an active networking component; calculating, by the inactive networking component, a checksum for the block of data; transmitting, to the checksum distribution manager from the inactive networking component, the checksum for the block of data; and sending, by the active networking component, a data communications message that includes the block of data and the checksum for the block of data.

  18. Turbine repair process, repaired coating, and repaired turbine component

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Rupak; Delvaux, John McConnell; Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose

    2015-11-03

    A turbine repair process, a repaired coating, and a repaired turbine component are disclosed. The turbine repair process includes providing a turbine component having a higher-pressure region and a lower-pressure region, introducing particles into the higher-pressure region, and at least partially repairing an opening between the higher-pressure region and the lower-pressure region with at least one of the particles to form a repaired turbine component. The repaired coating includes a silicon material, a ceramic matrix composite material, and a repaired region having the silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material. The repaired turbine component a ceramic matrix composite layer and a repaired region having silicon material deposited on and surrounded by the ceramic matrix composite material.

  19. Futuristic concepts in engines and components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This publication includes papers on two-stroke engines and components, Brayton Stirling and Otto Cycles, alternative cycles, advanced combustion, and other related topics. Contents include: Paving the way to controlled combustion engines (CCE); A new class of stratified-charge internal combustion engine; Internal combustion (IC) engine with minimum number of moving parts; New type of heat engine -- externally heated air engine; A porous media burner for reforming methanol for fuel cell powered electric vehicles; Using a Stirling engine simulation program as a regenerator design aid; In-cylinder regenerated engines; High speed electronic fuel injection for direct injected rotary engine; and The characteristics of fuel consumption and exhaust emissions of the side exhaust port rotary engine.

  20. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  1. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex#2;B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  2. Prefab the FabLab : rethinking the habitability of a fabrication lab by including fixture-based components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunez, Joseph Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about defining a fixture-based system that can be adapted into a digital fabrication production system of friction fit assembly. It is inspired by the work and research conducted by the Digital Design ...

  3. Executive Summary An essential component of the University of Miami's research at the Rosenstiel School includes studies that

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    , about 60 percent of people worldwide live in a coastal region, and here in the United States this number coastal areas, humans are becoming more vulnerable to the impact of tropical cyclones (hurricanes). Crisis of better materials and improved designs for wind- and water-resistant coastal structures. The University

  4. Influence of Transport Variables on Isospin Transport Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. D. S. Coupland; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; P. Danielewicz; Yingxun Zhang

    2011-07-19

    The symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state affects many aspects of nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions. Recent constraints from heavy ion collisions, including isospin diffusion observables, have started to put constraints on the symmetry energy below nuclear saturation density, but these constraints depend on the employed transport model and input physics other than the symmetry energy. To understand these dependencies, we study the influence of the symmetry energy, isoscaler mean field compressibility and momentum dependence, in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, and light cluster production on isospin diffusion within the pBUU transport code. In addition to the symmetry energy, several uncertain issues strongly affect isospin diffusion, most notably the cross sections and cluster production. In addition, there is a difference in the calculated isospin transport ratios, depending upon whether they are computed using the isospin asymmetry of either the residue or of all forward moving fragments. Measurements that compare the isospin transport ratios of these two quantities would help place constraints on the input physics, such as the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  5. NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

    2009-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

  6. MOTIVATION INCLUDED OR EXCLUDED FROM Mihaela Cocea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocea, Mihaela

    MOTIVATION ­ INCLUDED OR EXCLUDED FROM E-LEARNING Mihaela Cocea National College of Ireland Mayor, Dublin 1, Ireland sweibelzahl@ncirl.ie ABSTRACT The learners' motivation has an impact on the quality-Learning, motivation has been mainly considered in terms of instructional design. Research in this direction suggests

  7. Energy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Namboodiri, Vinod

    processing unit (CPU) processing power and capacity of mass storage devices doubles every 18 months. Such growth in both processing and storage capabilities fuels the production of ever more powerful portableEnergy Consumption of Personal Computing Including Portable Communication Devices Pavel Somavat1

  8. Course may include: Research in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development Information and Communication Technologies Issues in Education Final Project Seminar Master, the Final Project Seminar. This graduate program will allow you to develop your skills and knowledgeCourse may include: Research in Education Qualitative Methods in Educational Research Fundamentals

  9. Communication in automation, including networking and wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Communication in automation, including networking and wireless Nicholas Kottenstette and Panos J and networking in automation is given. Digital communication fundamentals are reviewed and networked control are presented. 1 Introduction 1.1 Why communication is necessary in automated systems Automated systems use

  10. Evidence of aging effects on certain safety-related components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magleby, H.L.; Atwood, C.L.; MacDonald, P.E.; Edson, J.L.; Bramwell, D.L.

    1996-01-01

    In response to interest shown by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Principal Working Group I (PWG- 1) of the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) conducted a generic study on the effects of aging of active components in nuclear power plants. (This focus on active components is consistent with PWG-l`s mandate; passive components are primarily within the mandate of PWG-3.) Representatives from France, Sweden, Finland, Japan, the United States, and the United Kingdom participated in the study by submitting reports documenting aging studies performed in their countries. This report consists of summaries of those reports, along with a comparison of the various statistical analysis methods used in the studies. The studies indicate that with some exceptions, active components generally do not present a significant aging problem in nuclear power plants. Design criteria and effective preventative maintenance programs, including timely replacement of components, are effective in mitigating potential aging problems. However, aging studies (such as qualitative and statistical analyses of failure modes and maintenance data) are an important part of efforts to identify and solve potential aging problems. Solving these problems typically includes such strategies as replacing suspect components with improved components, and implementing improved maintenance programs.

  11. Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

  12. Time-dependent angularly averaged inverse transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Bal; Alexandre Jollivet

    2009-05-07

    This paper concerns the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters in a time-dependent linear transport equation from knowledge of angularly averaged measurements performed at the boundary of a domain of interest. We show that the absorption coefficient and the spatial component of the scattering coefficient are uniquely determined by such measurements. We obtain stability results on the reconstruction of the absorption and scattering parameters with respect to the measured albedo operator. The stability results are obtained by a precise decomposition of the measurements into components with different singular behavior in the time domain.

  13. Two component-three dimensional catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael (Boulder, CO); White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Sammells, Anthony F. (Boulder, CO)

    2002-01-01

    This invention relates to catalytic reactor membranes having a gas-impermeable membrane for transport of oxygen anions. The membrane has an oxidation surface and a reduction surface. The membrane is coated on its oxidation surface with an adherent catalyst layer and is optionally coated on its reduction surface with a catalyst that promotes reduction of an oxygen-containing species (e.g., O.sub.2, NO.sub.2, SO.sub.2, etc.) to generate oxygen anions on the membrane. The reactor has an oxidation zone and a reduction zone separated by the membrane. A component of an oxygen containing gas in the reduction zone is reduced at the membrane and a reduced species in a reactant gas in the oxidation zone of the reactor is oxidized. The reactor optionally contains a three-dimensional catalyst in the oxidation zone. The adherent catalyst layer and the three-dimensional catalyst are selected to promote a desired oxidation reaction, particularly a partial oxidation of a hydrocarbon.

  14. EIS-0225: Continued Operation of the Pantex Plant and Associated Storage of Nuclear Weapon Components

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environemental impact of a proposal to continue operation of the Pantex Plant and associated storage of nuclear weapon components. Alternatives considered include: ...

  15. Primary Components of Binomial Ideals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eser, Zekiye

    2014-07-11

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 v LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 2.1 The graph G pIpBqq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 2.2 The graph of M . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 2.3 Examples of band graphs... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 2.4 A band graph with an infinite component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 2.5 The band graph G6pMq . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 2.6 Slice graphs for IpBq ? xx4z ? y4, x7z ? y7y . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 2.7 Slice...

  16. Stack Components Nancy L. Garland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /manufacturing · Durability · Electrode performance · Thermal and water management #12;Stack Component Targets 500 @ 0.75 VmA/cm2Performance on O2 400 @ 0.8 VmA/cm2Performance on H2 10$/kWCostMEA 5000hoursDurability 1000ppm-) · In collaboration with LANL (K. Weisbrod) and NREL (H. Wang) · Initial testing at General Motors indicates nitrided

  17. Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program 2005deermay.pdf More Documents & Publications Noxtechs PAC System Development and...

  18. Subterranean barriers including at least one weld

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Sloan, Paul A.; Richardson, John G.; Walsh, Stephanie; Kostelnik, Kevin M.

    2007-01-09

    A subterranean barrier and method for forming same are disclosed, the barrier including a plurality of casing strings wherein at least one casing string of the plurality of casing strings may be affixed to at least another adjacent casing string of the plurality of casing strings through at least one weld, at least one adhesive joint, or both. A method and system for nondestructively inspecting a subterranean barrier is disclosed. For instance, a radiographic signal may be emitted from within a casing string toward an adjacent casing string and the radiographic signal may be detected from within the adjacent casing string. A method of repairing a barrier including removing at least a portion of a casing string and welding a repair element within the casing string is disclosed. A method of selectively heating at least one casing string forming at least a portion of a subterranean barrier is disclosed.

  19. Photoactive devices including porphyrinoids with coordinating additives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Zimmerman, Jeramy; Yu, Eric K; Thompson, Mark E; Trinh, Cong; Whited, Matthew; Diev, Vlacheslav

    2015-05-12

    Coordinating additives are included in porphyrinoid-based materials to promote intermolecular organization and improve one or more photoelectric characteristics of the materials. The coordinating additives are selected from fullerene compounds and organic compounds having free electron pairs. Combinations of different coordinating additives can be used to tailor the characteristic properties of such porphyrinoid-based materials, including porphyrin oligomers. Bidentate ligands are one type of coordinating additive that can form coordination bonds with a central metal ion of two different porphyrinoid compounds to promote porphyrinoid alignment and/or pi-stacking. The coordinating additives can shift the absorption spectrum of a photoactive material toward higher wavelengths, increase the external quantum efficiency of the material, or both.

  20. Power generation method including membrane separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

  1. Rotor assembly including superconducting magnetic coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snitchler, Gregory L. (Shrewsbury, MA); Gamble, Bruce B. (Wellesley, MA); Voccio, John P. (Somerville, MA)

    2003-01-01

    Superconducting coils and methods of manufacture include a superconductor tape wound concentrically about and disposed along an axis of the coil to define an opening having a dimension which gradually decreases, in the direction along the axis, from a first end to a second end of the coil. Each turn of the superconductor tape has a broad surface maintained substantially parallel to the axis of the coil.

  2. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  3. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  4. Transportation energy data book: edition 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; McFarlin, D.N.

    1996-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

  5. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T. (Albuquerque, NM); Payne, Jason A. (Albuquerque, NM); Ottesen, Cory W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  6. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  7. Design Models for Components in Distributed Object Software X. Xie and S. M. Shatz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatz, Sol M.

    approach for component-based software engineering. This paper discusses an approach for blending Petri netDesign Models for Components in Distributed Object Software 1 X. Xie and S. M. Shatz University of Illinois at Chicago Abstract Component-based software development has many potential advantages, including

  8. Packaging, Transportation and Recycling of NPP Condenser Modules - 12262

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polley, G.M. [Perma-Fix Environmental Services, 575 Oak Ridge Turnpike, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Perma-Fix was awarded contract from Energy Northwest for the packaging, transportation and disposition of the condenser modules, water boxes and miscellaneous metal, combustibles and water generated during the 2011 condenser replacement outage at the Columbia Generating Station. The work scope was to package the water boxes and condenser modules as they were removed from the facility and transfer them to the Perma-Fix Northwest facility for processing, recycle of metals and disposition. The condenser components were oversized and overweight (the condenser modules weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lb]) which required special equipment for loading and transport. Additional debris waste was packaged in inter-modals and IP-1 boxes for transport. A waste management plan was developed to minimize the generation of virtually any waste requiring landfill disposal. The Perma-Fix Northwest facility was modified to accommodate the ?15 m [50-ft] long condenser modules and equipment was designed and manufactured to complete the disassembly, decontamination and release survey. The condenser modules are currently undergoing processing for free release to a local metal recycler. Over three millions pounds of metal will be recycled and over 95% of the waste generated during this outage will not require land disposal. There were several elements of this project that needed to be addressed during the preparation for this outage and the subsequent packaging, transportation and processing. - Staffing the project to support 24/7 generation of large components and other wastes. - The design and manufacture of the soft-sided shipping containers for the condenser modules that measured ?15 m X 4 m X 3 m [50 ft X 13 ft X 10 ft] and weighed ?102,058 kg [225,000 lbs] - Developing a methodology for loading the modules into the shipping containers. - Obtaining a transport vehicle for the modules. - Designing and modifying the processing facility. - Movement of the modules at the processing facility. If any of these issues were not adequately resolved prior to the start of the outage, costly delays would result and the re-start of the power plant could be impacted. The main focus of this project was to find successful methods for keeping this material out of the landfills and preserving the natural resources. In addition, this operation provided a significant cost savings to the public utility by minimizing landfill disposal. The onsite portion of the project has been completed without impact to the overall outage schedule. By the date of presentation, the majority of the waste from the condenser replacement project will have been processed and recycled. The goals for this project included helping Energy Northwest maintain the outage schedule, package and characterize waste compliantly, perform transportation activities in compliance with 49CFR (Ref-1), and minimize the waste disposal volume. During this condenser replacement project, over three millions pounds of waste was generated, packaged, characterized and transported without injury or incident. It is anticipated that 95% of the waste generated during this project will not require landfill disposal. All of the waste is scheduled to be processed, decontaminated and recycled by June of 2012. (authors)

  9. Mathematical analysis and numerical simulation of multi-phase multi-component flow in heterogeneous porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    methods Mathematical modelling CO2 storage Enhanced oil recovery Groundwater contamination Multi-phase multi-component flow processes are fundamental to engineering applications in hydrocarbon and geothermal The transport of dissolved chemical components (e.g., CO2, NaCl, CH4) in different fluid phases (e.g., water

  10. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being shipped, and will otherwise maintain it as nearly as possible in its original condition.The recommendations provided are short-term solutions to the problems of shipping evidence, and have considered only currently commercially available containers. These containers may not be appropriate for all cases. Design, testing, and certification of new transportation containers would be necessary to provide a container appropriate for all cases.Table 1 provides a summary of the recommendations for each class of hazardous material.Table 1: Summary of RecommendationsContainerCost1-quart paint can with ArmlockTM seal ringLabelMaster(r)%242.90 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use4 DraftDraftDraftTable 1: Summary of Recommendations (continued)ContainerCost55-gallon open or closed-head steel drumsAll-Pak, Inc.%2458.28 - %2473.62 eachHazard Class 3, 4, 5, 8, or 9 Large Containers95-gallon poly overpack LabelMaster(r)%24194.50 each1-liter glass container with plastic coatingLabelMaster(r)%243.35 - %243.70 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Small ContainersTC Hazardous Material Transport ContainerCurrently in Use20 to 55-gallon PIH overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24142.50 - %24170.50 eachHazard Class 6 Division 6.1 Poisonous by Inhalation (PIH) Large Containers65 to 95-gallon poly overpacksLabelMaster(r)%24163.30 - %24194.50 each1-liter transparent containerCurrently in UseHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Small ContainersInfectious Substance ShipperSource Packaging of NE, Inc.%24336.00 eachNone Commercially AvailableN/AHazard Class 6 Division 6.2 Infectious Material Large ContainersNone Commercially Available N/A5

  11. Regional Transportation Coordination Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden Crescent Regional Planning Commission

    2006-01-01

    stream_source_info Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination Study.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 357268 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Golden Crescent Regional Transportation Coordination... Study.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Golden Crescent Regional Transit i Regional Transportation Coordination Study: 7-County Golden Crescent Region Regional...

  12. FUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Fuel Cells for Transportation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation............................................................................................. 101 A. R&D of a 50-kW, High-Efficiency, High-Power-Density, CO-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack SystemFUEL CELLS FOR TRANSPORTATION 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department

  13. Not planning a sustainable transport system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finnveden, Göran Åkerman, Jonas

    2014-04-01

    The overall objective of the Swedish transport policy is to ensure the economically efficient and sustainable provision of transport services for people and business throughout the country. More specifically, the transport sector shall, among other things, contribute to the achievement of environmental quality objectives in which the development of the transport system plays an important role in the achievement of the objectives. The aim of this study is to analyse if current transport planning supports this policy. This is done by analysing two recent cases: the National Infrastructure Plan 2010–2021, and the planning of Bypass Stockholm, a major road investment. Our results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. Another interesting aspect of the planning processes is that the long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes, neither as a clear goal nor as factor that will influence future transport systems. In this way, the long-term sustainability aspects are not present in the planning. We conclude that the two cases do not contribute to a sustainable transport system. Thus, several changes must be made in the processes, including putting up clear targets for emissions. Also, the methodology for the environmental assessments needs to be further developed and discussed. - Highlights: • Two cases are studied to analyse if current planning supports a sustainable transport system. • Results show that the plans are in conflict with several of the environmental quality objectives. • Long-term climate goals are not included in the planning processes. • Current practices do not contribute to a sustainable planning processes. • Methodology and process for environmental assessments must be further developed and discussed.

  14. Optical panel system including stackable waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    2007-11-20

    An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

  15. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  16. Simple Model of Membrane Proteins Including Solvent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Pagan; A. Shiryayev; T. P. Connor; J. D. Gunton

    2006-03-04

    We report a numerical simulation for the phase diagram of a simple two dimensional model, similar to one proposed by Noro and Frenkel [J. Chem. Phys. \\textbf{114}, 2477 (2001)] for membrane proteins, but one that includes the role of the solvent. We first use Gibbs ensemble Monte Caro simulations to determine the phase behavior of particles interacting via a square-well potential in two dimensions for various values of the interaction range. A phenomenological model for the solute-solvent interactions is then studied to understand how the fluid-fluid coexistence curve is modified by solute-solvent interactions. It is shown that such a model can yield systems with liquid-liquid phase separation curves that have both upper and lower critical points, as well as closed loop phase diagrams, as is the case with the corresponding three dimensional model.

  17. Substrate binding by a bacterial ABC transporter involved in polysaccharide export

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuthbertson, Leslie; Kimber, Matthew S.; Whitfield, Chris (Guelph)

    2008-04-02

    ATP-binding-cassette (ABC) transporters are responsible for the export of a wide variety of cell-surface glycoconjugates in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These include the O-antigenic polysaccharide (O-PS) portion of lipopolysaccharide, a crucial virulence determinant in Gram-negative pathogens. O-PSs are synthesized by one of two fundamentally different pathways. Escherichia coli O serotypes O8 and O9a provide the prototype systems for studying O-PS export via ABC transporters. The transporter is composed of the transmembrane component Wzm and the nucleotide-binding component Wzt. Although the N-terminal domain of Wzt is a conventional ABC protein, the C-terminal domain of Wzt (C-Wzt) is a unique structural element that determines the specificity of the transporter for either the O8 or O9a O-PS. We show here that the two domains of Wzt can function when expressed as separate polypeptides; both are essential for export. In vitro, C-Wzt binds its cognate O-PS by recognizing a residue located at the nonreducing end of the polymer. The crystal structure of C-WztO9a is reported here and reveals a {beta} sandwich with an immunoglobulin-like topology that contains the O-PS-binding pocket. Substrate interactions with nucleotide-binding domains have been demonstrated in an ABC exporter previously. However, to our knowledge substrate binding by a discrete, cytoplasmic accessory domain in an extended nucleotide-binding domain polypeptide has not previously been demonstrated. Elucidation of the substrate-recognition system involved in O-PS export provides insight into the mechanism that coordinates polymer biosynthesis, termination, and export.

  18. ELECTROCHEMICAL POWER FOR TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, Elton J.

    2012-01-01

    of the Fuel Cell in Transportation Applications Workshop,practical fuel cell for commercial or consumer applicationfuel cell system engineer- ing is made, vehicle applications

  19. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Nuclear Fuel Grand BC and High-Level Radioactive Waste - Jeff Williams, Director, Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project, DOEOffice of Nuclear Energy National...

  20. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This snapshot is a summary of the EERE reports that provide a detailed analysis of opportunities and challenges along the path to a more sustainable transportation energy future.

  1. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    gas vehicles Annual road tax differentiated by vintageand charges for road transport Tax/pricing measure Optimalannual circulation taxes, tolls and road charges and parking

  2. Transportation Energy Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Daniel

    1989-01-01

    TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

  3. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    of reduction options/ AERO. Ministry of Transport, Publicfrom aviation with the AERO modeling system Part I.from aviation with the AERO modeling system. Montreal,

  4. Natural Gas Transportation Resiliency

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Transportation Resiliency Anders Johnson Director Pipeline System Design April 29, 2014 Confidential and Illustrative for discussion purposes only. The views expressed in this...

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Snapshot

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    modes, manage the demand for transportation, and shift the fuel mix to more sustainable sources necessary to reach these significant outcomes. Coordinating a...

  6. Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

  7. Powder Injection Molding of Titanium Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Kevin L.; Nyberg, Eric A.; Weil, K. Scott; Miller, Megan R.

    2005-01-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) is a well-established, cost-effective method of fabricating small-to-moderate size metal components. Derived from plastic injection molding and employing a mixture of metal powder and plastic binder, the process has been used with great success in manufacturing a wide variety of metal products, including those made from stainless steel, nickel-based superalloys, and copper alloys. Less progress has been achieved with titanium and other refractory metal alloys because of problems with alloy impurities that are directly attributable to the injection molding process. Specifically, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are left behind during binder removal and become incorporated into the chemistry and microstructure of the material during densification. Even at low concentration, these impurities can cause severe degradation in the mechanical properties of titanium and its alloys. We have developed a unique blend of PIM constituents where only a small volume fraction of binder (~5 – 10 vol%) is required for injection molding; the remainder of the mixture consists of the metal powder and binder solvent. Because of the nature of decomposition in the binder system and the relatively small amount used, the binder is eliminated almost completely from the pre-sintered component during the initial stage of a two-step heat treatment process. Results will be presented on the first phase of this research, in which the binder, injection molding, de-binding and sintering schedule were developed. Additional data on the mechanical and physical properties of the material produced will be discussed.

  8. Three-component gyrotropic metamaterial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tralle, Igor, E-mail: tralle@ur.edu.pl; Zi?ba, Pawe?; Pa?ko, Wioletta [Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Theoretical Physics Department, University of Rzeszów, Pigonia 1, 35-310 Rzeszów (Poland)

    2014-06-21

    All of the proposed ever since designs of metamaterials are characterized by ever-increasing sophistication of fabrication methods. Here, a comparatively simple recipe for the fabrication of a metamaterial, which is both gyrotropic and of the simultaneously negative permittivity and permeability, is proposed. The idea is to make a mixture of three ingredients, where one of them would be responsible for the negativity of ?, while the other two would be responsible for the negativity of ?. The first component of the mixture is the “swarm” of single-domain ferromagnetic nano-particles, immersed in a mixture of other two, silver and mercury cadmium telluride. By carrying out the computer simulations, the domains of gyromagnetic metamaterial exist, relative to all parameters characterizing the model, that is, the temperature, external magnetic field, parameters of nano-particles, and the fraction of cadmium in Hg{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te-compound as well as relative concentrations of the mixture components are established.

  9. NREL's Building Component Library for Use with Energy Models

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Building Component Library (BCL) is the U.S. Department of Energy’s comprehensive online searchable library of energy modeling building blocks and descriptive metadata. Novice users and seasoned practitioners can use the freely available and uniquely identifiable components to create energy models and cite the sources of input data, which will increase the credibility and reproducibility of their simulations. The BCL contains components which are the building blocks of an energy model. They can represent physical characteristics of the building such as roofs, walls, and windows, or can refer to related operational information such as occupancy and equipment schedules and weather information. Each component is identified through a set of attributes that are specific to its type, as well as other metadata such as provenance information and associated files. The BCL also contains energy conservation measures (ECM), referred to as measures, which describe a change to a building and its associated model. For the BCL, this description attempts to define a measure for reproducible application, either to compare it to a baseline model, to estimate potential energy savings, or to examine the effects of a particular implementation. The BCL currently contains more than 30,000 components and measures. A faceted search mechanism has been implemented on the BCL that allows users to filter through the search results using various facets. Facet categories include component and measure types, data source, and energy modeling software type. All attributes of a component or measure can also be used to filter the results.

  10. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  11. An approach to improving transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Jianxin; Mei, Deqing, E-mail: meidq-127@zju.edu.cn; Yang, Keji; Fan, Zongwei [State Key Lab of Fluid Power Transmission and Control, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China)

    2014-08-14

    In existing ultrasonic transportation methods, the long-range transportation of micro-particles is always realized in step-by-step way. Due to the substantial decrease of the driving force in each step, the transportation is lower-speed and stair-stepping. To improve the transporting velocity, a non-stepping ultrasonic transportation approach is proposed. By quantitatively analyzing the acoustic potential well, an optimal region is defined as the position, where the largest driving force is provided under the condition that the driving force is simultaneously the major component of an acoustic radiation force. To keep the micro-particle trapped in the optimal region during the whole transportation process, an approach of optimizing the phase-shifting velocity and phase-shifting step is adopted. Due to the stable and large driving force, the displacement of the micro-particle is an approximately linear function of time, instead of a stair-stepping function of time as in the existing step-by-step methods. An experimental setup is also developed to validate this approach. Long-range ultrasonic transportations of zirconium beads with high transporting velocity were realized. The experimental results demonstrated that this approach is an effective way to improve transporting velocity in the long-range ultrasonic transportation of micro-particles.

  12. Proven concepts for LLW-treatment of large components for free release and recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergstroem, Lena; Lindstrom, Anders; Lindberg, Maria; Wirendal, Bo; Lorenzen, Joachim [Studsvik RadWaste AB, SE-611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes Studsvik's technical concept of LLW-treatment of large, retired components from nuclear installations in operation or in decommissioning. Many turbines, heat exchangers and other LLW components have been treated in Studsvik during the last 20 years. This also includes development of techniques and tools, especially our latest experience gained under the pilot project for treatment of one full size PWR steam generator from Ringhals NPP, Sweden. The ambition of this pilot project was to minimize the waste volumes for disposal and to maximize the material recycling. Another objective, respecting ALARA, was the successful minimization of the dose exposure to the personnel. The treatment concept for large, retired components comprises the whole sequence of preparations from road and sea transports and the management of the metallic LLW by segmentation, decontamination and sorting using specially devised tools and shielded treatment cell, to the decision criteria for recycling of the metals, radiological analyses and conditioning of the residual waste into the final packages suitable for customer-related disposal. For e.g. turbine rotors with their huge number of blades the crucial moments are segmentation techniques, thus cold segmentation is a preferred method to keep focus on minimization of volumes for secondary waste. Also a variety of decontamination techniques using blasting cabinet or blasting tumbling machines keeps secondary waste production to a minimum. The technical challenge of the treatment of more complicated components like steam generators also begins with the segmentation. A first step is the separation of the steam dome in order to dock the rest of the steam generator to a specially built treatment cell. Thereafter, the decontamination of the tube bundle is performed using a remotely controlled manipulator. After decontamination is concluded the cutting of the tubes as well as of the shell is performed in the same cell with remotely controlled tools. Some of the sections of steam dome shell or turbine shafts can be cleared directly for unconditional reuse without melting after decontamination and sampling program. Experience shows that the amount of material possible for clearance for unconditional use is between 95 - 97 % for conventional metallic scrap. For components like turbines, heat exchangers or steam generators the recycling ratio can vary to about 80 - 85% of the initial weight. (authors)

  13. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY Investigator CCIT Research Report UCB-ITS-CWP-2011-2 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works;CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

  14. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  15. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2001-09-13

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  16. Transportation Energy Data Book (Edition 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2000-10-09

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 20'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  17. Transportation energy data book: Edition 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1995-05-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  18. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  19. Transportation energy data book: Edition 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

    1993-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  20. Transportation energy data book: Edition 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.; Morris, M.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 12 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes--highway, air, water, rail, pipeline--is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

  1. Standards for PV Modules and Components -- Recent Developments and Challenges: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2012-10-01

    International standards play an important role in the Photovoltaic industry. Since PV is such a global industry it is critical that PV products be measured and qualified the same way everywhere in the world. IEC TC82 has developed and published a number of module and component measurement and qualification standards. These are continually being updated to take advantage of new techniques and equipment as well as better understanding of test requirements. Standards presently being updated include the third edition of IEC 61215, Crystalline Silicon Qualification and the second edition of IEC 61730, PV Module Safety Requirements. New standards under development include qualification of junction boxes, connectors, PV cables, and module integrated electronics as well as for testing the packaging used during transport of modules. After many years of effort, a draft standard on Module Energy Rating should be circulated for review soon. New activities have been undertaken to develop standards for the materials within a module and to develop tests that evaluate modules for wear-out in the field (International PV Module QA Task Force). This paper will discuss these efforts and indicate how the audience can participate in development of international standards.

  2. Tellus, January 21, 1999 (revised) The Response of Atmospheric Heat Transport to ZonallyAveraged SST Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnusdottir, Gudrun

    '' that transports heat from the warm equator to the cold poles. The two fluid components of the climate systemTellus, January 21, 1999 (revised) The Response of Atmospheric Heat Transport to Zonally the atmospheric heat transport in a realistic atmospheric general circulation model under five different

  3. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32, from the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Stacy C.; Diegel, Susan W.; Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc.

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium designed for use as a reference. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 on energy; Chapter 3 0n highway vehicles; Chapter 4 on light vehicles; Chapter 5 on heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 on alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7on fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 on household vehicles; and Chapter 9 on nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 on transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 on greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 on criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also appendices which include detailed source information for various tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions.

  4. Transportation Todd Litman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    consumer cost savings. #12;11 Per Capita Transport EnergyPer Capita Transport Energy 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 D Problem? · Traffic congestion? · Road construction costs? · Parking congestion or costs? · Excessive costs to consumers? · Government costs? · Traffic crashes? · Lack of mobility for non-drivers? · Poor freight

  5. Expert systems in transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, K.P.

    1988-01-01

    The 5 papers in the report deal with the following areas: Knowledge representation and software selection for expert-systems design; Expert-system architecture for retaining-wall design; Development of expert-systems technology in the California Department of Transportation; Development of an expert system to assist in the interactive graphic transit system design process; Expert systems development for contingency transportation planing.

  6. Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-04-04

    To establish safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) offsite shipments and onsite transfers of hazardous materials and for modal transport. Cancels DOE O 460.1A. Canceled by DOE O 460.1C.

  7. Transport Layer Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Transport Layer Ao Tang Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 Lachlan L. H. Andrew California. Low California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 I. INTRODUCTION The Internet has evolved of the physical layer, the link layer, the network layer, the transport layer and the application layer1 . See

  8. TRANSPORTATION ENERGY RESEARCH PIER Transportation Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The project also tested a Caterpillar C15 engine certified to 2007 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.energy.ca.gov/research/ transportation/ January 2011 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions and Fuel Consumption Improvement Illustration of a heavy-duty tractor-trailer modified to meet the SmartWayTM Equipment Standards for lower fuel

  9. Uranium Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, William D.

    2008-01-15

    Uranium contamination is prevalent at many of the U.S. DOE facilities and at several civilian sites that have supported the nuclear fuel cycle. The potential off-site mobility of uranium depends on the partitioning of uranium between aqueous and solid (soil and sediment) phases. Hexavalent U (as uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) is relatively mobile, forming strong complexes with ubiquitous carbonate ion which renders it appreciably soluble even under mild reducing conditions. In the presence of carbonate, partition of uranyl to ferri-hydrate and select other mineral phases is usually maximum in the near-neutral pH range {approx} 5-8. The surface complexation reaction of uranyl with iron-containing minerals has been used as one means to model subsurface migration, used in conjunction with information on the site water chemistry and hydrology. Partitioning of uranium is often studied by short-term batch 'equilibrium' or long-term soil column testing ; MCLinc has performed both of these methodologies, with selection of method depending upon the requirements of the client or regulatory authority. Speciation of uranium in soil may be determined directly by instrumental techniques (e.g., x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, XPS; x-ray diffraction, XRD; etc.) or by inference drawn from operational estimates. Often, the technique of choice for evaluating low-level radionuclide partitioning in soils and sediments is the sequential extraction approach. This methodology applies operationally-defined chemical treatments to selectively dissolve specific classes of macro-scale soil or sediment components. These methods recognize that total soil metal inventory is of limited use in understanding bioavailability or metal mobility, and that it is useful to estimate the amount of metal present in different solid-phase forms. Despite some drawbacks, the sequential extraction method can provide a valuable tool to distinguish among trace element fractions of different solubility related to mineral phases. Four case studies are presented: Water and Soil Characterization, Subsurface Stabilization of Uranium and other Toxic Metals, Reductive Precipitation (in situ bioremediation) of Uranium, and Physical Transport of Particle-bound Uranium by Erosion.

  10. Analytical chemistry methods for metallic core components: Revision March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of alloys used to fabricate core components. These alloys are 302, 308, 316, 316-Ti, and 321 stainless steels and 600 and 718 Inconels and they may include other 300-series stainless steels.

  11. Component-based risk analysis Doctoral Dissertation by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stølen, Ketil

    Component-based risk analysis Doctoral Dissertation by Gyrd Brændeland Submitted to the Faculty. In conventional risk analysis the parts of the environment that are relevant for estimating the risk-level are often included as part of the target of analysis. Furthermore, in existing risk analysis methods [3, 30

  12. Apparatus for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2008-04-15

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  13. Methods for microwave heat treatment of manufactured components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2010-08-03

    An apparatus for heat treating manufactured components using microwave energy and microwave susceptor material. Heat treating medium such as eutectic salts may be employed. A fluidized bed introduces process gases which may include carburizing or nitriding gases. The process may be operated in a batch mode or continuous process mode. A microwave heating probe may be used to restart a frozen eutectic salt bath.

  14. HVAC component data modeling using industry foundation classes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazjanac, Vladimir; Forester, James; Haves, Philip; Sucic, Darko; Xu, Peng

    2002-07-01

    The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) object data model of buildings is being developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI). The aim is to support data sharing and exchange in the building and construction industry across the life-cycle of a building. This paper describes a number of aspects of a major extension of the HVAC part of the IFC data model. First is the introduction of a more generic approach for handling HVAC components. This includes type information, which corresponds to catalog data, occurrence information, which defines item-specific attributes such as location and connectivity, and performance history information, which documents the actual performance of the component instance over time. Other IFC model enhancements include an extension of the connectivity model used to specify how components forming a system can be traversed and the introduction of time-based data streams. This paper includes examples of models of particular types of HVAC components, such as boilers and actuators, with all attributes included in the definitions. The paper concludes by describing the on-going process of model testing, implementation and integration into the complete IFC model and how the model can be used by software developers to support interoperability between HVAC-oriented design and analysis tools.

  15. An Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Infrastructure (GSI) [1] is widely accepted as the standard for authentication on the Grid for security. Desired characteristics of Grid security include: · The ability to verify the identityAn Authorization Framework for a Grid Based Component Architecture Lavanya Ramakrishnan1 , Helen

  16. Predicting Attack-prone Components Michael Gegick, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    in the software life cycle and include security-related static analysis tool warnings, code churn and size to be vulnerable. The model's false positive rate is 47.4% of this top 18.6% or 9.1% of the total system components security- related static analysis tool warnings, code size and churn, and all faults identified by manual

  17. Case history advanced coatings for water treatment plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephenson, L.D.; Kumar, A.

    2008-12-15

    Components of water treatment plants (WTPs) are susceptible to corrosion from constant immersion in water. A case history of corrosion and proximity to chlorine problems and their treatment at an Army WTP is presented. Solutions included using high micro-silica restoration mortar and advanced coal tar epoxy coatings.

  18. STRUCTURAL REQUIREMENTS OF ORGANIC ANION TRANSPORTING POLYPEPTIDE MEDIATED TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Yi Miao

    2010-04-12

    The organic anion transporting polypeptides (human: OATP; other: Oatp) form a mammalian transporter superfamily that mediates the transport of structurally unrelated compounds across the cell membrane. Members in this superfamily participate...

  19. Essays on Urban Transportation and Transportation Energy Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Chun Kon

    2008-01-01

    and Transportation Energy Policy Chun Kon Kim University of California,California Goyang, KOREA viii P???????????? ??? W?????? P????? The Impacts of Transportation EnergyCalifornia Transportation Center (UCTC) Regents’ Dissertation Fellowship University of California, Irvine California Energy

  20. Analysis of RADTRAN transportation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resnikoff, M. [Radioactive Waste Management Associates, New York, NY (United States)

    1990-10-01

    This paper reviews the RADTRAN computer model, used to estimate the risks of transporting waste to a high-level repository. Ignoring high consequence accidents, human error, sabotage, realistic accident scenarios and recent health effects data leads to an underestimate of potential health effects. Potential economic costs following an accident in a rural area are low compared to a scale-up of the Palomares, Spain clean-up and other estimates. The author states that these costs can vary widely depending on the accident locale and whether certain direct and indirect costs are included.

  1. Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

  2. Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies Implementing Advances in Transport Security Technologies More...

  3. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Gap...

  4. Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) Automated Transportation Logistics and Analysis System (ATLAS) The Department of...

  5. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  6. Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qingwu; Li, Wenguang; Jiang, Hua

    2012-01-03

    An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

  7. Fuel Cell Stack Components BipolarPlate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Metallic Bipolar Plates · Carbon Foam for Fuel Cell Humidification · High Temperature Proton ExchangeFuel Cell Stack Components Fuel Processor BipolarPlate Cathode+ Anode- Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN Crossover Fuel Cell Stack Components #12;Barriers

  8. Battery components employing a silicate binder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Reinhardt, Frederick W. (Albuquerque, NM); Odinek, Judy G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2011-05-24

    A battery component structure employing inorganic-silicate binders. In some embodiments, casting or coating of components may be performed using aqueous slurries of silicates and electrode materials or separator materials.

  9. Waste Package Component Design Methodology Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.C. Mecham

    2004-07-12

    This Executive Summary provides an overview of the methodology being used by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to design waste packages and ancillary components. This summary information is intended for readers with general interest, but also provides technical readers a general framework surrounding a variety of technical details provided in the main body of the report. The purpose of this report is to document and ensure appropriate design methods are used in the design of waste packages and ancillary components (the drip shields and emplacement pallets). The methodology includes identification of necessary design inputs, justification of design assumptions, and use of appropriate analysis methods, and computational tools. This design work is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description''. The document is primarily intended for internal use and technical guidance for a variety of design activities. It is recognized that a wide audience including project management, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others are interested to various levels of detail in the design methods and therefore covers a wide range of topics at varying levels of detail. Due to the preliminary nature of the design, readers can expect to encounter varied levels of detail in the body of the report. It is expected that technical information used as input to design documents will be verified and taken from the latest versions of reference sources given herein. This revision of the methodology report has evolved with changes in the waste package, drip shield, and emplacement pallet designs over many years and may be further revised as the design is finalized. Different components and analyses are at different stages of development. Some parts of the report are detailed, while other less detailed parts are likely to undergo further refinement. The design methodology is intended to provide designs that satisfy the safety and operational requirements of the YMP. Four waste package configurations have been selected to illustrate the application of the methodology during the licensing process. These four configurations are the 21-pressurized water reactor absorber plate waste package (21-PWRAP), the 44-boiling water reactor waste package (44-BWR), the 5 defense high-level radioactive waste (HLW) DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF) codisposal short waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Short), and the naval canistered SNF long waste package (Naval SNF Long). Design work for the other six waste packages will be completed at a later date using the same design methodology. These include the 24-boiling water reactor waste package (24-BWR), the 21-pressurized water reactor control rod waste package (21-PWRCR), the 12-pressurized water reactor waste package (12-PWR), the 5 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal long waste package (5-DHLWDOE SNF Long), the 2 defense HLW DOE SNF codisposal waste package (2-MC012-DHLW), and the naval canistered SNF short waste package (Naval SNF Short). This report is only part of the complete design description. Other reports related to the design include the design reports, the waste package system description documents, manufacturing specifications, and numerous documents for the many detailed calculations. The relationships between this report and other design documents are shown in Figure 1.

  10. Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welzl, Michael

    Transport Services (TAPS) BOF plan T. Moncaster, M. Welzl, D. Ros: dra5-moncaster-tsvwg-transport-services-00 h Reducing Internet Transport Latency Michael Welzl, with help from (alphabe/cal): Anna

  11. Improving Efficiency and Equity in Transportation Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Fueling Transportation Finance. ” Ian W. H. Parry andFueling Transportation Finance. ” Transportation ResearchFueling Transportation Finance: A Primer on the Gas Tax •

  12. Evaluation of Storage for Transportation Equipment, Unfueled Convertors, and Fueled Convertors at the INL for the Radioisotope Power Systems Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. G. Johnson; K. L. Lively

    2010-05-01

    This report contains an evaluation of the storage conditions required for several key components and/or systems of the Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These components/systems (transportation equipment, i.e., type ‘B’ shipping casks and the radioisotope thermo-electric generator transportation systems (RTGTS), the unfueled convertors, i.e., multi-hundred watt (MHW) and general purpose heat source (GPHS) RTGs, and fueled convertors of several types) are currently stored in several facilities at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) site. For various reasons related to competing missions, inherent growth of the RPS mission at the INL and enhanced efficiency, it is necessary to evaluate their current storage situation and recommend the approach that should be pursued going forward for storage of these vital RPS components and systems. The reasons that drive this evaluation include, but are not limited to the following: 1) conflict with other missions at the INL of higher priority, 2) increasing demands from the INL RPS Program that exceed the physical capacity of the current storage areas and 3) the ability to enhance our current capability to care for our equipment, decrease maintenance costs and increase the readiness posture of the systems.

  13. Lessons learned by southern states in transportation of radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This report has been prepared under a cooperative agreement with DOE`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and is a summary of the lessons learned by southern states regarding the transportation of radioactive materials including High-Level Radioactive Wastes (HLRW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). Sources used in this publication include interviews of state radiological health and public safety officials that are members of the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) Advisory Committee on Radioactive Materials Transportation, as well as the Board`s Transuranic (TRU) Waste Transportation Working Group. Other sources include letters written by the above mentioned committees concerning various aspects of DOE shipment campaigns.

  14. Superconnections and Parallel Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumitrescu, Florin

    2007-01-01

    This note addresses the construction of a notion of parallel transport along superpaths arising from the concept of a superconnection on a vector bundle over a manifold $M$. A superpath in $M$ is, loosely speaking, a path in $M$ together with an odd vector field in $M$ along the path. We also develop a notion of parallel transport associated with a connection (a.k.a. covariant derivative) on a vector bundle over a \\emph{supermanifold} which is a direct generalization of the classical notion of parallel transport for connections over manifolds.

  15. Manufacturing complex silica aerogel target components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Defriend Obrey, Kimberly Ann [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Day, Robert D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Espinoza, Brent F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hatch, Doug [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Feng, Shihai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Aerogel is a material used in numerous components in High Energy Density Physics targets. In the past these components were molded into the proper shapes. Artifacts left in the parts from the molding process, such as contour irregularities from shrinkage and density gradients caused by the skin, have caused LANL to pursue machining as a way to make the components.

  16. NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sander, Evelyn

    NUCLEATION IN A TWO COMPONENT METAL ALLOY Kalea Sebesta Department of Applied Mathematics, known as nucleation, in a two component metal alloy. The motivation behind this study is to use component metal alloys. These alloys are seen in material sciences; therefore, understanding

  17. Office of Secure Transportation Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons,...

  18. Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spent Fuel Transportation Risk Assessment (SFTRA) Draft NUREG-2125 Overview for National Transportation Stakeholders Forum John Cook Division of Spent Fuel Storage and...

  19. Component failures that lead to reactor scrams. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, E. T.; Wilson, R. J.; Lim, E. Y.

    1980-04-01

    This report summarizes the operating experience scram data compiled from 35 operating US light water reactors (LWRs) to identify the principal components/systems related to reactor scrams. The data base utilized to identify the scram causes is developed from a EPRI-utility sponsored survey conducted by SAI coupled with recent data from the USNRC Gray Books. The reactor population considered in this evaluation is limited to 23 PWRs and 12 BWRs because of the limited scope of the program. The population includes all the US NSSS vendors. It is judged that this population accurately characterizes the component-related scrams in LWRs over the first 10 years of plant operation.

  20. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 4th Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  1. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 3rd Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  2. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 1st Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  3. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electricity, motor fuels and natural gas. The Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) submitted our agency planTexas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan 2nd Quarterly Report. This includes, but is not limited to, various electrical, gas, lighting and plumbing fixtures and implements

  4. RISKIND: An enhanced computer code for National Environmental Policy Act transportation consequence analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y.

    1996-03-01

    The RISKIND computer program was developed for the analysis of radiological consequences and health risks to individuals and the collective population from exposures associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or other radioactive materials. The code is intended to provide scenario-specific analyses when evaluating alternatives for environmental assessment activities, including those for major federal actions involving radioactive material transport as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). As such, rigorous procedures have been implemented to enhance the code`s credibility and strenuous efforts have been made to enhance ease of use of the code. To increase the code`s reliability and credibility, a new version of RISKIND was produced under a quality assurance plan that covered code development and testing, and a peer review process was conducted. During development of the new version, the flexibility and ease of use of RISKIND were enhanced through several major changes: (1) a Windows{sup {trademark}} point-and-click interface replaced the old DOS menu system, (2) the remaining model input parameters were added to the interface, (3) databases were updated, (4) the program output was revised, and (5) on-line help has been added. RISKIND has been well received by users and has been established as a key component in radiological transportation risk assessments through its acceptance by the U.S. Department of Energy community in recent environmental impact statements (EISs) and its continued use in the current preparation of several EISs.

  5. The Structure and Transport of Water and Hydrated Ions Within Hydrophobic, Nanoscale Channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, J K; Herberg, J L; Wu, Y; Schwegler, E; Mehta, A

    2009-06-15

    The purpose of this project includes an experimental and modeling investigation into water and hydrated ion structure and transport at nanomaterials interfaces. This is a topic relevant to understanding the function of many biological systems such as aquaporins that efficiently shuttle water and ion channels that permit selective transport of specific ions across cell membranes. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are model nanoscale, hydrophobic channels that can be functionalized, making them artificial analogs for these biological channels. This project investigates the microscopic properties of water such as water density distributions and dynamics within CNTs using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and the structure of hydrated ions at CNT interfaces via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Another component of this work is molecular simulation, which can predict experimental measurables such as the proton relaxation times, chemical shifts, and can compute the electronic structure of CNTs. Some of the fundamental questions this work is addressing are: (1) what is the length scale below which nanoscale effects such as molecular ordering become important, (2) is there a relationship between molecular ordering and transport?, and (3) how do ions interact with CNT interfaces? These are questions of interest to the scientific community, but they also impact the future generation of sensors, filters, and other devices that operate on the nanometer length scale. To enable some of the proposed applications of CNTs as ion filtration media and electrolytic supercapacitors, a detailed knowledge of water and ion structure at CNT interfaces is critical.

  6. Optimization of Maritime Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    and Technology Management Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Enterprise and D. Ronen (2007). Maritime transportation. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science (consolidation in the manufacturing sector, increasing competition, profit margins reduced, mergers and pooling

  7. Accident resistant transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, John A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cole, James K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a container for the safe air transport of plutonium having several intermediate wood layers and a load spreader intermediate an inner container and an outer shell for mitigation of shock during a hypothetical accident.

  8. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  9. National Transportation Stakeholders Forum

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    next webinar is scheduled to occur in June 2013 TRIBAL NATIONS CAUCUS UPDATE WIKI AND NTSF WEB SITES ntsf.wikidot.com www.em.doe.govPagesNationalTransportationForum.aspx...

  10. Transport in granular systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendell, Dawn M. (Dawn Marie), 1983-

    2011-01-01

    There are many situations in which a continuum view of granular systems does not fully capture the relevant mechanics. In order for engineers to be able to design systems for transporting granular materials, there needs ...

  11. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in above- ground bunkers, each of which is about the size of a one-car garage. Spent Fuel Storage: Dual Purpose Cask Systems 8 Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation: Framework...

  12. PBA Transportation Websites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PBA Transportation Websites presented to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  13. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    1994-05-01

    Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

  14. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  15. Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, C.M. [ed.

    1990-12-31

    Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

  16. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

  17. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    partners, including original equipment manufacturers, suppliers, fleets, national labs, Clean Cities coalitions, the Energy Department, the Federal Highway Administration, the...

  18. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  20. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  1. Polarized CMB recovery with sparse component separation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobin, Jerome; Starck, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    The polarization modes of the cosmological microwave background are an invaluable source of information for cosmology, and a unique window to probe the energy scale of inflation. Extracting such information from microwave surveys requires disentangling between foreground emissions and the cosmological signal, which boils down to solving a component separation problem. Component separation techniques have been widely studied for the recovery of CMB temperature anisotropies but quite rarely for the polarization modes. In this case, most component separation techniques make use of second-order statistics to discriminate between the various components. More recent methods, which rather emphasize on the sparsity of the components in the wavelet domain, have been shown to provide low-foreground, full-sky estimate of the CMB temperature anisotropies. Building on sparsity, the present paper introduces a new component separation technique dubbed PolGMCA (Polarized Generalized Morphological Component Analysis), which r...

  2. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2011-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  3. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2010-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

  4. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2009-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with U.S Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program and the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  5. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2005-03-08

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  6. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W

    2007-07-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  7. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2003-10-24

    The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  8. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W

    2006-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  9. Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Stacy Cagle; Diegel, Susan W; Boundy, Robert Gary

    2008-06-01

    The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

  10. Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Membrane Transport Chloride Transport Across Vesicle and Cell Membranes by Steroid-Based Receptors-established that molecules which transport cations across cell membranes (cationophores) can have potent biological effects of biological activity. Indeed, chloride transporters have direct medical potential as treatments for cystic

  11. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2010-4 This work was performed by the California Center for Innovative Transportation, a research group at the University of California, Berkeley, in cooperation with the State of California Business, Transportation

  12. CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA CENTER FOR INNOVATIVE TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY-ITS-CWP-2011-6 ISSN 1557-2269 The California Center for Innovative Transportation works with researchers that improve the efficiency, safety, and security of the transportation system. #12;#12;CALIFORNIA CENTER

  13. International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1Sth International Symposium Transport and Air Pollution Session 6: Biofuels 2 Determination of VOC components in the exhaust of light vehicles fuelled with different biofuels F. Gazier 1,4*, A. De/bende 1 of the emissions shows changes with the composition of the biofuel in the levels of hydrocarbons, aromatic

  14. Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-29

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Transportation Safeguards System (TSS) packaging and transportation and onsite transfer of nuclear explosives, nuclear components, Naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear materials, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels: DOE 5610.12 and DOE 5610.14.

  15. Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-06-30

    The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

  16. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-04-01

    Under current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulation, it is not sufficient for used nuclear fuel (UNF) to simply maintain its integrity during the storage period, it must maintain its integrity in such a way that it can withstand the physical forces of handling and transportation associated with restaging the fuel and moving it to treatment or recycling facilities, or a geologic repository. Hence it is necessary to understand the performance characteristics of aged UNF cladding and ancillary components under loadings stemming from transport initiatives. Researchers would like to demonstrate that enough information, including experimental support and modeling and simulation capabilities, exists to establish a preliminary determination of UNF structural performance under normal conditions of transport (NCT). This research, development and demonstration (RD&D) plan describes a methodology, including development and use of analytical models, to evaluate loading and associated mechanical responses of UNF rods and key structural components. This methodology will be used to provide a preliminary assessment of the performance characteristics of UNF cladding and ancillary components under rail-related NCT loading. The methodology couples modeling and simulation and experimental efforts currently under way within the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC). The methodology will involve limited uncertainty quantification in the form of sensitivity evaluations focused around available fuel and ancillary fuel structure properties exclusively. The work includes collecting information via literature review, soliciting input/guidance from subject matter experts, performing computational analyses, planning experimental measurement and possible execution (depending on timing), and preparing a variety of supporting documents that will feed into and provide the basis for future initiatives. The methodology demonstration will focus on structural performance evaluation of Westinghouse WE 17×17 pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies with a discharge burnup range of 30-58 GWd/MTU (assembly average), loaded in a representative high-capacity (?32 fuel rod assemblies) transportation package. Evaluations will be performed for representative normal conditions of rail transport involving a rail conveyance capable of meeting the Association of American Railroads (AAR) S-2043 specification. UNF modeling is anticipated to be defined to the pellet-cladding level and take in to account influences associated with spacer grids, intermediate fluid mixers, and control components. The influence of common degradation issues such as ductile-to-brittle-transition will also be accounted for. All model development and analysis will be performed with commercially available software packages exclusively. Inputs and analyses will be completely documented, all supporting information will be traceable, and bases will be defendable so as to be most useful to the U.S. Department of Energy community and mission. The expected completion date is the end of fiscal year (FY) 2013.

  17. Concentrating Solar Power �¢���� Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Michael W; Miner, Kris

    2013-03-30

    The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

  18. Geometric adiabatic transport in quantum Hall states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semyon Klevtsov; Paul Wiegmann

    2015-08-22

    We argue that in addition to the Hall conductance and the nondissipative component of the viscous tensor, there exists a third independent transport coefficient, which is precisely quantized. It takes constant values along quantum Hall plateaus. We show that the new coefficient is the Chern number of a vector bundle over moduli space of surfaces of genus 2 or higher and therefore cannot change continuously along the plateau. As such, it does not transpire on a sphere or a torus. In the linear response theory, this coefficient determines intensive forces exerted on electronic fluid by adiabatic deformations of geometry and represents the effect of the gravitational anomaly. We also present the method of computing the transport coefficients for quantum Hall states.

  19. The Impact of Information Technologies on Air Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansman, R. John

    The Air Transportation System and several key subsystems including the Aircraft, Airline, and Air Traffic Management are modeled as interacting control loops. The impact of Information Technologies on each of these subsystems ...

  20. 1.061 Transport Processes in the Environment, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Introduction to momentum and scalar transport in environmental flows, with emphasis given to river and lake systems. Derivation and solutions to the differential form of mass conservation equations. Topics include: molecular ...

  1. Modeling of Magnetic Nanoparticles Transport in Shale Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Cheng

    2014-12-18

    stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) from induced fractures play a critical role in significantly increasing well productivity. In this project, a mathematical model for simulating nanoparticle transport in shale reservoirs was developed. The simulator includes...

  2. Office of Packaging and Transportation Fiscal Year 2012 Annual...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and far ranging of these missions is dealing with the environmental legacy of the Cold War. Many problems posed by its operations are unique, and include the transportation of...

  3. Transport of DESY 1.3 GHZ Cryomodule at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGee, M.W.; Arkan, T.; Borissov, E.; Leibfritz, J.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab; Barbanotti, S.; /LASA, Segrate /INFN, Milan

    2009-05-01

    In an exchange of technology agreement, Deutsches Elektron-Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory in Hamburg Germany has provided a 1.3 GHz cryomodule 'kit' to Fermilab. The cryomodule components (qualified dressed cavities, cold mass parts, vacuum vessel, etc.) sent from Germany in pieces were assembled at Fermilab's Cryomodule Assembly Facility (CAF). The cavity string was assembled at CAF-MP9 Class 10 cleanroom and then transported to CAF-ICB cold mass assembly area via a flatbed air ride truck. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) studies were implemented to define location of instrumentation for initial cold mass transport, providing modal frequencies and shapes. Subsequently, the fully assembled cryomodule was transported to the SRF Accelerator Test Facility at New Muon Lab (NML). Internal geophones (velocity sensors) were attached during the coldmass assembly for transport (warm) and operational (cold) measurements. A description of the isolation system that maintained alignment during transport and protected fragile components is provided. Shock and vibration measurement results of each transport and modal analysis are discussed.

  4. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Deployment Support

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccess StoriesTransportation

  5. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation Secure Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure Data

  6. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation Secure

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - Transportation and Hydrogen Newsletter:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking WithSuccessTransportation

  8. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  9. H{sup -} beam transport experiments in a solenoid low energy beam transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabor, C.; Back, J. J.; Faircloth, D. C.; Lawrie, S. R.; Letchford, A. P.; Izaola, Z.

    2012-02-15

    The Front End Test Stand (FETS) is located at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and aims for a high current, fast chopped 3 MeV H{sup -} ion beam suitable for future high power proton accelerators like ISIS upgrade. The main components of the front end are the Penning ion source, a low energy beam transport line, an radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) providing also a chopper section and rebuncher. FETS is in the stage of commissioning its low energy beam transport (LEBT) line consisting of three solenoids. The LEBT has to transport an H{sup -} high current beam (up to 60 mA) at 65 keV. This is the injection energy of the beam into the RFQ. The main diagnostics are slit-slit emittance scanners for each transversal plane. For optimizing the matching to the RFQ, experiments have been performed with a variety of solenoid settings to better understand the actual beam transport. Occasionally, source parameters such as extractor slit width and beam energy were varied as well. The paper also discusses simulations based on these measurements.

  10. Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01

    A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

  11. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korenko, Michael K. (Wexford, PA)

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  12. High gliding fluid power generation system with fluid component separation and multiple condensers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahmoud, Ahmad M; Lee, Jaeseon; Radcliff, Thomas D

    2014-10-14

    An example power generation system includes a vapor generator, a turbine, a separator and a pump. In the separator, the multiple components of the working fluid are separated from each other and sent to separate condensers. Each of the separate condensers is configured for condensing a single component of the working fluid. Once each of the components condense back into a liquid form they are recombined and exhausted to a pump that in turn drives the working fluid back to the vapor generator.

  13. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The Materials and Components Technology Division (MCT) provides a research and development capability for the design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs related to nuclear energy support the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR): life extension and accident analyses for light water reactors (LWRs); fuels development for research and test reactors; fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology; and safe shipment of hazardous materials. MCT Conservation and Renewables programs include major efforts in high-temperature superconductivity, tribology, nondestructive evaluation (NDE), and thermal sciences. Fossil Energy Programs in MCT include materials development, NDE technology, and Instrumentation design. The division also has a complementary instrumentation effort in support of Arms Control Technology. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the database.

  14. Attoheat transport phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marciak-Kozlowska; M. Pelc; M. A. Kozlowski

    2009-06-09

    Fascinating developments in optical pulse engineering over the last 20 years lead to the generation of laser pulses as short as few femtosecond, providing a unique tool for high resolution time domain spectroscopy. However, a number of the processes in nature evolve with characteristic times of the order of 1 fs or even shorter. Time domain studies of such processes require at first place sub-fs resolution, offered by pulse depicting attosecond localization. The generation, characterization and proof of principle applications of such pulses is the target of the attoscience. In the paper the thermal processes on the attosecond scale are described. The Klein-Gordon and Proca equations are developed. The relativistic effects in the heat transport on nanoscale are discussed. It is shown that the standard Fourier equation can not be valid for the transport phenomena induced by attosecond laser pulses. The heat transport in nanoparticles and nanotubules is investigated.

  15. Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operations pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian

  16. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  17. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision points such as; crash, location, etc. For each pass through the routines, when a crash is randomly selected, crash parameters are then used to determine if failure has occurred using either external look up tables, correlations functions from deterministic calculations, or built in data libraries. The effectiveness of the software was recently demonstrated in safety analyses of the transportation of radioisotope systems for the US Dept. of Energy. These methods are readily adaptable to estimating risks associated with a variety of hazardous shipments such as spent nuclear fuel, explosives, and chemicals.

  18. Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation, 2005 Update. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnitt, R.; Eudy, L.

    2005-08-01

    Document provides an overview of the transportation market in 2005. Areas covered include hybrid, fuel cell, hydrogen, and alternative fuel vehicles.

  19. 1.212J / ESD.221J An Introduction to Intelligent Transportation Systems, Spring 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Joseph

    Basic elements of intelligent transportation systems. Technological, systems, and institutional aspects of ITS considered, including system architecture, congestion pricing, public/private partnerships, network models, ITS ...

  20. Heavy-flavor transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Beraudo

    2015-10-29

    The formation of a hot deconfined medium (Quark-Gluon Plasma) in high-energy nuclear collisions affects heavy-flavor observables. In the low/moderate-pT range transport calculations allow one to simulate the propagation of heavy quarks in the plasma and to evaluate the effect of the medium on the final hadronic spectra: results obtained with transport coefficients arising from different theoretical approaches can be compared to experimental data. Finally, a discussion of possible effects on heavy-flavor observables due to the possible formation of a hot-medium in small systems (like in p-A collisions) is presented.

  1. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas addressed by LBNL. Section 3 documents the current modeling tools, available at LBNL, for the EBS study. This may be important for identifying future modeling activities within the EBS group with these current capabilities and needs for future EBS modeling development. Section 4 presents the results of geomechanical modeling using the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) constitutive relationship for thermo-elasto-plastic media such as bentonite and an update on reactive-diffusive transport modeling approaches through bentonite in the EBS. Section 5 discusses identified knowledge gaps and technical issues as well as short- and long-term R&D plans.

  2. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste migration (e.g. BC Cribs and Trenches). The improved models have been also coupled with inverse models and newly-developed parameter scaling techniques to allow estimation of field-scale and effective transport parameters for the vadose zone. The development and utility of pedotransfer functions for describing fine-scale hydrogeochemical heterogeneity and for incorporating this heterogeneity into reactive transport models was explored. An approach based on grain-size statistics appears feasible and has been used to describe heterogeneity in hydraulic properties and sorption properties, such as the cation exchange capacity and the specific surface area of Hanford sediments. This work has also led to the development of inverse modeling capabilities for time-dependent, subsurface, reactive transport with transient flow fields using an automated optimization algorithm. In addition, a number of geophysical techniques investigated for their potential to provide detailed information on the subtle changes in lithology and bedding surfaces; plume delineation, leak detection. High-resolution resistivity is now being used for detecting saline plumes at several waste sites at Hanford, including tank farms. Results from the field studies and associated analysis have appeared in more than 46 publications generated over the past 4 years. These publications include test plans and status reports, in addition to numerous technical notes and peer reviewed papers.

  3. Groundwater flow with energy transport and waterice phase change: Numerical simulations, benchmarks, and application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Groundwater flow with energy transport and water­ice phase change: Numerical simulations saturated, coupled porewater-energy transport, with freezing and melting porewater, and includes propor for groundwater and energy transport with ice formation and melting are proposed that may be used by other

  4. TRANSPORT EFFECTS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrovay, Kristóf

    TRANSPORT EFFECTS IN THE EVOLUTION OF THE GLOBAL SOLAR MAGNETIC FIELD K. PETROVAY Instituto de model of the passive transport of the mean poloidal magnetic field in the convec­ tive zone, including of the transport coefficients we find that diffusivity is prevalent, and the latitudinal distribution of the field

  5. Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gohm, Alexander

    Selected Studies in Mountain Meteorology From Downslope Windstorms to Air Pollution Transport, including downslope windstorms and air pollution transport, they are all linked to mountain meteorology and associated cold fronts, as well as local winds in valleys that cause air pollution transport. High

  6. A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A model of sediment resuspension and transport dynamics in southern Lake Michigan Jing Lou-three-dimensional suspended sediment transport model was developed and generalized to include combined wave-current effects to study bottom sediment resuspension and transport in southern Lake Michigan. The results from a three

  7. MSIV leakage airborne iodine transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cline, J.E. (Cline Associates Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Gaseous iodine deposits on surfaces exposed to vapors. Basic chemical and physical principles predict this behavior, and several laboratory and in-plant measurements demonstrate the characteristic. An empirical model was developed that describes the deposition, resuspension, and transformation of airborne radioiodine molecular species as a stream containing these forms moves along its pathway. The model uses a data base of measured values of deposition and resuspension rates in its application and describes the conversion of the more reactive inorganic iodine species I[sub 2] to the less reactive organic species CH[sub 3]I as the iodine deposits and resuspends along the path. It also considers radioactive decay and chemical surface bonding during residence on surfaces. For the 8-day [sup 131]I, decay during the airborne portion of the transport is negligible. Verification of the model included measurement tests of long gaseous-activity sampling lines of different diameters, operated at different flow rates and stream temperatures. The model was applied to the streams at a boiling water reactor nuclear power plant to describe the transport through leaking main steam isolation valves (MSIVs), following a loss-of-coolant accident.

  8. Plug-in Electric Vehicle Infrastructure: A Foundation for Electrified Transportation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markel, T.

    2010-04-01

    Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs)--which include all-electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles--provide a new opportunity for reducing oil consumption by drawing power from the electric grid. To maximize the benefits of PEVs, the emerging PEV infrastructure--from battery manufacturing to communication and control between the vehicle and the grid--must provide access to clean electricity, satisfy stakeholder expectations, and ensure safety. Currently, codes and standards organizations are collaborating on a PEV infrastructure plan. Establishing a PEV infrastructure framework will create new opportunities for business and job development initiating the move toward electrified transportation. This paper summarizes the components of the PEV infrastructure, challenges and opportunities related to the design and deployment of the infrastructure, and the potential benefits.

  9. Behavior of the particle transport coefficients near the density limit in MTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinak, M.M.

    1993-04-01

    The perturbed particle transport coefficients were determined for a range of plasma conditions in the Alcator C tokamak, a component of the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX), from analysis of density perturbations created in gas modulation experiments. Density measurements from a 15 chord far-infrared interferometer were sufficiently detailed to allow radial profiles of the transport coefficients to be resolved. Gas modulation experiments were carried out on plasmas over a range of relatively low currents and a wide variety of line-averaged densities, including values near the Greenwald density limit. With this technique the perturbed diffusion coefficient D and the perturbed convection velocity V can be determined simultaneously. Measured profiles of D rise toward the outside of the plasma column in a manner generally similar to those determined previously for {chi}{sub e,HP} from sawtooth heat pulse propagation. Values of D are typically smaller than those of {chi}{sub e,HP} given for the same line-averaged densities by a factor of 2-5. Diffusion coefficients from a series of discharges at constant current showed little variation with density through most of the saturated ohmic confinement regime. At the Greenwald density limit threshold a dramatic increase occurred in both the perturbed convective and diffusive transport coefficients in the outer region of the plasma. The increases were most pronounced at the outermost range of the radii where coefficients were determined (r/a = 0.8), but were apparent over a region which extended well into the plasma interior. Density profiles maintained a similar shape near the density limit, congruous with the similar behavior of the transport coefficients. No dramatic deterioration was evident in the global energy confinement.

  10. Inverse Transport Theory of Photoacoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Bal; Alexandre Jollivet; Vincent Jugnon

    2009-08-27

    We consider the reconstruction of optical parameters in a domain of interest from photoacoustic data. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) radiates high frequency electromagnetic waves into the domain and measures acoustic signals emitted by the resulting thermal expansion. Acoustic signals are then used to construct the deposited thermal energy map. The latter depends on the constitutive optical parameters in a nontrivial manner. In this paper, we develop and use an inverse transport theory with internal measurements to extract information on the optical coefficients from knowledge of the deposited thermal energy map. We consider the multi-measurement setting in which many electromagnetic radiation patterns are used to probe the domain of interest. By developing an expansion of the measurement operator into singular components, we show that the spatial variations of the intrinsic attenuation and the scattering coefficients may be reconstructed. We also reconstruct coefficients describing anisotropic scattering of photons, such as the anisotropy coefficient $g(x)$ in a Henyey-Greenstein phase function model. Finally, we derive stability estimates for the reconstructions.

  11. Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Automatically Testing Interacting Software Components Leonard Gallagher Information Technology@ise.gmu.edu ABSTRACT One goal of integration testing for object-oriented software is to ensure high object. It addresses methods for identifying the relevant actions of a test component to be integrated into the system

  12. The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 The SOHO Archive Components, Architecture, Processing & Technology George Dimitoglou SOHO ESA/NASA Project Science Team EER/L3 Space Sciences Division #12;2 SOHO Archive Components n-tier architecture are many more #12;6 Technology Review #12;7 Statistics CDS 157,350 CELIAS 62,466 EIT 237,158 ERNE 7

  13. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models, a class of powerful by a neural net- work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  14. Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsieh, William

    Nonlinear principal component analysis by neural networks William W. Hsieh Oceanography a potential oversimplification of the datasets being analyzed. The advent of neural network (NN) models by a neural net­ work model which nonlinearly generalizes the classical principal component analysis (PCA

  15. Call for Papers Optoelectronic Interconnects and Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    -speed detectors for OI component assembly; fully embedded components 3D optical routing and assembly connectors for III-V and Si photonics multi-channel device packaging thermal and structural modeling optical International Symposium on SPIE OPTO: Optoelectronic Materials, Devices and Applications 22-27 January 2011

  16. Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2011-07-05

    A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

  17. Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Chapter 10 Part 651 Agricultural Waste Management Field Handbook 10­1(210-vi-AWMFH, rev. 1, July 1996) Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management....................................................................................................10­70 10­i #12;Chapter 10 Agricultural Waste Management System Component Design Part 651 Agricultural

  18. Hybrid solar lighting systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2007-06-12

    A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

  19. Fuel removal, transport, and storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, H.W.

    1986-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Unit 2 of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station (TMI-2) which damaged the core of the reactor resulted in numerous scientific and technical challenges. Some of those challenges involve removing the core debris from the reactor, packaging it into canisters, loading canisters into a rail cask, and transporting the debris to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for storage, examination, and preparation for final disposal. This paper highlights how some challenges were resolved, including lessons learned and benefits derived therefrom. Key to some success at TMI was designing, testing, fabricating, and licensing two rail casks, which each provide double containment of the damaged fuel. 10 refs., 12 figs.

  20. Spin Transport Shingo Katsumoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Yasuhiro

    -1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581, Japan According to DARPA's definition, "Spintronics"[1] means "Spin Transport Electronics". The issue "Spin Trans- port" thus covers all the fields of spintronics and one devices. In semiconductor spintronics devices, we therefore utilize the differences in n, , m for up

  1. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  2. Storing and transporting energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClaine, Andrew W. (Lexington, MA); Brown, Kenneth (Reading, MA)

    2010-09-07

    Among other things, hydrogen is released from water at a first location using energy from a first energy source; the released hydrogen is stored in a metal hydride slurry; and the metal hydride slurry is transported to a second location remote from the first location.

  3. "Educating transportation professionals."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    @virginia.edu http://cts.virginia.edu/Demetsky.htm Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.924.7464 Transportation Engineering & Management Research Our group works and Operations The mobility of freight is vital to the national economy. The growth in demand for freight

  4. Ionic (Proton) Transport Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environments - #12;Technology Options -- Ionic Transport Separation Systems Central, Semi-Central (coal/Semi-Central Systems Coal is the cheapest fuel, but requires the greatest pre-conditioning Clean-up of syngas requires Energy Systems ChevronTexaco SRI Consulting SAIC ChevronTexaco Technology Ventures #12;Performance

  5. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  6. The transport of cosmic rays across magnetic fieldlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desiati, Paolo [Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC) and Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 222 West Washington Avenue, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Zweibel, Ellen G., E-mail: desiati@wipac.wisc.edu, E-mail: zweibel@astro.wisc.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    The long residence times and small anisotropies of cosmic rays suggest that they are well confined and well scattered by the Galactic magnetic field. Due to the disk-like shape of the confinement volume, transport in the vertical direction, which is perpendicular to the mean Galactic magnetic field, is key to cosmic ray escape. It has long been recognized that this vertical transport depends both on the vertical component of the field lines themselves and on the extent to which the cosmic rays are tied to the field lines. In this paper, we use magnetic fields with very simple spatial and temporal structures to isolate some important features of cross field line transport. We show that even simple magnetic nonuniformities combined with pitch angle scattering can enhance cross field line transport by several orders of magnitude, while pitch angle scattering is unnecessary for enhanced transport if the field is chaotic. Nevertheless, perpendicular transport is much less than parallel transport in all the cases we study. We apply the results to confinement of cosmic rays in the Fermi bubbles.

  7. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation. Radionuclides irreversibly sorbed onto this fraction of colloids also transport without retardation. The transport times for these radionuclides will be the same as those for nonsorbing radionuclides. The fraction of nonretarding colloids developed in this analysis report is used in the abstraction of SZ and UZ transport models in support of the total system performance assessment (TSPA) for the license application (LA). This analysis report uses input from two Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) analysis reports. This analysis uses the assumption from ''Waste Form and In-Drift Colloids-Associated Radionuclide Concentrations: Abstraction and Summary'' that plutonium and americium are irreversibly sorbed to colloids generated by the waste degradation processes (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025]). In addition, interpretations from RELAP analyses from ''Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170010]) are used to develop the retardation factor distributions in this analysis.

  8. A Transport Synthetic Acceleration method for transport iterations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramone, Gilles Lionel

    1996-01-01

    We present a family of Transport Synthetic Acceleration (TSA) methods to iteratively solve within-group scattering problems. A single iteration in these schemes consists of a transport sweep followed by a low-order calculation ...

  9. Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson III, George R. ); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin ); Freerks, Robert L. )

    2013-01-15

    Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

  10. Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

    2013-03-01

    The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

  11. Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and complementary components of the U

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDF TableJune 201558,736

  12. Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and complementary components of the U

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDF TableJune 201558,736Changes in

  13. Pipeline transportation and underground storage are vital and complementary components of the U

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet) Year Jan4.PDF TableJune 201558,736Changes

  14. Analysis Insights, August 2015: Sustainable Transportation; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    NREL Analysis Insights mines our body of analysis work to synthesize topical insights and key findings. In this issue, we examine transportation systems, alternative fuels, and implications of increasing electrification of transit. Moving people and goods from point A to B has never been easier, but our current transportation systems also take a toll on our environment. Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation’s total carbon emissions. With new technology, can we make our transportation system cleaner and more cost effective? NREL is applying its analytical expertise and imagination to do just that. Solutions start with systems thinking. Connecting the dots between physical components - vehicles, fueling stations, and highways - and institutional components - traffic laws, regulations, and vehicle standards - helps illuminate solutions that address the needs of the transportation system's many stakeholders.

  15. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system safety analysis report for packaging. Volumes 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.

    1996-04-18

    This SARP describes the RTG Transportation System Package, a Type B(U) packaging system that is used to transport an RTG or similar payload. The payload, which is included in this SARP, is a generic, enveloping payload that specifically encompasses the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) RTG payload. The package consists of two independent containment systems mounted on a shock isolation transport skid and transported within an exclusive-use trailer.

  16. Cooling Strategies for Vane Leading Edges in a Syngas Environment Including Effects of Deposition and Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, Forrest; Bons, Jeffrey

    2014-09-30

    The Department of Energy has goals to move land based gas turbine systems to alternate fuels including coal derived synthetic gas and hydrogen. Coal is the most abundant energy resource in the US and in the world and it is economically advantageous to develop power systems which can use coal. Integrated gasification combined cycles are (IGCC) expected to allow the clean use of coal derived fuels while improving the ability to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. These cycles will need to maintain or increase turbine entry temperatures to develop competitive efficiencies. The use of coal derived syngas introduces a range of potential contaminants into the hot section of the gas turbine including sulfur, iron, calcium, and various alkali metals. Depending on the effectiveness of the gas clean up processes, there exists significant likelihood that the remaining materials will become molten in the combustion process and potentially deposit on downstream turbine surfaces. Past evidence suggests that deposition will be a strong function of increasing temperature. Currently, even with the best gas cleanup processes a small level of particulate matter in the syngas is expected. Consequently, particulate deposition is expected to be an important consideration in the design of turbine components. The leading edge region of first stage vanes most often have higher deposition rates than other areas due to strong fluid acceleration and streamline curvature in the vicinity of the surface. This region remains one of the most difficult areas in a turbine nozzle to cool due to high inlet temperatures and only a small pressure ratio for cooling. The leading edge of a vane often has relatively high heat transfer coefficients and is often cooled using showerhead film cooling arrays. The throat of the first stage nozzle is another area where deposition potentially has a strongly adverse effect on turbine performance as this region meters the turbine inlet flow. Based on roughness levels found on in service vanes (Bons, et al., 2001, up to 300 microns) flow blockage in first stage turbine nozzles can easily reach 1 to 2 percent in conventional turbines. Deposition levels in syngas fueled gas turbines are expected to be even more problematic. The likelihood of significant deposition to the leading edge of vanes in a syngas environment indicates the need to examine this effect on the leading edge cooling problem. It is critical to understand the influence of leading edge geometry and turbulence on deposition rates for both internally and showerhead cooled leading edge regions. The expected level of deposition in a vane stagnation region not only significantly changes the heat transfer problem but also suggests that cooling arrays may clog. Addressing the cooling issue suggests a need to better understand stagnation region heat transfer with realistic roughness as well as the other variables affecting transport near the leading edge. Also, the question of whether leading edge regions can be cooled internally with modern cooling approaches should also be raised, thus avoiding the clogging issue. Addressing deposition in the pressure side throat region of the nozzle is another critical issue for this environment. Issues such as examining the protective effect of slot and full coverage discrete-hole film cooling on limiting deposition as well as the influence of roughness and turbulence on effectiveness should be raised. The objective of this present study is to address these technical challenges to help enable the development of high efficiency syngas tolerant gas turbine engines.

  17. 35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    potential means for diversifying an energy resource base for the transportation sector. Largely as a result, there is a potential for the entrance of an estimated one million alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) into the California35 Alternative Transportation Fuels in California Chapter 4 ALTERNATIVE TRANSPORTATION FUELS

  18. Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

    2008-05-29

    Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

  19. A quantum kinetic equation for Fermi-systems including three-body correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Sedrakian; G. Roepke

    1998-04-23

    A single-time quantum transport equation, which includes effects beyond the quasiparticle approximation, is derived for Fermi-systems in the framework of non-equilibrium real-time Green's functions theory. Ternary correlations are incorporated in the kinetic description via a cluster expansion for the self-energies (e.g., the transport vertex and the width) truncated at the level of three-body scattering amplitudes. A finite temperature/density formulation of the three-body problem is given. Corresponding three-body equations reduce to the well-known Faddeev equations in the vacuum limit. In equilibrium the equation of state contains virial corrections proportional to the third quantum virial coefficient.

  20. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This report provides information on transportation fuels other than gasoline and diesel, and the vehicles that use these fuels. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) provides this information to support the U.S. Department of Energy`s reporting obligations under Section 503 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT). The principal information contained in this report includes historical and year-ahead estimates of the following: (1) the number and type of alterative-fueled vehicles (AFV`s) in use; (2) the consumption of alternative transportation fuels and {open_quotes}replacement fuels{close_quotes}; and (3) the number and type of alterative-fueled vehicles made available in the current and following years. In addition, the report contains some material on special topics. The appendices include a discussion of the methodology used to develop the estimates (Appendix A), a map defining geographic regions used, and a list of AFV suppliers.

  1. Integrated transportation system design optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Christine P. (Christine Pia), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Traditionally, the design of a transportation system has focused on either the vehicle design or the network flow, assuming the other as given. However, to define a system level architecture for a transportation system, ...

  2. The role of the Kubo number in two-component turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, G. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shalchi, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2013-09-15

    We explore the random walk of magnetic field lines in two-component turbulence by using computer simulations. It is often assumed that the two-component model provides a good approximation for solar wind turbulence. We explore the dependence of the field line diffusion coefficient on the Kubo number which is a fundamental and characteristic quantity in the theory of turbulence. We show that there are two transport regimes. One is the well-known quasilinear regime in which the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the Kubo number squared, and the second one is a nonlinear regime in which the diffusion coefficient is directly proportional to the Kubo number. The so-called percolative transport regime which is often discussed in the literature cannot be found. The numerical results obtained in the present paper confirm analytical theories for random walking field lines developed in the past.

  3. NHI Component Technical Readiness Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven R. Sherman; Dane F. Wilson; Steven J. Pawel

    2007-09-01

    A decision process for evaluating the technical readiness or maturity of components (i.e., heat exchangers, chemical reactors, valves, etc.) for use by the U.S. DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative is described. This system is used by the DOE NHI to assess individual components in relation to their readiness for pilot-scale and larger-scale deployment and to drive the research and development work needed to attain technical maturity. A description of the evaluation system is provided, and examples are given to illustrate how it is used to assist in component R&D decisions.

  4. Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos Nuclear Arms Control R&D Consortium includes Los Alamos A consortium led by the University of Michigan that includes LANL as...

  5. An investigation of the effect of diffusivity on the transport and spread of contaminants in groundwater systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, D.; Stewart, M.; Muyshondt, A.

    1997-07-01

    Contaminant transport in groundwater is modeled using an advection diffusion equation. The diffusion component of the model is due to molecular diffusion and advection through the flow passages in the soil matrix which are smaller than the resolvable length scales. In addition to the physical diffusion, the advection/diffusion equation requires a certain amount of diffusion for the governing equations to be stable. If there is insufficient physical diffusion the cell Peclet number is less than 2 and oscillations in the solution occur. Balance numerical diffusion must be supplied for a stable solution. Numerical simulations of contaminant transport in groundwater flows must therefore include accurate models of as many of three forms of diffusion. One represents the subscale fluid path diffusion (either tensor, vector, or scalar in form), another is the scalar molecular diffusion (scalar), and the numerical stabilizing diffusion (again either tensor, vector, or scalar in form). The final result must reasonably model contaminant spread and transport for the predictions to be useful. In the literature, measurements of contaminant diffusivity are usually made using one dimensional experiments. Because of the dependence on higher level models to capture all of the physics in contaminant transport, it is to validate these models using realistic multidimensional geometries with comparisons to experimental data. Here, the effects of different diffusion models are examined and compared for two important cases. The first is a contaminant plume originating at the surface and extracted at a drain. The second case is an isolated region of contamination which is advected and diffused towards the drain. In the second case, qualitative comparisons can be made with limited visualization data. These results will eventually be used with a comprehensive experimental program to validate models of diffusion transport.

  6. Transport Properties of Bilayer Graphene Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Electrical spin injection and transport in germanium”. Phys.P. , Temperature- Dependent Transport in Suspended Graphene.Y. M. , Quantum Transport: Introduction to Nanoscience.

  7. Contaminant Transport in the Southern California Bight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idica, Eileen Y.

    2010-01-01

    1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarctic1987). The California Current transports Pacific Subarcticthe dynamics and transport of Southern California stormwater

  8. 2030 Northwest Arkansas Regional Transportation Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Arkansas Regional Planning Commission

    2006-04-20

    on the Committees below were selected by the chief officials of each participating government or agency to represent them in the transportation planning process. Policy Committee members include Mayors, County Judges, and Chief Executive Officers. Technical Advisory... areas. PARTICIPANTS POLICY COMMITTEE AGENCY TAC Alan Meadors AHTD Planning & Research Steve Mitchell AHTD Transit Danny Chidester Joe Shipman AHTD District 4 AHTD District 9 Steve Lawrence Travis Harp Benton County Michelle Crain Troy Galloway...

  9. West Central Texas Regional Transportation Final Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West Central Texas Council of Governments

    2006-01-01

    incorporated work conducted in 2005 by the Central Texas Rural Transit District (CARR) and WCTCOG including a survey of transportation providers and stakeholders. Development of a regional inventory of transit providers, evaluation of the abilities... and capabilities of existing transit providers, and community outreach through a series of pubic meetings were conducted in April and May of 2006. West Central Texas is unique among the 24 Texas regions having four public transit providers, three rural...

  10. IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON ACHIEVING MODERATOR EXCLUSION AND SUPPORTING STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for the foreseeable future. This report proposes supplementing the ongoing research and development work related to potential degradation of used fuel, baskets, poisons, and storage canisters during an extended period of storage with a parallel path. This parallel path can assure criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). Using updated risk assessment insights for additional technical justification and relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal conditions of transportation. A demonstrating testing program supporting a detailed analytical effort as well as updated risk assessment insights can provide the basis for moderator exclusion during hypothetical accident conditions. This report also discusses how this engineered concept can support the goal of standardized transportation.

  11. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    https:www.jlab.orgnewsarticlesnewport-news-review-ch-47-segment-includes-tedf-groundbreaking-event Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event...

  12. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are...

  13. Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic devices and methods including porous polymer monoliths Microfluidic...

  14. Transforming California's Freight Transport System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Transforming California's Freight Transport System Policy Forum on the Role of Freight Transport in Achieving Clean Air, Climate Goals, Economic Growth and Healthy Communities in California Jack Kitowski April 19, 2013 1 #12;Freight Impacts at Many Levels 2 #12;Freight Transport Today: Contribution

  15. Transportation Safety Excellence in Operations Through Improved Transportation Safety Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Michael A. Lehto; MAL

    2007-05-01

    A recent accomplishment of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) Nuclear Safety analysis group was to obtain DOE-ID approval for the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantity radioactive/fissionable waste in Department of Transportation (DOT) Type A drums at MFC. This accomplishment supported excellence in operations through safety analysis by better integrating nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements in the Transportation Safety Document (TSD); reducing container and transport costs; and making facility operations more efficient. The MFC TSD governs and controls the inter-facility transfer of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials in non-DOT approved containers. Previously, the TSD did not include the capability to transfer payloads of greater-than-Hazard-Category-3 radioactive and/or fissionable materials using DOT Type A drums. Previous practice was to package the waste materials to less-than-Hazard-Category-3 quantities when loading DOT Type A drums for transfer out of facilities to reduce facility waste accumulations. This practice allowed operations to proceed, but resulted in drums being loaded to less than the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance criteria (WAC) waste limits, which was not cost effective or operations friendly. An improved and revised safety analysis was used to gain DOE-ID approval for adding this container configuration to the MFC TSD safety basis. In the process of obtaining approval of the revised safety basis, safety analysis practices were used effectively to directly support excellence in operations. Several factors contributed to the success of MFC’s effort to obtain approval for the use of DOT Type A drums, including two practices that could help in future safety basis changes at other facilities. 1) The process of incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the TSD at MFC helped to better integrate nuclear safety requirements with waste requirements. MFC’s efforts illustrate that utilizing the requirements of other disciplines, beyond nuclear safety, can provide an efficient process. Analyzing current processes to find better ways of meeting the requirements of multiple disciplines within a safety basis can lead to a more cost-effective, streamlined process. 2) Incorporating the DOT Type A drums into the MFC TSD was efficient because safety analysts utilized a transportation plan that provided analysis that could also be used for the change to the TSD addendum. In addition, because the plan they used had already been approved and was in use by the Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) at the INL, justification for the change to the TSD was more compelling. MFC safety analysts proved that streamlining a process can be made more feasible by drawing from analysis that has already been completed.

  16. Fuel cell water transport

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Hedstrom, James C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  17. Big data : evolution, components, challenges and opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarate Santovena, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution and current state of the "Big Data" industry, and to understand the key components, challenges and opportunities of Big Data and analytics face in today business environment, this is analyzed ...

  18. Thermochemical nanolithography components, systems, and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedo, Elisa; Marder, Seth R.; de Heer, Walt A.; Szoskiewicz, Robert J.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Jones, Simon C.; Okada, Takashi; Wang, Debin; Curtis, Jennifer E.; Henderson, Clifford L.; Hua, Yueming

    2013-06-18

    Improved nanolithography components, systems, and methods are described herein. The systems and methods generally employ a resistively heated atomic force microscope tip to thermally induce a chemical change in a surface. In addition, certain polymeric compositions are also disclosed.

  19. Outsourcing the Design of Structural Building Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swearingin, Adam V.

    2008-05-16

    . This project contains an examination of the tasks associated with the design of structural building components. These tasks are evaluated to determine the feasibility of outsourcing any or all “core competencies” to a consultant which employs design...

  20. Principal Components Analysis for Binary Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seokho

    2010-07-14

    Principal components analysis (PCA) has been widely used as a statistical tool for the dimension reduction of multivariate data in various application areas and extensively studied in the long history of statistics. One of the limitations of PCA...

  1. Rail transportation update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-01-15

    Record western coal shipments and lucrative export traffic lead America's railroad to their fourth most profitable year in history. But with the coal boom going bust, higher rates, and a new administration and congress, what sort of transportation year can coal mines and shippers expect in 2009? The article gives the opinions of company executives and discusses findings of the recent so-called Christenson Report which investigated growing railroad market power. 1 ref., 1 fig.

  2. Transport Model with Quasipions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiong, L.; Ko, Che Ming; Koch, V.

    1993-01-01

    above a threshold delta mass which increases with nuc ear due to the stifFening of the delta-hole branch in of the ionthe nuclear medium. Since the probability e pio component in the delta-hole branch becomes larger with 2 Tr [Pi'"(p~) PN...

  3. SA3654 Component characterization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meir, G.W.

    1996-06-01

    AlliedSignal Inc., Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T), was provided with production capability assurance program (PCAP) funding to develop, characterize, and qualify purchased product components for use on the PRESS-A program. The SA3654, N-Channel, Power MOSFET was identified as a component needing such activity to support PRESS-A. This report presents the characterization activities and results for the SA3654.

  4. Electrochemical components employing polysiloxane-derived binders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Delnick, Frank M.

    2013-06-11

    A processed polysiloxane resin binder for use in electrochemical components and the method for fabricating components with the binder. The binder comprises processed polysiloxane resin that is partially oxidized and retains some of its methyl groups following partial oxidation. The binder is suitable for use in electrodes of various types, separators in electrochemical devices, primary lithium batteries, electrolytic capacitors, electrochemical capacitors, fuel cells and sensors.

  5. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  6. Metal Cutting for Large Component Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulick, Robert M.

    2008-01-15

    Decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants presents technological challenges. One major challenge is the removal of large components mainly consisting of the reactor vessel, steam generators and pressurizer. In order to remove and package these large components nozzles must be cut from the reactor vessel to precise tolerances. In some cases steam generators must be segmented for size and weight reduction. One innovative technology that has been used successfully at several commercial nuclear plant decommissioning is diamond wire sawing. Diamond wire sawing is performed by rotating a cable with diamond segments attached using a flywheel approximately 24 inches in diameter driven remotely by a hydraulic pump. Tension is provided using a gear rack drive which also takes up the slack in the wire. The wire is guided through the use of pulleys keeps the wire in a precise location. The diamond wire consists of 1/4 inch aircraft cable with diamond beads strung over the cable separated by springs and brass crimps. Standard wire contains 40 diamond beads per meter and can be made to any length. Cooling the wire and controlling the spread of contamination presents significant challenges. Under normal circumstances the wire is cooled and the cutting kerf cleaned by using water. In some cases of reactor nozzle cuts the use of water is prohibited because it cannot be controlled. This challenge was solved by using liquid Carbon Dioxide as the cooling agent. The liquid CO{sub 2} is passed through a special nozzle which atomizes the liquid into snowflakes which is introduced under pressure to the wire. The snowflakes attach to the wire keeping it cool and to the metal shavings. As the CO{sub 2} and metal shavings are released from the wire due to its fast rotation, the snowflakes evaporate leaving only the fine metal shavings as waste. Secondary waste produced is simply the small volume of fine metal shavings removed from the cut surface. Diamond wire sawing using CO{sub 2} cooling has been employed for cutting the reactor nozzles at San Onofre Unit 1 and at Connecticut Yankee. These carbon steel nozzles ranged up to 54 inch diameter with a 15 inch thick wall and an interior stainless cladding. Diamond wire sawing using traditional water cooling has been used to segment the reactor head at Rancho Seco and for cutting reactor nozzles and control rod drive tubes at Dairyland Power's Lacrosse BWR project. Advantages: - ALARA: All cutting is preformed remotely significantly reducing dose. Stringing of wires is accomplished using long handle tools. - Secondary waste is reduced to just the volume of material cut with the diamond wire. - The potential for airborne contamination is eliminated. Due to the flexibility of the wire, any access restrictions and interferences can be accommodated using pulleys and long handle tools. - The operation is quiet. Disadvantages: - With Liquid Carbon Dioxide cooling and cleaning, delivery of the material must be carefully planned. The longer the distance from the source to the cut area, the greater the chance for pressure drop and subsequent problems with line freezing. - Proper shrouding and ventilation are required for environmental reasons. In each case, the metal structures were cut at a precise location. Radiation dose was reduced significantly by operating the equipment from a remote location. The cuts were very smooth and completed on schedule. Each project must be analyzed individually and take into account many factors including access, radiological conditions, environmental conditions, schedule requirements, packaging requirements and size of cuts.

  7. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Hydrogen Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FYDepartmentBillion

  8. Federal Perspective on Opportunities for Hydrogen and Natural Gas for Transportation„Including a Natural Gas Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14, 20111,FYDepartmentBillionFederal Perspective on

  9. Transportation Energy Futures Analysis Snapshot

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transportation currently accounts for 71% of total U.S. petroleum use and 33% of the nation's total carbon emissions. The TEF project explores how combining multiple strategies could reduce GHG emissions and petroleum use by 80%. Researchers examined four key areas – lightduty vehicles, non-light-duty vehicles, fuels, and transportation demand – in the context of the marketplace, consumer behavior, industry capabilities, technology and the energy and transportation infrastructure. The TEF reports support DOE long-term planning. The reports provide analysis to inform decisions about transportation energy research investments, as well as the role of advanced transportation energy technologies and systems in the development of new physical, strategic, and policy alternatives.

  10. Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mynick, Harry E.

    Transport optimization in stellaratorsa... H. E. Mynickb Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton transport in stellarators is presented. A primary deficiency of stellarators has been elevated transport this difficulty, developing a range of techniques for reducing transport, both neoclassical and, more recently

  11. SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    SEPTEMBER 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M of coastline. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes

  12. APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    APRIL 2006 MOUM ET. AL. 1 Energy Transport by Nonlinear Internal Waves J. N. MOUM1 , J. M. KLYMAK2. The energy transported by these waves includes a nonlinear advection term uE that is negligible in linear internal waves. Unlike linear internal waves, the pressure-velocity energy flux up includes important

  13. Thirty Years of Turnstiles and Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Meiss

    2015-02-28

    To characterize transport in a deterministic dynamical system is to compute exit time distributions from regions or transition time distributions between regions in phase space. This paper surveys the considerable progress on this problem over the past thirty years. Primary measures of transport for volume-preserving maps include the exiting and incoming fluxes to a region. For area-preserving maps, transport is impeded by curves formed from invariant manifolds that form partial barriers, e.g., stable and unstable manifolds bounding a resonance zone or cantori, the remnants of destroyed invariant tori. When the map is exact volume preserving, a Lagrangian differential form can be used to reduce the computation of fluxes to finding a difference between the action of certain key orbits, such as homoclinic orbits to a saddle or to a cantorus. Given a partition of phase space into regions bounded by partial barriers, a Markov tree model of transport explains key observations, such as the algebraic decay of exit and recurrence distributions.

  14. Update on EM Transportation Program Activities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Organizations * DOE Orders, Policy, Guidance Transportation Risk Reduction * Motor Carrier Evaluations * Physical Protection * Transportation Compliance Reviews * Safety...

  15. Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine and Powertrain Research Supertruck - Improving Transportation Efficiency through Integrated Vehicle, Engine...

  16. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities...

  17. Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Africa's Transport Infrastructure Mainstreaming Maintenance and Management Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Africa's Transport Infrastructure...

  18. Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Session...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation and Stationary Power Integration Workshop Agenda, October 27, 2008, Phoenix, Arizonia Transportation and Stationary Power Integration: Workshop Proceedings...

  19. Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies Enhancing Transportation Energy Security through Advanced Combustion and Fuels Technologies 2005...

  20. Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility photocathode gun and transport beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsa, Z.; Young, L.

    1990-01-01

    We present an analysis of the electron beam emitted from a laser driven photocathode injector (Gun, operating at 2856 MHZ), through a Transport beamline, to the LINAC entrance for the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). The beam parameters including beam energy, and emittance are calculated. Some of our results, are tabulated and the phase plots of the beam parameters, from Cathode, through the Transport line elements, to the LINAC entrance, are shown.

  1. Transport Theory of Heavy Flavor in Relativistic Nuclear Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Shanshan

    2015-01-01

    A short overview is presented for the recent progress in the theory of heavy flavor transport in ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions, including a summary of different transport models, their phenomenological results of heavy meson quenching and flow at RHIC and LHC, a possible solution to the $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ vs. $v_2$ puzzle and predictions for heavy flavor observables beyond the current measurements.

  2. A general hybrid radiation transport scheme for star formation simulations on an adaptive grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klassen, Mikhail; Pudritz, Ralph E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kuiper, Rolf [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Institut für Computergestützte Wissenschaften, Universität Zürich Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich (Switzerland); Banerjee, Robi; Buntemeyer, Lars, E-mail: klassm@mcmaster.ca [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-12-10

    Radiation feedback plays a crucial role in the process of star formation. In order to simulate the thermodynamic evolution of disks, filaments, and the molecular gas surrounding clusters of young stars, we require an efficient and accurate method for solving the radiation transfer problem. We describe the implementation of a hybrid radiation transport scheme in the adaptive grid-based FLASH general magnetohydrodyanmics code. The hybrid scheme splits the radiative transport problem into a raytracing step and a diffusion step. The raytracer captures the first absorption event, as stars irradiate their environments, while the evolution of the diffuse component of the radiation field is handled by a flux-limited diffusion solver. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method through a variety of benchmark tests including the irradiation of a static disk, subcritical and supercritical radiative shocks, and thermal energy equilibration. We also demonstrate the capability of our method for casting shadows and calculating gas and dust temperatures in the presence of multiple stellar sources. Our method enables radiation-hydrodynamic studies of young stellar objects, protostellar disks, and clustered star formation in magnetized, filamentary environments.

  3. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e Guide: Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B. Peter; Watson, David J.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2012-04-03

    This STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) guide document describes the theory, use, and application of the STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e operational modes. These operational modes of the STOMP simulator are configured to solve problems involving the sequestration of CO2 in geologic saline reservoirs. STOMP-CO2 is the isothermal version and STOMP-CO2e is the nonisothermal version. These core operational modes solve the governing conservation equations for component flow and transport through geologic media; where, the STOMP-CO2 components are water, CO2 and salt and the STOMP-CO2e operational mode also includes an energy conservation equation. Geochemistry can be included in the problem solution via the ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic-Equation Chemistry) module, and geomechanics via the EPRMech (Elastic-Plastic-Rock Mechanics) module. This addendum is designed to provide the new user with a full guide for the core capabilities of the STOMP-CO2 and -CO2e simulators, and to provide the experienced user with a quick reference on implementing features. Several benchmark problems are provided in this addendum, which serve as starting points for developing inputs for more complex problems and as demonstrations of the simulator’s capabilities.

  4. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradonjic, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagberg, Aric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hengartner, Nick [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Percus, Allon G [CLAREMONT GRADUATE UNIV.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  5. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Neelima Godugu

    2000-07-30

    ACTS flow loop is now operational under elevated pressure and temperature. Currently, experiments with synthetic based drilling fluids under pressure and temperature are being conducted. Based on the analysis of Fann 70 data, empirical correlations defining the shear stress as a function of temperature, pressure and the shear rate have been developed for Petrobras synthetic drilling fluids. PVT equipment has been modified for testing Synthetic oil base drilling fluids. PVT tests with Petrobras Synthetic base mud have been conducted and results are being analyzed Foam flow experiments have been conducted and the analysis of the data has been carried out to characterize the rheology of the foam. Comparison of pressure loss prediction from the available foam hydraulic models and the test results has been made. Cuttings transport experiments in horizontal annulus section have been conducted using air, water and cuttings. Currently, cuttings transport tests in inclined test section are being conducted. Foam PVT analysis tests have been conducted. Foam stability experiments have also been conducted. Effects of salt and oil concentration on the foam stability have been investigated. Design of ACTS flow loop modification for foam and aerated mud flow has been completed. A flow loop operation procedure for conducting foam flow experiments under EPET conditions has been prepared Design of the lab-scale flow loop for dynamic foam characterization and cuttings monitoring instrumentation tests has been completed. The construction of the test loop is underway. As part of the technology transport efforts, Advisory Board Meeting with ACTS-JIP industry members has been organized on May 13, 2000.

  6. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

    2003-09-30

    The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

  7. Non-Isothermal, Multi-phase, Multi-component Flows through Deformable Methane Hydrate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Shubhangi; Wohlmuth, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    We present a hydro-geomechanical model for subsurface methane hydrate systems. Our model considers kinetic hydrate phase change and non-isothermal, multi-phase, multi-component flow in elastically deforming soils. The model accounts for the effects of hydrate phase change and pore pressure changes on the mechanical properties of the soil, and also for the effect of soil deformation on the fluid-solid interaction properties relevant to reaction and transport processes (e.g., permeability, capillary pressure, reaction surface area). We discuss a 'cause-effect' based decoupling strategy for the model and present our numerical discretization and solution scheme. We then identify the important model components and couplings which are most vital for a hydro-geomechanical hydrate simulator, namely, 1) dissociation kinetics, 2) hydrate phase change coupled with non-isothermal two phase two component flow, 3) two phase flow coupled with linear elasticity (poroelasticity coupling), and finally 4) hydrate phase change c...

  8. Resolving the mystery of transport within internal transport barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staebler, G. M.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.; Greenfield, C. M.; Lao, L. L.; Smith, S. P.; Kinsey, J. E.; Grierson, B. A.; Chrystal, C.

    2014-05-15

    The Trapped Gyro-Landau Fluid (TGLF) quasi-linear model [G. M. Staebler, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 102508 (2005)], which is calibrated to nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations, is now able to predict the electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion toroidal rotation simultaneously for internal transport barrier (ITB) discharges. This is a strong validation of gyrokinetic theory of ITBs, requiring multiple instabilities responsible for transport in different channels at different scales. The mystery of transport inside the ITB is that momentum and particle transport is far above the predicted neoclassical levels in apparent contradiction with the expectation from the theory of suppression of turbulence by E×B velocity shear. The success of TGLF in predicting ITB transport is due to the inclusion of ion gyro-radius scale modes that become dominant at high E×B velocity shear and to improvements to TGLF that allow momentum transport from gyrokinetic turbulence to be faithfully modeled.

  9. Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-ForumTransportation

  10. Transportation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown ofTransportToolkit Prototype Jump

  11. Transportation Fuel Supply | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently accounts for

  12. Transportation Representation | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation currently

  13. Transportation and Parking

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.WeekProducts >Transportation

  14. Electron Heat Transport Measured

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear ProfileMultiferroicAward |Electron CorrelationHeat Transport

  15. Sandia Energy - Transportation Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home Analysis Final

  16. Sandia Energy - Transportation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel MagnetizationTransportation Energy Home

  17. Impact of Wireless Power Transfer in Transportation: Future Transportation Enabler, or Near Term Distraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onar, Omer C; Jones, Perry T

    2014-01-01

    While the total liquid fuels consumed in the U.S. for transportation of goods and people is expected to hold steady, or decline slightly over the next few decades, the world wide consumption is projected to increase of over 30% according to the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 [1]. The balance of energy consumption for transportation between petroleum fuels and electric energy, and the related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions produced consuming either, is of particular interest to government administrations, vehicle OEMs, and energy suppliers. The market adoption of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) appears to be inhibited by many factors relating to the energy storage system (ESS) and charging infrastructure. Wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies have been identified as a key enabling technology to increase the acceptance of EVs. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in many research areas related to understanding the impacts, opportunities, challenges and costs related to various deployments of WPT technology for transportation use. Though the initial outlook for WPT deployment looks promising, many other emerging technologies have met unfavorable market launches due to unforeseen technology limitations, sometimes due to the complex system in which the new technology was placed. This paper will summarize research and development (R&D) performed at ORNL in the area of Wireless Power Transfer (WPT). ORNL s advanced transportation technology R&D activities provide a unique set of experienced researchers to assist in the creation of a transportation system level view. These activities range from fundamental technology development at the component level to subsystem controls and interactions to applicable system level analysis of impending market and industry responses and beyond.

  18. Understanding Contaminant Transport Pathways at Rocky Flats - A Basis for the Remediation Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, Ian

    2008-01-15

    The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) is a Department of Energy facility located approximately 16 miles northwest of Denver, Colorado. Processing and fabrication of nuclear weapons components occurred at Rocky Flats from 1952 through 1989. Operations at the Site included the use of several radionuclides, including plutonium-239/240 (Pu), americium-241 (Am), and various uranium (U) isotopes, as well as several types of chlorinated solvents. The historic operations resulted in legacy contamination, including contaminated facilities, process waste lines, buried wastes and surface soil contamination. Decontamination and removal of buildings at the site was completed in late 2005, culminating more than ten years of active environmental remediation work. The Corrective Action Decision/Record of Decision was subsequently approved in 2006, signifying regulatory approval and closure of the site. The use of RFETS as a National Wildlife Refuge is scheduled to be in full operation by 2012. To develop a plan for remediating different types of radionuclide contaminants present in the RFETS environment required understanding the different environmental transport pathways for the various actinides. Developing this understanding was the primary objective of the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) project. Findings from the AME studies were used in the development of RFETS remediation strategies. The AME project focused on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in surface water, groundwater, air, soil and biota at RFETS. For the purposes of the AME studies, actinide elements addressed included Pu, Am, and U. The AME program, funded by DOE, brought together personnel with a broad range of relevant expertise in technical investigations. The AME advisory panel identified research investigations and approaches that could be used to solve issues related to actinide migration at the Site. An initial step of the AME was to develop a conceptual model to provide a qualitative description of the relationships among potential actinide sources and transport pathways at RFETS. One conceptual model was developed specifically for plutonium and americium, because of their similar geochemical and transport properties. A separate model was developed for uranium because of its different properties and mobility in the environment. These conceptual models were guidelines for quantitative analyses described in the RFETS Pathway Analysis Report, which used existing data from the literature as well as site-specific analyses, including field, laboratory and modeling studies to provide quantitative estimates of actinide migration in the RFETS environment. For pathways where more than one method was used to estimate offsite loads for a specific pathway, the method yielding the highest estimated off-site was used for comparison purposes. For all actinides studied, for pre-remediation conditions, air and surface water were identified to be the dominant transport mechanisms. The estimated annual airborne plutonium-239/240 load transported off site exceeded the surface water load by roughly a factor of 40. However, despite being the largest transport pathway, airborne radionuclide concentrations at the monitoring location with the highest measurements during the period studied were less than two percent of the allowable 10 milli-rem standard governing DOE facilities. Estimated actinide loads for other pathways were much less. Shallow groundwater was approximately two orders of magnitude lower, or 1/100 of the load conveyed in surface water. The estimated biological pathway load for plutonium was approximately five orders of magnitude less, or 1/100,000, of the load estimated for surface-water. The pathway analysis results were taken into consideration during subsequent remediation activities that occurred at the site. For example, when the 903 Pad area was remediated to address elevated concentrations of Pu and Am in the surface soil, portable tent structures were constructed to prevent wind and water erosion from occurring while remediation activitie

  19. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  20. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  1. Inductive coupler for downhole components and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott; Briscoe, Michael A.; Sneddon, Cameron; Fox, Joe

    2006-05-09

    The present invention includes a method of making an inductive coupler for downhole components. The method includes providing an annular housing, preferably made of steel, the housing having a recess. A conductor, preferably an insulated wire, is also provided along with a plurality of generally U-shaped magnetically conducting, electrically insulating (MCEI) segments. Preferably, the MCEI segments comprise ferrite. An assembly is formed by placing the plurality of MCEI segments within the recess in the annular housing. The segments are aligned to form a generally circular trough. A first portion of the conductor is placed within the circular trough. This assembly is consolidated with a meltable polymer which fills spaces between the segments, annular housing and the first portion of the conductor. The invention also includes an inductive coupler including an annular housing having a recess defined by a bottom portion and two opposing side wall portions. At least one side wall portion includes a lip extending toward but not reaching the other side wall portion. A plurality of generally U-shaped MCEI segments, preferably comprised of ferrite, are disposed in the recess and aligned so as to form a circular trough. The coupler further includes a conductor disposed within the circular trough and a polymer filling spaces between the segments, the annular housing and the conductor.

  2. Protection of lithographic components from particle contamination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E. (San Ramon, CA); Rader, Daniel J. (Lafayette, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system that employs thermophoresis to protect lithographic surfaces from particle deposition and operates in an environment where the pressure is substantially constant and can be sub-atmospheric. The system (thermophoretic pellicle) comprises an enclosure that surrounds a lithographic component whose surface is being protected from particle deposition. The enclosure is provided with means for introducing a flow of gas into the chamber and at least one aperture that provides for access to the lithographic surface for the entry and exit of a beam of radiation, for example, and further controls gas flow into a surrounding low pressure environment such that a higher pressure is maintained within the enclosure and over the surface being protected. The lithographic component can be heated or, alternatively the walls of the enclosure can be cooled to establish a temperature gradient between the surface of the lithographic component and the walls of the enclosure, thereby enabling the thermophoretic force that resists particle deposition.

  3. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Daly, Jeffery E. (Cypress, TX)

    2009-05-05

    A system for transmitting information between downhole components has a first downhole component with a first mating surface and a second downhole component having a second mating surface configured to substantially mate with the first mating surface. The system also has a first transmission element with a first communicating surface and is mounted within a recess in the first mating surface. The first transmission element also has an angled surface. The recess has a side with multiple slopes for interacting with the angled surface, each slope exerting a different spring force on the first transmission element. A second transmission element has a second communicating surface mounted proximate the second mating surface and adapted to communicate with the first communicating surface.

  4. Component technology for Stirling power converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thieme, L.G.

    1994-09-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has organized a component technology program as part of the efforts to develop Stirling converter technology for space power applications. The Stirling space power program is part of the NASA High Capacity Power Project of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). NASA Lewis is also providing technical management for a DOE/Sandia program to develop Stirling converters for solar terrestrial power producing electricity for the utility grid. The primary contractors for the space power and solar terrestrial programs develop component technologies directly related to their program goals. This Lewis component technology effort, while coordinated with the main programs, aims at longer term issues, advanced technologies, and independent assessments. This paper will present an overview of work on linear alternators, engine/alternator/load interactions and controls, heat exchangers, materials, life and reliability, and bearings.

  5. Title IX & Discrimination Complaint Form (including sexual harassment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Title IX & Discrimination Complaint Form (including sexual harassment) Office of Diversity. Although the university cannot commit to keeping a complaint of discrimination confidential the process for filing or investigating complaints of discrimination (including sexual harassment). Note

  6. Explosion at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, Durham 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, R.

    MINISTRY OF FUEL AND POWER - EXPLOSION AT LOUISA (including MORRISON OLD) COLLIERY, DURHAM REPORT On the Causes of, and Circumstances attending, the Explosion which occurred at Louisa (including Morrison Old) Colliery, ...

  7. FISCAL YEAR 2006 REPORT ON ELECTROLYZER COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colon-Mercado, H; David Hobbs, D; Daryl Coleman, D; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2006-08-03

    Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. In FY05, testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) explored a low temperature fuel cell design concept for the SDE. The advantages of this design concept include high electrochemical efficiency and small volumetric footprint that is crucial for successful implementation on a commercial scale. A key component of the SDE is the ion conductive membrane through which protons produced at anode migrate to the cathode and react to produce hydrogen. An ideal membrane for the SDE should have both low ionic resistivity and low sulfur dioxide transport. These features allow the electrolyzer to perform at high currents with low potentials, along with preventing contamination of both the hydrogen output and poisoning of the catalysts involved. Another key component is the electrocatalyst material used for the anode and cathode. Good electrocatalysts should be chemically stable and low overpotential for the desired electrochemical reactions. This report summarizes results from activities to evaluate different membrane and electrocatalyst materials for the SDE. Several different types of commercially-available membranes were analyzed for ionic resistance and sulfur dioxide transport including perfluorinated sulfonic acid, sulfonated poly-etherketone-ketone, and poly-benzimidazole membranes. Of these membrane types, the poly-benzimidazole (PBI) membrane, Celtec-L, exhibited the best combination of characteristics for use in an SDE. Testing examined the activity and stability of platinum and palladium as electrocatalyst for the SDE in sulfuric acid solutions. Cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that platinum provided better catalytic activity with much lower potentials and higher currents than palladium. Testing also showed that the catalyst activity is strongly influenced by concentration of the sulfuric acid. Various cell configurations were examined with respect to the deposition of electrocatalyst and use of conductive carbon materials such as carbon cloth and carbon paper. Findings from these evaluations and the results of the membrane and electrocatalyst testing, we prepared three different membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for electrolyzer testing. The first MEA consisted of a Nafion{reg_sign} membrane with platinum electrocatalyst deposited on carbon cloths, which were heat pressed onto the membrane, an assembly identical to those used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The second MEA also used a Nafion membrane with the electrocatalysts deposited directly onto the membrane. The third MEA proved similar to the second but utilized a PBI membrane in place of the Nafion{reg_sign} membrane. Tailor of the membrane and catalysts properties for the SDE system was concluded as a required step for the technology to move forward. It was also recommended the evaluation of the tested and new developed materials at conditions closer to the SDE operating conditions and for longer period of time.

  8. Materials and Components Technology Division research summary, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    This division has the purpose of providing a R and D capability for design, fabrication, and testing of high-reliability materials, components, and instrumentation. Current divisional programs are in support of the Integral Fast Reactor, life extension for light water reactors, fuels development for the new production reactor and research and test reactors, fusion reactor first-wall and blanket technology, safe shipment of hazardous materials, fluid mechanics/materials/instrumentation for fossile energy systems, and energy conservation and renewables (including tribology, high- temperature superconductivity). Separate abstracts have been prepared for the data base.

  9. Transportation legislative data base: State radioactive materials transportation statute compilation, 1989--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The Transportation Legislative Data Base (TLDB) is a computer-based information service containing summaries of federal, state and certain local government statutes and regulations relating to the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The TLDB has been operated by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) under cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management since 1992. The data base system serves the legislative and regulatory information needs of federal, state, tribal and local governments, the affected private sector and interested members of the general public. Users must be approved by DOE and NCSL. This report is a state statute compilation that updates the 1989 compilation produced by Battelle Memorial Institute, the previous manager of the data base. This compilation includes statutes not included in the prior compilation, as well as newly enacted laws. Statutes not included in the prior compilation show an enactment date prior to 1989. Statutes that deal with low-level radioactive waste transportation are included in the data base as are statutes from the states of Alaska and Hawaii. Over 155 new entries to the data base are summarized in this compilation.

  10. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    energy sources, including oil sands, shale oil, coal-to-oil (very heavy oil, oil sands and oil shale), natural gas

  11. Transportation and its Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    fuels include ethanol, biodiesel and methanol, and syntheticEsterification Vegetable oil Biodiesel (esters) Bio oilsuch as ethanol, methanol, biodiesel, di-methyl esters (DME)

  12. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  13. Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

    2005-07-05

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

  14. Loaded transducer for downhole drilling components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Hall, Jr., H. Tracy; Pixton, David S.; Briscoe, Michael A.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Fox, Joe; Sneddon, Cameron

    2006-02-21

    A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force, urging them closer together."

  15. ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

    2003-07-30

    This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

  16. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  17. Transportation Statistics Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenn, M.

    1997-01-01

    This document is the fourth Transportation Statistics Annual Report (TSAR) prepared by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) for the President and Congress. As in previous years, it reports on the state of U.S. transportation system at two levels. First, in Part I, it provides a statistical and interpretive survey of the system—its physical characteristics, its economic attributes, aspects of its use and performance, and the scale and severity of unintended consequences of transportation, such as fatalities and injuries, oil import dependency, and environment impacts. Part I also explores the state of transportation statistics, and new needs of the rapidly changing world of transportation. Second, Part II of the report, as in prior years, explores in detail the performance of the U.S. transportation system from the perspective of desired social outcomes or strategic goals. This year, the performance aspect of transportation chosen for thematic treatment is “Mobility and Access,” which complements past TSAR theme sections on “The Economic Performance of Transportation” (1995) and “Transportation and the Environment” (1996). Mobility and access are at the heart of the transportation system’s performance from the user’s perspective. In what ways and to what extent does the geographic freedom provided by transportation enhance personal fulfillment of the nation’s residents and contribute to economic advancement of people and businesses? This broad question underlies many of the topics examined in Part II: What is the current level of personal mobility in the United States, and how does it vary by sex, age, income level, urban or rural location, and over time? What factors explain variations? Has transportation helped improve people’s access to work, shopping, recreational facilities, and medical services, and in what ways and in what locations? How have barriers, such as age, disabilities, or lack of an automobile, affected these accessibility patterns? How are commodity flows and transportation services responding to global competition, deregulation, economic restructuring, and new information technologies? How do U.S. patterns of personal mobility and freight movement compare with other advanced industrialized countries, formerly centrally planned economies, and major newly industrializing countries? Finally, how is the rapid adoption of new information technologies influencing the patterns of transportation demand and the supply of new transportation services? Indeed, how are information technologies affecting the nature and organization of transportation services used by individuals and firms?

  18. Development and applications of GREET 2.7 -- The Transportation Vehicle-CycleModel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Wu, Y.

    2006-12-20

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a vehicle-cycle module for the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. The fuel-cycle GREET model has been cited extensively and contains data on fuel cycles and vehicle operations. The vehicle-cycle model evaluates the energy and emission effects associated with vehicle material recovery and production, vehicle component fabrication, vehicle assembly, and vehicle disposal/recycling. With the addition of the vehicle-cycle module, the GREET model now provides a comprehensive, lifecycle-based approach to compare the energy use and emissions of conventional and advanced vehicle technologies (e.g., hybrid electric vehicles and fuel cell vehicles). This report details the development and application of the GREET 2.7 model. The current model includes six vehicles--a conventional material and a lightweight material version of a mid-size passenger car with the following powertrain systems: internal combustion engine, internal combustion engine with hybrid configuration, and fuel cell with hybrid configuration. The model calculates the energy use and emissions that are required for vehicle component production; battery production; fluid production and use; and vehicle assembly, disposal, and recycling. This report also presents vehicle-cycle modeling results. In order to put these results in a broad perspective, the fuel-cycle model (GREET 1.7) was used in conjunction with the vehicle-cycle model (GREET 2.7) to estimate total energy-cycle results.

  19. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ?10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  20. Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.