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1

Transport Activity Measurement Toolkit (TAMT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Transport Activity Measurement Toolkit (TAMT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Transport Activity Measurement Toolkit (TAMT) Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Low emission development planning Resource Type: Dataset, Maps, Software/modeling tools, Video, Training materials User Interface: Website, Desktop Application Website: code.google.com/p/tamt/ Cost: Free Transport Activity Measurement Toolkit (TAMT) Screenshot References: TAMT Presentation[1] TAMT Google Site Page[2] TAMT Demonstration Videos[3] "The World Bank Latin America and the Caribbean Region Sustainable Development Department Transport Cluster in conjunction with the World

2

Transportation activity analysis using smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation activity surveys investigate when, where and how people travel in urban areas to provide information necessary for urban transportation planning. In Singapore, the Land Transport Authority (LTA) carries out ...

Xiao, Yu

3

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Contacts for EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on

4

Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Activated transport in AMTEC electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Transport of alkali metal atoms through porous cathodes of alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter (AMTEC) cells is responsible for significant, reducible losses in the electrical performance of these cells. Experimental evidence for activated transport of metal atoms at grain surfaces and boundaries within some AMTEC electrodes has been derived from temperature dependent studies as well as from analysis of the detailed frequency dependence of ac impedance results for other electrodes, including thin, mature molybdenum electrodes which exhibit transport dominated by free molecular flow of sodium gas at low frequencies or dc conditions. Activated surface transport will almost always exist in parallel with free molecular flow transport, and the process of alkali atom adsorption/desorption from the electrode surface will invariably be part of the transport process, and possibly a dominant part in some cases. Little can be learned about the detailed mass transport process from the ac impedance or current voltage curves of an electrode at one set of operating parameters, because the transport process includes a number of important physical parameters that are not all uniquely determined by one experiment. The temperature dependence of diffusion coefficient of the alkali metal through the electrode in several cases provides an activation energy and pre-exponential, but at least two activated processes may be operative, and the activation parameters should be expected to depend on the alkali metal activity gradient that the electrode experiences. In the case of Pt/W/Mn electrodes operated for 2500 hours, limiting currents varied with electrode thickness, and the activation parameters could be assigned primarily to the surface/grain boundary diffusion process. 17 refs.

Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.; Underwood, M.L.; O'Connor, D.; Kikkert, S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office manages

7

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Key Federal Statutes to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Federal Statutes on AddThis.com... Home About Contacts Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Key Federal Statutes These are excerpts from federal statutes that established key Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities.

8

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Key Terms Key Terms to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Key Terms on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Guidance Documents Statutes & Regulations Program Annual Reports Fact Sheets Newsletter Case Studies Workshops Tools Key Terms FAQs Key Terms The Energy Policy Act (EPAct) includes specific terminology related to

9

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel Petitions to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Fuel Petitions on AddThis.com... Home About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Alternative Fuel Petitions Resources Alternative Fuel Petitions Section 301(2) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct 1992) defines

10

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Alternative Compliance for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

11

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Clean Air Asia Partner Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Phase I information[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include enhancing capacity for implementing

12

Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Philippines-Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Agency/Company /Organization Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), Clean Air Asia Partner Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector Land Focus Area Greenhouse Gas, People and Policy, Transportation Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -NAMA Program Start 2012 Program End 2013 Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References Phase I information[1] Overview Progress and Outcomes Capacity building activities include enhancing capacity for implementing

13

Active Transport 1 MEMBRANE FUNCTION, Part 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active Transport 1 MEMBRANE FUNCTION, Part 3 Active Transport1 Active Transport: If the cell must expenditure is required when a substance is moved up (against) a concentration gradient or when concrete. A good example is the Na+ / K+ pump (also known as the Na+ / K+ ATPase). It translocates both Na

Prestwich, Ken

14

Update on EM Transportation Program Activities | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update on EM Transportation Program Activities Motor Carrier Evaluation Program, DOE Directives, Upcoming Shipping Activities Update on EM Transportation Program...

15

Vehicle Technologies Office: EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office manages several Energy Policy Act (EPAct) transportation regulatory activities that aim to reduce U.S. petroleum consumption by building a core market for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). EPAct directed DOE to develop the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to manage regulatory activities, including the State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleet Program, which requires covered fleets to reduce petroleum consumption through one of two compliance methods. Features Discover how National Grid meets EPAct requirements Read the latest newsletter Learn about Alternative Compliance Quick Links Standard Compliance Reporting Standard Compliance Alternative Compliance

16

Office of Secure Transportation Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16th, 2012 16th, 2012 WIPP Knoxville, TN OFFICE OF SECURE TRANSPORTATION Agency Integration Briefing Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct other missions supporting the national security of the United States of America. 3 5 OST's Commitment to Transportation Safety and Security Over three decades of safe, secure transport of nuclear weapons and special nuclear material to and from military locations and DOE facilities More than 140 million miles traveled Over three decades and 240,000 flight hours of accident-free flying Professionalism We conduct ourselves and our operations with the highest standards of professionalism and integrity.

17

The Transport Properties of Activated Carbon Fibers  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The transport properties of activated isotropic pitch-based carbon fibers with surface area 1000 m{sup 2}/g have been investigated. We report preliminary results on the electrical conductivity, the magnetoresistance, the thermal conductivity and the thermopower of these fibers as a function of temperature. Comparisons are made to transport properties of other disordered carbons.

di Vittorio, S. L.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Endo, M.; Issi, J-P.; Piraux, L.

1990-07-00T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Transportation Security Rulemaking...

19

Transportable calorimeter measurements of highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

A sensitive calorimeter has been combined with a small temperature-controlled water bath to compose a transportable system that is capable of measuring multikilogram quantities of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The sample chamber size, 5 in. in diameter by 10 in. high, is large enough to hold sufficient HEU metal or high-grade scrap to provide a measurable thermal signal. Calorimetric measurements performed on well-characterized material indicate that the thermal power generated by 93% {sup 235}U samples with 1.0% {sup 234}U can be measured with a precision of about 1% (1 sigma) for 4-kg samples. The transportable system consists of a twin-bridge calorimeter installed inside a 55-gal. stainless steel drum filled with water with heating and cooling supplied by a removable thermoelectric module attached to the side. Isotopic measurements using high-resolution gamma-ray measurements of the HEU samples and analysis with the FRAM code were used to determine the isotopic ratios and specific power of the samples. This information was used to transform the measured thermal power into grams of HEU. Because no physical standards are required, this system could be used for the verification of plutonium, {sup 238}Pu heat sources, or large quantities of metal or other high-grade matrix forms of HEU.

Rudy, C.; Bracken, D.S.; Staples, P.; Carrillo, L.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Definition and Measurement of Transportation System Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation Economic and social development Entertainment Other Costsbenefits and costs of transportation. It is a social policy

Dahlgren, Joy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of novel active transport membrande devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air Products has undertaken a research program to fabricate and evaluate gas separation membranes based upon promising ``active-transport`` (AT) materials recently developed in our laboratories. Active Transport materials are ionic polymers and molten salts which undergo reversible interaction or reaction with ammonia and carbon dioxide. The materials are useful for separating these gases from mixtures with hydrogen. Moreover, AT membranes have the unique property of possessing high permeability towards ammnonia and carbon dioxide but low permeability towards hydrogen and can thus be used to permeate these components from a gas stream while retaining hydrogen at high pressure.

Laciak, D.V.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Bursts of Active Transport in Living Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We scrutinize the temporally-resolved speed of active cargo transport in living cells, and show intermittent bursting motions. These nonlinear fluctuations follow a scaling law over several decades of time and space, the statistical regularities displaying a time-averaged shape that we interpret to reflect stress buildup followed by rapid release. The power law of scaling is the same as seen in driven jammed colloids, granular, and magnetic systems. The implied regulation of active transport with environmental obstruction extends the classical notion of molecular crowding.

Bo Wang; James Kuo; Steve Granick

2013-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Measurements of activity in nuclear medicine. National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) develop the standards of activity measurement ...

24

Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Measuring, Reporting, and Verifying (MRV) of Transport Nationally Appropriate Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) Phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Measuring, Reporting, and...

26

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF MEASURES FOR REDUCING TRANSPORTATION SECTOR GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS IN CANADA by Rose: Analysis of Measures for Reducing Transportation Sector Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Canada Project Number the problem of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the Canadian transportation sector. Reductions

27

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Compliance Methods for State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets on Digg Find More places to share EPAct Transportation Regulatory

28

Iran Thomas Auditorium, 8600 Transport Measurements by Scanning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8600 Transport Measurements by Scanning Probe Microscopy: Possibilities for Graphene Randall M. Feenstra Department of Physics Carnegie Mellon University CNMS D D I I S S...

29

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology to someone by E-mail Share EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Facebook Tweet about EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Twitter Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Google Bookmark EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Delicious Rank EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: National Grid Exceeds EPAct Requirements Deploying Natural Gas Technology on Digg

30

Analysis of the Interaction Between Air Transportation and Economic Activity: A Worldwide Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment

Hansman, R. John

2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Analysis of the Interaction Between Air Transportation and Economic Activity: A Worldwide Perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment

Ishutkina, Mariya A.

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: TRANSfer - Towards climate-friendly transport technologies and measures Agency/Company /Organization: GIZ Focus Area: Governance - Planning - Decision-Making Structure Topics: Best Practices Resource Type: Reports, Journal Articles, & Tools Website: transferproject.org/index.php/hb During the 3-year project, project partners will develop the online handbook 'Navigating Transport NAMAs' with practical advice on how to develop and implement a mitigation action in the transport sector. The handbook will consist of a generic part with general information on transport NAMAs and a number of case studies which will be based on south-south networks of countries and practical implementation within the

33

Office of Secure Transportation Activities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activities Our Mission To provide safe and secure ground and air transportation of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapons components, and special nuclear materials and conduct...

34

Analysis of the interaction between air transportation and economic activity : a worldwide perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air transportation usage and economic activity are interdependent. Air transportation provides employment and enables certain economic activities which are dependent on the availability of air transportation services. The ...

Ishutkina, Mariya A. (Mariya Aleksandrovna)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011 March 2011 Report for the Appropriateness of Revisions to the Emergency Planning Hazards Assessment and Protection Action Recommendation Cards for the Office of Secure Transportation [HIAR-OST-2011-03-04] The Office of Emergency Management Oversight (HS-63) conducted a review of a new revision of the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) emergency planning hazards assessment (EPHA) and protective action recommendation (PAR) cards. The review was conducted at the Headquarters OST Albuquerque Office. The purpose of the visit was to evaluate the appropriateness of OST's path forward in revising the EPHA and PAR cards. Independent Activity Report, Office of Secure Transportation - March 2011

36

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOT/PHMSA DOT/PHMSA A ti iti Activities Michael Conroy U S Department of Transportation - 1 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Office of Hazardous Materials Safety Radioactive Materials U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Overview * Harmonization with International Regulations * Update on Revisions to International Regulations * Recent Letters of Interpretation * Update on Rulemakings * PHMSA Information Resources - 2 - * PHMSA Information Resources 2 U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration HM-230 Harmonized with 2000 Version of IAEA's 1996 Edition - 3 - U.S. Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

37

Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Heat transport in active harmonic chains  

SciTech Connect

We show that a harmonic lattice model with amplifying and attenuating elements, when coupled to two thermal baths, exhibits unique heat transport properties. Some of these novel features include anomalous nonequilibrium steady-state heat currents, negative differential thermal conductance, as well as nonreciprocal heat transport. We find that when these elements are arranged in a PT-symmetric manner, the domain of existence of the nonequilibrium steady state is maximized. We propose an electronic experimental setup based on resistive-inductive-capacitive (RLC) transmission lines, where our predictions can be tested.

Zheng, Mei C.; Ellis, Fred M.; Kottos, Tsampikos; Fleischmann, Ragnar; Geisel, Theo; Prosen, Tomaz [Department of Physics, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06459 (United States); Max-Planck-Institute for Dynamics and Self-organization, Am Fassberg 17, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany) and Institute for Nonlinear Dynamics, Department of Physics, University of Goettingen, D-37077 Goettingen (Germany); Physics Department, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Jump to: navigation, search Name Facility for Environmentally Friendly Transport Technology and Measures (TRANSfer) Agency/Company /Organization Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy Topics Adaptation, Low emission development planning Website http://transferproject.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2013 Country Colombia, Haiti, Indonesia, South Africa South America, Caribbean, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Africa References Transfer Project[1] Low-carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles[2] Program Overview The increasing levels of greenhouse gas emissions produced by road traffic in developing countries are becoming a greater problem in efforts to

40

Measurement of gas transport properties for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process for fabricating ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), transport of gas phase reactant into the fiber preform is a critical step. The transport can be driven by pressure or by concentration. This report describes methods for measuring this for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon fiber 3-D weave composite. The results are consistent with a percolating network model for gas transport in CVI preforms and composites. This model predicts inherent variability in local pore characteristics and transport properties, and therefore, in local densification during processing; this may lead to production of gastight composites.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge sector is believed to be responsible for 28.4% of our greenhouse gas emissions (see figure), including 33% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs

42

Measurement of the radiative transport properties of reticulated alumina foams  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for determining radiative transport properties of reticulated materials. The method has both experimental and analytical components. A polar nephelometer is used to measure the scattering profile of a sample of the reticulated material. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the experiment are then combined with the experimental results to give the scatter albedo and extinction coefficient. This paper presents the results of using this method to determine the radiative transport properties of four different porosities (10, 20, 30, 65 pores per inch) of cylindrical reticulated alumina samples ranging in thickness form 0.5 inches to 2. 5 inches.

Hale, M.J.; Bohn, M.S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Update on EM Transportation Program Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presented to: Presented to: 2012 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Knoxville, TN May 16, 2012 1  Continue to manage waste inventories in a safe and compliant manner.  Address high risk waste in a cost- effective manner.  Maintain and optimize current disposal capability for future generations.  Develop future disposal capacity in a complex environment.  Promote the development of treatment and disposal alternatives in the commercial sector.  Review current policies and directives and provide needed oversight. 2 3 Millions of Cubic Feet Source: 2012 WIMS Preliminary Data (millions of cubic feet) 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 FY11 Actual FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 OnSite Commercial NNSS TBD Forecasts from DRAFT 2011 WIMS Packaging Certification * Certificates of

44

Microscopic calculation of the free energy cost for activated transport in glass-forming liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated transport in liquidssupercooled liquids in particularoccurs via mutual nucleation of alternative

Pyotr Rabochiy; Vassiliy Lubchenko

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo applications. Further development could potentially enable selective capture of intracellular antigens, targeted delivery of therapeutic agents, or disruption of the transport systems and consequently the infection and pathogenesis cycle of biothreat agents.

Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Active transport: A kinetic description based on thermodynamic grounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that active transport processes in biological systems can be understood through a local equilibrium description formulated at the mesoscale, the scale to describe stochastic processes. This new approach uses the method established by nonequilibrium thermodynamics to account for the irreversible processes occurring at this scale and provides nonlinear kinetic equations for the rates in terms of the driving forces. The results show that the application domain of nonequilibrium thermodynamics method to biological systems goes beyond the linear domain. A model for transport of Ca$^{2+}$ by the Ca$^{2+}$-ATPase, coupled to the hydrolysis of adenosine-triphosphate is analyzed in detail showing that it depends on the reaction Gibbs energy in a non-linear way. Our results unify thermodynamic and kinetic descriptions, thereby opening new perspectives in the study of different transport phenomena in biological systems.

S. Kjelstrup; J. M. Rubi; D. Bedeaux

2004-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measure of Diffusion Model Error for Thermal Radiation Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffusion approximation to the equation of transfer (Boltzmann transport equation) is usually applied to media where scattering dominates the interactions. Diffusion approximation helps in significant savings in terms of code complexity and computational time. However, this approximation often has significant error. Error due to the inherent nature of a physics model is called model error. Information about the model error associated with the diffusion approximation is clearly desirable. An indirect measure of model error is a quantity that is related in some way to the error but not equal to the error. In general, indirect measures of error are expected to be less costly than direct measures. Perhaps the most well-known indirect measure of the diffusion model error is the variable-Eddington tensor. This tensor provides a great deal of information about the angular dependence of the angular intensity solution, but it is not always simple to interpret. We define a new indirect measure of the diffusion model error called the diffusion model error source (DME source). When this DME source is added to the diffusion equation, the transport solution for the angular-integrated intensity is obtained. In contrast to the variable-Eddington tensor, our DME source is a scalar that is conceptually easy to interpret. In addition to defining the DME source analytically, we show how to generate this source numerically relative to the Sn radiative transfer equations with linear-discontinuous spatial discretization. This numerical source is computationally tested and shown to reproduce the Sn solution for a number of problems. Our radiative transfer model solves a coupled, time dependent, multi-frequency, 1-D slab equation and material heat transfer equation. We then use diffusion approximation to solve the same problem. The difference due to this approximation can be modelled by a diffusion source. The diffusion source is defined as an amount of inhomogeneous source that, when added to a diffusion calculation, gives a solution for the angle-integrated intensity that is equal to the transport solution.

Kumar, Akansha

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Multi-Agent-Based simulation for analysis of transport policy and infrastructure measures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we elaborate on the usage of multi-agent-based simulation (MABS) for quantitative impact assessment of transport policy and infrastructure measures. We provide a general discussion on how to use MABS for freight transport analysis, focusing ... Keywords: MABS, freight transportation, multi-agent systems, multi-agent-based simulation, supply chain simulation, transport policy assessment

Johan Holmgren; Linda Ramstedt; Paul Davidsson; Jan A. Persson

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Mechanisms of motor activity regulation in axonal transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. (2005). "Axonopathy and transport deficits early in theSunday Driver links axonal transport to damage signaling." JL. Holzbaur (2006). "Axonal transport and neurodegenerative

Reis, Gerald Feliz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce E [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Using Travel Time Reliability Measures to Improve Regional Transportation Planning and URS Corporation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, connectivity, and safety to evaluate the transportation system's health and determine where future investmentsUsing Travel Time Reliability Measures to Improve Regional Transportation Planning and Operations of the Transportation Research Board January 13­17, 2008 Revised November 3, 2007 TRB 2008 Annual Meeting CD-ROM Paper

Bertini, Robert L.

52

Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Finkenthal, D.F. [Palomar Coll. (United States); Naumenko, N. [Inst. for Atomic and Molecular Physics (Japan); Tugarinov, S. [TRINITI (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Indicators that matter : measuring transportation performance in Ahmedabad  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In light of the growing challenges of planning for transportation in India, this thesis proposes that a set of indicators, sensitive to local conditions, developed, implemented and managed through a collaborative partnership ...

Osborne, James Clark, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Consumption) Transport Modal Service Supply Chain ­ Fuel Parts Manufacture Vehicle Assembly Warehousing the upstream and downstream processes associated with alternative vehicle fuel infrastructure supply technologies, in addition to the end use or "tailpipe" emissions that are directly correlated with vehicle

55

Lessons learned from reactive transport modeling of a low-activity waste glass disposal system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of reactive chemical transport calculations were conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code to evaluate the long-term performance of a representative low-activity waste glass in a shallow subsurface disposal ... Keywords: chemical transport, low-level waste, numerical model, unsaturated flow, vadose zone

Diana H. Bacon; B. Peter McGrail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

57

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Print banner Home Agenda Awards Exhibitors Lodging Posters Registration T-Shirt Contest Transportation Workshops Contact Us User Meeting Archives Users' Executive...

58

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Transportation and Air Quality Transportation Energy Policy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Appliance Energy...

59

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Transportation of Depleted Uranium Materials in Support of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Program Issues associated with transport of depleted UF6 cylinders and conversion products. Conversion Plan Transportation Requirements The DOE has prepared two Environmental Impact Statements (EISs) for the proposal to build and operate depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6) conversion facilities at its Portsmouth and Paducah gaseous diffusion plant sites, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The proposed action calls for transporting the cylinder at ETTP to Portsmouth for conversion. The transportation of depleted UF6 cylinders and of the depleted uranium conversion products following conversion was addressed in the EISs.

60

Pilot workload in the air transport environment : measurement, theory, and the influence of air traffic control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operating environment of an air transport crew is characterized by multiple interrupting tasks, these tasks being composed of a mixture of purely physical control and purely mental planning processes. Measurement of ...

Katz, Jeffrey G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Monitoring Volume Transport through Measurement of Cable Voltage across the Korea Strait  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage induced by the Tsushima Current on an abandoned submarine telephone cable between Pusan, Korea, and Hamada, Japan, has been measured since March 1998 in order to monitor the volume transport through the Korea Strait. Voltage has a good ...

Kuh Kim; Sang Jin Lyu; Young-Gyu Kim; Byung Ho Choi; Keisuke Taira; Henry T. Perkins; William J. Teague; Jeffrey W. Book

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Water transport in fuel cell membranes measured by laser interferometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) The coefficients of electro-osmotic drag were found to increase with the increasing water content, which indicates that the Grotthuss mechanism of proton transfer is not active in the membranes with low water ...

Kim, Jungik, 1973-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Risks » Transportation Health Risks » Transportation DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Transportation A discussion of health risks associated with transport of depleted UF6. Transport Regulations and Requirements In the future, it is likely that depleted uranium hexafluoride cylinders will be transported to a conversion facility. For example, it is currently anticipated that the cylinders at the ETTP Site in Oak Ridge, TN, will be transported to the Portsmouth Site, OH, for conversion. Uranium hexafluoride has been shipped safely in the United States for over 40 years by both truck and rail. Shipments of depleted UF6 would be made in accordance with all applicable transportation regulations. Shipment of depleted UF6 is regulated by the

64

Tropospheric Water Vapor Transport as Determined from Airborne Lidar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first collocated measurements during THORPEX (The Observing System Research and Predictability Experiment) regional campaign in Europe in 2007 were performed by a novel four-wavelength differential absorption lidar and a scanning 2-?m Doppler ...

Andreas Schfler; Andreas Drnbrack; Christoph Kiemle; Stephan Rahm; Martin Wirth

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Activity based scheduling simulator for product transport using pipeline networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oil companies often rely on scheduling algorithms to increase the throughput of oil derivatives and other products which are transported through pipeline networks. This work presents an architecture for a scheduling simulator for pipeline networks, and ...

Danilo Shibata; Daniel Alfenas; Ricardo Guiraldelli; Marcos R. Pereira-Barretto; Fernando Marcellino

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity and Contribution to California Agriculture William A. Matthews* University of California Agricultural Issues Center of California Agricultural Issues Center. #12; The California Seed Industry: A Measure of Economic Activity

Hammock, Bruce D.

67

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking Laser Coordinate Measurement System Application for Turbine Outage Activities provides nuclear and fossil personnel with a faster and more accurate method for performing turbine measurement activities during an outage.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation systems are an often overlooked critical infrastructure component. These systems comprise a widely diverse elements whose operation impact all aspects of society today. This chapter introduces the key transportation sectors and illustrates ...

Mark Hartong; Rajn Goel; Duminda Wijesekera

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions relevant to the experiments, and (3) to explore whether the corresponding predictions can explain the experimentally-observed behavior of the rise and dispersion of oil droplets in isotropic turbulence. A brief summary of results is presented in Section 4.

Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meier AKMeier@lbl.gov (510) 486-4740 Links Transportation and Air Quality Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Electricity Grid Energy Analysis Energy...

71

Rain-Related Impacts on Selected Transportation Activities and Utility Services in the Chicago Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intensive meteorological study of summer precipitation in the Chicago area during 197678 furnished detailed data needed to perform a study of the impacts of rain on selected transportation-related activities and on certain utility services. ...

Jan Bertness

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Thermal Transport Measurement of Silicon-Germanium Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal properties of one dimensional nanostructures are of interest for thermoelectric energy conversion. Thermoelectric efficiency is related to non dimensional thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT=S^2 o T/k, where S ,o , k and T are Seebeck coefficient, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and the absolute temperature respectively. These physical properties are interdependent. Therefore, making materials with high ZT is a very challenging task. However, nanoscale materials can overcome some of these limitations. When the size of nanomaterials is comparable to wavelength and mean free path of energy carriers, especially phonons, size effect contributes to the thermal conductivity reduction without bringing about major changes in the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient. Therefore, the figure of merit ZT can be manipulated. For example, the thermal conductivities of several silicon nanowires were more than two orders of magnitude lower than that of bulk silicon values due to the enhanced boundary scattering. Among the nanoscale semiconductor materials, Silicon-Germanium(SiGe) alloy nanowire is a promising candidate for thermoelectric materials The thermal conductivities of SiGe core-shell nanowires with core diameters of 96nm, 129nm and 177nm were measured using a batch fabricated micro device in a temperature range of 40K-450K. SiGe nanowires used in the experiment were synthesized via the Vapour-Liquid-Solid (VLS) growth method. The thermal conductivity data was compared with thermal conductivity of Si and Ge nanowires. The data was compared with SiGe alloy thin film, bulk SiGe, Si/SixGe1-x superlattice nanowire, Si/Si0.7Ge0.3 superlattice thin film and also with the thermal conductivity of Si0.5Ge0.5 calculated using the Einstein model. The thermal conductivities of these SiGe alloy nanowires observed in this work are ~20 times lower than Si nanowires, ~10 times lower than Ge nanowires, ~3-4 times lower than Si/SixGe1-x superlattice thin film, Si/SixGe1-x superlattice nanowire and about 3 time lower than bulk SiGe alloy. The low values of thermal conductivity are majorly due to the effect of alloy scattering, due to increased boundary scattering as a result of nanoscale diameters, and the interface diffuse scattering by core-shell effect. The influence of core-shell effect, alloy scattering and boundary scattering effect in reducing the thermal conductivity of these nanowires opens up opportunities for tuning thermoelectric properties which can pave way to thermoelectric materials with high figures of merit in the future.

Gwak, Yunki

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurement of the transport spin polarization of FeV using point-contact Andreev reflection  

SciTech Connect

The Fe1 xVx alloy system exhibits the lowest known Gilbert relaxation rate of any ferromagnetic metal or binary alloy with G1 435MHz at x1 427% V. Low relaxation rates are of particular interest in modern spin electronic applications involving spin torque. The transport spin polarization of a series of sputtered epitaxial Fe1 xVx samples was measured using point contact Andreev reflection. Values of the transport spin polarization agree well with those measured for pure Fe and are independent of composition. The results indicate that the substitution of up to 50% of V for Fe does not reduce the spin polarization in the alloy.

Bailey, William [Columbia University; Osofsky, Mike [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Bussman, Konrad [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Parker, David S [ORNL; Cheng, L [Columbia University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Nitrite transport in chloroplast inner envelope vesicles. I. Direct measurement of proton-linked transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chloroplast inner envelope membrane vesicles that are loaded with the pH-sensitive fluorophore, pyranine, show rapid internal acidification when nitrite is added. Acidification is dependent upon {Delta}pH, with the inside of vesicles being alkaline with respect to the outside. The rate of vesicle acidification was directly proportional to the concentration of nitrite that was added and the imposed pH difference across the membrane. In contrast, added nitrate had no effect on vesicle acidification. Nitrite also caused acidification of asolectin vesicles that were prepared by extrusion were approximately the same size, allowing them to be compared when the final extent of acidification, measured after the pH gradient had collapsed, was similar. The rate of nitrite-dependent acidification was similar in these two preparations at any single nitrite concentration. These results indicate that nitrite movement occurs by rapid diffusion across membranes as nitrous acid, and this movement is dependent on a proton gradient across the lipid bilayer. Under conditions approximating these in vivo, the rate of diffusion of nitrous acid far exceeds that of nitrite reduction within chloroplasts. 26 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Shingles, R.; Roh, M.H.; McCarty, R.E. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Borehole measurements while drilling: systems and activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attention is focused on all potential methods of drilling safer and cheaper. Real time data from the bit offers the greatest potential for meeting these needs. As a result, numerous companies are actively competing to develop this oil field service capability and to capture a world wide market. Two basic categories of service are sought. The first, and highest priority, is drilling safety and efficiency; the second is real-time logging, or formation evaluation. This study addresses the types of systems being studied, describes company activity and projects underway, estimates the practical potential for success and considers the commercial market for successful systems. The need for research data on bit hydraulics and drill string dynamics, special deep, hot or sour gas situations and other relatively unusual requirements may become exceptions to the general conclusions that are drawn. Historical and present activity are documented through presenting the results of extensive literature and patent researches. A breakdown is presented of activity by company along with names and addresses for further contact.

McDonald, W.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Laser Doppler Anemometry Measurements of Dilute Pneumatic Transport in a Vertical Lifter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vertical pneumatic transport in a lab-scale vertical lifter has been studied using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA). The experimental system consists of a lower fluidized silo, an upper receiving tank and a connecting vertical transport pipe made of clear glass. The experimental study has been performed in order to get detailed information of the complex gas-particle flow behavior in a dilute vertical conveying system. Axial and tangential particle velocities, as well as root mean square velocities are measured simultanously for different flow conditions. The particulate material transported is Zirconium Oxide (ZrO2) solids. Measurements is obtained using transport air flow rate of 24, 36, 48 and 60 m3/h. The air is feeded into the tranport air through a nozzle. The length this nozzle is sticking into the transport pipe is varied in order to study the nozzle position influence on the flow behavior. The receiving tank is equipped with weighing cells, so that solids mass fluxes also can be measured for different flow conditions.

Telemark Technological R; D Centre (tel-tek; Vidar Mathiesen; Vidar Mathiesen; Tron Solberg; Tron Solberg

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The relationship between turbulence measurements and transport in different heating regimes in TFTR  

SciTech Connect

The scaling of broad band density fluctuations in the confinement zone of TFTR measured by microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and reflectometry show a relationship between these fluctuations and energy transport measured from power balance calculations. In L-mode plasmas scattering and BES indicates that the density fluctuation level, {delta}n{sup 2}, in the confinement zone for 0.2 < k{perpendicular}ps < 1.0 depends qualitatively on P{sub aux} and I{sub p} in a way that is consistent with variations in energy transport. Fluctuation levels measured with all systems increase strongly toward the edge in all heating regimes following increases in energy transport coefficients. Measurements using BES have shown that poloidal and radial correlation lengths in the confinement zone of L-mode and supershot plasmas fall in the range of 1 to 2 cm. with a wave structure which has k{sub max} {approx} 1 cm{sup {minus}1} (k{perpendicular}ps {approx} 0.2) in the poloidal direction and k{sub max} approaching zero in the radial direction. A simple estimate of the diffusion coefficient based on a measured radial correlation length and correlation time indicates good agreement with power balance calculations. Similar estimates using reflectometry give radial coherence lengths at 10 to 20 kHz in low density ohmic and supershot plasmas of between I and 2 cm.

Bretz, N.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Paul, S.F.; Hammett, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.; Cosby, G. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The relationship between turbulence measurements and transport in different heating regimes in TFTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scaling of broad band density fluctuations in the confinement zone of TFTR measured by microwave scattering, beam emission spectroscopy (BES), and reflectometry show a relationship between these fluctuations and energy transport measured from power balance calculations. In L-mode plasmas scattering and BES indicates that the density fluctuation level, [delta]n[sup 2], in the confinement zone for 0.2 < k[perpendicular]ps < 1.0 depends qualitatively on P[sub aux] and I[sub p] in a way that is consistent with variations in energy transport. Fluctuation levels measured with all systems increase strongly toward the edge in all heating regimes following increases in energy transport coefficients. Measurements using BES have shown that poloidal and radial correlation lengths in the confinement zone of L-mode and supershot plasmas fall in the range of 1 to 2 cm. with a wave structure which has k[sub max] [approx] 1 cm[sup [minus]1] (k[perpendicular]ps [approx] 0.2) in the poloidal direction and k[sub max] approaching zero in the radial direction. A simple estimate of the diffusion coefficient based on a measured radial correlation length and correlation time indicates good agreement with power balance calculations. Similar estimates using reflectometry give radial coherence lengths at 10 to 20 kHz in low density ohmic and supershot plasmas of between I and 2 cm.

Bretz, N.L.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Paul, S.F.; Hammett, G.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.; Zarnstorff, M.C. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Fonck, R.J.; Durst, R.; Cosby, G. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

User-Oriented Two-Dimensional Measure of Effectiveness for the Evaluation of Transport and Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional measure of effectiveness for comparing hazardous material transport and dispersion model predictions and field observations has been developed. This measure is used for comparing predictions and observations paired in space and ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; James F. Heagy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integration of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Transportation Sustainability Jee Eun Kang University ofin Transportation Sustainability DISSERTATION submitted infor transportation sustainability work in this dissertation.

Kang, Jee Eun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A monthly report on transportation research, education, and outreach activities at the University of Minnesota Green freight innovations ...... 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The second session looked at future approaches for transportation finance: Lee Munnich, director of the StateA monthly report on transportation research, education, and outreach activities at the University 4 CEO continued on page 4 Legislators attend transportation seminars CTS redesigns Web site

Minnesota, University of

83

Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: Due to limited parking, all visitors are strongly encouraged to: 1) car-pool, 2) take the Lab's special conference shuttle service, or 3) take the regular off-site shuttle. If you choose to use the regular off-site shuttle bus, you will need an authorized bus pass, which can be obtained by contacting Eric Essman in advance. Transportation & Visitor Information Location and Directions to the Lab: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is located in Berkeley, on the hillside directly above the campus of University of California at Berkeley. The address is One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720. For comprehensive directions to the lab, please refer to: http://www.lbl.gov/Workplace/Transportation.html Maps and Parking Information: On Thursday and Friday, a limited number (15) of barricaded reserved parking spaces will be available for NON-LBNL Staff SNAP Collaboration Meeting participants in parking lot K1, in front of building 54 (cafeteria). On Saturday, plenty of parking spaces will be available everywhere, as it is a non-work day.

84

A Comparison of Measured and Wind-derived Ekman Transport at 11N in the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of measured and wind-derived ageostrophic transport is presented from a zonal transect spanning the Atlantic Ocean along 11N. The transport per unit depth shows a striking surface maximum that decays to nearly zero at a depth of ...

T. K. Chereskin; D. Roemmich

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geostrophic Velocity Measurement Techniques for the Meridional Overturning Circulation and Meridional Heat Transport in the South Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two ocean general circulation models are used to test the ability of geostrophic velocity measurement systems to observe the meridional overturning circulation (MOC) and meridional heat transport (MHT) in the South Atlantic. Model sampling ...

Renellys C. Perez; Silvia L. Garzoli; Christopher S. Meinen; Ricardo P. Matano

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

An Uterine Electromyographic Activity as a Measure of Labor Progression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

16 An Uterine Electromyographic Activity as a Measure of Labor Progression Jerneja Vrhovec to the increase of the size of muscle cells (hypertrophy) and less due to the proliferation of muscle cells should be obtained between the maintenance of tone and the resistance to propagated uterine contractions

Ljubljana, University of

87

PWR Activity Transport and Source Term Assessment: Surface Activity Concentrations by Gamma Scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of surface isotopic concentrations, known as gamma scanning in the United States, is an invaluable tool in assessing variations in shutdown dose rates and the impacts of chemistry and operational changes.

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Environmental Measurements Laboratory fiscal year 1998: Accomplishments and technical activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) is government-owned, government-operated, and programmatically under the DOE Office of Environmental Management. The Laboratory is administered by the Chicago Operations Office. EML provides program management, technical assistance and data quality assurance for measurements of radiation and radioactivity relating to environmental restoration, global nuclear nonproliferation, and other priority issues for the Department of Energy, as well as for other government, national, and international organizations. This report presents the technical activities and accomplishments of EML for Fiscal Year 1998.

Erickson, M.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXASTRANS TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF TEXASTRAN HALL HONOR OF Inductees #12;2 TEXAS TRANSPORTATION HALL HONOR OF L NOR OF Texas is recognized as having one of the finest multimodal transportation systems in the world. The existence of this system has been key

90

Active spectroscopic measurements using the ITER diagnostic system  

SciTech Connect

Active (beam-based) spectroscopic measurements are intended to provide a number of crucial parameters for the ITER device being built in Cadarache, France. These measurements include the determination of impurity ion temperatures, absolute densities, and velocity profiles, as well as the determination of the plasma current density profile. Because ITER will be the first experiment to study long timescale ({approx}1 h) fusion burn plasmas, of particular interest is the ability to study the profile of the thermalized helium ash resulting from the slowing down and confinement of the fusion alphas. These measurements will utilize both the 1 MeV heating neutral beams and a dedicated 100 keV hydrogen diagnostic neutral beam. A number of separate instruments are being designed and built by several of the ITER partners to meet the different spectroscopic measurement needs and to provide the maximum physics information. In this paper, we describe the planned measurements, the intended diagnostic ensemble, and we will discuss specific physics and engineering challenges for these measurements in ITER.

Thomas, D. M. [ITER Organization, 13067 St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Counsell, G. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Johnson, D. [US ITER Project Office, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); Vasu, P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Zvonkov, A. [Russian Research Center ''Kurchatov Institute'', Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

Calculating Capstone Depleted Uranium Aerosol Concentrations from Beta Activity Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Beta activity measurements were used as surrogate measurements of uranium mass in aerosol samples collected during the field testing phase of the Capstone Depleted Uranium (DU) Aerosol Study. These aerosol samples generated by the perforation of armored combat vehicles were used to characterize the depleted uranium (DU) source term for the subsequent human health risk assessment (HHRA) of Capstone aerosols. Establishing a calibration curve between beta activity measurements and uranium mass measurements is straightforward if the uranium isotopes are in equilibrium with their immediate short-lived, beta-emitting progeny. For DU samples collected during the Capstone study, it was determined that the equilibrium between the uranium isotopes and their immediate short lived, beta-emitting progeny had been disrupted when penetrators had perforated target vehicles. Adjustments were made to account for the disrupted equilibrium and for wall losses in the aerosol samplers. Correction factors for the disrupted equilibrium ranged from 0.16 to 1, and the wall loss correction factors ranged from 1 to 1.92.

Szrom, Fran; Falo, Gerald A.; Parkhurst, MaryAnn; Whicker, Jeffrey J.; Alberth, David P.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Gliders Measure Western Boundary Current Transport from the South Pacific to the Equator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spray gliders, most launched from small boats near shore, have established a sustainable time series of equatorward transport through the Solomon Sea. The first 3.5 years (mid-2007 through 2010) are analyzed. Coast-to-coast equatorward transport ...

Russ E. Davis; William S. Kessler; Jeffrey T. Sherman

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Transport and seismoelectric properties of porous permeable rock : numerical modeling and laboratory measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to better understand the transport and seismoelectric (SE) properties of porous permeable rock. Accurate information of rock transport properties, together with pore geometry, can aid us to ...

Zhan, Xin, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Beams, brightness, and background: Using active spectroscopy techniques for precision measurements in fusion plasma research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of an injected neutral beam-either a dedicated diagnostic beam or the main heating beams-to localize and enhance plasma spectroscopic measurements can be exploited for a number of key physics issues in magnetic confinement fusion research, yielding detailed profile information on thermal and fast ion parameters, the radial electric field, plasma current density, and turbulent transport. The ability to make these measurements has played a significant role in much of our recent progress in the scientific understanding of fusion plasmas. The measurements can utilize emission from excited state transitions either from plasma ions or from the beam atoms themselves. The primary requirement is that the beam 'probe' interacts with the plasma in a known fashion. Advantages of active spectroscopy include high spatial resolution due to the enhanced localization of the emission and the use of appropriate imaging optics, background rejection through the appropriate modulation and timing of the beam and emission collection/detection system, and the ability of the beam to populate emitter states that are either nonexistent or too dim to utilize effectively in the case of standard or passive spectroscopy. In addition, some active techniques offer the diagnostician unique information because of the specific quantum physics responsible for the emission. This paper will describe the general principles behind a successful active spectroscopic measurement, emphasize specific techniques that facilitate the measurements and include several successful examples of their implementation, briefly touching on some of the more important physics results. It concludes with a few remarks about the relevance and requirements of active spectroscopic techniques for future burning plasma experiments.

Thomas, Dan M. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Development of Microorganisms with Improved Transport and Biosurfactant Activity for Enhanced Oil Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project had three objectives: (1) to develop microbial strains with improved biosurfactant properties that use cost-effective nutrients, (2) to obtain biosurfactant strains with improved transport properties through sandstones, and (3) to determine the empirical relationship between surfactant concentration and interfacial tension and whether in situ reactions kinetics and biosurfactant concentration meets appropriate engineering design criteria. Here, we show that a lipopeptide biosurfactant produced by Bacillus mojavensis strain JF-2 mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon from sand-packed columns and Berea sandstone cores when a viscosifying agent and a low molecular weight alcohol were present. The amount of residual hydrocarbon mobilized depended on the biosurfactant concentration. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0.1 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1 g/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) recovered 10-40% of residual oil from Berea sandstone cores. Even low biosurfactant concentrations (16 mg/l) mobilized substantial amounts of residual hydrocarbon (29%). The bio-surfactant lowered IFT by nearly 2 orders of magnitude compared to typical IFT values of 28-29 mN/m. Increasing the salinity increased the IFT with or without 2,3-butanediol present. The lowest interfacial tension observed was 0.1 mN/m. A mathematical model that relates oil recovery to biosurfactant concentration was modified to include the stepwise changes in IFT as biosurfactant concentrations changes. This model adequately predicted the experimentally observed changes in IFT as a function of biosurfactant concentration. Theses data show that lipopeptide biosurfactant systems may be effective in removing hydrocarbon contamination sources in soils and aquifers and for the recovery of entrapped oil from low production oil reservoirs. Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were regrown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. We conducted a push-pull test to study in-situ biosurfactant production by exogenous biosurfactant producers to aid in oil recovery from depleted reservoirs. Five wells from the same formation were used. Two wells received cells and nutrients, two wells were treated with nutrients onl

M.J. McInerney; K.E. Duncan; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; Randy R. Simpson; N.Ravi; D. Nagle

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

DEVELOPMENT OF MICROORGANISMS WITH IMPROVED TRANSPORT AND BIOSURFACTANT ACTIVITY FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diverse microorganisms were screened for biosurfactant production and anaerobic growth at elevated salt concentrations to obtain candidates most suitable for microbial oil recovery. Seventy percent of the 205 strains tested, mostly strains of Bacillus mojavensis, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus licheniformis, and Bacillus sonorensis, produced biosurfactants aerobically and 41% of the strains had biosurfactant activity greater than Bacillus mojavensis JF-2, the current candidate for oil recovery. Biosurfactant activity varied with the percentage of the 3-hydroxy-tetradecanoate isomers in the fatty acid portion of the biosurfactant. Changing the medium composition by incorporation of different precursors of 3-hydroxy tetradecanoate increased the activity of biosurfactant. The surface tension and critical micelle concentration of 15 different, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus strains was determined individually and in combination with other biosurfactants. Some biosurfactant mixtures were found to have synergistic effect on surface tension (e.g. surface tension was lowered from 41 to 31 mN/m in some cases) while others had a synergistic effect on CMD-1 values. We compared the transport abilities of spores from three Bacillus strains using a model porous system to study spore recovery and transport. Sand-packed columns were used to select for spores or cells with the best transport abilities through brine-saturated sand. Spores of Bacillus mojavensis strains JF-2 and ROB-2 and a natural recombinant, strain C-9, transported through sand at very high efficiencies. The earliest cells/spores that emerged from the column were re-grown, allowed to sporulate, and applied to a second column. This procedure greatly enhanced the transport of strain C-9. Spores with enhanced transport abilities can be easily obtained and that the preparation of inocula for use in MEOR is feasible. Tertiary oil recovery experiments showed that 10 to 40 mg/l of JF-2 biosurfactant in the presence of 0.1 mM 2,3-butanediol and 1 g/l of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide (PHPA) recovered 10-40% of residual oil from Berea sandstone cores. When PHPA was used alone, about 10% of the residual oil was recovered. Interfacial tension (IFT) decreased in a stepwise manner as biosurfactant concentration increased with marked reductions in IFT occurring at biosurfactant concentrations of 10 and 40 mg/l. When the biosurfactant concentration was greater than 10 mg/l, residual oil recovery linearly increased with biosurfactant concentration. A mathematical model that relates oil recovery to biosurfactant concentration was modified to include the stepwise changes in IFT as biosurfactant concentrations changes. This model adequately predicted the experimentally observed changes in IFT as a function of biosurfactant concentration. Our work shows that (1) diverse microorganisms produce biosurfactants, (2) nutrient manipulation may provide a mechanism to increase biosurfactant activity, (3) biosurfactant concentrations in excess of the critical micelle concentration recover substantial amounts of residual oil, and (4) equations that describe the effect of the biosurfactant on IFT adequately predict residual oil recovery in sandstone cores.

M.J. McInerney; N. Youssef; T. Fincher; S.K. Maudgalya; M.J. Folmsbee; R. Knapp; D. Nagle

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Active Transport of Bile Acids Decreases Mucin 2 in Neonatal Ileum: Implications for Development of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency of premature infants, but its etiology remains unclear. We have previously shown that mucin 2 (Muc2) positive goblet cells are significantly decreased in NEC. We have also shown that ileal bile acids (BAs) are significantly increased during the development of this disease. Because BAs can affect mucins, we hypothesized that elevated ileal BAs contribute to decreased Muc2 in experimental NEC. The role of Muc2 in NEC was evaluated in Winnie +/+ mice, a strain that produces aberrant Muc2. Muc2 and trefoil factor 3 (Tff3) were assessed in neonatal rats subjected to the NEC protocol when bile acids were removed, and in ileal explants from newborn and older rats cultured with and without BAs. Further, the role of active transport of BAs was determined using neonatal rats given the apical sodium dependent bile acid transporter (Asbt) inhibitor SC-435 and in neonatal Asbt knockout mice subjected to the NEC protocol. Mice with aberrant Muc2 had significantly greater incidence and severity of NEC. Using both in vivo and ex vivo techniques, we determined that BAs decrease Muc2 positive cells in neonatal but not older ileum. However, Tff3 positive cells are not decreased by BAs. In addition, active transport of BAs is required for BAs to decrease Muc2 in immature ileum. These data show that functional Muc2 plays a critical role in the prevention of NEC and BAs can potentiate the decreased Muc2 in disease development. Further, BAs have a more profound effect on Muc2 in immature

Necrotizing Enterocolitis; Nina A. Martin; Sarah K. Mount Patrick; Teresa E. Estrada; Harrison A. Frisk; Daniel T. Rogan; Melissa D. Halpern

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN); Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN); Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY)

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

Measurement of gas transport through fiber preforms and densified composites for chemical vapor infiltration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas transport via pressure-driven permeation or via concentration-driven diffusion is a key step in the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. This paper describes methods for the measurement of these properties for CVI preforms and partially infiltrated composites. Results are presented for Nicalon-fiber cloth layup preforms and composites, Nextel-fiber braid preforms and composites, and a Nicalon-fiber three-dimensional (3-D) weave composite. The permeability of Nicalon cloth layup preforms is strongly dependent on the packing density over the range of 29--40 vol% but is only weakly dependent on the orientation of the alternating cloth layers. The permeability of Nextel braid preforms is dependent on the thread count and the weight for cloths with similar construction and packing density. The gas permeability of the finer wave (6.3 tows/cm (16 tows/in.)) is approximately one-half that of the coarser weave (3.5 tows/cm (9 tows/in.)). Results are reported for a small number of infiltrated composites with Nextel fiber reinforcement. Attempts to mount a Nicalon-fiber 3-D weave preform specimen have been unsuccessful. Results for a small number of composite specimens with 3-D weave reinforcement are reported.

Starr, T.L.; Hablutzel, N. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Materials Science and Engineering

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of Effect of Chemical Reactions on the Hydrologic Properties of Fractured Glass Media Using a Tri-axial Flow and Transport Apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of sub-surface media is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Methods and information for such characterization of fractured media are severely lacking. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured glass blocks HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted in such randomly and multiply fractured ILAW glass blocks, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using Vapor Hydration Testing (VHT) at 200 oC temperature and 200 psig (1379 KPa) pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. A tri-axial fractured media flow and transport experimental apparatus, which allows the simultaneous measurement of flow and transport properties and their anisotropy, has been designed and built for this purpose. Such apparatus for fractured media characterization are being reported in the literature only recently. Hydraulic properties of fractured blocks were measured in different orientations and along different cardinal directions, before and after glass corrosion reactions. Miscible displacement experiments using a non-reactive dye were also conducted, before and after glass corrosion reactions, to study the tracer transport behavior through such media. Initial efforts to analyze breakthrough curve (BTC) data using a 1D Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) solution revealed that a different fractured media transport model may be necessary for such interpretation. It was found that glass reactions can have a significant influence on the hydrologic properties of fractured ILAW glass media. The methods and results are unique and useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured geomedia in general and glass media in particular.

Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Hiroshima and Nagasaki initial radiations: delayed neutron contributions and comparison of calculated and measured cobalt activations  

SciTech Connect

Calculated estimates of neutron doses received by atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki have not included contributions from delayed neutrons emitted by fission products in the debris cloud, although the possibility of a significant contribution from this source has been suggested. In the present work, an established model accounting for gamma-ray kermas from these fission products is adapted to provide the desired neutron kerma estimates. Adaptations include use of explicit time dependence of neutron emitters, properly folded with the time-dependent phenomenology of the explosion itself, and detailed air-over-ground neutron transport with a source having an energy spectrum characteristic of these delayed neutrons. Results show that delayed neutrons are indeed negligible contributors to atomic-bomb survivor dosimetry, as well as to neutron activations at Hiroshima. About half the activation at Nagasaki, however, is due to the delayed component. Calculated activation of cobalt, a revision of previous estimates, is compared to measured values at Hiroshima and at Nagasaki. The causes of the substantial discrepancies are discussed and compared to previously reported discrepancies for sulfur activation. Additional investigation is recommended.

Loewe, W.E.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Characterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement and interpretation of the isotopic signal of soil respiration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state transport models. The affect of natural fluctuations in advective soil gas transport was little to nonCharacterizing the impact of diffusive and advective soil gas transport on the measurement signature of soil respiration, we seek to learn the isotopic composition of the carbon respired in the soil

Bond, Barbara J.

103

Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Equation of state and transport property measurements of warm dense matter.  

SciTech Connect

Location of the liquid-vapor critical point (c.p.) is one of the key features of equation of state models used in simulating high energy density physics and pulsed power experiments. For example, material behavior in the location of the vapor dome is critical in determining how and when coronal plasmas form in expanding wires. Transport properties, such as conductivity and opacity, can vary an order of magnitude depending on whether the state of the material is inside or outside of the vapor dome. Due to the difficulty in experimentally producing states near the vapor dome, for all but a few materials, such as Cesium and Mercury, the uncertainty in the location of the c.p. is of order 100%. These states of interest can be produced on Z through high-velocity shock and release experiments. For example, it is estimated that release adiabats from {approx}1000 GPa in aluminum would skirt the vapor dome allowing estimates of the c.p. to be made. This is within the reach of Z experiments (flyer plate velocity of {approx}30 km/s). Recent high-fidelity EOS models and hydrocode simulations suggest that the dynamic two-phase flow behavior observed in initial scoping experiments can be reproduced, providing a link between theory and experiment. Experimental identification of the c.p. in aluminum would represent the first measurement of its kind in a dynamic experiment. Furthermore, once the c.p. has been experimentally determined it should be possible to probe the electrical conductivity, opacity, reflectivity, etc. of the material near the vapor dome, using a variety of diagnostics. We propose a combined experimental and theoretical investigation with the initial emphasis on aluminum.

Knudson, Marcus D.; Desjarlais, Michael Paul

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Aerosol Influence on Cloud Microphysics Examined by Satellite Measurements and Chemical Transport Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic aerosols are hypothesized to decrease cloud drop radius and increase cloud droplet number concentration enhancing cloud optical depth and albedo. Here results have been used from a chemical transport model driven by the output of a ...

Harshvardhan; S. E. Schwartz; C. M. Benkovitz; G. Guo

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reclaiming residual space from elevated transport infrastructure : time, space, and activity under the Chicago Brown Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis studies the non-transport functions of the residual space generated by elevated transport infrastructure and its relationship with abutting neighborhoods The space under the Chicago Brown Line, among all other ...

Su, Jing, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurements of the effects of smoke on active circuits  

SciTech Connect

Smoke has long been recognized as the most common source of fire damage to electrical equipment; however, most failures have been analyzed after the fire was out and the smoke vented. The effects caused while the smoke is still in the air have not been explored. Such effects have implications for new digital equipment being installed in nuclear reactors. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring work to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control. As part of this program, Sandia National Laboratories has tested simple active circuits to determine how smoke affects them. These tests included the study of three possible failure modes on a functional board: (1) circuit bridging, (2) corrosion (metal loss), and (3) induction of stray capacitance. The performance of nine different circuits was measured continuously on bare and conformally coated boards during smoke exposures lasting 1 hour each and continued for 24 hours after the exposure started. The circuit that was most affected by smoke (100% change in measured values) was the one most sensitive to circuit bridging. Its high impedance (50 Mohm) was shorted during the exposure, but in some cases recovered after the smoke was vented. The other two failure modes, corrosion and induced stray capacitance, caused little change in the function of the circuits. The smoke permanently increased resistance of the circuit tested for corrosion, implying that the contacts were corroded. However, the change was very small (< 2%). The stray capacitance test circuit showed very little change after a smoke exposure in either the short or long term. The results of the tests suggest that conformal coatings and type of circuit are major considerations when designing digital circuitry to be used in critical control systems.

Tanaka, T.J.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measurements of the Effects of Smoke on Active Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Smoke has long been recognized as the most common source of fire damage to electrical equipment; however, most failures have been analyzed after the fire was out and the smoke vented. The effects caused while the smoke is still in the air have not been explored. Such effects have implications for new digital equipment being installed in nuclear reactors. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is sponsoring work to determine the impact of smoke on digital instrumentation and control. As part of this program, Sandia National Laboratories has tested simple active circuits to determine how smoke affects them. These tests included the study of three possible failure modes on a functional board: (1) circuit bridging, (2) corrosion (metal loss), and (3) induction of stray capacitance. The performance of nine different circuits was measured continuously on bare and conformably coated boards during smoke exposures lasting 1 hour each and continued for 24 hours after the exposure started. The circuit that was most affected by smoke (100% change in measured values) was the one most sensitive to circuit bridging. Its high impedance (50 M{Omega}) was shorted during the exposure, but in some cases recovered after the smoke was vented. The other two failure modes, corrosion and induced stray capacitance, caused little change in the function of the circuits. The smoke permanently increased resistance of the circuit tested for corrosion, implying that the cent acts were corroded. However, the change was very small (< 2%). The stray-capacitance test circuit showed very little change after a smoke exposure in either the short or long term. The results of the tests suggest that conformal coatings and type of circuit are major considerations when designing digital circuitry to be used in critical control systems.

Tanaka, T.J.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

Transportation Revolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To transform the vehicle sector, the U.S. auto manufacturing industry is actively developing new technologies and products. This transportation revolution will also affect...

110

Overview of Advanced Technology Transportation, 2005 Update. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Document provides an overview of the transportation market in 2005. Areas covered include hybrid, fuel cell, hydrogen, and alternative fuel vehicles.

Barnitt, R.; Eudy, L.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Benchmark test of neutron transport calculations: Indium, nickel, gold, europium, and cobalt activation with and without energy moderated fission neutrons by iron simulating the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A benchmark test of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code system (MCNP) was performed using a bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf fission neutron source which was obtained by transmission through 10-cm-thick iron. An iron plate was used to simulate the effect of the Hiroshima atomic bomb casing. This test includes the activation of indium and nickel for fast neutrons and gold, europium, and cobalt for thermal and epithermal neutrons, which were inserted in the moderators. The latter two activations are also to validate {sup 152}Eu and {sup 60}Co activity data obtained from the atomic bomb-exposed specimens collected at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The neutron moderators used were Lucite and Nylon 6 and the total thickness of each moderator was 60 cm or 65 cm. Measured activity data (reaction yield) of the neutron-irradiated detectors in these moderators decreased to about 1/1,000th or 1/10,000th, which corresponds to about 1,500 m ground distance from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. For all of the indium, nickel, and gold activity data, the measured and calculated values agreed within 25%, and the corresponding values for europium and cobalt were within 40%. From this study, the MCNP code was found to be accurate enough for the bare- and energy-moderated {sup 252}Cf neutron activation calculations of these elements using moderators containing hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

Iwatani, Kazuo; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hasai, Hiromi; Hoshi, Masaharu; Hiraoka, Masayuki; Hayakawa, Norihiko [Hiroshima Univ., Higashi-Hiroshima (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Women`s College, Hiroshima-ken (Japan)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Improved security for commercial container transports using an innovative active RFID system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The huge number of containers daily involved in the global transportation system opens important logistic and security issues. The matter of improving the management of goods in the harbor and the serious vulnerability problem of containers are relevant ... Keywords: Electronic seals, RFID technology, Secure supply chain, Secure transport, Wireless communications

Francesco Rizzo; Marcello Barboni; Lorenzo Faggion; Graziano Azzalin; Marco Sironi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

NIST Mini-sensor Measures Magnetic Activity in Human Brain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to measure alpha waves in the brain associated with a person opening and closing their eyes as well as signals resulting from stimulation of the ...

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

Taking America's Measure--Fun Activities for Kids!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... light bulbs that help you read the label were measured using standards that rely on a NIST master light standard. The electricity for the light bulb is ...

115

Toward the definition and measurement of the mental workload of transport pilots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes work performed in the first year of a continuing research project aimed at developing useful methods for measuring the workload of pilots operating aircraft in the ATC system. Good methods of measuring ...

Sheridan, Thomas B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AT THE AT THE U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION R. Clyde Ragland, P.E. Office of Nuclear Security and Incident Response 2011 DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 11, 2011 2 NRC Focus Prior to September 11, 2001 * Historically, NRC Transportation Security Regulations Focused on Highest Risk Radioactive Material, consisted of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) NRC Actions Since September 11, 2001 * Domestically, reviewed materials transported by NRC licensees and re- evaluated security requirements considering: - applicable threats to shipments - material considerations - magnitude of adverse consequences * Internationally, participated in the development of the IAEA Code of Conduct on the Safety and Security of Radioactive

117

The 3rd workshop on active internet measurements (AIMS-3) report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 10-12, 2011, CAIDA hosted the third Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-3) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with the previous two AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our ... Keywords: active measurement, internet measurement techniques, management techniques, validation

kc claffy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Self-calibrated active pyrometer for furnace temperature measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pyrometer with a probe beam superimposed on its field-of-view for furnace temperature measurements. The pyrometer includes a heterodyne millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave receiver including a millimeter/sub-millimeter-wave or microwave source for probing. The receiver is adapted to receive radiation from a surface whose temperature is to be measured. The radiation includes a surface emission portion and a surface reflection portion which includes the probe beam energy reflected from the surface. The surface emission portion is related to the surface temperature and the surface reflection portion is related to the emissivity of the surface. The simultaneous measurement of surface emissivity serves as a real time calibration of the temperature measurement. In an alternative embodiment, a translatable base plate and a visible laser beam allow slow mapping out of interference patterns and obtaining peak values therefor. The invention also includes a waveguide having a replaceable end portion, an insulating refractory sleeve and/or a source of inert gas flow. The pyrometer may be used in conjunction with a waveguide to form a system for temperature measurements in a furnace. The system may employ a chopper or alternatively, be constructed without a chopper. The system may also include an auxiliary reflector for surface emissivity measurements.

Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 15, 1998 December 15, 1998 MEMORANDUM FOR DOE PAAA COORDINATORS CONTRACTOR PAAA COORDINATORS FROM: R. KEITH CHRISTOPHER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF ENFORCEMENT AND INVESTIGATION SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance Supplement 98-02: DOE Enforcement Activities where Off-site Transportation Issues are also Present. Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedures for Enforcement, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity to the Office of Enforcement and Investigation to issue clarifying guidance from time to time with respect to the processes used in its enforcement activities. Recently several questions have arisen regarding the scope of Price-Anderson enforcement when transportation issues are directly or indirectly involved in an incident. These questions can be separated into two areas,

120

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRACTICE FOR CALCULATING TRANSPORT PROPERTIES V. 1. T HEcases; (4) performing more transport property measurementsFOR THE CALCULATION OF TRANSPORT PROPERTIES: III. EVALUATION

Brown, N.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Estimating discharged plutonium using measurements of structural material activation products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the US and Russia move to lower numbers of deployed nuclear weapons, transparency regarding the quantity of weapons usable fissile material available in each country may become more important. In some cases detailed historical information regarding material production at individual facilities may be incomplete or not readily available, e.g., at decommissioned facilities. In such cases tools may be needed to produce estimates of aggregate material production as part of a bilateral agreement. Such measurement techniques could also provide increased confidence in declared production quantities.

Charlton, W. S. (William S.); Lumley-Woodyear, A. de; Budlong-Sylvester, K. W. (Kory W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Measuring Molecular Motor Forces In Vivo: Implications for Tug-of-War Models of Bidirectional Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measuring Molecular Motor Forces In Vivo: Implications for Tug-of-War Models of Bidirectional, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas ABSTRACT Molecular motor proteins use the energy released from the force motors generate amounts to directly probing their function. We report on optical trapping

Texas at Austin. University of

123

UARS/MLS Cloud Ice Measurements: Implications for H2O Transport near the Tropopause  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for detecting large hydrometeors at high altitudes is described here and applied to the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite/Microwave Limb Sounder (UARS/MLS) 203-GHz radiance measurements at tangent pressures between 200 and 46 hPa. ...

D. L. Wu; W. G. Read; A. E. Dessler; S. C. Sherwood; J. H. Jiang

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Lattice-gas model for active vesicle transport by molecular motors with opposite polarities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a multi-species lattice gas model for motor protein driven collective cargo transport on cellular filaments. We use this model to describe and analyze the collective motion of interacting vesicle cargoes being carried by oppositely directed molecular motors, moving on a single biofilament. Building on a totally asymmetric exclusion process (TASEP) to characterize the motion of the interacting cargoes, we allow for mass exchange with the environment, input and output at filament boundaries and focus on the role of interconversion rates and how they affect the directionality of the net cargo transport. We quantify the effect of the various different competing processes in terms of non-equilibrium phase diagrams. The interplay of interconversion rates, which allow for flux reversal and evaporation/deposition processes introduce qualitatively new features in the phase diagrams. We observe regimes of three-phase coexistence, the possibility of phase re-entrance and a significant flexibility in how the different phase boundaries shift in response to changes in control parameters. The moving steady state solutions of this model allows for different possibilities for the spatial distribution of cargo vesicles, ranging from homogeneous distribution of vesicles to polarized distributions, characterized by inhomogeneities or {\\it shocks}. Current reversals due to internal regulation emerge naturally within the framework of this model. We believe this minimal model will clarify the understanding of many features of collective vesicle transport, apart from serving as the basis for building more exact quantitative models for vesicle transport relevant to various {\\it in-vivo} situations.

Sudipto Muhuri; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Performance evaluation of indoor localization techniques based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of networks for indoor localization based on RF power measurements from active or passive devices is evaluated in terms of the accuracy, complexity, and costs. In the active device case, the terminal to be located measures the power transmitted ...

Damiano De Luca; Franco Mazzenga; Cristiano Monti; Marco Vari

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

The 5th workshop on active internet measurements (AIMS-5) report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 6-8, 2013, CAIDA hosted the fifth Workshop on Active Internet Measurements (AIMS-5) as part of our series of Internet Statistics and Metrics Analysis (ISMA) workshops. As with previous AIMS workshops, the goals were to further our understanding ... Keywords: active measurement, internet, validation

kc claffy

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

-1 -Conservation Activity Conceptual Models June 2008.doc CCF Measures of Conservation Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 -Conservation Activity Conceptual Models June 2008.doc CCF Measures of Conservation Success Conservation Activity Conceptual Models These models are flowchart-style representations of the generic processes by which different types of conservation activity can lead to conservation effects. The components

Foster, William A.

128

Erosion and Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 pp. EROSION AND OPTIMAL TRANSPORT [23] I. Ekeland and T.and D. Simons, Sediment transport capacity of overland ?ow,measure spaces via optimal transport, Ann. of Math. (2),

Birnir, Bjorn; Rowlett, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

A fifth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held February 16-18, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 46 Russian attendees from 14 different Russian organizations and six non-Russian attendees, four from the US and two from France. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C.

Jardine, L J; Borisov, G B

2004-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

130

Measurements of Electron Thermal Transport due to Electron Temperature Gradient Modes in a Basic Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production and identification of electron temperature gradient modes have already been reported [X. Wei, V. Sokolov, and A. K. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 17, 042108 (2010)]. Now a measurement of electron thermal conductivity via a unique high frequency triple probe yielded a value of {chi}{sub perpendiculare} ranging between 2 and 10 m{sup 2}/s, which is of the order of a several gyrobohm diffusion coefficient. This experimental result appears to agree with a value of nonlocal thermal conductivity obtained from a rough theoretical estimation and not inconsistent with gyrokinetic simulation results for tokamaks. The first experimental scaling of the thermal conductivity versus the amplitude of the electron temperature gradient fluctuation is also obtained. It is approximately linear, indicating a strong turbulence signature.

Sokolov, V.; Sen, A. K. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2011-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Intelligent Transportation Systems - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intelligent Transportation Systems Intelligent Transportation Systems The Center for Transportation Analysis does specialty research and development in intelligent transportation systems. Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) are part of the national strategy for improving the operational safety, efficiency, and security of our nation's highways. Since the early 1990s, ITS has been the umbrella under which significant efforts have been conducted in research, development, testing, deployment and integration of advanced technologies to improve the measures of effectiveness of our national highway network. These measures include level of congestion, the number of accidents and fatalities, delay, throughput, access to transportation, and fuel efficiency. A transportation future that includes ITS will involve a significant improvement in these

132

Active Turbulence and Scalar Transport near the ForestAtmosphere Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent velocity, temperature, water vapor concentration, and other scalars were measured at the canopyatmosphere interface of a 1314-m-tall uniform pine forest and a 33-m-tall nonuniform hardwood forest. These measurements were used to ...

Gabriel G. Katul; Chris D. Geron; Cheng-I. Hsieh; Brani Vidakovic; Alex B. Guenther

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integration of Locational Decisions with the Household Activity Pattern Problem and Its Applications in Transportation Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activity, R is the battery capacity, r is the charging rate,In the analysis, battery capacity is kept in the unit ofthe full electric battery inventory (capacity) of vehicle of

Kang, Jee Eun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Plasma density measurements and the behavior of transport coefficients during adiabatic compression in the Tuman-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Data on the electon density obtained during experiments on the compression of toroidal plasmas is analysed, and the transport coefficients are evaluated and discussed. (AIP)

Ipatov, V.A.; Kalmykov, S.G.; Lipin, B.M.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities Department of Transportation...

136

Measurement of quasi-ballistic heat transport across nanoscale interfaces using ultrafast coherent soft x-ray beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mean free path, the thermal energy phonon carriers traveli.e. non-diffusive) thermal energy distribution [13, 14] (to the transport of thermal energy from a nanoscale heat

Siemens, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sustainable Transportation Update Newsletters | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Fuels, Engines, Emissions Transportation...

138

An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles  

SciTech Connect

Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential limitations.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goddard, Braden [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Charlton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peerani, Paolo [European Commission, EC-JRC-IPSC

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between Oct 1, 2000 and December 31, 2000. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 2: Addition of a foam generation and breaker system), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (h) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members. The tasks Completed During This Quarter are Task 7 and Task 8.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira; Lei Zhou

2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Photocharge transport and recombination measurements in amorphous silicon films and solar cells by photoconductive frequency mixing: Annual subcontract report, 20 April 1998--19 April 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the present phase of the program, the transport parameters of a number of amorphous semiconductors prepared by a number of techniques were determined by the photoconductive frequency mixing technique. This technique enabled the authors to determine the drift mobility, md, and the photomixing lifetime, t. The technique is based on the idea of heterodyne detection for photoconductors. When two similarly polarized monochromatic optical beams of slightly different frequencies are incident upon a photoconductor, the generation rate of electron-hole pairs will produce a photocurrent, when a dc-bias is applied, which will contain components resulting from the square of the sum of the individual incident fields. Consequently, a photocurrent will be produced, which will consist of a direct current and a microwave current corresponding to the beat frequency. These two currents allow a separate determination of the drift mobility and the photomixing lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. In the present work, the longitudinal modes of a He-Ne laser were employed to generate a beat frequency of 252 MHz; all the measurements were performed at this frequency for the data indicated in the accompanying figures. The following topics were explored: Measurements of the charge transport parameters of homogeneous a-SiGe:H alloys produced by NREL employing the hot-wire technique; The change in the charge transport parameters in the transition from hydrogenated amorphous silicon to microcrystalline silicon for material produced by NREL and MVSystems; The improvement in instrumentation of the photomixing measurements; Measurements of the hydrostatic dependency of the transport parameters of amorphous silicon; and Preliminary photomixing measurements on p-i-n devices.

Braunstein, R.; Kattwinkel, A.; Liebe, J.; Sun, G.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Application of the active well coincidence counter to the measurement of uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Active Well Coincidence Counter has been developed to assay uranium fuel material in field inspection applications. The unit is used to measure bulk UO/sub 2/ samples, high enrichment uranium metals, LWR fuel pellets, and /sup 233/U-Th fuel materials which have very high gamma-ray backgrounds.

Menlove, H.O.; Foley, J.E.; Bosler, G.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

PROMETHEE: An Alpha Low Level Waste Assay System Using Passive and Active Neutron Measurement Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a passive-active neutron assay system for alpha low level waste characterization at the French Atomic Energy Commission is discussed. Less than 50 Bq[{alpha}] (about 50 {mu}g Pu) per gram of crude waste must be measured in 118-l 'European' drums in order to reach the requirements for incinerating wastes. Detection limits of about 0.12 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu in total active neutron counting, and 0.08 mg of effective {sup 239}Pu coincident active neutron counting, may currently be detected (empty cavity, measurement time of 15 min, neutron generator emission of 1.6 x 10{sup 8} s{sup -1} [4{pi}]). The most limiting parameters in terms of performances are the matrix of the drum - its composition (H, Cl...), its density, and its heterogeneity degree - and the localization and self-shielding properties of the contaminant.

Passard, Christian [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Mariani, Alain [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Jallu, Fanny [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Romeyer-Dherbey, Jacques [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Recroix, Herve [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Rodriguez, Michel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Loridon, Joel [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Denis, Caroline [French Atomic Energy Commission, C.E.A. Cadarache (France); Toubon, Herve [COGEMA (France)

2002-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dry, portable calorimeter for nondestructive measurement of the activity of nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The activity of a quantity of heat-producing nuclear fuel is measured rapidly, accurately and nondestructively by a portable dry calorimeter comprising a preheater, an array of temperature-controlled structures comprising a thermally guarded temperature-controlled oven, and a calculation and control unit. The difference between the amounts of electric power required to maintain the oven temperature with and without nuclear fuel in the oven is measured to determine the power produced by radioactive disintegration and hence the activity of the fuel. A portion of the electronic control system is designed to terminate a continuing sequence of measurements when the standard deviation of the variations of the amount of electric power required to maintain oven temperature is within a predetermined value.

Beyer, Norman S. (Elmhurst, IL); Lewis, Robert N. (Clarendon Hills, IL); Perry, Ronald B. (Hinsdale, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Can a Long Nanoflare Storm Explain the Observed Emission Measure Distributions in Active Region Cores?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the "long nanoflare storm," where short duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolutions strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than 5 times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths,...

Mulu-Moore, Fana M; Warren, Harry P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Postcombustion measures for cleaner solid fuels combustion: activated carbons for toxic pollutants removal from flue gases  

SciTech Connect

In this work the efficiency of postcombustion measures (i.e., activated carbon utilization) to achieve cleaner solid fuels combustion was evaluated. Thus, two commercial activated carbons (Calgon F400 and RWE active coke) were tested for removing toxic polluting compounds (Hg, PCBs, PCDD/Fs) from the gas phase. The effects of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the activated carbons tested were investigated, along with the sorption temperature and sulfur addition in carbon matrix. Experiments were realized in a bench-scale adsorption unit and in a commercial solid fuels-fired hot water boiler. The results showed that both activated carbons tested are suitable for the removal of toxic compounds (i.e., Hg, PCBs, PCDD/Fs) from the gas phase. Due to differences in Hg adsorptive capacity and adsorption rate, which are attributed to the diversified pore structure and surface chemistry of the activated carbons, RWE active coke is, presumably, more suitable for continuous Hg removal (i.e., activated carbon injection), while Calgon F400 is more suitable for batch one (packed column). For both activated carbons, Hg adsorption capacity was reduced with temperature increase, while it was enhanced by the presence of sulfur. Oxygen surface functional groups seem to be involved in Hg adsorption mechanism. Lactones are believed to act as potential active sites for mercury adsorption, while phenols may act as inhibitors. The removal of PCBs and PCDD/Fs from the gas phase seems not to be a problem for the activated carbons tested, regardless of their pore structure or surface chemistry. 61 refs., 23 figs., 8 tabs.

G. Skodras; I. Diamantopoulou; P. Natas; A. Palladas; G.P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluation of active transport membranes for carbon dioxide removal from hydrogen containing streams. Approved final topical report  

SciTech Connect

Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. is developing a new class of gas separation membranes called Active Transport Membranes (ATM). ATMs are unique in that they permeate acid gas components, via a reactive pathway, to the low pressure side of the membrane while retaining lighter, non-reactive gases at near feed pressure. This feature is intuitively attractive for hydrogen and synthesis gas processes where CO{sub 2} removal is desired and the hydrogen or synthesis gas product is to be used at elevated pressure. This report provides an overview of the technology status and reports on preliminary, order of magnitude assessments of ATMs for three applications requiring CO{sub 2} removal from gas streams containing hydrogen. The end uses evaluated are: CO{sub 2} removal in the COREX{reg_sign} Steel making process--upgrading export gas for a Direct Reducing Iron (DRI) process; CO{sub 2} removal for onboard hydrogen gas generators for mobile fuel cell applications; Bulk CO{sub 2} removal from hydrogen plant synthesis gas--a plant de-bottlenecking analysis for ammonia production. For each application, an overview of the process concept, rough equipment sizing and techno-economic evaluation against competing technologies is provided. Brief descriptions of US and world market conditions are also included.

Cook, P.J.; Laciak, D.V.; Pez, G.P.; Quinn, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Active-Interrogation Measurements of Induced-Fission Neutrons from Low-Enriched Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection and control of nuclear fuels is paramount for nuclear security and safeguards; therefore, it is important to develop fast and robust controlling mechanisms to ensure the safety of nuclear fuels. Through both passive- and active-interrogation methods we can use fast-neutron detection to perform real-time measurements of fission neutrons for process monitoring. Active interrogation allows us to use different ranges of incident neutron energy to probe for different isotopes of uranium. With fast-neutron detectors, such as organic liquid scintillation detectors, we can detect the induced-fission neutrons and photons and work towards quantifying a samples mass and enrichment. Using MCNPX-PoliMi, a system was designed to measure induced-fission neutrons from U-235 and U-238. Measurements were then performed in the summer of 2010 at the Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy. Fissions were induced with an associated particle D-T generator and an isotopic Am-Li source. The fission neutrons, as well as neutrons from (n, 2n) and (n, 3n) reactions, were measured with five 5 by 5 EJ-309 organic liquid scintillators. The D-T neutron generator was available as part of a measurement campaign in place by Padova University. The measurement and data-acquisition systems were developed at the University of Michigan utilizing a CAEN V1720 digitizer and pulse-shape discrimination algorithms to differentiate neutron and photon detections. Low-enriched uranium samples of varying mass and enrichment were interrogated. Acquired time-of-flight curves and cross-correlation curves are currently analyzed to draw relationships between detected neutrons and sample mass and enrichment. In the full paper, the promise of active-interrogation measurements and fast-neutron detection will be assessed through the example of this proof-of-concept measurement campaign. Additionally, MCNPX-PoliMi simulation results will be compared to the measured data to validate the MCNPX-PoliMi code when used for active-interrogation simulations.

J. L. Dolan; M. J. Marcath; M. Flaska; S. A. Pozzi; D. L. Chichester; A. Tomanin; P. Peerani; G. Nebbia

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Activation measurements of high energy deuterons in the plasma focus device  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear activation techniques were used to measure the fluence of high energy deuterons in a plasma focus device having a stored energy of 75 kilojoules at 18 kV. The $sup 12$C(d,n)$sup 13$N (330 keV threshold) and $sup 27$Al(d,p)$sup 28$Al reactions were used to provide both an absolute number of high energy deuterons and an average energy, evaluated from the $sup 13$N/$sup 28$Al ratio calculated for various energies by Young. Previous measurements indicated more than 10$sup 15$ deuterons could be accelerated to energies above 330 keV in the low pressure mode of operation, with a highly anisotropic distribution. Present measurements show that more than 10$sup 12$ deuterons achieve energies greater than 5 MeV on some high intensity shots in the low pressure mode. The presence of multi-MeV deuterons in the plasma focus device was substantiated by measuring activation as a function of depth in 1 mil Al foils, and by measurements of neutron energy using time-of-flight. (auth)

Gullickson, R.L.; Sahlin, H.L.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optimal design of measurement network for neutronic activity field reconstruction by data assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data assimilation framework, to merge information from model and measurement, an optimal reconstruction of the neutronic activity field can be determined for a nuclear reactor core. In this paper, we focus on solving the inverse problem of determining an optimal repartition of the measuring instruments within the core, to get the best possible results from the data assimilation reconstruction procedure. The position optimisation is realised using Simulated Annealing algorithm, based on the Metropolis-Hastings one. Moreover, in order to address the optimisation computing challenge, algebraic improvements of data assimilation have been developed and are presented here.

Bertrand Bouriquet; Jean-Philippe Argaud; Romain Cugnart

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transportation Security Rulemaking Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation made by R. Clyde Ragland for the NTSF annual meeting held from May 14-16, 2013 in Buffalo, NY.

151

Measuring Active-Sterile Neutrino Oscillations with a Stopped Pion Neutrino Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The question of the existence of light sterile neutrinos is of great interest in many areas of particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. Furthermore, should the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab confirm the LSND oscillation signal, then new measurements are required to identify the mechanism responsible for these oscillations. Possibilities include sterile neutrinos, CP or CPT violation, variable mass neutrinos, Lorentz violation, and extra dimensions. In this paper, we consider an experiment at a stopped pion neutrino source to determine if active-sterile neutrino oscillations with delta-m greater than 0.1 eV2 can account for the signal. By exploiting stopped pi+ decay to produce a monoenergetic nu_mu source, and measuring the rate of the neutral current reaction nu_x + 12C -> nu_x +12C* as a function of distance from the source, we show that a convincing test for active-sterile neutrino oscillations can be performed.

G. T. Garvey; A. Green; C. Green; W. C. Louis; G. B. Mills; G. McGregor; H. Ray; R. Schirato; R. G. Van de Water; D. H. White

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Development of Novel active transport membrane devices. Phase I. Final report, 31 October 1988--31 January 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of this program was to identify and develop a technique for fabricating Active Transport Materials (ATM) into lab-scale membrane devices. Air Products met this objective by applying thin film, multilayer fabrication techniques to support the AT material on a substrate membrane. In Phase IA, spiral-wound hollow fiber membrane modules were fabricated and evaluated. These nonoptimized devices were used to demonstrate the AT-based separation of carbon dioxide from methane, hydrogen sulfide from methane, and ammonia from hydrogen. It was determined that a need exists for a more cost efficient and less energy intensive process for upgrading subquality natural gas. Air Products estimated the effectiveness of ATM for this application and concluded that an optimized ATM system could compete effectively with both conventional acid gas scrubbing technology and current membrane technology. In addition, the optimized ATM system would have lower methane loss and consume less energy than current alternative processes. Air Products made significant progress toward the ultimate goal of commercializing an advanced membrane for upgrading subquality natural gas. The laboratory program focused on developing a high performance hollow fiber substrate and fabricating and evaluating ATM-coated lab-scale hollow fiber membrane modules. Selection criteria for hollow fiber composite membrane supports were developed and used to evaluate candidate polymer compositions. A poly(amide-imide), PAI, was identified for further study. Conditions were identified which produced microporous PAI support membrane with tunable surface porosity in the range 100-1000{Angstrom}. The support fibers exhibited good hydrocarbon resistance and acceptable tensile strength though a higher elongation may ultimately be desirable. ATM materials were coated onto commercial and PAI substrate fiber. Modules containing 1-50 fibers were evaluated for permselectivity, pressure stability, and lifetime.

Laciak, D.V.; Quinn, R.; Choe, G.S.; Cook, P.J.; Tsai, Fu-Jya

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly progress report for Year 2 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in Flow Loop development and research during the period of time between July 14, 2000 and September 30, 2000. This report presents information on the following specific tasks: (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development (Task 2), (b) Progress on research project (Task 8): ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress on research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress on research project (Task 7): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress on research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Initiate research on project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (g) Progress on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution (Tasks 11), and Foam properties (Task 12), (h) Initiate a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. Since the previous Task 1 has been completed, we will now designate this new task as: (Task 1S). (i) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Barkim Demirdal; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Paco Vieira

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the fourth quarterly progress report for Year-3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between April 1, 2002 and June 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)''; (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions''; (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''; (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between October 1, 2002 and December 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks. (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System. (b) New research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions''. (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) New Research project (Task 13): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions''. (g) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (h) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the third quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Jan. 1, 2002 and Mar. 31, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9b): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), and Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b); (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop, progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S); and (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second quarterly progress report for Year 3 of the ACTS project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between Oct 1, 2001 and Dec. 31, 2001. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility (Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Collection System), (b) Research project (Task 6): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (c) Research project (Task 9): ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), and Foam properties while transporting cuttings. (Task 12), (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Affonso Lourenco; Evren Ozbayoglu; Lei Zhou

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Transportation Demand Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Demand Management Plan FALL 2009 #12;T r a n s p o r t a t i o n D e m a n d M a n the transportation impacts the expanded enrollment will have. Purpose and Goal The primary goal of the TDM plan is to ensure that adequate measures are undertaken and maintained to minimize the transportation impacts

159

CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: fanamariam.mulumoore@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

160

Report on the 1961 TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH--------.. . -. .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) ) ) Report on the 1961 TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH--------.. . -. . AND SERVICE ACTIVITIES IC C Negotiations with carriers ..·..... Resea rch activities ·...........·... Transportation Section staff resea rch . Transportation rate indexes .... Fish meal, scrap, and solublf's information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sustainable Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THOUGHT PIECE Sustainable Transport by Melvin M. Webberwant to sustain any mode of transport only if we judge it todraconian in rejecting transport modes that have failed in

Webber, Melvin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Secondary standards (non-activation) for neutron data measurements above 20 MeV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to H(n,p) scattering and {sup 235,238}U(n,f) reactions, secondary standards for neutron flux determination may be useful for neutron energies above 20 MeV. For experiments where gamma rays are detected, reference gamma-ray production cross sections are relevant. For neutron-induced charged particle production, standard (n,p) and (n,alpha) cross sections would be helpful. Total cross section standards would serve to check the accuracy of these measurements. These secondary standards are desirable because they can be used with the same detector systems employed in measuring the quantities of interest. Uncertainties due to detector efficiency, geometrical effects, timing and length of flight paths can therefore be significantly reduced. Several secondary standards that do not depend on activation techniques are proposed. 14 refs.

Haight, R.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of electrical methods to measure microbial activity in soils: Preliminary microcosm results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of the geophysical technique known as self-potential to the measurement of microbial activity was tested on laboratory microcosms containing ferric iron and iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella alga BrY. Measurements of the electrical response of silver-coated copper electrodes distributed along a Teflon probe inserted into sterile and inoculated layers containing either ferric chloride, ferric citrate, or ferric oxide rich soil were recorded over hours or days. Strong electrical signals reached values more negative than {minus}400 mV for all types of inoculated ferric iron layers. Electric signals in sterile control layers, by contrast, rarely reached values more negative than {minus}150 mV. These preliminary experiments indicate that it may be possible to apply the self-potential geophysical method to monitor bioremediation in the field.

Cox, B.L. Sweet, A.; Majer, E.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Sediment transport time measured with U-Series isotopes: Results from ODP North Atlantic Drill Site 984  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grains, either in the source rock or in the sediment [64].too high due because the source rock activity ratio is lesssignificantly less than the source rock value. The ( 234 U/

DePaolo, Donald J.; Maher, Kate; Christensen, John N.; McManus, Jerry

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Measurement of the 241Am (n, 2n) reaction cross section, by the activation method  

SciTech Connect

The measurement of the cross section of the reaction 241Am (n, 2n)240Am, has been performed, for the first time at neutron energies from 8.8, to 11.1MeV, by the activation method. The neutron beam was produced at the TANDEM accelerator of NCSR 'Demokritos', by the 2H (d,n)3 He reaction, using a deuterium gas target. During the 5-day long irradiation, the neutron beam fluctuations were monitored in 100 sec intervals by a BF3 counter connected with a multi-scaling unit. The radioactive target consisted of a 37GBq 241Am source enclosed in a Pb container. A natural Au foil, a 27Al foil and a 93Nb foil were used as reference materials for the neutron flux determination. After the end of the irradiation the activity induced at the target and the reference foils, was measured off-line by a 56 % HPGe detector.

Perdikakis, G. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens (Greece); Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Papadopoulos, C. T.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Patronis, N. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A.; Spyrou, A.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Kalyva, G.; Kossionides, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Karamanis, D. [Department of Physics, School of Natural Sciences, University of Ioannina (Greece); Tsabaris, C. [Hellenic Centre for Marine Research, P.O. Box 712 Anavyssos (Greece)

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Load Measurement and Dynamometer Simulation Using Coastdown Techniques" Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: Date:...

167

Vehicle Technologies Office: Data and Analysis for Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Reports and Papers Consumer Views on Transportation and Energy (PDF 1.4 MB)...

168

Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

McCuaig, Franklin D. (Westmont, IL)

1977-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Oritz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Marlow, William H. (College Station, TX)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

SciTech Connect

This is the first quarterly progress report for Year-4 of the ACTS Project. It includes a review of progress made in: (1) Flow Loop construction and development and (2) research tasks during the period of time between July 1, 2002 and Sept. 30, 2002. This report presents a review of progress on the following specific tasks: (a) Design and development of an Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility Task 3: Addition of a Cuttings Injection/Separation System, Task 4: Addition of a Pipe Rotation System, (b) New Research project (Task 9b): ''Development of a Foam Generator/Viscometer for Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature (EPET) Conditions'', (d) Research project (Task 10): ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Mud Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (e) Research on three instrumentation tasks to measure: Cuttings concentration and distribution in a flowing slurry (Task 11), Foam texture while transporting cuttings (Task 12), Viscosity of Foam under EPET (Task 9b). (f) Development of a Safety program for the ACTS Flow Loop. Progress on a comprehensive safety review of all flow-loop components and operational procedures. (Task 1S). (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with Petroleum and service company members, and increasing the number of JIP members.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk, Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Retrospective radon progeny measurements through measurements of 210 activities on glass objects using stacked LR 115 detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of both active layers were calculated. Two glass samples were exposed in a chamber to determine the experimental calibration fac- tors for the radon gas and progeny, which were then compared with the theoretical agreed well. The discrepancy between the calibration factors for radon gas was due to a much higher

Yu, K.N.

172

Transportation technology at Sandia  

SciTech Connect

Industrial and military activities in the US produce large amounts of hazardous mixed waste, which includes both radioactive and toxic substances. The already overburdened environment is faced with the task of safely disposing of these complex wastes. A very important aspect of this effort is the safe and economical transportation of radioactive and toxic chemical wastes to projected repositories. Movement of wastes to the repository sites is accomplished by a combination of truck, rail, ship, and air. The DOE directs transportation activities including cask development technology for use in single or multimode transport. Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Technology programs provide the technology and know-how to support DOE in achieving safe, efficient, and economical packaging and transportation of nuclear and other hazardous waste materials. This brochure describes the Transportation Technology programs and the specialized techniques and capabilities they offer to prospective users.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that organizes future transportation scenarios (includingclimate change. In this future, transportation activity andhow potential transportation futures in California could

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Definition of Small Gram Quantity Contents for Type B Radioactive Material Transportation Packages: Activity-Based Content Limitations  

SciTech Connect

Since the 1960's, the Department of Transportation Specification (DOT Spec) 6M packages have been used extensively for transportation of Type B quantities of radioactive materials between Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, laboratories, and productions sites. However, due to the advancement of packaging technology, the aging of the 6M packages, and variability in the quality of the packages, the DOT implemented a phased elimination of the 6M specification packages (and other DOT Spec packages) in favor of packages certified to meet federal performance requirements. DOT issued the final rule in the Federal Register on October 1, 2004 requiring that use of the DOT Specification 6M be discontinued as of October 1, 2008. A main driver for the change was the fact that the 6M specification packagings were not supported by a Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) that was compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations part 71 (10 CFR 71). Therefore, materials that would have historically been shipped in 6M packages are being identified as contents in Type B (and sometimes Type A fissile) package applications and addenda that are to be certified under the requirements of 10 CFR 71. The requirements in 10 CFR 71 include that the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) must identify the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents (10 CFR 71.33(b)(1) and 10 CFR 71.33(b)(2)), and that the application (i.e., SARP submittal or SARP addendum) demonstrates that the external dose rate (due to the maximum radioactivity of radioactive constituents and maximum quantities of fissile constituents) on the surface of the packaging (i.e., package and contents) not exceed 200 mrem/hr (10 CFR 71.35(a), 10 CFR 71.47(a)). It has been proposed that a 'Small Gram Quantity' of radioactive material be defined, such that, when loaded in a transportation package, the dose rates at external points of an unshielded packaging not exceed the regulatory limits prescribed by 10 CFR 71 for non-exclusive shipments. The mass of each radioisotope presented in this paper is limited by the radiation dose rate on the external surface of the package, which per the regulatory limit should not exceed 200 mrem/hr. The results presented are a compendium of allowable masses of a variety of different isotopes (with varying impurity levels of beryllium in some of the actinide isotopes) that, when loaded in an unshielded packaging, do not result in an external dose rate on the surface of the package that exceeds 190 mrem/hr (190 mrem/hr was chosen to provide 5% conservatism relative to the regulatory limit). These mass limits define the term 'Small Gram Quantity' (SGQ) contents in the context of radioactive material transportation packages. The term SGQ is isotope-specific and pertains to contents in radioactive material transportation packages that do not require shielding and still satisfy the external dose rate requirements. Since these calculated mass limits are for contents without shielding, they are conservative for packaging materials that provide some limited shielding or if the contents are placed into a shielded package. The isotopes presented in this paper were chosen as the isotopes that Department of Energy (DOE) sites most likely need to ship. Other more rarely shipped isotopes, along with industrial and medical isotopes, are planned to be included in subsequent extensions of this work.

Sitaraman, S; Kim, S; Biswas, D; Hafner, R; Anderson, B

2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

175

Determination of filter-cake thicknesses from on-line flow measurements and gas/particle transport modeling  

SciTech Connect

The use of cylindrical candle filters to remove fine ({approx}0.005 mm) particles from hot ({approx}500- 900{degrees}C) gas streams currently is being developed for applications in advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technologies. Successfully deployed with hot-gas filtration, PFBC and IGCC technologies will allow the conversion of coal to electrical energy by direct passage of the filtered gases into non-ruggedized turbines and thus provide substantially greater conversion efficiencies with reduced environmental impacts. In the usual approach, one or more clusters of candle filters are suspended from a tubesheet in a pressurized (P {approx_lt}1 MPa) vessel into which hot gases and suspended particles enter, the gases pass through the walls of the cylindrical filters, and the filtered particles form a cake on the outside of each filter. The cake is then removed periodically by a backpulse of compressed air from inside the filter, which passes through the filter wall and filter cake. In various development or demonstration systems the thickness of the filter cake has proved to be an important, but unknown, process parameter. This paper describes a physical model for cake and pressure buildups between cleaning backpulses, and for longer term buildups of the ``baseline`` pressure drop, as caused by incomplete filter cleaning and/or re-entrainment. When combined with operating data and laboratory measurements of the cake porosity, the model may be used to calculate the (average) filter permeability, the filter-cake thickness and permeability, and the fraction of filter-cake left on the filter by the cleaning backpulse or re-entrained after the backpulse. When used for a variety of operating conditions (e.g., different coals, sorbents, temperatures, etc.), the model eventually may provide useful information on how the filter-cake properties depend on the various operating parameters.

Smith, D.H.; Powell, V. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Ibrahim, E. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Ferer, M. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Physics; Ahmadi, G. [National Research Council, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Documents: Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Transportation PDF Icon Transportation Impact Assessment for Shipment of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) Cylinders...

177

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Cuttings Transport Study (ACTS) was a 5-year JIP project undertaken at the University of Tulsa (TU). The project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and JIP member companies. The objectives of the project were: (1) to develop and construct a new research facility that would allow three-phase (gas, liquid and cuttings) flow experiments under ambient and EPET (elevated pressure and temperature) conditions, and at different angle of inclinations and drill pipe rotation speeds; (2) to conduct experiments and develop a data base for the industry and academia; and (3) to develop mechanistic models for optimization of drilling hydraulics and cuttings transport. This project consisted of research studies, flow loop construction and instrumentation development. Following a one-year period for basic flow loop construction, a proposal was submitted by TU to the DOE for a five-year project that was organized in such a manner as to provide a logical progression of research experiments as well as additions to the basic flow loop. The flow loop additions and improvements included: (1) elevated temperature capability; (2) two-phase (gas and liquid, foam etc.) capability; (3) cuttings injection and removal system; (4) drill pipe rotation system; and (5) drilling section elevation system. In parallel with the flow loop construction, hydraulics and cuttings transport studies were preformed using drilling foams and aerated muds. In addition, hydraulics and rheology of synthetic drilling fluids were investigated. The studies were performed under ambient and EPET conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on the hydraulics and cuttings transport were investigated. Mechanistic models were developed to predict frictional pressure loss and cuttings transport in horizontal and near-horizontal configurations. Model predictions were compared with the measured data. Predominantly, model predictions show satisfactory agreements with the measured data. As a part of this project, instrumentation was developed to monitor cuttings beds and characterize foams in the flow loop. An ultrasonic-based monitoring system was developed to measure cuttings bed thickness in the flow loop. Data acquisition software controls the system and processes the data. Two foam generating devices were designed and developed to produce foams with specified quality and texture. The devices are equipped with a bubble recognition system and an in-line viscometer to measure bubble size distribution and foam rheology, respectively. The 5-year project is completed. Future research activities will be under the umbrella of Tulsa University Drilling Research Projects. Currently the flow loop is being used for testing cuttings transport capacity of aqueous and polymer-based foams under elevated pressure and temperature conditions. Subsequently, the effect of viscous sweeps on cuttings transport under elevated pressure and temperature conditions will be investigated using the flow loop. Other projects will follow now that the ''steady state'' phase of the project has been achieved.

Stefan Miska; Troy Reed; Ergun Kuru

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Adopting Biophysics Methods in Pursuit of Biogeophysical Research: Advancing the measurement and modeling of electrical signatures of microbe-mineral transformations impacting contaminant transport  

SciTech Connect

This exploratory project involved laboratory experiments to investigate three hypotheses: (H1) Physics-based modeling of low-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as alpha) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy (DS) data can quantify pore-scale geometric changes impacting contaminant transport resulting from biomineralization; (H2) Physics-based modeling of high-frequency dispersions (henceforth referred to as beta) measured in broadband dielectric spectroscopy data can quantify rates of mineral growth in/on the cell wall; (H3) Application of this measurement and modeling approach can enhance geophysical interpretation of bioremediation experiments conducted at the RIFLE IFC by providing constraints on bioremediation efficiency (biomass concentration, mineral uptake within the cell wall, biomineralization rate). We tested H1 by performing DS measurements (alpha and beta range) on iron (Fe) particles of dimensions similar to microbial cells, dispersed within agar gels over a range of Fe concentrations. We have tested the ability of the physics-based modeling to predict volume concentrations of the Fe particles by assuming that the Fe particles are polarizable inclusions within an otherwise nonpolarizable medium. We evaluated the smallest volume concentration that can be detected with the DS method. Similar experiments and modeling have been performed on the sulfate-reducing bacteria D. vulgaris. Synchrotron x-ray absorption measurements were conducted to determine the local structure of biominerals coatings on D. vulgaris which were grown in the presence of different Fe concentrations. We imaged the mineral growth on cell wall using SEM. We used dielectric spectroscopy to differentiate between iron sulfide precipitates of biotic and abiotic nature. Biotic measurements were made on D. vulgaris bacteria grown in the presence of different concentrations of iron to form different thicknesses of iron sulfide precipitates around themselves and abiotic measurements were made on different concentrations of pyrrhotite particles suspended in agar. Results show a decrease in dielectric permittivity as a function of frequency for biotic minerals and an opposite trend is observed for abiotic minerals. Our results suggest that dielectric spectroscopy offers a noninvasive and fast approach for distinguishing between abiotic and biotic mineral precipitates.

Prodan, Camelia [NJIT

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Undulator Transportation Test Results  

SciTech Connect

A test was performed to determine whether transporting and handling the undulators makes any changes to their properties. This note documents the test. No significant changes to the test undulator were observed. After the LCLS undulators are tuned and fiducialized in the Magnetic Measurement Facility (MMF), they must be transported to storage buildings and transported to the tunnel. It has been established that the undulators are sensitive to temperature. We wish to know whether the undulators are also sensitive to the vibrations and shocks of transportation. To study this issue, we performed a test in which an undulator was measured in the MMF, transported to the tunnel, brought back to the MMF, and re-measured. This note documents the test and the results.

Wolf, Zachary

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

180

It's About Time: Investing in Transportation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MARCH 2011 It's About Time: Investing in Transportation to Keep Texas Economically Competitive #12 of Contents Preface 1 The Challenge Facing Texans 3 Texas Transportation Action Principles 6 Texas' Deteriorating Transportation System: Background and Measurement 8 Baseline Scenario: Unacceptable Conditions

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181

VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS FOR A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION FAN LOOP FROM HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The velocity pattern of a fan loop structure within a solar active region over the temperature range 0.15-1.5 MK is derived using data from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board the Hinode satellite. The loop is aligned toward the observer's line of sight and shows downflows (redshifts) of around 15 km s{sup -1} up to a temperature of 0.8 MK, but for temperatures of 1.0 MK and above the measured velocity shifts are consistent with no net flow. This velocity result applies over a projected spatial distance of 9 Mm and demonstrates that the cooler, redshifted plasma is physically disconnected from the hotter, stationary plasma. A scenario in which the fan loops consist of at least two groups of 'strands'-one cooler and downflowing, the other hotter and stationary-is suggested. The cooler strands may represent a later evolutionary stage of the hotter strands. A density diagnostic of Mg VII was used to show that the electron density at around 0.8 MK falls from 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} cm{sup -3} at the loop base, to 5.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} cm{sup -3} at a projected height of 15 Mm. A filling factor of 0.2 is found at temperatures close to the formation temperature of Mg VII (0.8 MK), confirming that the cooler, downflowing plasma occupies only a fraction of the apparent loop volume. The fan loop is rooted within a so-called outflow region that displays low intensity and blueshifts of up to 25 km s{sup -1} in Fe XII {lambda}195.12 (formed at 1.5 MK), in contrast to the loop's redshifts of 15 km s{sup -1} at 0.8 MK. A new technique for obtaining an absolute wavelength calibration for the EIS instrument is presented and an instrumental effect, possibly related to a distorted point-spread function, that affects velocity measurements is identified.

Young, P. R. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); O'Dwyer, B.; Mason, H. E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Proceedings of the 6th Annual Meeting for Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition: Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation and WasteTreatment, Storage and Disposal Activities  

SciTech Connect

The sixth annual Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition meeting organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was held November 15-17, 2004, at the State Education Center (SEC), 4 Aerodromnya Drive, St. Petersburg, Russia. The meeting discussed Excess Weapons Plutonium Disposition topics for which LLNL has the US Technical Lead Organization responsibilities. The technical areas discussed included Radioactive Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal, and Plutonium Oxide and Plutonium Metal Packaging, Storage and Transportation and Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. The meeting was conducted with a conference format using technical presentations of papers with simultaneous translation into English and Russian. There were 55 Russian attendees from 16 different Russian organizations and four non-Russian attendees from the US. Forty technical presentations were made. The meeting agenda is given in Appendix B and the attendance list is in Appendix C. The 16 different Russian design, industrial sites, and scientific organizations in attendance included staff from Rosatom/Minatom, Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Authority of Russia (GOSATOMNADZOR, NIERA/GAN), All Russian Designing & Scientific Research Institute of Complex Power Technology (VNIPIET), Khlopin Radium Institute (KRI), A. A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), All Russian & Design Institute of Production Engineering (VNIPIPT), Ministry of Atomic Energy of Russian Federation Specialized State Designing Institute (GSPI), State Scientific Center Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR), Siberian Chemical Combine Tomsk (SCC), Mayak PO, Mining Chemical Combine (MCC K-26), Institute of Biophysics (IBPh), Sverdlosk Scientific Research Institute of Chemical Machine Building (SNIIChM), Kurchatov Institute (KI), Institute of Physical Chemistry Russian Academy of Science (IPCh RAS) and Radon PO-Moscow. The four non-Russian attendees included one representative from DOE NNSA, and LLNL, and two from Duratek, The meeting was organized into three major sessions: (1) Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal; (2) Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation; (3) Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation. Twenty presentations were made on the topic of Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal (Session II), ten presentations on Plutonium Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session III), and four presentations on Spent Fuel Packaging, Storage and Transportation (Session IV). In addition, DOE/NNSA, Minatom/Rosatom and TVEL summarized the bases for the conference at the beginning of the meeting (Session I). Nine months had passed since the last LLNL contracts review meeting. During that time period, LLNL and TVEL have been able to sign six contracts for a total of $1,700,000 in the areas of: (1) Waste treatment, storage and disposal; and (2) Plutonium packaging, storage and transportation. The scope of several other work projects are now in various stages of development in these areas. It is anticipated that more contracts will be signed before the next meeting of this type. These events have allowed us to start work in our technical activities under new direction from TVEL, which is now the single Russian organization to coordinate and conclude contracts with LLNL. The meeting presentations and discussions have defined where we are and where we are going in the near term in regard to our joint interests in excess weapons plutonium disposition. Each topical section of this Proceedings is introduced by a summary of the presentations in that section.

Jardine, L J

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the implementation of transport demand management measures. Appropriate Transport Demand Management (TDM) strategies and measures can affect travel behaviour and therefore reduce...

184

Using tax and regulatory measures to reform choice and usage of motor vehicles for personal transportation in Australia for the sustainability of oil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis has been motivated by the need to preserve the scarce oil resources used by motorists for their personal transportation. The inquiry for this (more)

Pearce, Prafula

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on surfaces Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on surfaces #12;Monge quadratic transport in Rn Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures with compact support in Rn . We call transport map from µ0 to µ1 any measurable map T : Rn Rn

Rifford, Ludovic

186

THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} burnable poison on the measurement of fresh pressurized water reactor fuel. To empirically determine the response function over the range of historical and future use we have considered enrichments up to 5 wt% {sup 235}U/{sup tot}U and Gd weight fractions of up to 10 % Gd/UO{sub 2}. Parameterized correction factors are presented.

Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Objectively measured physical activity in pregnancy: a study in obese and overwieght women.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:543-548. 25. Borodulin KM, Evenson KR, Wen F, Herring AH, Benson AM: Physical Activity Patterns during Pregnancy. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 2008, 40:1901-1908. 26. Lof M, Forsum E: Activity pattern and energy expenditure due to physical...

McParlin, Catherine; Robson, Stephen C; Tennant, Peter W G; Besson, Herve; Rankin, Judith; Adamson, Ashley J; Pearce, Mark S; Bell, Ruth

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

DIAGNOSING THE TIME-DEPENDENCE OF ACTIVE REGION CORE HEATING FROM THE EMISSION MEASURE. I. LOW-FREQUENCY NANOFLARES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational measurements of active region emission measures contain clues to the time dependence of the underlying heating mechanism. A strongly nonlinear scaling of the emission measure with temperature indicates a large amount of hot plasma relative to warm plasma. A weakly nonlinear (or linear) scaling of the emission measure indicates a relatively large amount of warm plasma, suggesting that the hot active region plasma is allowed to cool and so the heating is impulsive with a long repeat time. This case is called low-frequency nanoflare heating, and we investigate its feasibility as an active region heating scenario here. We explore a parameter space of heating and coronal loop properties with a hydrodynamic model. For each model run, we calculate the slope {alpha} of the emission measure distribution EM(T){proportional_to}T {sup {alpha}}. Our conclusions are: (1) low-frequency nanoflare heating is consistent with about 36% of observed active region cores when uncertainties in the atomic data are not accounted for; (2) proper consideration of uncertainties yields a range in which as many as 77% of observed active regions are consistent with low-frequency nanoflare heating and as few as zero; (3) low-frequency nanoflare heating cannot explain observed slopes greater than 3; (4) the upper limit to the volumetric energy release is in the region of 50 erg cm{sup -3} to avoid unphysical magnetic field strengths; (5) the heating timescale may be short for loops of total length less than 40 Mm to be consistent with the observed range of slopes; (6) predicted slopes are consistently steeper for longer loops.

Bradshaw, S. J.; Reep, J. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Klimchuk, J. A., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu, E-mail: jeffrey.reep@rice.edu, E-mail: james.a.klimchuk@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Solar Physics Lab., Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

189

Continuous Flow Differential Pressure Rotary Transport ...  

This patent-pending active material transport system design concept provides solutions to several process challenges associated with moving materials ...

190

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transportation System Transportation System Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework

191

ECUT energy data reference series: Otto cycle engines in transportation  

SciTech Connect

Information that describes the use of the Otto cycle engines in transportation is summarized. The transportation modes discussed in this report include the following: automobiles, light trucks, heavy trucks, marine, recreational vehicles, motorcycles, buses, aircraft, and snowmobiles. These modes account for nearly 100% of the gasoline and LPG consumed in transportation engines. The information provided on each of these modes includes descriptions of the average energy conversion efficiency of the engine, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the activity level as measured in ton-miles. Estimates are provided for the years 1980 and 2000.

Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

SCOUT-O3/ACTIVE: High-altitude Aircraft Measurements around Deep Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During November and December 2005, two consortia of mainly European groups conducted an aircraft campaign in Darwin, Australia, to measure the composition of the tropical upper-troposphere and tropopause regions, between 12 and 20 km, in order to ...

G. Vaughan; K. Bower; C. Schiller; A. R. MacKenzie; T. Peter; H. Schlager; N. R. P. Harris; P. T. May

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective March 1, 1997 "Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE)" Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: ...

194

Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective October 15, 2001 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: ...

195

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 21'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, S.C.

2001-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Transportation Energy Data Book (Edition 20)  

SciTech Connect

The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 20'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--greenhouse gas emissions; Chapter 4--criteria pollutant emissions; Chapter 5--transportation and the economy; Chapter 6--highway vehicles; Chapter 7--light vehicles; Chapter 8--heavy vehicles; Chapter 9--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 10--fleet vehicles; Chapter 11--household vehicles; and Chapter 12--nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, S.C.

2000-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

Healthy transportation - healthy communities: developing objective measures of built-environment using GIS and testing significance of pedestrian variables on walking to transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walking to transit stations is proposed as one of the strategies to increase the use of transit. Urban planners, transportation planners, environmentalists, and health professionals encourage and support environmental interventions that can reduce the use of cars for all kinds of trips and use alternative modes of travel such as walking, biking, and mass-transit. This study investigates the influence of the built-environment on walking to transit stations. Transit-oriented communities at quarter and half-mile distances from the Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) station in Dallas, Texas, were analyzed to identify the relation of various constructs of built-environment on walking to the DART stations. Twenty-one pedestrian indices were reviewed to develop a comprehensive list of 73 built-environment variables used to measure the suitability to walk. This study aims to objectively measure built-environment using spatial data. Based on this criterion the total number of variables was narrowed to 32. Walking to transit, calculated as a percentage of transit users who walk to the DART LRT stations, was used as the dependent variable. The number of stations in operation and used for analysis in this study is 20(n). Therefore, bootstrapping was used to perform the statistical analysis for this study. The final pattern of variable grouping for the quarter-mile and the half-mile analysis revealed four principal components: Vehicle-Oriented Design, Density, Diversity, and Walking-Oriented Design. Bootstrap regression revealed that density ( = -0.767) was the only principal component that significantly (p<0.05) explained walking to transit station at quarter-mile distance from the station. At half-mile distance built-environment variables did not report any significant relation to walking to transit. The present study revealed that mere increase of density should not be taken as a proxy of increase in walking. Environmental interventions that can promote walking should be identified even at locations with high density. Further studies should use advanced statistical techniques such as Hierarchical Linear Modeling or Structural Equation Modeling to test the relationship of both the principal components and the individual variables that define the principal component to clearly understand the relationship of built-environment with walking to transit station.

Maghelal, Praveen Kumar

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Photocharge Transport and Recombination Measurements in Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells by Photoconductive Frequency Mixing: Final Subcontract Report: 13 May 1994 - 15 January 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during this subcontract by the University of California. The photoconductivity, lifetime, and drift mobility of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H), and hydrogenated amorphous silicon germanium (a-SiGe:H) were determined using a photomixing technique in the as prepared and light-soaked states. In addition to the decay of the photoconductivity and electron lifetime, continuous decay of the electron drift mobility was found during the light-soaking process (Staebler-Wronski effect). Experimental data were fitted to a stretched exponential law. Different stretched-exponential parameters for photoconductivity, lifetime, and drift mobility were obtained, which indicates the production of defects with different generation kinetics upon light soaking. The transport properties of intrinsic a-Si:H samples (which were produced by the hot-wire technique at NREL at different substrate temperatures such that the hydrogen content ranged from >10% to <1%), were systematically studied. It was found that with increasing substrate temperature, the lifetime, the drift mobility, and the photoconductivity decreased, but the Urbach energy ({approx} 0.1 eV below the conduction band) increased. These results indicate that for the a-Si:H films with increasing deposition temperature, the density of positively charged, negatively charged, and neutral defects all show a tendency to increase, in agreement with the results observed by other workers employing other measurement techniques. Researchers also found that the drift mobility of these samples increases and the lifetime decreases with increasing electric field, while the mt product is essentially independent of the electric field in the range of 1,000-10,000 V/cm. The electric field dependence of mobility (Dm) /m0/ (DE) in the as-grown or/and annealed states are always larger than that in the light-soaked state. This electric field dependence of mobility can be explained by the existence of long-range potential fluctuations. Photoemission measurements in air were performed on a-Si:H, a-SiC:H, and transparent conducting oxide layers, and revealed inhomogeneities of composition or surface contamination.

Braunstein, R.; Tang, Y.; Dong, S.; Liebe, J.; Sun, G.; Kattwinkel, A. (University of California: Los Angeles, California)

1999-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

199

Business activity monitoring system design framework integrated with process-based performance measurement model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, strong interests in the real-time performance management are increasing to gain competitive advantages in the rapidly changing business environment. For better business performance or continuous process improvement of an enterprise, real-time ... Keywords: business activity monitoring (BAM), business performance, business process management (BPM), key performance indicator (KPI)

Kwan Hee Han; Sang Hyun Choi; Jin Gu Kang; Geon Lee

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Measurement of the {sup 241}Am(n,2n) reaction cross section using the activation method  

SciTech Connect

In the context of the n{sub T}OF Collaboration, the measurement of the cross section of the reaction {sup 241}Am(n,2n){sup 240}Am, has been performed, for the first time at neutron energies from 8.8 to 11.4 MeV, by the activation method, relative to the {sup 27}Al(n,a){sup 24}Na reaction reference cross section. The monoenergetic neutron beam was produced at the 5.5 MV TANDEM accelerator of NCSR ''Demokritos,'' by means of the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction, using a deuterium filled gas cell. The radioactive target consisted of a 37 GBq {sup 241}Am source enclosed in a Pb container. After the end of the irradiation, the activity induced by the neutron beam at the target and reference, was measured off-line by a 56% relative efficiency, HPGe detector.

Perdikakis, G. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Athens (Greece); Papadopoulos, C.T.; Vlastou, R.; Kokkoris, M.; Galanopoulos, S.; Patronis, N. [Department of Physics, National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Lagoyannis, A.; Spyrou, A.; Zarkadas, Ch.; Kalyva, G.; Kossionides, S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, NCSR ' ' Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Karamanis, D. [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, Ioannina (Greece)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A new experimental setup for high-pressure catalytic activity measurements on surface deposited mass-selected Pt clusters  

SciTech Connect

A new experimental setup to study catalytic and electronic properties of size-selected clusters on metal oxide substrates from the viewpoint of cluster-support interaction and to formulate a method for the development of heterogeneous catalysts such as automotive exhaust catalysts has been developed. The apparatus consists of a size-selected cluster source, a photoemission spectrometer, a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), and a high-pressure reaction cell. The high-pressure reaction cell measurements provided information on catalytic properties in conditions close to practical use. The authors investigated size-selected platinum clusters deposited on a TiO{sub 2}(110) surface using a reaction cell and STM. Catalytic activity measurements showed that the catalytic activities have a cluster-size dependency.

Watanabe, Yoshihide; Isomura, Noritake [Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193, Japan and Toyota Central R and D Labs. Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Performance measures for evaluating public participation activities in DOE`s Office of Environmental Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Public participation in decision-making in the United States has become a dominant theme throughout the public sector and is increasingly used in the private sector. Recent reports by the National Research Council and the Commission on Risk Assessment and Risk Management, set up jointly by the White House and Congress, conclude that risk decisions must increasingly be structured in such a manner as to involve stakeholders meaningfully in the processes and activities leading to decisions and, perhaps, through decision implementation. Both of these reports indicate that decisions may take longer but be better if officials: (1) bring all interested and affected parties to the table at the beginning of the risk-discussion process; (2) identify relevant concerns, losses, exposures and other information the parties have; (3) address significant concerns through appropriate research; and (4) present findings in an understandable, accessible way. This report is intended to facilitate subsequent evaluations of public participation activities and programs.

Carnes, S.A.; Schweitzer, M.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.; Munro, J.F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Passive and Active Radiation Measurements Capability at the INL Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility is a Department of Energy facility located in the Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex. It contains various nuclear and non-nuclear materials that are available to support many radiation measurement assessments. User-selected, single material, nuclear and non-nuclear materials can be readily utilized with ZPPR clamshell containers with almost no criticality concerns. If custom, multi-material configurations are desired, the ZPPR clamshell or an approved aluminum Inspection Object (IO) Box container may be utilized, yet each specific material configuration will require a criticality assessment. As an example of the specialized material configurations possible, the National Nuclear Security Agencys Office of Nuclear Verification (NNSA/NA 243) has sponsored the assembly of six material configurations. These are shown in the Appendixes and have been designated for semi-permanent storage that can be available to support various radiation measurement applications.

Robert Neibert; John Zabriskie; Collin Knight; James L. Jones

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

arXiv:nucl-ex/0309004v16Sep2003 Measurement of the Total Active  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. Tafirout,5 Y. Takeuchi,10 G. Tesi´c,3 M. Thomson,10 M. Thorman,8 R. Van Berg,9 R.G. Van de Water J.B. Wilhelmy,7 J.F. Wilkerson,13 J.R. Wilson,8 J.M. Wouters,7 M. Yeh,2 and K. Zuber8 (SNO probability. The measurements were made with dissolved NaCl in the heavy water to enhance the sensitivity

205

Transportation Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight and passenger rail, freight shipping, and miscellaneous

206

Road Transportation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The recession of the early 1990s marked the starting point for a transformation of the Swedish transportation industry. Cost oriented production techniques by the (more)

Gudmundsson, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8206,...

208

WIPP Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Container Documents Documents related to transuranic waste containers and packages. CBFO Tribal Program Information about WIPP shipments across...

209

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Transportation on the Earth Ludovic Rifford Universit´e de Nice - Sophia Antipolis & Institut Universitaire de France UPV/EHU Ludovic Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;The framework Let M Rifford Mass Transportation on the Earth #12;Transport maps Let µ0 and µ1 be probability measures on M. We

Rifford, Ludovic

210

Activation Measurements for Thermal Neutrons, U.S. Measurements of 36Cl in Mineral Samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki; and Measurement of 63 Ni in Copper Samples From Hiroshima by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The present paper presents the {sup 36}Cl measurement effort in the US. A large number of {sup 36}Cl measurements have been made in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of {sup 36}Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results from these measurements are presented here and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. The production of {sup 36}Cl by bomb neutrons in mineral samples from Hiroshima and Nagasaki was primarily via the reaction {sup 35}Cl(n,{gamma}){sup 36}Cl. This reaction has a substantial thermal neutron cross-section (43.6 b at 0.025 eV) and the product has a long half-life (301,000 y). hence, it is well suited for neutron-activation detection in Hiroshima and Nagasaki using AMS more than 50 years after the bombings. A less important reaction for bomb neutrons, {sup 39}K(n,{alpha}){sup 36}Cl, typically produces less than 10% of the {sup 36}Cl in mineral samples such as granite and concrete, which contain {approx} 2% potassium. In 1988, only a year after the publication of the DS86 final report (Roesch 1987), it was demonstrated experimentally that {sup 36}Cl measured using AMS should be able to detect the thermal neutron fluences at the large distances most relevant to the A-bomb survivor dosimetry. Subsequent measurements in mineral samples from both Hiroshima and Nagasaki validated the experimental findings. The potential utility of {sup 36}Cl as a thermal neutron detector in Hiroshima was first presented by Haberstock et al. who employed the Munich AMS facility to measure {sup 36}Cl/Cl ratios in a gravestone from near the hypocenter. That work subsequently resulted in an expanded {sup 36}Cl effort in Germany that paralleled the US work. More recently, there have also been {sup 36}Cl measurements made by a Japanese group. The impetus for the extensive {sup 36}Cl and other neutron activation measurements was the recognized need to validate the neutron component of the dose in Hiroshima. Although this was suggested at the time of the DS86 Final Report, where it was stated that the calculated neutron doses for survivors could possibly be wrong, the paucity of neutron validation measurements available at that time prevented adequate resolution of this matter. It was not until additional measurements and data evaluations were made that it became clear that more work was required to better understand the discrepancies observed for thermal neutrons in Hiroshima. This resulted in a large number of additional neutron activation measurements in Hiroshima and Nagasaki by scientists in the US, Japan, and Germany. The results presented here for {sup 36}Cl, together with measurements made by other scientists and for other isotopes, now provide a much improved measurement basis for the validation of neutrons in Hiroshima.

Tore Straume; Alfredo A. Marchetti; Stephen D. Egbert; James A. Roberts; Ping Men; Shoichiro Fujita; Kiyoshi Shizuma; Masaharu Hoshi; G. Rugel; W. Ruhm; G. Korschinek; J. E. McAninch; K. L. Carroll; T. Faestermann; K. Knie; R. E. Martinelli; A. Wallner; C. Wallner

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

Transportation Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to systematically identify and examine possible near and long-term ecological and environmental effects from the production of hydrogen from various energy sources based on the DOE hydrogen production strategy and the use of that hydrogen in transportation applications. This project uses state-of-the-art numerical modeling tools of the environment and energy system emissions in combination with relevant new and prior measurements and other analyses to assess the understanding of the potential ecological and environmental impacts from hydrogen market penetration. H2 technology options and market penetration scenarios will be evaluated using energy-technology-economics models as well as atmospheric trace gas projections based on the IPCC SRES scenarios including the decline in halocarbons due to the Montreal Protocol. Specifically we investigate the impact of hydrogen releases on the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the long-term stability of the ozone layer due to changes in hydrogen emissions, the impact of hydrogen emissions and resulting concentrations on climate, the impact on microbial ecosystems involved in hydrogen uptake, and criteria pollutants emitted from distributed and centralized hydrogen production pathways and their impacts on human health, air quality, ecosystems, and structures under different penetration scenarios

Wuebbles, D.J.; Dubey, M.K., Edmonds, J.; Layzell, D.; Olsen, S.; Rahn, T.; Rocket, A.; Wang, D.; Jia, W.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In partial response to a Department of Energy (DOE) request to evaluate the state of measurements of special nuclear material, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) evaluated and classified all highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide items in its inventory. Because of a lack of traceable HEU standards, no items were deemed to fit the category of well measured. A subsequent DOE-HQ sponsored survey by New Brunswick Laboratory resulted in their preparation of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements], a unit of which was delivered to LLNL in October of 1999. This paper describes the approach to calibration of the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of poorly measured/unmeasured HEU oxide inventory. Included are discussions of (1) the calibration effort, including the development of the mass calibration curve; (2) the results from an axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber, and (3) an error model for the total (systematic + random) uncertainty in the predicted mass that includes the uncertainties in calibration and sample position.

Mount, M.; Glosup, J.; Cochran, C.; Dearborn, D.; Endres, E.

2000-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

213

Conditioning the gamma spectrometer for activity measurement at very high background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in determining the fuel element burnup in a future reactor is studied. The HPGe detector is exposed by a Co60 source with varying irradiation rate from 10 kcps to 150 kcps to simulate the input counting rate in real reactor environment. A Cs137 and a Eu152 source are positioned at given distances to generate certain event rate in the detector with the former being proposed as a labeling nuclide to measure the burnup of fuel element. It is shown that both the energy resolution slightly increasing with the irradiation rate and the passthrough rate at high irradiation level match the requirement of the real application. The influence of the background is studied in different parameter sets used in the particularly developed procedure of the background subtraction. It is demonstrated that with the typical input irradiation rate and Cs137 intensity relevant to deep burnup situation, the precision of the Cs137 counting rate in the current experiment is consistently below 2.8%, indicating a promising feasibility of utilizing an HPGe detector in the burnup measurement in future bed-like reactor.

Weihua Yan; Liguo Zhang; Zhao Zhang; Zhigang Xiao

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

214

Intercomparison of active, passive and continuous instruments for radon and radon progeny measurements in the EML chamber and test facility  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from the Fifth Intercomparison of Active, Passive and Continuous Instruments for Radon and Radon Progeny Measurements conducted in the EML radon exposure and test facility in May 1996. In total, thirty-four government, private and academic facilities participated in the exercise with over 170 passive and electronic devices exposed in the EML test chamber. During the first week of the exercise, passive and continuous measuring devices were exposed (usually in quadruplicate) to about 1,280 Bq m{sup {minus}3} {sup 222}Rn for 1--7 days. Radon progeny measurements were made during the second week of the exercise. The results indicate that all of the tested devices that measure radon gas performed well and fulfill their intended purpose. The grand mean (GM) ratio of the participants` reported values to the EML values, for all four radon device categories, was 0.99 {plus_minus} 0.08. Eighty-five percent of all the radon measuring devices that were exposed in the EML radon test chamber were within {plus_minus}1 standard deviation (SD) of the EML reference values. For the most part, radon progeny measurements were also quite good as compared to the EML values. The GM ratio for the 10 continuous PAEC instruments was 0.90 {plus_minus} 0.12 with 75% of the devices within 1 SD of the EML reference values. Most of the continuous and integrating electronic instruments used for measuring the PAEC underestimated the EML values by about 10--15% probably because the concentration of particles onto which the radon progeny were attached was low (1,200--3,800 particles cm{sup {minus}3}). The equilibrium factor at that particle concentration level was 0.10--0.22.

Scarpitta, S.C.; Tu, K.W.; Fisenne, I.M.; Cavallo, A.; Perry, P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Progress toward a microsecond duration, repetitive, intense-ion beam for active spectroscopic measurements on ITER  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe the design of an intense, pulsed, repetitive, neutral beam based on magnetically insulated diode technology for injection into ITER for spectroscopic measurements of thermalizing alpha particle and thermal helium density profiles, ion temperature, plasma rotation, and low Z impurity concentrations in the confinement region. The beam is being developed to enhance low signal-to-noise ratios expected with conventional steady-state ion beams because of severe beam attenuation and intense bremstrahlung emission. A 5 GW (e.g., 100 keV, 50 kA) one-microsecond-duration beam would increase the signal by 10{sup 3} compared to a conventional 5 MW beam with signal-to-noise ratios comparable to those from a chopped conventional beam in one second.

Davis, H.A.; Bartsch, R.R.; Barnes, C.W. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Active spectroscopic measurements of the bulk deuterium properties in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutral-beam induced D{sub {alpha}} emission spectrum contains a wealth of information such as deuterium ion temperature, toroidal rotation, density, beam emission intensity, beam neutral density, and local magnetic field strength magnitude Double-Vertical-Line B Double-Vertical-Line from the Stark-split beam emission spectrum, and fast-ion D{sub {alpha}} emission (FIDA) proportional to the beam-injected fast ion density. A comprehensive spectral fitting routine which accounts for all photoemission processes is employed for the spectral analysis. Interpretation of the measurements to determine physically relevant plasma parameters is assisted by the use of an optimized viewing geometry and forward modeling of the emission spectra using a Monte-Carlo 3D simulation code.

Grierson, B. A.; Pablant, N. A.; Solomon, W. M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Kaplan, D. H.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Chrystal, C. [University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was

218

Activation measurement of the 3He(a,g)7Be reaction cross section at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The astrophysically important 3He(a,g)7Be reaction was studied at high energies where the available experimental data are in contradiction. A thin window 3He gas cell was used and the cross section was measured with the activation method. The obtained cross sections at energies between Ec.m. = 1.5 and 2.5 MeV are compared with the available data and theoretical calculations. The present results support the validity of the high energy cross section energy dependence observed by recent experiments.

C. Bordeanu; Gy. Gyrky; Z. Halsz; T. Szcs; G. G. Kiss; Z. Elekes; J. Farkas; Zs. Flp; E. Somorjai

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

219

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23  

SciTech Connect

The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 23'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (www-cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, S.C.

2003-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

220

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 27 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 26 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 25 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy; Chapter 3 - highway vehicles; Chapter 4 - light vehicles; Chapter 5 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 - household vehicles; and Chapter 9- nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 - greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 - criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 32 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL] [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL] [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24  

SciTech Connect

The ''Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 24'' is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Planning, Budget Formulation, and Analysis, under the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) program in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2--energy; Chapter 3--highway vehicles; Chapter 4--light vehicles; Chapter 5--heavy vehicles; Chapter 6--alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7--fleet vehicles; Chapter 8--household vehicles; and Chapter 9--nonhighway modes; Chapter 10--transportation and the economy; Chapter 11--greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12--criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, S.C.

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

225

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 29 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 is a statistical compendium designed for use as a reference reference. The data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 on energy; Chapter 3 0n highway vehicles; Chapter 4 on light vehicles; Chapter 5 on heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 on alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7on fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 on household vehicles; and Chapter 9 on nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 on transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 on greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 on criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for various tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, Stacy C.; Diegel, Susan W.; Boundy, Robert G. [Roltek, Inc.

227

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 28 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with U.S Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program and the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; and Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the readers convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 30 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 31 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Program. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the Data Book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest edition of the Data Book is available to a larger audience via the Internet (cta.ornl.gov/data). This edition of the Data Book has 12 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 energy; Chapter 3 highway vehicles; Chapter 4 light vehicles; Chapter 5 heavy vehicles; Chapter 6 alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 7 fleet vehicles; Chapter 8 household vehicles; Chapter 9 nonhighway modes; Chapter 10 transportation and the economy; Chapter 11 greenhouse gas emissions; and Chapter 12 criteria pollutant emissions. The sources used represent the latest available data. There are also three appendices which include detailed source information for some tables, measures of conversion, and the definition of Census divisions and regions. A glossary of terms and a title index are also included for the reader s convenience.

Davis, Stacy Cagle [ORNL; Diegel, Susan W [ORNL; Boundy, Robert Gary [ORNL

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Upper critical fields and thermally-activated transport of Nd(0.7Fe0.3) FeAs single crystal  

SciTech Connect

We present measurements of the resistivity and the upper critical field H{sub c2} of Nd(O{sub 0.7}F{sub 0.3})FeAs single crystals in strong DC and pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T and 60 T, respectively. We found that the field scale of H{sub c2} is comparable to {approx}100 T of high T{sub c} cuprates. H{sub c2}(T) parallel to the c-axis exhibits a pronounced upward curvature similar to what was extracted from earlier measurements on polycrystalline samples. Thus this behavior is indeed an intrinsic feature of oxypnictides, rather than manifestation of vortex lattice melting or granularity. The orientational dependence of H{sub c2} shows deviations from the one-band Ginzburg-Landau scaling. The mass anisotropy decreases as T decreases, from 9.2 at 44K to 5 at 34K. Spin dependent magnetoresistance and nonlinearities in the Hall coefficient suggest contribution to the conductivity from electron-electron interactions modified by disorder reminiscent that of diluted magnetic semiconductors. The Ohmic resistivity measured below T{sub c} but above the irreversibility field exhibits a clear Arrhenius thermally activated behavior over 4--5 decades. The activation energy has very different field dependencies for H{parallel}ab and H{perpendicular}ab. We discuss to what extent different pairing scenarios can manifest themselves in the observed behavior of H{sub c2}, using the two-band model of superconductivity. The results indicate the importance of paramagnetic effects on H{sub c2}(T), which may significantly reduce H{sub c2}(0) as compared to H{sub c2}(0) {approx}200--300 T based on extrapolations of H{sub c2}(T) near T{sub c} down to low temperatures.

Balakirev, Fedor F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaroszynski, J [NHMFL, FSU; Hunte, F [NHMFL, FSU; Balicas, L [NHMFL, FSU; Jo, Youn - Jung [NHMFL, FSU; Raicevic, I [NHMFL, FSU; Gurevich, A [NHMFL, FSU; Larbalestier, D C [NHMFL, FSU; Fang, L [CHINA; Cheng, P [CHINA; Jia, Y [CHINA; Wen, H H [CHINA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Highways, Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Evaluating Criticism of Transportation Costing, VictoriaFrom Here: Evaluating Transportation Diversity, Victoria

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Shielding analysis of neuron emitting sealed sources in S100 pipe component OVERPACK/TRUPACT-11 geometries using MCNP transport code and empirical measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to estimate an upper bound for the dose at the mid-plane on the surface of a S100 Overpack, i.e., a specially designed drum for transuranium (TRU) waste containing shielding and sealed neutron sources. In addition, the dose at the surface and at a distance for a TRUPACT-II Container with 14 S100 Overpack drums was also estimated for the Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT), for Normal Condition of Transport with crushed Overpacks and for accident conditions. The source modeled was a Plutonium-Beryllium source with the Plutonium infinitely dilute in the Beryllium. In the calculations, a source of one curie per drum was modeled. The resulting dose from the calculations may be scaled to reflect multi-curie level sources. When these results are scaled to 28 curies per drum, the limiting payload, the dose rates obtained meet the requirements of the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report.

Perry, R. T. (Robert T.); Brown, T. H. (Thomas H.); Tompkins, J. A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Defense Transportation - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defense Transportation The Center for Transportation Analysis provides analytical, planning, and operational support to defense transportation related projects. This includes the...

234

Does Evaporation over the Arabian Sea Play a Crucial Role in Moisture Transport across the West Coast of India during an Active Monsoon Period?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study interannual variability of the contributions of evaporation and moisture flux from the Southern Hemisphere towards the moisture transport across the west coast of India is examined. The mean rates of evaporation and ...

Y. Sadhuram; M. R. Ramesh Kumar

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

electrifyingthefuture transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

programme of electrification and the potential introduction of diesel hybrids. The Department for Transport vehicles Wind turbine systems Industrial equipment The lab has full ethernet capability which will enable

Birmingham, University of

236

Sustainable Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads U.S. researchers and other partners in making transportation cleaner and more efficient through solutions that put electric drive...

237

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

238

The Exchange Value Embedded in a Transport System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vershynina, A. : On the transport dimension of measures.optimal maps for Monges transport prob- lem as a limit ofQ. : Optimal paths related to transport problems. Commun.

Xia, Qinglan; Xu, Shaofeng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Transportation Network Modeling in Passenger Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Summary & Future work 2 #12;NETPLAN Energy and Transportation Integration model A modeling frameworkTransportation Network Modeling in NETPLAN Passenger Transportation Venkat Krishnan Eirini;Outline 1. Introduction to NETPLAN 2. Transportation modeling- A review Freight Passenger 3. Developed

Daniels, Thomas E.

240

Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10%, but brands vary. A colorless liquid should be reported in cups E, F, or G. (Student error is to be expected) 2. Measure 1 ml of water in an eye dropper and use a permanent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services Page 1 of 4 UNIVERSITY RULE 21.01.05.M3 Transportation Services Transportation Services is responsible for managing all parking, traffic and transportation-related activities on campus. Transportation Services is guided by state and federal statutes and regulations. Official Rule 1

242

Photocharge transport and recombination measurements in amorphous silicon films and solar cells by photoconductive frequency mixing. Annual subcontract report, 15 May 1995--15 May 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using the photomixing technique, the authors systematically studied the transport properties of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) samples that had hydrogen content ranging from over 10% to less than 1% and which were produced by the hot-wire technique at NREL. They investigated the continuous decay of electron drift mobility in intrinsic a-Si:H on light-soaking and determined the degradation of photoconductivity, lifetime, and drift mobility in these a-Si:H samples while light-soaking. In addition to the decay of the photoconductivity and electron lifetime, continuous decay of the electron drift mobility was found during the light-soaking process, which reveals a new phenomenon associated with the Staebler-Wronski effect. The drift mobility decreased by a factor of 2--4 for 5-hour light-soaking at 4-sun intensity. The authors investigated the effects of deposition conditions on transport properties of intrinsic a-Si:H films and, by using the photomixing technique, they determined the electron drift mobility, lifetime, and the conduction-band Urbach energy of a-Si:H films as a function of substrate temperature. 44 refs.

Braunstein, R.; Dong, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Charge Transport Anisotropy Due to Grain Boundaries in Directionally Crystallized Thin Films of Regio-Regular Poly(3-hexylthiophene) Semicrystalline polymers, such as polythiophenes, hold much promise as active layers in printable electronic devices such as photovoltaic cells, sensors, and thin film transistors. As organic semiconductors approach commercialization, there is a need to better understand the relationship between charge transport and microstructure, in particular, to identify the inherent bottlenecks to charge transport. In semicrystalline and polycrystalline materials, charge transport is most likely dominated by grain-boundary effects, although the exact mechanism is not well understood. Unfortunately, grain boundaries in semicrystalline thin films are difficult to characterize: the grains are too small to allow for measurements across individual grain boundaries (as is often done for polycrystalline films of small molecules) and bulk measurements are complicated by the unknown orientation of polymer chains within the grain. To better understand the effect of chain orientation on grain boundaries, we use anisotropic thin films of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) - one of the most well-studied polymeric semiconductors, as a tool to study charge transport.

244

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part I: Climatology, Variability, Transport, and Relation to Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years (19942004) of measurements of tropical upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) by the Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC) are investigated over three regionsthe tropical Atlantic, tropical Africa, ...

Zhengzhao Luo; Dieter Kley; Richard H. Johnson; Herman Smit

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

N N ti l T t ti National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Chicago, IL, May 26, 2010 Ahmad Al-Daouk Date and page number - 1 Director, National Security Department National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center - Albuquerque, NM National Transportation Stakeholders Forum OSRP * NNSA Contractors transporting in commerce, are required law to comply with applicable regulations required law to comply with applicable regulations (e.g. federal, local, tribal) * Great majority of NNSA shipments are non-secured * Off-Site Source Recovery Program (OSRP) - OSRP is a U.S. Government activity sponsored and overseen by NNSA Office of Global Threat Reduction and the program is managed by LANL Mi i i t t d b d d Date and page number - 2 - Mission is to remove excess, unwanted, abandoned, or

246

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes a review of the progress made in ACTF Flow Loop development and research during 90 days pre-award period (May 15-July 14, 1999) and the following three months after the project approval date (July15-October 15, 1999) The report presents information on the following specific subjects; (a) Progress in Advanced Cuttings Transport Facility design and development, (b) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Flow of Synthetic Drilling Fluids Under Elevated Pressure and Temperature Conditions'', (c) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (d) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Cuttings Transport with Aerated Muds Under LPAT Conditions (Joint Project with TUDRP)'', (e) Progress report on the research project ''Study of Foam Flow Behavior Under EPET Conditions'', (f) Progress report on the instrumentation tasks (Tasks 11 and 12) (g) Activities towards technology transfer and developing contacts with oil and service company members.

Ergun Kuru; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Gerald Kane; Len Volk; Mark Pickell; Evren Ozbayoglu; Barkim Demirdal; Paco Vieira; Affonso Lourenco

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Project No.: DE-FE0004908 Membranes shown (from top to bottom): ceramic support, activated and coated with palladium...

248

Transport in gyrokinetic tokamaks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of transport in full-volume gyrokinetic (gk) simulations of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence in core tokamak plasmas is presented. Though this ``gyrokinetic tokamak`` is much simpler than experimental tokamaks, such simplicity is an asset, because a dependable nonlinear transport theory for such systems should be more attainable. Toward this end, we pursue two related lines of inquiry. (1) We study the scalings of gk tokamaks with respect to important system parameters. In contrast to real machines, the scalings of larger gk systems (a/{rho}{sub s} {approx_gt} 64) with minor radius, with current, and with a/{rho}{sub s} are roughly consistent with the approximate theoretical expectations for electrostatic turbulent transport which exist as yet. Smaller systems manifest quite different scalings, which aids in interpreting differing mass-scaling results in other work. (2) With the goal of developing a first-principles theory of gk transport, we use the gk data to infer the underlying transport physics. The data indicate that, of the many modes k present in the simulation, only a modest number (N{sub k} {approximately} 10) of k dominate the transport, and for each, only a handful (N{sub p} {approximately} 5) of couplings to other modes p appear to be significant, implying that the essential transport physics may be described by a far simpler system than would have been expected on the basis of earlier nonlinear theory alone. Part of this analysis is the inference of the coupling coefficients M{sub kpq} governing the nonlinear mode interactions, whose measurement from tokamak simulation data is presented here for the first time.

Mynick, H.E.; Parker, S.E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Aerosol plume transport and transformation in high spectral resolution lidar measurements and WRF-Flexpart simulations during the MILAGRO Field Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) experiences high loadings of atmospheric aerosols from anthropogenic sources, biomass burning and wind-blown dust. This paper uses a combination of measurements and numerical ...

de Foy, B.

250

Transportation Energy Efficiency Trends, 1972--1992  

SciTech Connect

The US transportation sector, which remains 97% dependent on petroleum, used a record 22.8 quads of energy in 1993. Though growing much more slowly than the economy from 1975 to 1985, energy use for transportation is now growing at nearly the same rate as GDP. This report describes the analysis of trends in energy use and energy intensity in transportation into components due to, (1) growth in transportation activity, (2) changes in energy intensity, and (3) changes in the modal structure of transportation activities.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Fan, Y. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved ETA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Effective May 1, 2004 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment (M&TE) Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: ...

252

Atomic transport at liquid metal/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interfaces  

SciTech Connect

In this work, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to identify the controlling transport mechanisms at metal/oxide interfaces and measure the corresponding diffusivities. Interfacial transport rates in our experiments are two to four orders of magnitude faster than any previously reported rates for the oxide surface. The interfacial diffusivities and the degree of interfacial anisotropy depend on the oxygen activity of the system. Atomic transport at metal/oxide interfaces plays a defining role in many technological processes, and these experiments provide fundamental data for the formulation of the atomic theory needed to explain many of the observed phenomena.

Saiz, Eduardo; Cannon, Rowland M.; Tomsia, Antoni P.

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

253

activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Detecting Things We Cannot See: Learning the Concepts of Control and Variable in an Experiment Submitted by Anita Brook-Dupree, 1996 TRAC teacher at Fermilab, Teacher, Alternative Middle Years School, Philadelphia, PA. Particle physicists at Fermilab in Batavia, Illinois are faced with the problem of detecting the presence of sub-atomic particles they cannot see. During my summer as a TRAC teacher at Fermilab, I tried to think of ways to teach middle school students about things we cannot see. I want to thank my nine-year-old daughter Gia for the idea for the following activity. I was lamenting that I could not come up with ideas of how to relate the work of Fermilab scientists to anything that my students would understand. Then I was reminded by my daughter, that when I brought her to school on the

254

Transportation Issues  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Issues and Resolutions - Compilation of Laboratory Transportation Work Package Reports Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Compiled by Paul McConnell Sandia National Laboratories September 30, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000342 Transportation Issues and Resolutions ii September 2012 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any

255

LNG transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the beginning of 1965, the participants to the starting up of first French LNG transportation system between ARZEW and LE HAVRE were indeed pioneers when they started the cool-down of the three tanks of LE HAVRE, with a LNG freight delivered by old liberty-ship ''BEAUVAIS''. Could they forecast the development of LNG industry in FRANCE and in the world and imagine that modest 'JULES VERNE' and his two english brothers would have, 25 years later, 80 successors - more than five times as big, for the main part of them, that 12 liquefaction plants would be running in the world, supplying about twenty LNG terminals. For the first time, a country - FRANCE - can draw the lessons from the exploitation of the 3 LNG transportation systems during a long period. That is the subject of the present paper.

Picard, J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transportation Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

For Review Only 1 Transportation Security Draft Annotated Bibliography Review July 2007 Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 2 Work Plan Task * TEC STG Work Plan, dated 8/2/06, Product #16, stated: "Develop an annotated bibliography of publicly-available documents related to security of radioactive material transportation." * Earlier this year, a preliminary draft annotated bibliography on this topic was developed by T-REX , UNM, to initially address this STG Work Plan Task. Preliminary Draft - For Review Only 3 Considerations in Determining Release of Information * Some "Publicly-available" documents could potentially contain inappropriate information according to standards set by DOE information security policy and DOE Guides. - Such documents would not be freely

257

Social aspects of transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The social costs and benefits of roads are not evident. They will undoubtedly vary by gender, age, occupation and location of the road user. Thus, before measurement procedures can be considered, the range of social costs and benefits of roads have to be identified and categorised. In the Scoping Paper provided for authors, a number of key questions and issues are identified, to be probed. PART ONE Before addressing those, however, it is important, I suggest, to go back to basics and ask ourselves what is transport for? and how best can the economic, social and other objectives identified be achieved, before we proceed to more specific questions as to the identification and appraisal of social benefits and costs of road transport. Then I consider briefly a range of specific issues which seem to me to be worth commenting on, before turning to the specific questions and issues raised by the Scoping Paper. 1. Why transport? Transport is a means to specific ends. It is ultimately to improve peoples lives and livelihoods of people. The essential feature of transport development should be: to reduce the time and energy spent on- and thus the cost of- travel and the transport of goods; and thereby to improve peoples access to resources, people, goods, opportunities, markets and services including the provision of information- they value. The issue of identifying and assessing costs and benefits should, therefore, be framed within this broader framework: what are the costs and benefits of different means of improving access to whatever it is that people value. This suggests, immediately two important points: first, that improving access may not involve improving road transport it may imply other means of transport, other means of transmitting information, or even other development interventions; and second, that one crucial component of any form of assessment of costs and benefits must be what people themselves value. Before we become deeply involved in identifying and appraising the costs and benefits of road transport or more appropriately of various alternative 1

David Seddon

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels. ucB-prominentlyin our transportation future, powering electricTransportation Energy Futures Daniel Sperling Mark A.

DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Achieving Sustainable Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a serious concern for future transportation planning, but itplanning for the future. Transportation should be at the topsustainable transportation look like? Again, the future will

Mason, Jonathan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport and its infrastructure Coordinating Lead Authors:5 Transport and its infrastructure Chandler, K. , E. Eberts,5 Transport and its infrastructure Sausen, R. , I. Isaksen,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Intelligent Transport Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Sustainable Urban Transport: City Interview Synthesis (of Leeds, Institute for Transport Studies, forthcoming.I NTELLIGENT TRANSPORT SYSTEMS LINKING TECHNOLOGY AND

Deakin, Elizabeth; Frick, Karen Trapenberg; Skabardonis, Alexander

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Preface: Nonclassical Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models of solute transport in highly heterogeneous geologicSemenov. 2008b. Nonclassical transport processes in geologicand L. Matveev. 2008. Transport regimes and concentration

Bolshov, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gilbert is a Toronto-based transport and energy consultantof the forthcoming book Transport Revolutions: Making theand substantial transition to transport systems based on

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Session 2A Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials  

Water and Gas Transport Through Cementitious Materials State of the art ... Novel methods for liquid permeability measurement of saturated ...

265

CNST Team Calculates the Electronic Transport Properties of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... arrangements exhibited properties particularly promising for future electronics, including ... reported in the literature), a transport measurement could ...

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electroabsorption and transport measurements and modeling in amorphous-silicon-based solar cells: Phase I technical progress report, 24 March 1998--23 March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done by the Syracuse University during Phase 1 of this subcontract. Researchers performed work in the following areas: (1) In ``Electroabsorption measurements and built-in potentials in a-Si:H-based solar cells and devices'', researchers obtained an estimate of Vbi = 1.17 V in cells with a-SiGe:H absorber layers from United Solar Systems Corp. (2) In ``Solar cell modeling employing the AMPS computer program'', researchers began operating a simple AMPS modeling site and explored the effect of conduction bandtail width on Voc computed analytical approximations and the AMPS program. The quantitative differences between the two procedures are discussed. (3) In ``Drift mobility measurements in a-Si:H made with high hydrogen dilution'', researchers measured electron and hole mobilities in several n/i/Ni (semitransparent) cells from Pennsylvania State University with a-Si absorber layers made under maximal hydrogen dilution and found a modest increase in hole mobility in these materials compared to conventional a-Si:H. (4) In ``Electroabsorption spectroscopy in solar cells'', researchers discovered and interpreted an infrared absorption band near 1.0 eV, which they believe is caused by dopants and defects at the n/i interface of cells, and which also has interesting implications for the nature of electroabsorption and for the doping mechanism in n-type material.

Schiff, E. A.; Lyou, J.; Kopidakis, N.; Rao, P.; Yuan, Q.

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster Presentations: Stacy Davis - "Transportation Data Programs: Transportation Energy Data Book, Vehicle Technologies Market Report, and the Vehicle Technologies Fact of...

268

Study of the Periodicities of Lightning Activity in Three Main Thunderstorm Centers Based on Schumann Resonance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time variations of lightning activity in the three main tropical thunderstorm centers located in the Maritime Continent (Pakistan, India, Southeast Asia, Indonesia, and Australia), Africa, and the Americas are analyzed using a lightning activity ...

Zenon Nieckarz; Stanis?aw Zi?ba; Andrzej Ku?ak; Adam Michalec

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

270

ISD97, a computer program to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity  

SciTech Connect

A computer program, ISD97, was developed to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity. The ISD97 code operates using a two-step process. A deconvolution of the data is carried out using the maximum entropy method, and a map of activity on the ground that fits the data within experimental error is generated. This maximum entropy map is then analyzed to determine the locations and magnitudes of potential areas of elevated activity that are consistent with the data. New deconvolutions are then carried out for each potential area of elevated activity identified by the code. Properties of the algorithm are demonstrated using data from actual field measurements.

Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P.; Miller, K.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transportation Research Internship Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research Internship Program Civil & Coastal Engineering Overview The Transportation Research Internship Program (TRIP) is conducted by the Transportation Research Center (TRC) and the Center is to provide undergraduates an exciting opportunity to learn about transportation engineering

Slatton, Clint

272

Transportation Energy Databook: Edition 17  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 17 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building blocks of modern society. Efficient mobility improves the quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect quality. The transportation systems graduate pro- gram provides in-depth knowledge on the design

Wang, Yuhang

274

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

275

Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 National 0 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois Spring 2010 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Illinois NTSF Spring 2010 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Applying Risk Communication to the Transportation of Radioactive Materials Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration Activities EM Waste and Materials Disposition & Transportation National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Integrated Strategy for Spent Fuel Management Status and Future of TRANSCOM Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program - Making A Difference Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Status and Plans - 2010 Meeting Summary Meeting Summary Notes

276

List of Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Fuels Incentives Transportation Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 30 Renewable Transportation Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 30) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Energy Bond Fund Program (Illinois) State Grant Program Illinois Commercial Industrial Solar Water Heat Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Landfill Gas Wind energy Biomass Hydroelectric energy Renewable Transportation Fuels Geothermal Electric No Alternative Fuel Transportation Grant Program (Indiana) State Grant Program Indiana Commercial Nonprofit Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cells No Alternative Fuel Vehicle Conversion Rebate Program (Arkansas) State Rebate Program Arkansas Transportation Renewable Transportation Fuels No

277

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATION STAKEHOLDERS TRANSPORTATION STAKEHOLDERS FORUM Activities and Accomplishments May 16, 2013 Buffalo, New York NTSF RESOURCES  Wiki Site  Private domain / Registration required  Repository of information  Users are allowed editing capabilities  Webinars  Cover a variety of topics (NRC Rulemaking, Section 180(c), BRC Recommendations, Strategy for Management and Disposal of UNF and HLRW, etc.)  Recording are available on the wiki site  Input is needed for future content NTSF Working Groups COMMUNICATIONS WORKING GROUP  Webinars  Development Guide  LLW Fact Sheet  Table of Waste Types  New Fact Sheets  Newsletter  NFSTPP Communications Products TEPP WORKING GROUP  Formed a TEPP Working Group after the 2012 NTSF to

278

Independent Oversight Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - February 2004 Independent Oversight Evaluation, Office of Secure Transportation - February 2004 February 2004 Evaluation of the Office of Secure Transportation Emergency Management Program The Secretary of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) conducted an inspection of emergency management programs at the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Office of Secure Transportation (OST) in October 2003. Inspection activities included the observation of the OST annual emergency exercise and reviews of selected emergency management program elements. The exercise demonstrated that the OST emergency response organization could effectively provide for prompt event categorization, DOE and NNSA

279

Use of Laboratory Drag Measurements in Evaluating Hot-Gas Filtration of Char from the Transport Gasifier at the Power Systems Development Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initial objective of this study was to better understand the reasons for the substantial increase in filter DP that was observed after the gasifier recycle loop modifications. Beyond this specific objective, a secondary goal was to develop a meaningful method of evaluating the effect of particle size and other particle properties on dustcake drag and filter DP. As mentioned earlier, the effect of particle size on dustcake drag and filter DP can be a very important consideration in the selection and specification of a precleaner cyclone for use upstream of the hot-gas filter. Installing a cyclone ahead of a hot-gas filter will reduce the transient areal loading of dust to the filter, but the beneficial effect of the reduced areal loading may be offset by an increase in drag associated with a finer particle-size distribution. The overall goal of this study was to better understand these tradeoffs and to ultimately develop a procedure that would be useful in analyzing the performance of hot-gas filters and in sizing new hot-gas filters. In addition to the obvious effects of a cyclone on dust loading and particle size, other indirect effects on particulate properties and flow resistance may occur when the cyclone is incorporated into the gasifier recycle loop as was the case at the PSDF. To better understand the importance of these other effects, this study sought to separate the particle-size effect from these other effects by measuring the drag of size-fractionated char samples collected before and after the recycle loop modifications.

Dahlin, R.S.; Landham, E.C.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

280

Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental understanding Fundamental understanding * Driving membranes towards applications Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity High Priority * A need for a standard/available AEM (similar to Nafion in PEMs) * Define standard experimental conditions and protocols * A need for much more fundamental studies in transport mechanisms and mechanical properties * A need to develop much more new AEMs with alternative chemistries (new cation and backbone chemistries) Fundamental Studies * TRANSPORT * Conductivity (pure OH - hard to measure) * Water content, λ * Diffusion coefficients, NMR * Drag coefficients * Transference * Solubility * Fundamental transport mechanisms for anion and water transport * Computational Modeling * MORPHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY * Vibrational Spectroscopy: FTIR, Raman

282

Measurements of proton-induced radionuclide production cross sections to evaluate cosmic-ray activation of tellurium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured a large number of proton-induced radionuclide production cross sections from tellurium targets of natural isotopic composition at incident energies of 0.80, 1.4, and 23 GeV. The results of these measurements are compared to semi-empirical calculations.

A. F. Barghouty; C. Brofferio; S. Capelli; M. Clemenza; O. Cremonesi; S. Cebrin; E. Fiorini; R. C. Haight; E. B. Norman; E. Previtali; B. J. Quiter; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; S. A. Wender

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

283

Spheromak Energy Transport Studies via Neutral Beam Injection  

SciTech Connect

Results from the SSPX spheromak experiment provide strong motivation to add neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Such auxiliary heating would significantly advance the capability to study the physics of energy transport and pressure limits for the spheromak. This LDRD project develops the physics basis for using NBI to heat spheromak plasmas in SSPX. The work encompasses three activities: (1) numerical simulation to make quantitative predictions of the effect of adding beams to SSPX, (2) using the SSPX spheromak and theory/modeling to develop potential target plasmas suitable for future application of neutral beam heating, and (3) developing diagnostics to provide the measurements needed for transport calculations. These activities are reported in several publications.

McLean, H S; Hill, D N; Wood, R D; Jayakumar, J; Pearlstein, L D

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

284

NEUTRON MULTIPLICITY AND ACTIVE WELL NEUTRON COINCIDENCE VERIFICATION MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED FOR MARCH 2009 SEMI-ANNUAL DOE INVENTORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Development (AD) Section field nuclear measurement group performed six 'best available technique' verification measurements to satisfy a DOE requirement instituted for the March 2009 semi-annual inventory. The requirement of (1) yielded the need for SRNL Research Operations Department Material Control & Accountability (MC&A) group to measure the Pu content of five items and the highly enrich uranium (HEU) content of two. No 14Q-qualified measurement equipment was available to satisfy the requirement. The AD field nuclear group has routinely performed the required Confirmatory Measurements for the semi-annual inventories for fifteen years using sodium iodide and high purity germanium (HpGe) {gamma}-ray pulse height analysis nondestructive assay (NDA) instruments. With appropriate {gamma}-ray acquisition modeling, the HpGe spectrometers can be used to perform verification-type quantitative assay for Pu-isotopics and HEU content. The AD nuclear NDA group is widely experienced with this type of measurement and reports content for these species in requested process control, MC&A booking, and holdup measurements assays Site-wide. However none of the AD HpGe {gamma}-ray spectrometers have been 14Q-qualified, and the requirement of reference 1 specifically excluded a {gamma}-ray PHA measurement from those it would accept for the required verification measurements. The requirement of reference 1 was a new requirement for which the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Research Operations Department (ROD) MC&A group was unprepared. The criteria for exemption from verification were: (1) isotope content below 50 grams; (2) intrinsically tamper indicating or TID sealed items which contain a Category IV quantity of material; (3) assembled components; and (4) laboratory samples. Therefore all (SRNL) Material Balance Area (MBA) items with greater than 50 grams total Pu or greater than 50 grams HEU were subject to a verification measurement. The pass/fail criteria of reference 7 stated 'The facility will report measured values, book values, and statistical control limits for the selected items to DOE SR...', and 'The site/facility operator must develop, document, and maintain measurement methods for all nuclear material on inventory'. These new requirements exceeded SRNL's experience with prior semi-annual inventory expectations, but allowed the AD nuclear field measurement group to demonstrate its excellent adaptability and superior flexibility to respond to unpredicted expectations from the DOE customer. The requirements yielded five SRNL items subject to Pu verification and two SRNL items subject to HEU verification. These items are listed and described in Table 1.

Dewberry, R.; Ayers, J.; Tietze, F.; Klapper, K.

2010-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Quarter began with installing the new drill pipe, hooking up the new hydraulic power unit, completing the pipe rotation system (Task 4 has been completed), and making the SWACO choke operational. Detailed design and procurement work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. The prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed by Temco and delivered. Work is currently underway to calibrate the system. Literature review and preliminary model development for cuttings transportation with polymer foam under EPET conditions are in progress. Preparations for preliminary cuttings transport experiments with polymer foam have been completed. Two nuclear densitometers were re-calibrated. Drill pipe rotation system was tested up to 250 RPM. Water flow tests were conducted while rotating the drill pipe up to 100 RPM. The accuracy of weight measurements for cuttings in the annulus was evaluated. Additional modifications of the cuttings collection system are being considered in order to obtain the desired accurate measurement of cuttings weight in the annular test section. Cutting transport experiments with aerated fluids are being conducted at EPET, and analyses of the collected data are in progress. The printed circuit board is functioning with acceptable noise level to measure cuttings concentration at static condition using ultrasonic method. We were able to conduct several tests using a standard low pass filter to eliminate high frequency noise. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications to the DTF have almost been completed. A stop-flow cell is being designed for the DTF, the ACTF and Foam Generator/Viscometer which will allow us to capture bubble images without the need for ultra fast shutter speeds or microsecond flash system.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mengjiao Yu; Ramadan Ahmed; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Aimee Washington; Crystal Redden

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Stabilized Radiometer Platform (STRAP)An Actively Stabilized Horizontally Level Platform for Improved Aircraft Irradiance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of solar and infrared irradiance by instruments rigidly mounted to an aircraft have historically been plagued by the introduction of offsets and fluctuations into the data that are solely due to the pitch and roll movements of the ...

Anthony Bucholtz; Robert T. Bluth; Ben Kelly; Scott Taylor; Keir Batson; Anthony W. Sarto; Tim P. Tooman; Robert F. McCoy Jr.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Manpower analysis in transportation safety. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project described provides a manpower review of national, state and local needs for safety skills, and projects future manning levels for transportation safety personnel in both the public and private sectors. Survey information revealed that there are currently approximately 121,000 persons employed directly in transportation safety occupations within the air carrier, highway and traffic safety, motor carrier, pipeline, rail carrier, and marine carrier transportation industry groups. The projected need for 1980 is over 145,000 of which over 80 percent will be in highway safety. An analysis of transportation tasks is included, and shows ten general categories about which the majority of safety activities are focused. A skills analysis shows a generally high level of educational background and several years of experience are required for most transportation safety jobs. An overall review of safety programs in the transportation industry is included, together with chapters on the individual transportation modes.

Bauer, C.S.; Bowden, H.M.; Colford, C.A.; DeFilipps, P.J.; Dennis, J.D.; Ehlert, A.K.; Popkin, H.A.; Schrader, G.F.; Smith, Q.N.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Transportation Security | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Security SHARE Global Threat Reduction Initiative Transportation Security Cooperation Secure Transport Operations (STOP) Box Security of radioactive material while...

289

Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 National 1 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado Spring 2011 National Transportation Stakeholder Forum Meetings, Colorado NTSF Spring 2011 Agenda Final Agenda NTSF Presentations Activities and Accomplishments Developing a Regulatory Framework for Extended Storage and Transportation DOE Railcar Fleet Asset Planning & Lessons Learned DOE Shipment Activities: What We Accomplished and a Look Forward DOE-Idaho's Packaging and Transportation Perspective Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Evaluation of Shortline Railroads & SNF/HLW Rail Shipment Inspections Tasked for the Transportation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Gamma Industry Processing Alliance Overview Global Threat Reduction Initiative National Nuclear Security Administration Overview

290

Measurement of highly enriched uranium metal buttons with the high-level neutron coincidence counter operating in the active mode  

SciTech Connect

The portable High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter is used in the active mode with the addition of AmLi neutron sources to assay the /sup 235/U content of highly enriched metal pieces or buttons. It is concluded that the portable instrument is a practical instrument for assaying uranium metal buttons with masses in the range 1.5 to 4 kg.

Foley, J.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Measuring Transport Properties in Grout and Cement  

education, nuclear energy and issues involving Homeland Security particularly those surrounding dirty bombs or RDDs ... ?= potential (pressure, gravit ...

292

Radiation Transport Measurements in Methanol Pool Fires ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and b) CH stretching (with methane) .... ... within a coal flame with ... The test bed, illustrated in ...

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Measurement of Water Transport from Saturated Pumice ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A thin slice of polished granite stone (about fo mm x 4 mm x 3 mm) was insened first into the cuvette, providing a support for the pumice that was ...

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphereocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transportation Demand This  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

69 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates...

297

Transportation / Field Trips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In the event that a child misses the transportation, parents may choose the ... their child's class on an outing and possibly transport themselves or their ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

PBA Transportation Websites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA From: Patterson, Philip (DOE HQ) Subject: Useful Websites for Transportation from PBA Here are some websites you might want to check...

299

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Integrating Sustainability into the Trans- portationTHOUGHT PIECE Sustainability and Transport by Richardof the concept of sustainability to transport planning. In

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. However,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 of 4 Abstract--Heart rate variability (HRV) is frequently used to measure autonomic nervous frequency (HF) ratio with little change in mean heart rate. Results suggest that nicotine affects both components may yield erroneous results. Keywords--Autonomic regulation, heart rate variability, Lomb

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(active travel) substitutes for at least some motorised travel and thereby reduces CO2 emissions [e.g. 12]. This assump- tion is supported by the finding that energy expenditure from walking is negatively correlated with fossil fuel use from car driving... About your local pedestrian and cycling routes Continued 11 About your work or place of study S E C T I O N E Sedentary occupation You spend most of your time sitting (e.g. in an office, driving a vehicle). Standing occupation You spend most of your time...

Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David; on behalf of the iConnect consortium

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Transportation Sector: Climate Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory, Market analysis Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: climate.dot.gov/methodologies/analysis-resources.html Cost: Free USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse Screenshot References: USDOT-Transportation and Climate Change Clearinghouse[1] "Assessments of available models and analytical tools can be used to compare greenhouse gas measurement methods and analytical approaches. This

303

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Active laser frequency stabilization and resolution enhancement of interferometers for the measurement of gravitational waves in space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser frequency stabilization is notably one of the major challenges on the way to a space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The proposed Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is presently under development in an ESA, NASA collaboration. We present a novel method for active laser stabilization and phase noise suppression in such a gravitational wave detector. The proposed approach is a further evolution of the "arm locking" method, which in essence consists of using an interferometer arm as an optical cavity, exploiting the extreme long-run stability of the cavity size in the frequency band of interest. We extend this method by using the natural interferometer arm length differences and existing interferometer signals as additional information sources for the reconstruction and active suppression of the quasi-periodic laser frequency noise, enhancing the resolution power of space-borne gravitational wave detectors.

Markus Herz

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

305

Calibration Tools for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Oxide and Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide with a Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has completed an extensive effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler (Canberra Model JCC-92) for accountability measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide and HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. Earlier papers described the PAN shuffler calibration over a range of item properties by standards measurements and an extensive series of detailed simulation calculations. With a single normalization factor, the simulations agree with the HEU oxide standards measurements to within {+-}1.2% at one standard deviation. Measurement errors on mixed U-Pu oxide samples are in the {+-}2% to {+-}10% range, or {+-}20 g for the smaller items. The purpose of this paper is to facilitate transfer of the LLNL procedure and calibration algorithms to external users who possess an identical, or equivalent, PAN shuffler. Steps include (1) measurement of HEU standards or working reference materials (WRMs); (2) MCNP simulation calculations for the standards or WRMs and a range of possible masses in the same containers; (3) a normalization of the calibration algorithms using the standard or WRM measurements to account for differences in the {sup 252}Cf source strength, the delayed-neutron nuclear data, effects of the irradiation protocol, and detector efficiency; and (4) a verification of the simulation series trends against like LLNL results. Tools include EXCEL/Visual Basic programs which pre- and post-process the simulations, control the normalization, and embody the calibration algorithms.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P

2003-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TEC was formed in 1992 to improve coordination between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and external groups interested in the Department's transportation activities. TEC is co-chaired by DOE's...

307

Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 19  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 19 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. The latest editions of the Data Book are available to a larger audience via the Internet (http://www-cta.ornl.gov/data/tedb.htm).

Davis, S.C.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

resistance measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... uncertainties caused by transportation and the ... ? standard resistors influencing transport behaviour and ... NBS Ohm Past-Present-Future, RF Dziuba ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments on the flow loop are continuing. Improvements to the software for data acquisition are being made as additional experience with three-phase flow is gained. Modifications are being made to the Cuttings Injection System in order to improve control and the precision of cuttings injection. The design details for a drill-pipe Rotation System have been completed. A US Patent was filed on October 28, 2002 for a new design for an instrument that can generate a variety of foams under elevated pressures and temperatures and then transfer the test foam to a viscometer for measurements of viscosity. Theoretical analyses of cuttings transport phenomena based on a layered model is under development. Calibrations of two nuclear densitometers have been completed. Baseline tests have been run to determine wall roughness in the 4 different tests sections (i.e. 2-in, 3-in, 4-in pipes and 5.76-in by 3.5-in annulus) of the flow loop. Tests have also been conducted with aerated fluids at EPET conditions. Preliminary experiments on the two candidate aqueous foam formulations were conducted which included rheological tests of the base fluid and foam stability reports. These were conducted after acceptance of the proposal on the Study of Cuttings Transport with Foam Under Elevated Pressure and Elevated Temperature Conditions. Preparation of a test matrix for cuttings-transport experiments with foam in the ACTF is also under way. A controller for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration and distribution has been designed that can control four transceivers at a time. A prototype of the control circuit board was built and tested. Tests showed that there was a problem with radiated noise. AN improved circuit board was designed and sent to an external expert to verify the new design. The new board is being fabricated and will first be tested with static water and gravel in an annulus at elevated temperatures. A series of viscometer tests to measure foam properties have begun using foam generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF). Investigation of techniques to measure foam quality and size, size distribution and shape of bubbles is continuing.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Graduate Certificate in Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graduate Certificate in Transportation Nohad A. Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning of Engineering and Computer Science integrated transportation systems. The Graduate Certificate in Transportation their capabilities. Students in the program can choose among a wide range of relevant courses in transportation

Bertini, Robert L.

312

TRANSPORTATION Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and educate the future transportation workforce. An example of what we can accomplish is shown2003 CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION STUDIES Annual Report #12;Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota 200 Transportation and Safety Building 511 Washington Avenue S.E. Minneapolis, MN

Minnesota, University of

313

Transportation Organization and Functions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Office of Packaging and Transportation list of organizations and functions, with a list of acronyms.

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Multi-Modal Multi-Modal Transportation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Multi-Modal Transportation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Multi-Modal Transportation Using multiple modes of transportation is the best approach for some

315

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Study of Study of DOE FY03 SNF Shipments Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 Background Benchmarking * The goal of benchmarking is to identify, understand, and adapt outstanding practices from organizations anywhere in the world to help your organization improve its performance * Benchmarking looks outward to find best practice and high performance and then measures actual business operations against those goals Background Best Practices * Best practices are proven solutions that represent superior performance when adapted and implemented in one's own organization. This includes processes and procedures that others are using to transport radioactive materials Background Lessons Learned * Lessons learned are "good work practices" or

316

Transportation Energy Data Book, Edition 18  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 18 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. This edition of the Data Book has 11 chapters which focus on various aspects of the transportation industry. Chapter 1 focuses on petroleum; Chapter 2 - energy Chapter 3 - emissions; Chapter 4 - transportation and the economy; Chapter 5 - highway vehicles; Chapter 6 - Light vehicles; Chapter 7 - heavy vehicles; Chapter 8 - alternative fuel vehicles; Chapter 9 - fleet vehicles; Chapter 10 - household vehicles; and Chapter 11 - nonhighway modes. The sources used represent the latest available data.

Davis, Stacy C.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Land Transport Emergency Response Technology Report  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was tasked by the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) to provide assistance in developing an emergency response plan for radioactive material transportation activities. Those tasks included compiling radioactive materials (RAM) transportation accident data from the open literature and databases, investigating emergency response plans for radioactive materials transport in the United States, and developing specific recommendations for the JNC' nuclear material transport emergency response plan, based on information gathered during the first two tasks. These recommendations include developing a RAM database, a public transparency Internet website, an emergency response infrastructure designed specifically for transportation needs, and a clear set of directives to provide authority in the case of transportation accidents or incidents involving RAM.

DOTSON, LORI J.; PIERCE, JIM D.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Trends in transportation energy use, 1970--1988: An international perspective  

SciTech Connect

Personal mobility and timely movement of goods have become increasingly important around the world, and energy use for transportation has grown rapidly as a consequence. Energy is used in transportation for two rather different activities: moving people, which we refer to as passenger travel, and moving freight. While freight transport is closely connected to economic activity, much of travel is conducted for personal reasons. In the OECD countries, travel accounts for around 70% of total transportation energy use. In contrast, freight transport accounts for the larger share in the Former East Bloc and the developing countries (LDCs). In our analysis, we focus on three elements that shape transportation energy use: activity, which we measure in passenger-km (p-km) or tonne-km (t-km), modal structure (the share of total activity accounted for by various modes), and modal energy intensities (energy use per p-km or t-km). The modal structure of travel and freight transport is important because there are often considerable differences in energy intensity among modes. The average 1988 average energy use per p-km of different travel modes in the United States (US), West Germany, and Japan are illustrated. With the exception of rail in the US, bus and rail travel had much lower intensity than automobile and air travel. What is perhaps surprising is that the intensity of air travel is only slightly higher than that of automobile travel. This reflects the much higher utilization of vehicle capacity in air travel and the large share of automobile travel that takes place in urban traffic (automobile energy intensity in long-distance driving is much lower than the average over types of driving).

Schipper, L.; Steiner, R.; Meyers, S.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation > Airport planning and development > Airport maintenance > Bicycle and pedestrian > Ports and waterways >>> Transportation operat

320

Occultation measurement of the size of the X-ray emitting region in the Active Galactic Nucleus of NGC 1365  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an occultation of the central X-ray emitting region in the Seyfert Galaxy NGC 1365. This extreme spectral variation (from Compton-thin to reflection-dominated and back to Compton-thin in four days) has been caught in a ten days Chandra monitoring campaign consisting of six short (15 ks) observations performed every two days. We discuss the implications of this occultation within the scenario of a Compton-thick cloud crossing the line of sight of the X-ray source. We estimate a source size R<10^14 cm and a distance of the cloud from the source D<10^16 cm. This direct measurement confirms the theoretical expectations of an extremely compact X-ray source, and shows that the Compton-thick circumnuclear gas is located at a distance from the center on the scale of the Broad Line Region.

G. Risaliti; M. Elvis; G. Fabbiano; A. Baldi; A. Zezas; M. Salvati

2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Award on January 16, 2013, during the Chairman's Luncheon at the 92nd Annual Transportation Research Board (TRB) Meeting in Washington, DC. Dr. Greene was honored for his...

322

NETL: CCPI - Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiative (CCPI) - Round 2 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle Demonstration of a Coal-Based Transport Gasifier (Active) Project Brief...

323

Transportation Energy Futures Study: The Key Results and Conclusions...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

study and provide context on EERE's transportation energy strategy. In his role with EERE, Mike provides leadership direction on cross-cutting activities in EERE's portfolio. In...

324

Measuring the success of public participation efforts associated with the U.S. Department of energy`s environmental management activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the last several years, US DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) has actively pursued a policy of involving local stakeholders in the planning and implementation of environmental management activities at contaminated sites throughout the DOE complex. An ongoing ORNL study is focusing on how to measure the success of the public participation efforts. Five DOE facilities were selected for intensive site visits; 4 or 5 additional sites were covered by telephone interviews. Key stakeholder groups were interviewed. Based on the data collection and preliminary analysis, 17 definitions of success were developed for public participation programs. Objective and subjective indicators of the success of the public participation efforts are discussed.

Schweitzer, M.; Carnes, S.A.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.; Munro, J.F.

1996-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIA - Related Links for Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Related Links Transportation Related Links Transportation Related Links government reports, data, and web sites (sorted alphabetically by primary agency) Date Last Updated/Reviewed: December 2006 Next Update/Review: April 2007 Federal and International Agencies and Institutes International Energy Agency (IEA) Dealing with Climate Change The International Energy Agency's »Dealing with Climate Change« database of policies and measures now features 2005 revisions and developments. The database has expanded to include more than 1400 records of the climate policy process in the IEA's 26 Member Countries since 1999. Member country governments have reviewed and endorsed the policies listed, reinforcing the informative value and authority of the database. The database is freely accessible online.

326

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Quarter has been divided between running experiments and the installation of the drill-pipe rotation system. In addition, valves and piping were relocated, and three viewports were installed. Detailed design work is proceeding on a system to elevate the drill-string section. Design of the first prototype version of a Foam Generator has been finalized, and fabrication is underway. This will be used to determine the relationship between surface roughness and ''slip'' of foams at solid boundaries. Additional cups and rotors are being machined with different surface roughness. Some experiments on cuttings transport with aerated fluids have been conducted at EPET. Theoretical modeling of cuttings transport with aerated fluids is proceeding. The development of theoretical models to predict frictional pressure losses of flowing foam is in progress. The new board design for instrumentation to measure cuttings concentration is now functioning with an acceptable noise level. The ultrasonic sensors are stable up to 190 F. Static tests with sand in an annulus indicate that the system is able to distinguish between different sand concentrations. Viscometer tests with foam, generated by the Dynamic Test Facility (DTF), are continuing.

Troy Reed; Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi; Mark Pickell; Len Volk; Mike Volk; Lei Zhou; Zhu Chen; Crystal Redden; Aimee Washington

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Measuring progress on HEU minimization - The need for acceleration and addressing 'out-of- scope' activities  

SciTech Connect

Currently, 294 reactors and isotope production facilities use HEU fuel or target material, out of which 154 are used for naval propulsion. These facilities are in annual need of more than 3 500 kg HEU for naval propulsion, more than 900 kg HEU in research reactors, and more than 80 kg HEU for isotope production in civilian facilities, in addition to 6 000 kg HEU in various other types of reactors. 48 civilian research reactors, representing a decrease in the HEU consumption on 278 kg - or 19% compared to the amount of HEU consumed in 1978 in similar facilities, have completed the conversion to LEU as a result over continued international assistance over three decades. The establishment of baseline measurements for assessing the results of the current HEU minimization effort calls for additional focus on the scope and methodology for HEU minimization. The justification for addressing only 54% of the remaining HEU-fueled research reactors as part of the GTRI program should be addressed together with increased focus on facility decommissioning as 120 HEU-fueled reactors with HEU consumption on 450 kg have been shutdown since 1978. There should be no need for converting all the remaining 133 HEU-fueled research reactors as decommissioning and dismantling should play a more prominent role in the future HEU minimization effort. As other sectors reduce the HEU fuel inventory, there is a need to evaluate the risk associated with the continued use of large quantities of weapons-grade HEU fuel for naval propulsion. (author)

Reistad, Ole; Hustveit, Styrkaar [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA), 1332 Osteras (Norway)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Measurements of metabolically active inorganic phosphate in plants growing in natural and agronomic settings and under water stress. [Stromal Phosphate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At high rates of photosynthesis, the conflicting requirements of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis for phosphate and starch and sucrose synthesis for low phosphate, may limit the overall rate of photosynthesis. This is called feedback limitation of photosynthesis. A nonaqueous fractionation technique was used to measure stromal phosphate levels without contamination from vacuolar phosphate. Under normal conditions the stromal phosphate level was found to be 7mM. Under feedback limited photosynthesis, this value dropped to <1mM. In a related study, the effect of water stress on photosynthesis was examined. Water stress was shown to cause a decrease in total leaf photosynthesis, due not to a total loss of photosynthetic ability, but rather due to photosynthesis only occurring in patches of the leaf. Water stress was shown to cause a reduction in starch and sucrose synthesis. Since this decline can be reversed by increasing the CO{sub 2} level around the plant, this is proposed to be due to closing of stomata due to the water stress. (MHB)

Sharkey, T.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo SPONSORED BY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation ExpoAlternative Transportation Expo providers,Exhibits and vehicles from auto manufacturers, energy providers, entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest.entrepreneurs, transportation providers, and an art contest

de Lijser, Peter

330

Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium in Mixed Oxide  

SciTech Connect

As a follow-on to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron drum (PAN) shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide, a method has been developed to extend the use of the PAN shuffler to the measurement of HEU in mixed uranium-plutonium (U-Pu) oxide. This method uses the current LLNL HEU oxide calibration algorithms, appropriately corrected for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, and recently developed PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithms to yield the mass of {sup 235}U present via differences between the expected count rate for the PuO{sub 2} and the measured count rate of the mixed U-Pu oxide. This paper describes the LLNL effort to use PAN shuffler measurements of units of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] and CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] and a selected set of LLNL PuO{sub 2}-bearing containers in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to each to (1) establish and validate a correction to the HEU calibration algorithm for the mixed U-Pu oxide assay time, (2) develop a PuO{sub 2} calibration algorithm that includes the effect of PuO{sub 2} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (8.57 cm to 9.88 cm inside diameter and 9.60 cm to 13.29 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop and validate the method for establishing the mass of {sup 235}U present in an unknown of mixed U-Pu oxide.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

331

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Fuels, Engines, Emissions Transportation Analysis Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Propulsion Materials Lightweight Materials Bioenergy Fuel Cell Technologies Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Transportation SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their effects on the combustion process in an internal combustion engine. Oak Ridge National Laboratory brings together science and technology experts from across scientific disciplines to partner with government and industry in addressing transportation challenges. Research objectives are

333

KK4, Optical and Electrical Transport Properties of Nearly Intrinsic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have also measured the electrical transport properties of single InN:Si .... F1, Applications of SiC Power Devices A Materials and Device Perspective.

334

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump...

335

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: 1) Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline 2) Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas 3) Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode 4) Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Transportation risk assessment for ethanol transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is aimed at assessing the quantitative risks involved with an ethanol pipeline. Pipelines that run from the Midwest, where the vast majority of ethanol is produced, to the target areas where reformulated gasoline is required (California, Texas Gulf Coast, New England Atlantic Coast) will be of particular interest. The goal is to conduct a quantitative risk assessment on the pipeline, truck, and rail transportation modes to these areas. As a result of the quantitative risk assessment, we are able to compare the risk associated with the different modes of transportation for ethanol. In order to perform and compare the quantitative risk assessment, the following challenges are addressed: Identify target areas requiring reformulated gasoline Map detailed route for each transportation mode to all three target areas Perform a quantitative risk assessment for each transportation mode Compare quantitative risk assessment results for each route and transportation mode The focus is on California, Texas Gulf Coast, and New England Atlantic Coast because of the large volume. It is beneficial to look at these areas as opposed to the smaller areas because pipeline transportation requires very large volumes. In order to find a meaningful comparison between all three transportation modes, only the areas with the three large volumes were evaluated. Since the risk assessment is completed using historical data, each route is segmented in a way that is consistent with the data that is available. All of the curves support the hypothesis that pipeline transportation poses the least societal risk when transporting ethanol from the Midwest to target areas. Rail transportation poses the largest amount of societal risk. While overall rail incidents are not as frequent as road incidents, the frequency of a fatality is much higher when an incident does occur.

Shelton Davis, Anecia Delaine

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Local Transportation Sales Taxes: California's Experiment in Transportation Finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 131051, County Transportation Expenditure Plans. Fresno County Transportation Authority, Annual Report (1994-D.A. Niemeier, Comparing Transportation Project Development

Crabbe, Amber E.; Hiatt, Rachel; Poliwka, Susan D.; Wachs, Martin

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Environmental conditions and responses of circus elephants transported by truck and railcar during relatively high and low temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No published research exists regarding the transport of circus elephants despite evidence of stressful conditions in transported livestock. Shipments of elephants with participating circuses and private exhibitors were identified during relatively high and low temperatures to characterize the transport environment and the animals' response to transport. Ten hot and five cold weather trips with seven circuses were surveyed. During each trip, external and internal temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation were continuously measured during both extremes. Concentrations of ammonia and carbon monoxide during transport were also determined. Body temperature from a sample of elephants for each circus or exhibitor was also measured continuously as an indication of the animal's physiological response. Blood samples were taken an hour before, immediately before, immediately after, and an hour after transport to determine plasma cortisol concentrations as an indication of psycho-physiological response. Direct and video observations were made and analyzed for the occurrence of normal and abnormal behaviors. The temperature of the transport vehicle during transport maintained temperatures with a range under 36?C and above 0?C during hot and cool weather surveys, respectively. Concentrations of ammonia or carbon monoxide were not detectable during transport. Body temperature for each elephant was maintained within a 1.5?C range. Increases in body temperature were observed during or after physical activity with a maximum of 37.5?C. Significant differences in cortisol concentrations were found between the first and second (p=0.015) and the first and third (p=0.028) sample times during one trip, though appear minimal and may reflect arousal. No other significant differences were found between sample times. Observations during transport identified that the stereotypic behavior of weaving occurred in some elephants up to 80% of the time in transport time, although animals were observed to eat and drink, among other behaviors associated with a positive environment. Due to the lack of extreme temperatures within the transport vehicle during transport, biologically insignificant fluctuations in cortisol concentrations, stable body temperature, occurrence of natural behaviors, comparatively robust overall health, and the absence of the stressors in transported livestock, transport does not appear to be inherently stressful or compromise the welfare of the surveyed elephants.

Toscano, Michael Jeffrey

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

transportation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

transportation transportation Dataset Summary Description The 2009 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) provides information to assist transportation planners and policy makers who need comprehensive data on travel and transportation patterns in the United States. The 2009 NHTS updates information gathered in the 2001 NHTS and in prior Nationwide Personal Transportation Surveys (NPTS) conducted in 1969, 1977, 1983, 1990, and 1995. Source U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration Date Released February 28th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords NHTS TEF transportation Transportation Energy Futures travel trip Data application/zip icon Travel Day Trip File (zip, 42.6 MiB) application/zip icon Household File (zip, 5 MiB) application/zip icon Person File (zip, 17.4 MiB)

340

Linear Motor Powered Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This special issue on linear-motor powered transportation covers both supporting technologies and innovative transport systems in various parts of the World, as this technology moves from the lab to commercial operations. ...

Thornton, Richard D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Cross-Gyre Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

What is the fate of surface Ekman transport entering a subtropical gyre through its zonal boundaries? This question is investigated by resolving interior transport of a deep surface layer into nonvortical (potential flow) and nondivergent (...

G. T. Csanady

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

WIPP Transportation (FINAL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM Waste Isolation Pilot Plant U.S. Department Of Energy The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has established an elaborate system for safely transporting...

343

Transportation Management Workshop: Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of discussions presented at the Transportation Management Workshop held in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Topics include waste packaging, personnel training, robotics, transportation routing, certification, containers, and waste classification.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and alternative transport fuels; R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomassprices and the economic viability of alternative transport fuels; R&D outcomes in several areas, especially biomass

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Transportation Demand This  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Transportation Demand Transportation Demand This page inTenTionally lefT blank 75 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Transportation Demand Module The NEMS Transportation Demand Module estimates transportation energy consumption across the nine Census Divisions (see Figure 5) and over ten fuel types. Each fuel type is modeled according to fuel-specific and associated technology attributes applicable by transportation mode. Total transportation energy consumption is the sum of energy use in eight transport modes: light-duty vehicles (cars and light trucks), commercial light trucks (8,501-10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), freight trucks (>10,000 lbs gross vehicle weight), buses, freight and passenger aircraft, freight

346

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have tested the loop elevation system. We raised the mast to approximately 25 to 30 degrees from horizontal. All went well. However, while lowering the mast, it moved laterally a couple of degrees. Upon visual inspection, severe spalling of the concrete on the face of the support pillar, and deformation of the steel support structure was observed. At this time, the facility is ready for testing in the horizontal position. A new air compressor has been received and set in place for the ACTS test loop. A new laboratory has been built near the ACTS test loop Roughened cups and rotors for the viscometer (RS300) were obtained. Rheologies of aqueous foams were measured using three different cup-rotor assemblies that have different surface roughness. The relationship between surface roughness and foam rheology was investigated. Re-calibration of nuclear densitometers has been finished. The re-calibration was also performed with 1% surfactant foam. A new cuttings injection system was installed at the bottom of the injection tower. It replaced the previous injection auger. A mechanistic model for cuttings transport with aerated mud has been developed. Cuttings transport mechanisms with aerated water at various conditions were experimentally investigated. A total of 39 tests were performed. Comparisons between the model predictions and experimental measurements show a satisfactory agreement. Results from the ultrasonic monitoring system indicated that we could distinguish between different sand levels. We also have devised ways to achieve consistency of performance by securing the sensors in the caps in exactly the same manner as long as the sensors are not removed from the caps. A preliminary test was conducted on the main flow loop at 100 gpm flow rate and 20 lb/min cuttings injection rate. The measured bed thickness using the ultrasonic method showed a satisfactory agreement with nuclear densitometer readings. Thirty different data points were collected after the test section was put into liquid holdup mode. Readings indicated 2.5 to 2.7 inches of sand. The corresponding nuclear densitometers readings were between 2.5 and 3.1 inches. Lab tests were conducted to check an on-line viewing system. Sharp images were obtained through a CCD camera with the use of a ring light or fiber light. A prototype device for measuring the average bubble size for the foam generator-viscometer was constructed from a 1/2 inch fitting. The new windowed cell has been received and installed on the ACTF Bubble Characterization Cart.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Transportation Security Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) final rules issued in 2003 required persons who offer for transportation or transport certain hazardous materials to develop and implement security plans. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed a Transportation Security Implementation Working Group, which included representation from the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), to identify key projects, which were documented in the original report in 2005. This report updates information in the original rep...

2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

348

NIST Transportation to NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transportation to NIST. The National Institute of Standards and Technology is located approximately 25 miles north of Washington ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

349

Argonne Transportation Current News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

materials (pdf) clean cities logo Clean Cities Transportation Workshop for Almaty, Kazakhstan Jeff Chamberlain Jeff Chamberlain discusses Argonne's breakthrough cathode...

350

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy. OECD, 2004b: Current international shipping market trends -trends continue. In contrast, transport energy use in the mature market

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

352

Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.2 Transport in tokamakAnomalous radial transport model for edge plasma . . . . . .Anomalous transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

MCNP/X TRANSPORT IN THE TABULAR REGIME  

SciTech Connect

The authors review the transport capabilities of the MCNP and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes in the energy regimes in which tabular transport data are available. Giving special attention to neutron tables, they emphasize the measures taken to improve the treatment of a variety of difficult aspects of the transport problem, including unresolved resonances, thermal issues, and the availability of suitable cross sections sets. They also briefly touch on the current situation in regard to photon, electron, and proton transport tables.

HUGHES, H. GRADY [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

Transportation Infrastructure and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Better Forecasting Tool for Transportation Decision-making, Mineta Transportation Institute, San Jose Stateat the 2008 meeting of the Transportation Research Board and

Boarnet, Marlon G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Transportation Analysis | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis SHARE Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory contribute to the efficient, safe, and free movement of...

356

FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Transportation Projects on...

357

Transportation Research and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Transportation Research and Analysis to supercomputers, we can simulate how individual bridges interact with sediment transport, local topography the bridge. Computer-based research at this highly detailed level promises to prevent future bridge disasters

Kemner, Ken

358

Nevada University Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

illnesses and disabilities · Development of professionals and future leaders in the area of transportationNUTC Nevada University Transportation Center University of Nevada, Las Vegas Sustainable Transporation in Arid Regions 2007-2009 Biennial Report 5 #12;2007-2009 Nevada University Transportation Center

Ahmad, Sajjad

359

PalladianDigest Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PalladianDigest CONNECT. EMPOWER. GROW. Tackling Transportation Challenges Nebraska has been a vital link in the nation's transportation system since the days when carts, wagons to University of Nebraska­Lincoln research. That's fine with UNL transportation researchers, said Larry Rilett

Farritor, Shane

360

Northwestern University Transportation Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwestern University Transportation Center 2011 Business Advisory Committee NUTC #12;#12;I have the pleasure of presenting our Business Advisory Committee members--a distinguished group of transportation industry lead- ers who have partnered with the Transportation Center in advancing the state of knowledge

Bustamante, Fabián E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Introduction to Transportation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to Transportation Planning CMP 4710/6710 Fall 2012 3 Credit Hours Room: ARCH 229 on a Saturday night, transportation is not an objective in and of itself, but a means to carry out the functions of daily living (i.e., it's a "derived good"). As a consequence, the transportation systems we build

Tipple, Brett

362

Louisiana Transportation Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Louisiana Transportation Research Center LTRC www.ltrc.lsu.edu 2012-13 ANNUALREPORT #12;The Louisiana Transportation Research Center (LTRC) is a research, technology transfer, and training center administered jointly by the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD) and Louisiana State

Harms, Kyle E.

363

TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

Minnesota, University of

364

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: State and Alternative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Membership Corporation P.O. Box 38 Jefferson, GA 30549-0038 Greg Broussard Kansas City Board of Public Utilities 6742 Riverview Avenue Kansas City, KS 66102 Tracey R. Karrick...

365

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Exemptions from Standard...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Standard Compliance Alternative Fuel Vehicles Biodiesel Credits Reporting Exemptions Alternative Compliance Alternative Fuel Petitions...

366

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Reporting Standard...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Standard Compliance Alternative Fuel Vehicles Biodiesel Credits Reporting Exemptions Alternative Compliance Alternative Fuel Petitions...

367

Neutrons and Granite: Transport and Activation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In typical ground materials, both energy deposition and radionuclide production by energetic neutrons vary with the incident particle energy in a non-monotonic way. We describe the overall balance of nuclear reactions involving neutrons impinging on granite to demonstrate these energy-dependencies. While granite is a useful surrogate for a broad range of soil and rock types, the incorporation of small amounts of water (hydrogen) does alter the balance of nuclear reactions.

Bedrossian, P J

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Transportation and packaging resource guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this resource guide is to provide a convenient reference document of information that may be useful to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor personnel involved in packaging and transportation activities. An attempt has been made to present the terminology of DOE community usage as it currently exists. DOE`s mission is changing with emphasis on environmental cleanup. The terminology or nomenclature that has resulted from this expanded mission is included for the packaging and transportation user for reference purposes. Older terms still in use during the transition have been maintained. The Packaging and Transportation Resource Guide consists of four sections: Sect. 1, Introduction; Sect. 2, Abbreviations and Acronyms; Sect. 3, Definitions; and Sect. 4, References for packaging and transportation of hazardous materials and related activities, and Appendices A and B. Information has been collected from DOE Orders and DOE documents; U.S Department of Transportation (DOT), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations; and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and other international documents. The definitions included in this guide may not always be a regulatory definition but are the more common DOE usage. In addition, the definitions vary among regulatory agencies. It is, therefore, suggested that if a definition is to be used in a regulatory or a legal compliance issue, the definition should be verified with the appropriate regulation. To assist in locating definitions in the regulations, a listing of all definition sections in the regulations are included in Appendix B. In many instances, the appropriate regulatory reference is indicated in the right-hand margin.

Arendt, J.W.; Gove, R.M.; Welch, M.J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

States Energy Board States Energy Board Joint Meeting of the Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee and the Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group The Hilton Knoxville Knoxville, Tennessee May 15, 2012 Tuesday, May 15, 2012 8:30 a.m. Breakfast 9:30 a.m. Welcome / Opening Remarks / Introductions - Christopher Wells, Southern States Energy Board - Sandra Threatt, Chair, SSEB Radioactive Materials Transportation Working Group - Elgan Usrey, Chair, SSEB Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group 9:45 a.m. WIPP Transportation Program and National TRU Activities - Bill Mackie, Carlsbad Field Office 10:30 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m. Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance Level VI Program Update - Larry Stern, Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

370

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EHSS EHSS Industrial Hygiene Group HazMat Transport/Shipping Home Biological & Infectious Substances Chemicals Compressed Gas Cryogens Dry Ice Engineered Nanomaterials Gasoline Lithium Betteries Radioactive Materials Waste: Hazardous, Biohazardous, Medical or Radioactive Mixed Hazardous Materials Personal/Rental Vehicles HazMat Transport/Shipping Transporting and shipping hazardous materials can be dangerous, but both activities can be done safely - much of it by the researchers themselves. Each of the items below is subject to some transportation or shipping restrictions. Click on the applicable hazardous material icon below to learn how you can safely (and legally) transport that hazardous material and to learn what laboratory resources are available to you for your shipping needs.

371

Conservation and renewable energy technologies for transportation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Transportation Technologies (OTT) is charged with long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research and development of promising transportation technologies that are unlikely to be undertaken by the private sector alone. OTT activities are designed to develop an advanced technology base within the US transportation industry for future manufacture of more energy-efficient, fuel-flexible, and environmentally sound transportation systems. OTT operations are focused on three areas: advanced automotive propulsion systems including gas turbines, low heat rejection diesel, and electric vehicle technologies; advanced materials development and tribology research; and research, development, demonstration, test, and evaluation (including field testing in fleet operations) of alternative fuels. Five papers describing the transportation technologies program have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Transportation Business Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Business Plan is a step in the process of procuring the transportation system. It sets the context for business strategy decisions by providing pertinent background information, describing the legislation and policies governing transportation under the NWPA, and describing requirements of the transportation system. Included in the document are strategies for procuring shipping casks and transportation support services. In the spirit of the NWPA directive to utilize the private sector to the maximum extent possible, opportunities for business ventures are obvious throughout the system development cycle.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Influence of Transport Variables on Isospin Transport Ratios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy in the nuclear equation of state affects many aspects of nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, and nuclear reactions. Recent constraints from heavy ion collisions, including isospin diffusion observables, have started to put constraints on the symmetry energy below nuclear saturation density, but these constraints depend on the employed transport model and input physics other than the symmetry energy. To understand these dependencies, we study the influence of the symmetry energy, isoscaler mean field compressibility and momentum dependence, in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections, and light cluster production on isospin diffusion within the pBUU transport code. In addition to the symmetry energy, several uncertain issues strongly affect isospin diffusion, most notably the cross sections and cluster production. In addition, there is a difference in the calculated isospin transport ratios, depending upon whether they are computed using the isospin asymmetry of either the residue or of all forward moving fragments. Measurements that compare the isospin transport ratios of these two quantities would help place constraints on the input physics, such as the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

D. D. S. Coupland; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang; P. Danielewicz; Yingxun Zhang

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

Personal and environmental correlates of active travel and physical activity in a deprived urban population  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment of the literature on the relationships among transportation, land use, and physical activity Washington, DC: Trans- portation Research Board and Institute of Medicine Committee on Physical Activity, Health, Transportation, and Land Use; 2004. 8...

Ogilvie, David; Mitchell, Richard; Mutrie, Nanette; Petticrew, Mark; Platt, Stephen

2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Transportation Planning & Decision Science Group Transportation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viewer Unveiled at ITS-America Meeting in Nashville At the Annual Intelligent Transportation Association of America (ITS-A) meeting held in Nashville on April 22 - 24, the...

376

ADVANCED CUTTINGS TRANSPORT STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Final design of the mast was completed (Task 5). The mast is consisting of two welded plate girders, set next to each other, and spaced 14-inches apart. Fabrication of the boom will be completed in two parts solely for ease of transportation. The end pivot connection will be made through a single 2-inch diameter x 4 feet-8 inch long 316 SS bar. During installation, hard piping make-ups using Chiksan joints will connect the annular section and 4-inch return line to allow full movement of the mast from horizontal to vertical. Additionally, flexible hoses and piping will be installed to isolate both towers from piping loads and allow recycling operations respectively. Calibration of the prototype Foam Generator Cell has been completed and experiments are now being conducted. We were able to generate up to 95% quality foam. Work is currently underway to attach the Thermo-Haake RS300 viscometer and install a view port with a microscope to measure foam bubble size and bubble size distribution. Foam rheology tests (Task 13) were carried out to evaluate the rheological properties of the proposed foam formulation. After successful completion of the first foam test, two sets of rheological tests were conducted at different foam flow rates while keeping other parameters constant (100 psig, 70F, 80% quality). The results from these tests are generally in agreement with the previous foam tests done previously during Task 9. However, an unanticipated observation during these tests was that in both cases, the frictional pressure drop in 2 inch pipe was lower than that in the 3 inch and 4 inch pipes. We also conducted the first foam cuttings transport test during this quarter. Experiments on aerated fluids without cuttings have been completed in ACTF (Task 10). Gas and liquid were injected at different flow rates. Two different sets of experiments were carried out, where the only difference was the temperature. Another set of tests was performed, which covered a wide range of pressure and temperature. Several parameters were measured during these tests including differential pressure and mixture density in the annulus. Flow patterns during the aerated fluids test have been observed through the view port in the annulus and recorded by a video camera. Most of the flow patterns were slug flow. Further increase in gas flow rate changed the wavy flow pattern to slug flow. At this stage, all of the planned cuttings transport tests have been completed. The results clearly show that temperature significantly affects the cuttings transport efficiency of aerated muds, in addition to the liquid flow rate and gas liquid ratio (GLR). Since the printed circuit board is functioning (Task 11) with acceptable noise level we were able to conduct several tests. We used the newly designed pipe test section to conduct tests. We tested to verify that we can distinguish between different depths of sand in a static bed of sand in the pipe section. The results indicated that we can distinguish between different sand levels. We tested with water, air and a mix of the two mediums. Major modifications (installation of magnetic flow meter, pipe fittings and pipelines) to the dynamic bubble characterization facility (DTF, Task 12) were completed. An Excel program that allows obtaining the desired foam quality in DTF was developed. The program predicts the foam quality by recording the time it takes to pressurize the loop with nitrogen.

Stefan Miska; Nicholas Takach; Kaveh Ashenayi

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Developing a Total Travel Time Performance Measure A Concept Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that can be used to target improvements for future versions of the measure. Background Transportation and David Schrank Texas Transportation Institute (TTI) For Mobility Measurement in Urban Transportation the supply and demand for transportation services. Land use pattern and density are also used to provide

378

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Stakeholders Forum Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 14-16, 2013 Tuesday, May 14 7:00 am - 5:00 pm Registration Niagara Foyer 7:00 am - 7:45 am Breakfast and Networking Grand A 8:00 am - 10:00 am National Updates for Transportation Stakeholder Groups and Guests - Panel Grand BC Moderator: John Giarrusso Jr., MA Emergency Management Agency / Northeast High-Level Radioactive Waste Transportation Task Force Co-Chair US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management - Steve O'Connor, Director, Office of Packaging & Transportation US Nuclear Regulatory Commission - Earl P. Easton, Senior Level Advisor (retired) and David W. Pstrak, Transportation and Storage Specialist, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation

379

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Minneapolis Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study #12;Public Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City Works Transportation Infrastructure Study Minneapolis City of Lakes Background: · Currently, funding

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Panagiotis Scarlatos, Ph.D., Director Transportation Safety and Security #12;Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety and Security Partners #12 evacuations · Tracking systems for hazardous materials Center for Intermodal Transportation Safety

Fernandez, Eduardo

382

Effective Potential Energy Expression for Membrane Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

All living cells transport molecules and ions across membranes, often against concentration gradients. This active transport requires continual energy expenditure and is clearly a nonequilibrium process for which standard equilibrium thermodynamics is not rigorously applicable. Here we derive a nonequilibrium effective potential that evaluates the per particle transport energy invested by the membrane. A novel method is used whereby a Hamiltonian function is constructed using particle concentrations as generalized coordinates. The associated generalized momenta are simply related to the individual particle energy from which we identify the effective potential. Examples are given and the formalism is compared with the equilibrium Gibb's free energy.

Robert W. Finkel

2007-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Self-Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Title Self-Assembly and Transport Limitations in Confined Nafion Films Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Modestino, Miguel A., Devproshad K. Paul, Shudipto Dishari, Stephanie A. Petrina, Frances I. Allen, Michael A. Hickner, Kunal Karan, Rachel Segalman, and Adam Z. Weber Journal Macromolecules Volume 46 Issue 3 Pagination 867 - 873 Date Published 02/2013 ISSN 0024-9297 Abstract Ion-conducting polymers are important materials for a variety of electrochemical applications. Perfluorinated ionomers, such as Nafion, are the benchmark materials for proton conduction and are widely used in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices including solar-fuel generators, chlor-alkali cells, and redox flow batteries. While the behavior of Nafion in bulk membranes (10 to 100s ?m thick) has been studied extensively, understanding its properties under thin-film confinement is limited. Elucidating the behavior of thin Nafion films is particularly important for the optimization of fuel-cell catalyst layers or vapor-operated solar-fuel generators, where a thin film of ionomer is responsible for the transport of ions to and from the active electrocatalytic centers. Using a combination of transport-property measurements and structural characterization, this work demonstrates that confinement of Nafion in thin films induced thickness-dependent proton conductivity and ionic-domain structure. Confining Nafion films to thicknesses below 50 nm on a silicon substrate results in a loss of microphase separation of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic domains, which drastically increases the material?s water uptake while in turn decreasing its ionic conductivity.

384

Microwave-assisted fast vapor-phase transport synthesis of MnAPO-5 molecular sieves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MnAPO-5 was prepared by a microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C in short times. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, UV-vis spectroscopic measurement, NH{sub 3}-temperature-programmed desorption and esterification reaction. It was found that dry gels prepared with aluminum isopropoxide, phosphoric acid and manganese acetate could be transferred to MnAPO-5 in the vapors of triethylamine and water by the microwave-assisted vapor-phase transport method at 180 deg. C for less than 30 min. The crystallization time was greatly reduced by the microwave heating compared with the conventional heating. The resulting MnAPO-5 exhibited much smaller particle sizes, higher surface areas and slightly higher catalytic activity in the esterification of acetic acid and butyl alcohol than those prepared by the conventional vapor-phase transport method and hydrothermal synthesis.

Shao Hui [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Polytechnic University, Changzhou 213016 (China); Yao Jianfeng; Ke Xuebin [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China); Zhang Lixiong [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: lixiongzhang@yahoo.com; Xu Nanping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

2009-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

Magnetic Electrochemical Sensing Platform for Biomonitoring of Exposure to Organophosphorus Pesticides and Nerve Agents Based on Simultaneous Measurement of Total Enzyme Amount and Enzyme Activity  

SciTech Connect

We report a new approach for electrochemical quantification of enzymatic inhibition and phosphorylation for biomonitoring of exposure to organophosphorus (OP) pesticides and nerve agents based on a magnetic beads (MBs) immunosensing platform. The principle of this approach is based on the combination of MBs immuno-capture based enzyme activity assay and competitive immunoassay of total amount of enzyme for simultaneous detection of enzyme inhibition and phosphorylation in biological fluids. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) was chosen as a model enzyme. In competitive immunoassay, the target total BChE in a sample (mixture of OP-inhibited BChE and active BChE) competes with the BChE modified on the MBs to bind to the limited anti-BChE antibody labeled with quantum dots (QDs-anti-BChE), and followed by electrochemical stripping analysis of the bound QDs conjugate on the MBs. This assay shows a linear response over the total BChE concentration range of 0.1~20 nM. Simultaneously, real time BChE activity was measured on an electrochemical carbon nanotube-based sensor coupled with microflow injection system after immuno-capture by MBs-anti-BChE conjugate. Therefore, the formed phosphorylated adduct (OP-BChE) can be estimated by the difference values of the total amount BChE (including active and OP-inhibited) and active BChE from established calibration curves. This approach not only eliminates the difficulty in screening of low-dose OP exposure (less than 20% inhibition of BChE) because of individual variation of BChE values, but also avoids the drawback of the scarce availability of OP-BChE antibody. It is sensitive enough to detect 0.5 nM OP-BChE, which is less than 2% BChE inhibition. This method offers a new method for rapid, accurate, selective and inexpensive quantification of phosphorylated adducts and enzyme inhibition for biomonitoring of OP and nerve agent exposures.

Du, Dan; Wang, Jun; Wang, Limin; Lu, Donglai; Smith, Jordan N.; Timchalk, Charles; Lin, Yuehe

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Transport studies on CVD-grown graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we report transport studies performed on CVD-grown graphene. We perform resistivity and hall measurements on a large-area sample at 4' K. We measure the carrier mobility of the sample and find it to be on ...

Huntley, Miriam Hanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Transportation energy data book: edition 16  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 16 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares U.S. transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high- occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data on environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McFarlin, D.N. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

Weir, S

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

Transportation Licenses Available | Tech Transfer | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation SHARE Transportation 200301316 Integrated Inverter Control for Multiple Electric Machines 200701874 Power Conversion Apparatus and Method for Hybrid Electric and Electric Vehicle Engines 200701929 Rapid Separation and Detection of Hydrocarbon Fractions in an Exhaust Stream 200701962 Sensor Rapidly Measures the Concentration of Oxygen in Fluids 200802045 Failure Prediction of Complex Structures Under Loading and Environmental Stress 200802130 Optical Backscatter Probe for Sensing Particulate Matter 200802165 Optimized Fuel Formulation and Engine Control Parameters for Advanced Diesel Engine 200802180 Enhancements to WIM for Ease of Use - Modifications and/or Elimination of Load Cell Foot Strap 200802188 Highly efficient 6-stroke engine cycle with water

390

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation RMIR (Radioactive Materials Incident Report) Database Transportation Accident and Incident Experience,1971-1999 Access Hazardous Materials Information System (HMIS) the primary source of national data for the Federal, state, and local governmental agencies responsible for the safety of hazardous materials transportation. Rail Transport Highway Transport Air Transport The Radioactive Material Incident Report (RMIR) Database was developed in 1981 at the Transportation Technology Center of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development activities for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This database contains information about radioactive materials transportation incidents that have occurred in the U.S. from 1971 through 1999. These data were drawn from the U.S.

391

Water transport properties of fuel cell ionomers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We will report transport parameters measured for several available perfluorosulfonate membranes. The water sorption characteristics, diffusion coefficient of water, electroosmotic drag, and conductivity will be compared for these materials. The intrinsic properties of the membranes will be the basis of our comparison. An objective look at transport parameters should enable us to compare membranes without the skewing effects of extensive features such as membrane thickness. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.; Valerio, J.; Gottesfeld, S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Update on Calibration of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Passive-Active Neutron Drum Shuffler for Measurement of Highly Enriched Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect

In October of 1999, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began an effort to calibrate the LLNL passive-active neutron (PAN) drum shuffler for measurement of highly enriched uranium (HEU) oxide. A single unit of certified reference material (CRM) 149 [Uranium (93% Enriched) Oxide - U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Standard for Neutron Counting Measurements] was used to (1) develop a mass calibration curve for HEU oxide in the nominal range of 393 g to 3144 g {sup 235}U, and (2) perform a detailed axial and radial mapping of the detector response over a wide region of the PAN shuffler counting chamber. Results from these efforts were reported at the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management 41st Annual Meeting in July 2000. This paper describes subsequent efforts by LLNL to use a unit of CRM 146 [Uranium Isotopic Standard for Gamma Spectrometry Measurements] in consort with Monte Carlo simulations of the PAN shuffler response to CRM 149 and CRM 146 units and a selected set of containers with CRM 149-equivalent U{sub 3}O{sub 8} to (1) extend the low range of the reported mass calibration curve to 10 g {sup 235}U, (2) evaluate the effect of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} density (2.4 g/cm{sup 3} to 4.8 g/cm{sup 3}) and container size (5.24 cm to 12.17 cm inside diameter and 6.35 cm to 17.72 cm inside height) on the PAN shuffler response, and (3) develop mass calibration curves for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} enriched to 20.1 wt% {sup 235}U and 52.5 wt% {sup 235}U.

Mount, M; O' Connell, W; Cochran, C; Rinard, P; Dearborn, D; Endres, E

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

MEASUREMENT AND CALCULATION OF RADIONUCLIDE ACTIVITIES IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE FOR ACCEPTANCE OF DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY GLASS IN A FEDERAL REPOSITORY  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of the analyses of High Level Waste (HLW) sludge slurry samples and of the calculations necessary to decay the radionuclides to meet the reporting requirement in the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) [1]. The concentrations of 45 radionuclides were measured. The results of these analyses provide input for radioactive decay calculations used to project the radionuclide inventory at the specified index years, 2015 and 3115. This information is necessary to complete the Production Records at Savannah River Site's Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) so that the final glass product resulting from Macrobatch 5 (MB5) can eventually be submitted to a Federal Repository. Five of the necessary input radionuclides for the decay calculations could not be measured directly due to their low concentrations and/or analytical interferences. These isotopes are Nb-93m, Pd-107, Cd-113m, Cs-135, and Cm-248. Methods for calculating these species from concentrations of appropriate other radionuclides will be discussed. Also the average age of the MB5 HLW had to be calculated from decay of Sr-90 in order to predict the initial concentration of Nb-93m. As a result of the measurements and calculations, thirty-one WAPS reportable radioactive isotopes were identified for MB5. The total activity of MB5 sludge solids will decrease from 1.6E+04 {micro}Ci (1 {micro}Ci = 3.7E+04 Bq) per gram of total solids in 2008 to 2.3E+01 {micro}Ci per gram of total solids in 3115, a decrease of approximately 700 fold. Finally, evidence will be given for the low observed concentrations of the radionuclides Tc-99, I-129, and Sm-151 in the HLW sludges. These radionuclides were reduced in the MB5 sludge slurry to a fraction of their expected production levels due to SRS processing conditions.

Bannochie, C; David Diprete, D; Ned Bibler, N

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Kinetics of NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport probed by single-cell screening without imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport probed by single-cell screening without imaging Jun of nucleocytoplasmic transport of an important transcription factor NF-kB. With data collected from single cells, we activation barrier for NF-kB transport. Our data demonstrate that NF-kB nucleocytoplasmic transport fits

Lu, Chang

395

Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reductions in Urban Transport Reductions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Name Indonesia-GTZ Emissions Reductions in Urban Transport Agency/Company /Organization GTZ Partner Ministry of Transportation Sector Energy Focus Area Transportation Topics Background analysis Website http://www.gtz.de/en/themen/um Program Start 2008 Program End 2012 Country Indonesia UN Region South-Eastern Asia References GTZ Transport & Climate Change Website[1] GTZ is working with Indonesia on this program with the following objective: "Indonesian cities increasingly plan and implement measures for a transport system that is energy efficient as well as environmentally and climate friendly." Background of the project is the absence of a national policy on

396

Transportation | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Transportation From modeling and simulation programs to advanced electric powertrains, engines, biofuels, lubricants, and batteries, Argonne's transportation research is vital to the development of next-generation vehicles. Revolutionary advances in transportation are critical to reducing our nation's petroleum consumption and the environmental impact of our vehicles. Some of the most exciting new vehicle technologies are being ushered along by research conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. Our Transportation Technology R&D Center (TTRDC) brings together scientists and engineers from many disciplines across the laboratory to work with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), automakers and other industrial partners. Our goal is to put new transportation technologies on the road that improve

397

Transportation Services | Staff Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Services Transportation Services The BNL Transportation Office, located at 20 Brookhaven Avenue, Building 400A, is available to assist BNL employees, guests and visitors with transportation needs in support of Laboratory programs. The hours of operation are 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM Monday through Friday. To contact the Transportation Office call (631) 344-2535. Stony Brook Parking Passes The Transportation Office has a limited number of parking passes for the three (3) parking garages at Stony Brook University. The passes are available to and are intended for use by BNL employees/scientific staff on official business only. Passes may be used at the Administration, University Hospital and Health Services Center garages on the Stony Brook campus when visiting SBU on official business.

398

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) In an effort to address responder concerns, the Department retooled its approach to emergency responder preparedness and implemented the more simplified and responder-friendly Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP). TEPP is a component of the overall comprehensive emergency management system established by DOE Order (DOE O) 151.1, Comprehensive Emergency Management System. TEPP integrates a basic approach to transportation emergency planning and preparedness activities under a single program with the goal to ensure DOE, its operating contractors, and state, tribal, and local emergency responders are prepared to respond promptly, efficiently, and effectively to accidents involving DOE

399

Sustainable Transportation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in transportation technologies, alternative fuels, and fuel cell technologies.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Defects and Transport I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 8, 2012 ... Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ... the specific case of mixed proton/oxygen vacancy/electronic conduction in a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Transport in PEMFC Stacks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information September 30 th 2009 Washington, DC 1 Transport in PEMFC Stacks Cortney Mittelsteadt Bryn McPheeters This...

402

Rail Coal Transportation Rates  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

figure data Figure 7 shows the percent change in average real rates for those state-to-state ... Estimated transportation rates for coal delivered to electric ...

403

Boulder Area Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NIST does not endorse or guarantee the quality or services provided by these businesses. All Denver/Boulder area transportation companies. ...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

404

Argonne Transportation Current News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

one-stop shop for news, photographs and other interesting reference information on transportation research. Current News Read current news and research highlights. Archives: 2011...

405

Argonne Transportation - Podolski Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists Receives Award for Contributions in Intelligent Transportation Systems Tentner Receives ITS Miwest Award Adrian Tentner receives the first Chapter Service Award from ITS...

406

Aluminum in Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Aluminum in Transportation: Case Study of the Development of a ... The unit was entirely redesigned using aluminum and based on the future

407

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be competitive, but the quantity of waste oils is minisculeoils are currently being used as biodiesel transport fuel in limited quantities and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Transportation | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE Transportation Research ORNL researcher Jim Szybist uses a variable valve-train engine to evaluate different types of fuels, including ethanol blends, and their...

409

Transportation Energy Futures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION ment of Oil Shale Technology. Washing- ton,interest and investments in oil shale, ethanol, coal liquidsbiomass materials, coal, oil shale, tar sands, natural gas,

Sperling, Daniel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Transportation Storage Interface  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Transportation: Technical Needs 13 * High priority degradation areas: * Stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel canister body and welds * Degradation of cask bolts *...

411

Transportation and its Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Options for Liquid Biofuels Development in Ireland. SEI, 562006: Outlook for advanced biofuels. Energy Policy, 34(17),40 pp. IEA, 2004c: Biofuels for Transport: An International

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Update Sustainable Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the significant impacts and breadth of transportation science research at ORNL and new directions to achieve efficient, clean, and sustainable mobility. Ron's talk attracted...

413

Sustainability and Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf/Hughes_D_NatGas_Boston_2006. pdf> Idaho.2005. Idaho Bicycle and Pedestrian Program.Boise, Idaho: Idaho Transportation Department [cited 13

Gilbert, Richard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 2006 Transportation Tomorrow Survey Data Presentation #12;2006 TRANSPORTATION TOMORROW SURVEY JOINT PROGRAM IN TRANSPORTATION UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO City of Hamilton City of Kawartha Lakes City of Guelph City of Brantford

Toronto, University of

416

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Transportation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Transportation Transportation International Energy Outlook 2010 Transportation Sector Energy Consumption In the IEO2010 Reference case, transportation energy use in non-OECD countries increases by an average of 2.6 percent per year from 2007 to 2035, as compared with an average of 0.3 percent per year for OECD countries. Overview Energy use in the transportation sector includes the energy consumed in moving people and goods by road, rail, air, water, and pipeline. The road transport component includes light-duty vehicles, such as automobiles, sport utility vehicles, minivans, small trucks, and motorbikes, as well as heavy-duty vehicles, such as large trucks used for moving freight and buses used for passenger travel. Consequently, transportation sector energy demand hinges on growth rates for both economic activity and the driving-age population. Economic growth spurs increases in industrial output, which requires the movement of raw materials to manufacturing sites, as well as the movement of manufactured goods to end users.

417

Transportation energy data book: Edition 12  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 12 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes--highway, air, water, rail, pipeline--is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

Davis, S.C.; Morris, M.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Transportation energy data book: Edition 15  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 15 is a statistical compendium. Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. Purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter I compares US transportation data with data from other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet vehicles, federal standards, fuel economies, and high-occupancy vehicle lane data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. Chapter 6 covers the major nonhighway modes: air, water, and rail. The last chapter, Chapter 7, presents data environmental issues relating to transportation.

Davis, S.C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Transportation energy data book: Edition 13  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes - highway, air, water, rail, pipeline - is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Transportation energy data book: Edition 13  

SciTech Connect

The Transportation Energy Data Book: Edition 13 is a statistical compendium prepared and published by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under contract with the Office of Transportation Technologies in the Department of Energy (DOE). Designed for use as a desk-top reference, the data book represents an assembly and display of statistics and information that characterize transportation activity, and presents data on other factors that influence transportation energy use. The purpose of this document is to present relevant statistical data in the form of tables and graphs. Each of the major transportation modes -- highway, air, water, rail, pipeline -- is treated in separate chapters or sections. Chapter 1 compares US transportation data with data from seven other countries. Aggregate energy use and energy supply data for all modes are presented in Chapter 2. The highway mode, which accounts for over three-fourths of total transportation energy consumption, is dealt with in Chapter 3. Topics in this chapter include automobiles, trucks, buses, fleet automobiles, federal standards, fuel economies, and vehicle emission data. Household travel behavior characteristics are displayed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains information on alternative fuels and alternatively-fueled vehicles. The last chapter, Chapter 6, covers each of the nonhighway modes: air, water, pipeline, and rail, respectively.

Davis, S.C.; Strang, S.G.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Conservation in transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

None

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Biofuels and Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels and Transportation Impacts and Uncertainties Some Observations of a Reformed Ethanol and Logistics Symposium 3 Topics · Why Biofuels · Ethanol Economics · Ethanol Transportation Equipment Biofuels? · National Security · Reduce Imports of oil · Peak Oil · Replace Fossil Resources

Minnesota, University of

423

HEU Measurements of Holdup and Recovered Residue in the Deactivation and Decommissioning Activities of the 321-M Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

This paper contains a summary of the holdup and material control and accountability (MC&A) assays conducted for the determination of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of Building 321-M at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The 321-M facility was the Reactor Fuel Fabrication Facility at SRS and was used to fabricate HEU fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the SRS production reactors. The facility operated for more than 35 years. During this time thousands of uranium-aluminum-alloy (U-Al) production reactor fuel tubes were produced. After the facility ceased operations in 1995, all of the easily accessible U-Al was removed from the building, and only residual amounts remained. The bulk of this residue was located in the equipment that generated and handled small U-Al particles and in the exhaust systems for this equipment (e.g., Chip compactor, casting furnaces, log saw, lathes A & B, cyclone separator, Freon{trademark} cart, riser crusher, ...etc). The D&D project is likely to represent an important example for D&D activities across SRS and across the Department of Energy weapons complex. The Savannah River National Laboratory was tasked to conduct holdup assays to quantify the amount of HEU on all components removed from the facility prior to placing in solid waste containers. The U-235 holdup in any single component of process equipment must not exceed 50 g in order to meet the container limit. This limit was imposed to meet criticality requirements of the low level solid waste storage vaults. Thus the holdup measurements were used as guidance to determine if further decontamination of equipment was needed to ensure that the quantity of U-235 did not exceed the 50 g limit and to ensure that the waste met the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) of the solid waste storage vaults. Since HEU is an accountable nuclear material, the holdup assays and assays of recovered residue were also important for material control and accountability purposes. In summary, the results of the holdup assays were essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to ensure that administrative criticality safety controls were not exceeded. This paper discusses the {gamma}-ray assay measurements conducted and the modeling of the acquired data to obtain measured holdup in process equipment, exhaust components, and fixed geometry scrap cans. It also presents development work required to model new acquisition configurations and to adapt available instrumentation to perform the assays.

DEWBERRY, RAYMOND; SALAYMEH, SALEEM R.; CASELLA, VITO R.; MOORE, FRANK S.

2005-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

FINAL Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) January 28-30, 2002 New Orleans, Louisiana Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 20 th semi-annual meeting January 28-30, 2002, in New Orleans, Louisiana. This was the tenth anniversary of TEC, and 102 attendees from national, State, Tribal, and local government organizations; industry and professional groups and other interested parties in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, met to address a variety of issues related to DOE's radioactive materials transportation activities. The TEC process includes the involvement of these key stakeholders in developing solutions to DOE transportation issues through their actual participation in the work product. These members provide continuing and improved

425

DOE - Safety of Radioactive Material Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When are they used? How are they moved? What's their construction? Who uses them? Who makes rules? What are the requirements? Safety Record A radioactive material (RAM) packaging is a container that is used to safely transport radioactive material from one location to another. In RAM transportation the container alone is called the Packaging. The packaging together with its contents is called the Package. Basic types of radioactive material packagings are: Excepted Packaging Industrial Packaging Type A Packaging Type B Packaging [EXCEPTED] Click to view picture [IP] Click to view picture [TYPE A] Click to view picture [TYPE B] Click to view picture Excepted Packagings are designed to survive normal conditions of transport. Excepted packagings are used for transportation of materials that are either Low Specific Activity (LSA) or Surface Contaminated Objects (SCO) and that are limited quantity shipments, instruments or articles, articles manufactured from natural or depleted uranium or natural thorium; empty packagings are also excepted (49CFR 173.421-428).

426

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portland, Oregon - February 6-7, 2001 Portland, Oregon - February 6-7, 2001 Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) February 6-7, 2001 Portland, Oregon Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 18 th semi-annual meeting February 6-7, 2001, in Portland, Oregon. Attending were 125 representatives from national, State, Tribal and local government organizations, industry and professional groups and other interested parties/DOE programs who meet to address a variety of issues related to DOE's radioactive materials transportation activities and provide continuing and improved coordination between DOE, other levels of government, and outside organizations with DOE transportation-related responsibilities. PLENARY I - TRANSCOM 2000 PRESENTATION (February 6)

427

Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transportation Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Click to return to AEO2011 page AEO2011 Data From AEO2011 report . Market Trends From 2009 to 2035, transportation sector energy consumption grows at an average annual rate of 0.6 percent (from 27.2 quadrillion Btu to 31.8 quadrillion Btu), slower than the 1.2 percent average rate from 1975 to 2009. The slower growth is a result of changing demographics, increased LDV fuel economy, and saturation of personal travel demand.[1] References [1] ↑ 1.0 1.1 AEO2011 Transportation Sector Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Transportation&oldid=378906" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

428

Argonne Transportation Current News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Transportation News & Highlights 8 Transportation News & Highlights EDTA Publications Now Online December 2008 -- View them here. Argonne to advise battery alliance December 2008 -- A coalition of more than fourteen companies has announced the creation of a new business alliance aimed at promoting U.S. production of lithium ion batteries. The newly formed National Alliance for Advanced Transportation Battery Cell Manufacture is based in Chicago. Argonne National Laboratory will serve in an advisory role as the Alliance begins operations. More... French Auto Industry Visits Center for Transportation Research November 18, 2008 -- Representatives of the French auto industry visited the Argonne Center for Transportation Research on November 18, 2008. The purpose of the visit was to share information and discuss technology opportunities for hybrid and electric vehicles. More...

429

Vapor pressure measurements on non-aqueous electrolyte solutions. Part 2. Tetraalkylammonium salts in methanol. Activity coefficients of various 1-1 electrolytes at high concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Precise vapor pressure data for solutions of Et/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/NBr, Bu/sub 4/Nl, Bu/sub 4/NClO/sub 4/, and Am/sub 4/NBr in methanol at 25/sup 0/C in the concentration range 0.04 < m(mol-(kg of solvent)/sup -1/) < 1.6 are communicated and discussed. Polynomials in molalities are given which may be used for calculating precise vapor pressure depressions of these solutions. Osmotic coefficients are calculated by taking into account the second virial coefficient of methanol vapor. Discussion of the data at low concentrations is based on the chemical model of electrolyte solutions taking into account non-coulombic interactions; ion-pair association constants are compared to those of conductance measurements. Pitzer equations are used to reproduce osmotic and activity coefficient at high concentrations; the set of Pitzer parameters b = 3.2, ..cap alpha../sub 1/ = 2.0 and ..cap alpha../sub 2/ = 20.0 is proposed for methanol solutions.

Barthel, J.; Lauermann, G.; Neueder, R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Coordination External Coordination Working Group: Background and Process Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 TEC History * DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) formed TEC in 1992 * EM & RW developed MOU and TEC charter in 1992 - Other DOE program offices joined in 1993-94 * Other agencies (DOT, FRA, NRC, EPA) have been active participants Meeting Locations 1992-present Some Founding Principles * TEC concept centered on unique stakeholder accountability principles - Participation by key responsible parties in technical/policy issue discussion and resolution results in increased confidence and more efficient business decisions * Ultimate goal: develop multi-year set of

431

Vapor phase heat transport systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vapor phase heat-transport systems are being tested in two of the passive test cells at Los Alamos. The systems consist of an active fin-and-tube solar collector and a condenser inside a water storage tank. The refrigerant, R-11, can be returned to the collector by a pump or by a self-pumping scheme. In one of the test cells the liquid was self-pumped to the roof-mounted collector 17 ft above the condenser. A mechanical valve was designed and tested that showed that the system could operate in a completely passive mode. Performance comparisons have been made with a passive water wall test cell.

Hedstrom, J.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INLAND PORT TRANSPORTATION EVALUATION GUIDE by Robert Harrison, Center for Transportation Research Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System; and Jolanda Prozzi, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH Bureau of Engineering Research

Texas at Austin, University of

433

The Full Cost of Intercity Highway Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction There has been a great deal of recent interest in identifying and measuring the full costs of transportation, particularly highways (see for instance: Keeler et al. 1974, Fuller et al. 1983, Quinet 1990, Mackenzie et al. 1992, INRETS 1993, Miller and Moffet 1993, IWW/INFRAS 1995, IBI 1995, Levinson et al. 1996, Delucchi 1996). This debate questions whether various modes of transportation are implicitly subsidized and to what extent this biases investment and usage decisions. While environmental impacts are used to stop new infrastructure, the full costs to society of transportation are not generally calculated for financing projects or charging for their use. In this paper we review the theoretical and empirical literature on the cost structure of the provision of intercity highway transportation and specify and estimate our own cost functions . In defining this framework we distinguish between internal (private) and external (social) costs, long and short run cos

David Gillen; David Levinson; David M. Levinson

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » Services » Waste Management » Packaging and Transportation » National Transportation Stakeholders Forum » National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) Charter The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF) is the mechanism through which DOE engages at a national level with states, tribes, federal agencies and other interested stakeholders about the Department's shipments of radioactive waste and materials, as well as occasional high- visibility shipments that are nonradioactive. The purpose of the NTSF is to bring transparency, openness, and accountability to DOE's offsite transportation activities through collaboration with state and tribal governments. DOE will work through existing agreements and

435

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

http://tti.tamu.edu Multi-modal Transportation > Highway Transportation > Trucking > Railroad transportation > Public transit > Rural transportation > Rural transit > Freight pipeline transportation >>> Transportation operat > Freight traffic > Commodities > Travel time > Travel demand > http

436

Optoelectronic device with nanoparticle embedded hole injection/transport layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optoelectronic device is disclosed that can function as an emitter of optical radiation, such as a light-emitting diode (LED), or as a photovoltaic (PV) device that can be used to convert optical radiation into electrical current, such as a photovoltaic solar cell. The optoelectronic device comprises an anode, a hole injection/transport layer, an active layer, and a cathode, where the hole injection/transport layer includes transparent conductive nanoparticles in a hole transport material.

Wang, Qingwu (Chelmsford, MA); Li, Wenguang (Andover, MA); Jiang, Hua (Methuen, MA)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface More Documents & Publications Status...

438

Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum Meeting, New York Spring 2013 National Transportation Stakeholders Forum...

439

Materials Transportation Testing & Analysis at Sandia National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Testing & Analysis Mission Sandia's Transportation Risk & Packaging Program develops innovative technologies and methodologies to solve transportation and packaging...

440

Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Packaging and Transportation Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) Automated Transportation Management System (ATMS) The Department of Energy's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transport activity measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents & Publications...

442

Amyloid precursor protein and axonal transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relationship to axonal transport . 1 Chapter II Mutationsits axonal transport . . 10undergoes axonal transport . 42 Figure 2.4. Effect

Rodrigues, Elizabeth M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Packaging and Transportation Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) In an effort to address responder...

444

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OVERVIEW OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ANALYSES FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT Jim Page, Malachi Weng-Gutierrez, and Gordon Schremp Fossil Fuels Office Fuels and Transportation....................................................................................................... 3 SUMMARY OF PROPOSED TRANSPORTATION ENERGY ANALYSES ............... 4 Background

445

Tips: Transportation | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Tips: Transportation July 5, 2012 - 5:19pm Addthis Tips: Transportation In 2010, Americans traveled a total of 3 trillion miles -- the equivalent of 6.5 million...

446

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leslie Mancebo (7234) Transportation Demand & Marketing Coordinator 1 FTE, 1 HC Administrative Vice Chancellor Transportation and Parking Services Clifford A. Contreras (0245) Director 30.10 FTE Alternative Transportation & Marketing Reconciliation Lourdes Lupercio (4723) Michelle McArdle (7512) Parking

Hammock, Bruce D.

447

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION POLICY AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: OUR CHOICE FOR THE FUTURE Proceedings from PROCEEDINGS North Dakota's Transportation Network: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches PROCEEDINGS Transportation and Economic Development: Our Choice for the Future Program Biographical Sketches

Levinson, David M.

448

Argonne Transportation - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Publications All downloadable documents on this site are in PDF format. You will need Adobe Reader to view these files (download Adobe Reader). Please note that some of these files are very large and may take some time to download. transforum TransForum The Center's quarterly newsletter featuring articles and photographs about current transportation research and breakthroughs. A 2011 STC Excellence Award winner. Subscribe to TransForum » factsheet icon Fact Sheets One sheet summaries on transportation topics and research argonne logo Recent Papers & Presentations Search for Papers, Presentations & More Find publications highlighting researcher work presented at conferences and other venues. Search by WORD or PHRASE Enter word or phrase

449

Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan, U.S. Department of Energy Region 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Region 6 Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Plan (TEPP Plan) operates within the framework of the DOE emergency management system for developing, coordinating, and directing emergency planning, preparedness, and readiness assurance activities for radiological transportation incidents. The DOE Region 6 TEPP Plan is a narrative description of the DOE Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program activities, training and technical assistance provided to states and tribes along DOE's transportation corridors in DOE Region 6.

Marsha Keister

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport from a breached waste package. Advective transport occurs when radionuclides that are dissolved or sorbed onto colloids (or both) are carried from the waste package by the portion of the seepage flux that passes through waste package breaches. Diffusive transport occurs as a result of a gradient in radionuclide concentration and may take place while advective transport is also occurring, as well as when no advective transport is occurring. Diffusive transport is addressed in detail because it is the sole means of transport when there is no flow through a waste package, which may dominate during the regulatory compliance period in the nominal and seismic scenarios. The advective transport rate, when it occurs, is generally greater than the diffusive transport rate. Colloid-facilitated advective and diffusive transport is also modeled and is presented in detail in Appendix B of this report.

J.D. Schreiber

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sector Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Results 1- 20 Next (20 | 50 | 100 | 250 | 500) 2011 APTA Public Transportation Fact Book + A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction + APEC-Alternative Transport...

452

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Title Transport Properties for Combustion Modeling Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Brown, Nancy J.,...

453

Center for Transportation Analysis Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Transportation Analysis Overview The mission of the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) at Oak