National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transparent conductor interfaces

  1. Zinc oxyfluoride transparent conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gordon, Roy G.

    1991-02-05

    Transparent, electrically conductive and infrared-reflective films of zinc oxyfluoride are produced by chemical vapor deposition from vapor mixtures of zinc, oxygen and fluorine-containing compounds. The substitution of fluorine for some of the oxygen in zinc oxide results in dramatic increases in the electrical conductivity. For example, diethyl zinc, ethyl alcohol and hexafluoropropene vapors are reacted over a glass surface at 400.degree. C. to form a visibly transparent, electrically conductive, infrared reflective and ultraviolet absorptive film of zinc oxyfluoride. Such films are useful in liquid crystal display devices, solar cells, electrochromic absorbers and reflectors, energy-conserving heat mirrors, and antistatic coatings.

  2. Flexible transparent conductors based on metal nanowire networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, Chuan Fei; Ren, Zhifeng

    2015-04-01

    Few conductors are transparent and flexible. Metals have the best electrical conductivity, but they are opaque and stiff in bulk form. However, metals can be transparent and flexible when they are very thin or properly arranged on the nanoscale. This review focuses on the flexible transparent conductors based on percolating networks of metal. Specifically, we discuss the fabrication, the means to improve the electrical conductivity, the large stretchability and its mechanism, and the applications of these metal networks. We also suggest some criteria for evaluating flexible transparent conductors and propose some new research directions in this emerging field.

  3. Nanostructured Transparent Conductors Have Potential for Thin-Film Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-08-01

    Possible alternatives to transparent conductors show promise for enabling new processes and reducing costs.

  4. Transparent conductor-Si pillars heterojunction photodetector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Joondong; Park, Yun Chang

    2014-08-14

    We report a high-performing heterojunction photodetector by enhanced surface effects. Periodically, patterned Si substrates were used to enlarge the photo-reactive regions and yield proportionally improved photo-responses. An optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) was deposited on a Si substrate and spontaneously formed an ITO/Si heterojunction. Due to an electrical conductive ITO film, ITO/Si heterojunction device can be operated at zero-bias, which effectively suppresses the dark current, resulting in better performances than those by a positive or a negative bias operation. This zero-bias operating heterojunction device exhibits a short response time (? 22.5?ms) due to the physical reaction to the incident light. We revealed that the location of the space charge region (SCR) is crucial for a specific photon-wavelength response. The SCR space has the highest collection efficiency of the photo-generated carriers. The photo-response can be maximized when we design the photodetector by superposing the SCR space over a corresponding photon-absorption length. The surface enhanced Si pillar devices significantly improved the photo-responses ratios from that of a planar Si device. According to this design scheme, a high photo-response ratio of 5560% was achieved at a wavelength of 600?nm. This surfaced-enhanced heterojunction design scheme would be a promising approach for various photoelectric applications.

  5. Preparation of transparent conductors ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, R.N.; Ginley, D.S.

    1998-07-28

    A process is described for the preparation by electrodeposition of metal oxide film and powder compounds for ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites wherein the metal oxide includes a plurality of metals. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath, providing soluble salts of the metals to this bath, electrically energizing the bath to thereby cause formation of a recoverable film of metal on the electrode, recovering the resultant film as a film or a powder, and recovering powder formed on the floor of the bath. The films and powders so produced are subsequently annealed to thereby produce metal oxide for use in electronic applications. The process can be employed to produce metal-doped metal oxide film and powder compounds for transparent conductors. The process for preparation of these metal-doped metal oxides follows that described above.

  6. Preparation of transparent conductors ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath; Ginley, David S.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the preparation by electrodeposition of metal oxide film and powder compounds for ferroelectric memory materials and ferrites wherein the metal oxide includes a plurality of metals. The process comprises providing an electrodeposition bath, providing soluble salts of the metals to this bath, electrically energizing the bath to thereby cause formation of a recoverable film of metal on the electrode, recovering the resultant film as a film or a powder, and recovering powder formed on the floor of the bath. The films and powders so produced are subsequently annealed to thereby produce metal oxide for use in electronic applications. The process can be employed to produce metal-doped metal oxide film and powder compounds for transparent conductors. The process for preparation of these metal-doped metal oxides follows that described above.

  7. Transparent conductor-embedding nanolens for Si solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Joondong E-mail: junsin@skku.edu Kumar, Melvin David; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hongsik; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Lee, Eunsongyi; Kim, Dong-wook; Kim, Hyunyub; Kim, Mingeon; Yi, Junsin E-mail: junsin@skku.edu; Jeong, Chaehwan E-mail: junsin@skku.edu

    2015-04-13

    We present a large-scale applicable nanolens-embedding solar cell. An electrically conductive and optically transparent indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film was coated on a Si substrate. After then, periodically patterned ITO nanodome-arrays were formed on the ITO film by using a nano-imprint method. This structure is effective to reduce the incident light reflection for broad wavelengths and also efficient to drive the incident photons into a light-absorbing Si substrate. There exist two electric fields. One is by a p/n junction and the other is by the light absorption into Si. We designed nanolens structures to overlap two electric fields and demonstrate highly improved solar cell performances of current and voltage values from a planar structure.

  8. Transparent Conductors from Carbon Nanotubes LBL-Assembled with Polymer Dopant with ?-? Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jian; Shim, Bong Sup; Di Prima, Matthew; Kotov, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) and other carbon-based coatings are being considered as replacements for indium tin oxide (ITO). The problems of transparent conductors (TCs) coatings from SWNT and similar materials include poor mechanical properties, high roughness, low temperature resilience, and fast loss of conductivity. The simultaneous realization of these desirable characteristics can be achieved using high structural control of layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition, which is demonstrated by the assembly of hydroethyl cellulose (HOCS) and sulfonated polyetheretherketone (SPEEK)-SWNTs. A new type of SWNT doping based on electron transfer from valence bands of nanotubes to unoccupied levels of SPEEK through ?-? interactions was identified for this system. It leads to a conductivity of 1.1 10? S/m at 66 wt % loadings of SWNT. This is better than other polymer/SWNT composites and translates into surface conductivity of 920 ?/? and transmittance of 86.7% at 550 nm. The prepared LBL films also revealed unusually high temperature resilience up to 500 C, and low roughness of 3.5 nm (ITO glass -2.4 nm). Tensile modulus, ultimate strength, and toughness of such coatings are 13 2 GPa, 366 35 MPa, and 8 3 kJ/m, respectively, and exceed corresponding parameters of all similar TCs. The cumulative figure of merit, ?TC, which included the critical failure strain relevant for flexible electronics, was ?TC = 0.022 and should be compared to ?TC = 0.006 for commercial ITO. Further optimization is possible using stratified nanoscale coatings and improved doping from the macromolecular LBL components.

  9. Plasmonic Three-Dimensional Transparent Conductor Based on Al-Doped Zinc Oxide-Coated Nanostructured Glass Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malek, Gary A.; Aytug, Tolga; Liu, Qingfeng; Wu, Judy

    2015-04-02

    Transparent nanostructured glass coatings, fabricated on glass substrates, with a unique three-dimensional (3D) architecture were utilized as the foundation for the design of plasmonic 3D transparent conductors. Transformation of the non-conducting 3D structure to a conducting 3D network was accomplished through atomic layer deposition of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO). After AZO growth, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited by electronbeam evaporation to enhance light trapping and decrease the overall sheet resistance. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microcopy images revealed the highly porous, nanostructured morphology of the AZO coated glass surface along with the in-plane dimensions of the depositedmore » AuNPs. Sheet resistance measurements conducted on the coated samples verified that the electrical properties of the 3D network are comparable to that of the untextured two-dimensional AZO coated glass substrates. In addition, transmittance measurements of the glass samples coated with various AZO thicknesses showed preservation of the highly transparent nature of each sample, while the AuNPs demonstrated enhanced light scattering as well as light-trapping capability.« less

  10. Plasmonic Three-Dimensional Transparent Conductor Based on Al-Doped Zinc Oxide-Coated Nanostructured Glass Using Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malek, Gary A.; Aytug, Tolga; Liu, Qingfeng; Wu, Judy

    2015-04-02

    Transparent nanostructured glass coatings, fabricated on glass substrates, with a unique three-dimensional (3D) architecture were utilized as the foundation for the design of plasmonic 3D transparent conductors. Transformation of the non-conducting 3D structure to a conducting 3D network was accomplished through atomic layer deposition of aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO). After AZO growth, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited by electronbeam evaporation to enhance light trapping and decrease the overall sheet resistance. Field emission scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microcopy images revealed the highly porous, nanostructured morphology of the AZO coated glass surface along with the in-plane dimensions of the deposited AuNPs. Sheet resistance measurements conducted on the coated samples verified that the electrical properties of the 3D network are comparable to that of the untextured two-dimensional AZO coated glass substrates. In addition, transmittance measurements of the glass samples coated with various AZO thicknesses showed preservation of the highly transparent nature of each sample, while the AuNPs demonstrated enhanced light scattering as well as light-trapping capability.

  11. Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductors | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent Conductors Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent Conductors

  12. Directivity patterns and pulse profiles of ultrasound emitted by laser action on interface between transparent and opaque solids: Analytical theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikitin, Sergey M. E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Tournat, Vincent; Chigarev, Nikolay; Castagnede, Bernard; Gusev, Vitalyi E-mail: vitali.goussev@univ-lemans.fr; Bulou, Alain; Zerr, Andreas

    2014-01-28

    The analytical theory for the directivity patterns of ultrasounds emitted from laser-irradiated interface between two isotropic solids is developed. It is valid for arbitrary combinations of transparent and opaque materials. The directivity patterns are derived both in two-dimensional and in three-dimensional geometries, by accounting for the specific features of the sound generation by the photo-induced mechanical stresses distributed in the volume, essential in the laser ultrasonics. In particular, the theory accounts for the contribution to the emitted propagating acoustic fields from the converted by the interface evanescent photo-generated compression-dilatation waves. The precise analytical solutions for the profiles of longitudinal and shear acoustic pulses emitted in different directions are proposed. The developed theory can be applied for dimensional scaling, optimization, and interpretation of the high-pressure laser ultrasonics experiments in diamond anvil cell.

  13. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, Julius; Henesian, Mark A.

    1986-01-01

    A low pressure gas electrode utilizing ionized gas in a glow discharge regime forms a transparent electrode for electro-optical switches. The transparent electrode comprises a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the electrode is a transparent electrode. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. The plasma can be created either by the main high voltage pulser used to charge up the crystal or by auxiliary discharges or external sources of ionization. A typical configuration utilizes 10 torr argon in the discharge region adjacent to each crystal face.

  14. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  15. Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Coated Conductors Cylinder Ltd. Place: Malvern, England, United Kingdom Zip: WR14 3SZ Product: Coated Conductors Consultancy Ltd. (3-Cs)...

  16. Improvement of SOFC electrodes using mixed ionic-electronic conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuzaki, Y.; Hishinuma, M.

    1996-12-31

    Since the electrode reaction of SOFC is limited to the proximity of a triple phase boundary (TPB), the local current density at the electrode and electrolyte interface is larger than mean current density, which causes large ohmic and electrode polarization. This paper describes an application of mixed ionic-electronic conductors to reduce such polarization by means of (1) enhancing ionic conductivity of the electrolyte surface layer by coating a high ionic conductors, and (2) reducing the local current density by increasing the electrochemically active sites.

  17. YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of high-temperature superconductors (HTS) in 1986, both (Bi,Pb)2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (BSCCO or 2223 with a critical temperature, Tc of 110 K) and YBa2Cu3O7- (YBCO or 123 with a Tc of 91 K) have emerged as the leading candidate materials for the first generation (1G) and second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor wires or tapes that will carry high critical current density in liquid nitrogen temperatures [1-7]. The crystal structures and detailed fundamental properties of BSCCO and YBCO superconductors have been reviewed by Matsumoto in a separate chapter in this book. The U.S. Department of Energy s target price for the conductor is close to the current copper wire cost of $10-50/kA-meter, i.e. a meter of copper type conductor carrying 1000 A current costs ~ $ 50 [8]. The long-term goal for the DOE, Office of Electricity, Advanced Conductors and Cables program is to achieve HTS wire in 1000 meters long with current carrying capacity of 1000 A/cm [8]. Robust, high-performance HTS wire will certainly revolutionize the electric power grid and various other electric power equipments as well. Sumitomo Electric Power (Japan) has been widely recognized as the world leader in manufacturing the first-generation HTS wires based on BSCCO materials using the Oxide-Powder-In-Tube (OPIT) over-pressure process [9]. Typically, 1G HTS wires carry critical currents, Ic, of over 200 Amperes (A) in piece lengths of one kilometer lengths at the standard 4 mm width and ~ 200 m thickness. However, due to the higher cost of 1G wire, mainly because of the cost of Ag alloy sheath, the researchers shifted their effort towards the development of YBCO (second generation 2G) tapes in the last fifteen years [1-7]. One of the main obstacles to the ability to carry high critical currents in YBCO films has been the phenomenon of weak links, i.e., grain boundaries formed by the misalignment of neighboring YBCO grains are known to form obstacles to current flow [10]. By

  18. Sputtered pin amorphous silicon semi-conductor device and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Friedman, Robert A.

    1983-11-22

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semi-conductor device is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers of amorphous silicon and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. A method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced physical integrity and facilitates ease of construction in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  19. Conductor for a fluid-cooled winding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kenney, Walter J.

    1983-01-01

    A conductor and method of making the conductor are provided for use in winding electrical coils which are cooled by a fluid communicating with the conductor. The conductor is cold worked through twisting and reshaping steps to form a generally rectangular cross section conductor having a plurality of helical cooling grooves extending axially of the conductor. The conductor configuration makes it suitable for a wide variety of winding applications and permits the use of simple strip insulation between turns and perforated sheet insulation between layers of the winding.

  20. Opportunities for Improving Photovoltaic Performance with Better Transparent Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, David S.; Perkins, John D.

    2015-06-14

    NREL and DOE recently held a workshop to assess the challenges, opportunities and potential impacts for improved transparent contacts (TCs) to positively impact current and emerging photovoltaic conversion technologies. Here, we report on the workshop outcomes based on the collective input and participation from industry, academia, national laboratories and DOE. A primary conclusion is that new emerging materials can have significant impacts on the overall performance, reliability and cost for commercial scale PV. One key observation is that TC's should no longer be thought of as a single-layer single-purpose material but as an integrated contact layer stack that includes a charge selective interface layer, a conducting layer and sometimes layers for reliability or light management. In addition, the long standing goal of developing of high performance atmospheric-pressure-processed TCs has finally been met by the rapidly improving Ag nanowire based composites with better than ITO performance from an all ink based process. Even the more conventional metal oxide materials are improving rapidly by introducing solution processed buffer layers, and even conductor layers. This rapid evolution has opened the way to high-throughput low-cost TC processing. Key desired metrics for TCs and approaches to achieving them are discussed.

  1. Quartz antenna with hollow conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Benabou, Elie

    2002-01-01

    A radio frequency (RF) antenna for plasma ion sources is formed of a hollow metal conductor tube disposed within a glass tube. The hollow metal tubular conductor has an internal flow channel so that there will be no coolant leakage if the outer glass tube of the antenna breaks. A portion of the RF antenna is formed into a coil; the antenna is used for inductively coupling RF power to a plasma in an ion source chamber. The antenna is made by first inserting the metal tube inside the glass tube, and then forming the glass/metal composite tube into the desired coil shape.

  2. Surface and interface modification science and technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.-H.

    1999-07-19

    Surface modification of solids is of scientific and technological interest due to its significant benefits in a wide variety of applications. Various coatings applications such as corrosion protection and electrical insulators and conductors are required for proper engineering design based on geometrical relationships between interfaces and on thermodynamic/kinetic considerations for the development of surface modifications. This paper will explore three basic examples: the proton conductor BaCeO{sub 3}, high-temperature protective coatings, and epitaxial relationships between interfaces.

  3. Conductor-polymer composite electrode materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ginley, D.S.; Kurtz, S.R.; Smyrl, W.H.; Zeigler, J.M.

    1984-06-13

    A conductive composite material useful as an electrode, comprises a conductor and an organic polymer which is reversibly electrochemically dopable to change its electrical conductivity. Said polymer continuously surrounds the conductor in intimate electrical contact therewith and is prepared by electrochemical growth on said conductor or by reaction of its corresponding monomer(s) on said conductor which has been pre-impregnated or pre-coated with an activator for said polymerization. Amount of the conductor is sufficient to render the resultant composite electrically conductive even when the polymer is in an undoped insulating state.

  4. Temperature limited heater utilizing non-ferromagnetic conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar; Harold J. , Harris; Christopher Kelvin

    2012-07-17

    A heater is described. The heater includes a ferromagnetic conductor and an electrical conductor electrically coupled to the ferromagnetic conductor. The ferromagnetic conductor is positioned relative to the electrical conductor such that an electromagnetic field produced by time-varying current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor confines a majority of the flow of the electrical current to the electrical conductor at temperatures below or near a selected temperature.

  5. Well conductor support structure and method for using

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.W.; Glasscock, M.S.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a conductor support module for supporting well conductors of an offshore platform, the conductor support module being separate from but integrable with the jacket of the offshore platform. It comprises: substantially parallel vertical support members; and horizontal conductor support members attached to the vertical support members, the vertical spacing between adjacent horizontal conductor support members being determined by the lateral support requirements of the well conductors; whereby lateral loads on the well conductors are transferred from the well conductors to the conductor support module and thereby to the offshore platform.

  6. US ITER toroidal field coil conductor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ITER toroidal field coil conductor production requires miles of niobium-tin superconducting wire. Photo: Oxford Superconducting Technology Continued on page 6 INSIDE: ITER Site ...

  7. Doped LZO buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2010-03-23

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising LZO and a dopant for mitigating metal diffusion through the LZO, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  8. Pd conductor for thick film hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felten, J.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Cooperation between a materials developer and sensor designers has resulted in a palladium conductor used ro design and build a new hydrogen sensor that has superior performance characteristics and is also inexpensive to manufacture. Material characteristics give it faster response time and greater thermal/mechanical stability. The thick film palladium conductor paste, which can be fired at 850{degrees}C-950{degrees}C, has provided device designers a practical conductor paste with which to produce the improved sensor. The conductor uses a high surface area Pd powder combined with a binder glass that is chemically very inert, which combination produces a porous conductor that has good adhesion and chemical resistance. The current sensor design consists of three or four thick film Layers. Because of the flexibility of thick film techniques, the sensor element can be configured to any desired size and shape for specific instrument needs.

  9. Holes Are a Positive Thing: Designing Conductors for Solar Photovoltai...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Holes Are a Positive Thing: Designing Conductors for Solar Photovoltaics Basic Energy ... Holes Are a Positive Thing: Designing Conductors for Solar Photovoltaics Predicted by ...

  10. Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates ...

  11. Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher's Accepted Manuscript: Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates Title: Dirac semimetal films as spin conductors on topological substrates ...

  12. A Dictionary for Transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2001-11-15

    There are many terms that are used in association with the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) Transparency Project associated with the Mayak Fissile Materials Storage Facility. This is a collection of proposed definitions of these terms.

  13. Dielectric insulating polyolefin compounds and conductor products insulated therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacKenzie, Jr., Burton T.; Prober, Maurice; Kiersztyn, Stanley E.

    1979-01-01

    Polyolefin compounds containing nitrile polysiloxane fluid which have improved electrical properties, and electrical conductors insulated therewith.

  14. Conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed perpendicular to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  15. Remote Monitoring Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sukhoruchkin, V.K.; Shmelev, V.M.; Roumiantsev, A.N.; Croessmann, C.D.; Horton, R.D.; Matter, J.C.; Czajkowski, A.F.; Sheely, K.B.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The objective of the Remote Monitoring Transparency Program is to evaluate and demonstrate the use of remote monitoring technologies to advance nonproliferation and transparency efforts that are currently being developed by Russia and the US without compromising the national security of the participating parties. Under a lab-to-lab transparency contract between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Kurchatov Institute (KI RRC), the Kurchatov Institute will analyze technical and procedural aspects of the application of remote monitoring as a transparency measure to monitor inventories of direct-use HEU and plutonium (e.g., material recovered from dismantled nuclear weapons). A goal of this program is to assist a broad range of political and technical experts in learning more about remote monitoring technologies that could be used to implement nonproliferation, arms control, and other security and confidence building measures. Specifically, this program will: (1) begin integrating Russian technologies into remote monitoring systems; (2) develop remote monitoring procedures that will assist in the application of remote monitoring techniques to monitor inventories of HEU and Pu from dismantled nuclear weapons; and (3) conduct a workshop to review remote monitoring fundamentals, demonstrate an integrated US/Russian remote monitoring will have on the national security of participating countries.

  16. Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Joseph A.; Domroese, Michael K.; Lindeman, David D.; Radewald, Vern E.; Rouillard, Roger; Trice, Jennifer L.

    2000-01-01

    A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

  17. Quench propagation velocity for highly stabilized conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mints, R.G. |; Ogitsu, T. |; Devred, A.

    1995-05-01

    Quench propagation velocity in conductors having a large amount of stabilizer outside the multifilamentary area is considered. It is shown that the current redistribution process between the multifilamentary area and the stabilizer can strongly effect the quench propagation. A criterion is derived determining the conditions under which the current redistribution process becomes significant, and a model of effective stabilizer area is suggested to describe its influence on the quench propagation velocity. As an illustration, the model is applied to calculate the adiabatic quench propagation velocity for a conductor geometry with a multifilamentary area embedded inside the stabilizer.

  18. Electrode with transparent series resistance for uniform switching of optical modulation devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tench, D. Morgan; Cunningham, Michael A.; Kobrin, Paul H.

    2008-01-08

    Switching uniformity of an optical modulation device for controlling the propagation of electromagnetic radiation is improved by use of an electrode comprising an electrically resistive layer that is transparent to the radiation. The resistive layer is preferably an innerlayer of a wide-bandgap oxide sandwiched between layers of indium tin oxide or another transparent conductor, and may be of uniform thickness, or may be graded so as to provide further improvement in the switching uniformity. The electrode may be used with electrochromic and reversible electrochemical mirror (REM) smart window devices, as well as display devices based on various technologies.

  19. Stators with improved conductor assembly and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dang, Dang Dinh; Blissenbach, Rolf; Schauer, David; Wattleworth, John; Milani, Michael; Hatch, Erik

    2013-07-30

    A stator includes a stator core, a plurality of slots, and a conductor. The plurality of slots are formed within the stator core. The conductor is disposed continuously within at least two of the plurality of openings.

  20. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films ...

  1. Resistive coating for current conductors in cryogenic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hirayama, Chikara; Wagner, George R.

    1982-05-18

    This invention relates to a resistive or semiconducting coating for use on current conductors in cryogenic applications. This includes copper-clad superconductor wire, copper wire used for stabilizing superconductor magnets, and for hyperconductors. The coating is a film of cuprous sulfide (Cu.sub.2 S) that has been found not to degrade the properties of the conductors. It is very adherent to the respective conductors and satisfies the mechanical, thermal and electrical requirements of coatings for the conductors.

  2. Multi-megampere current interruption from explosive deformation of conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goforth, J.H.; Williams, A.H.; Marsh, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    Two approaches for using explosives to interrupt current flowing in solid conductors are described. One concept uses explosives to extrude the switch conductor into thin regions that fuse due to current in the switch. A preliminary scaling law is presented. The second approach employs dielectric jets to sever current carrying conductors. A feasibility experiment and an improved design are described.

  3. Full tape thickness feature conductors for EMI structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kenneth A.; Knudson, Richard T.; Smith, Frank R.; Barner, Gregory

    2014-06-10

    Generally annular full tape thickness conductors are formed in single or multiple tape layers, and then stacked to produce an annular solid conductive wall for enclosing an electromagnetic isolation cavity. The conductors may be formed using punch and fill operations, or by flowing conductor-containing material onto the tape edge surfaces that define the interior sidewalls of the cavity.

  4. Correlation effects in nuclear transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankfurt, L. L.; Moniz, Ernest J.; Sargsyan, M. M.; Strikman, M. I.

    1995-06-01

    The Glauber approximation is used to calculate the contribution of nucleon correlations in high-energy A(e,e'N) reactions. When the excitation energy of the residual nucleus is small, the increase of the nuclear transparency due to correlations between the struck nucleon and the other nucleons is mostly compensated by a decrease of the transparency due to the correlations between nondetected nucleons. We derive Glauber model predictions for nuclear transparency for the differential cross section when nuclear shell level excitations are measured. The role of correlations in color transparency is briefly discussed.

  5. Ionic conductors for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krumpelt, Michael; Bloom, Ira D.; Pullockaran, Jose D.; Myles, Kevin M.

    1993-01-01

    An electrolyte that operates at temperatures ranging from 600.degree. C. to 800.degree. C. is provided. The electrolyte conducts charge ionically as well as electronically. The ionic conductors include molecular framework structures having planes or channels large enough to transport oxides or hydrated protons and having net-positive or net-negative charges. Representative molecular framework structures include substituted aluminum phosphates, orthosilicates, silicoaluminates, cordierites, apatites, sodalites, and hollandites.

  6. Enhanced Mixed Electronic-Ionic Conductors through Cation Ordering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Allan J.; Morgan, Dane; Grey, Clare

    2014-08-31

    The performance of many energy conversion and storage devices depend on the properties of mixed ionic-electronic conducting (miec) materials. Mixed or ambipolar conductors simultaneously transport ions and electrons and provide the critical interface between chemical and electrical energy in devices such as fuel cells, ion transport membranes, and batteries. Enhancements in storage capacity, reversibility, power density and device lifetime all require new materials and a better understanding of the fundamentals of ambipolar conductivity and surface reactivity.The high temperature properties of the ordered perovksites AA’B2O5+x, where A = rare earth ion, Y and B = Ba, Sr were studied. The work was motivated by the high oxygen transport and surface exchange rates observed for members of this class of mixed ionic and electronic conductors. A combined experimental and computational approach, including structural, electrochemical, and transport characterization and modeling was used. The approach attacks the problem simultaneously at global (e.g., neutron diffraction and impedance spectroscopy), local (e.g., pair distribution function, nuclear magnetic resonance) and molecular (ab initio thermokinetic modeling) length scales. The objectives of the work were to understand how the cation and associated anion order lead to exceptional ionic and electronic transport properties and surface reactivity in AA’B2O5+x perovskites. A variety of compounds were studied by X-ray and neutron diffraction, measurements of thermodynamics and transport and theoretically. These included PrBaCo2O5+x and NdBaCo2O5+x, PrBaCo2-xFexO6- δ (x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2) and LnBaCoFeO6- δ (Ln = La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd), Sr3YCo4O10.5, YBaMn2O5+x. A0.5A’0.5BO3 (where A=Y, Sc, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm; A’= Sr

  7. Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerr, John Borland; Wang, Shanger; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao; Hou, Jun; Sloop, Steven Edward

    2005-10-18

    Single ion conductors comprising polymer electrolytes prepared by grafting a salt compound onto a comb-branch polymer or dendrimer are disclosed having superior properties.

  8. Single ion conductor cross-linked polymeric networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerr, John Borland; Wang, Shanger; Hou, Jun; Sloop, Steven Edward; Han, Yong Bong; Liu, Gao

    2011-03-08

    Single ion conductors comprising polymer electrolytes prepared by grafting a salt compound onto a comb-branch polymer or dendrimer are disclosed having superior properties.

  9. Flow Batteries Enabled by Nanoscale Percolating Conductor Networks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014, Research Highlights Flow Batteries Enabled by Nanoscale Percolating Conductor Networks Images for Flow Batteries Scientific Achievement Created novel electronically ...

  10. Advanced Conductor Development with High Temperature Superconductors and Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holesinger, Terry George

    2015-11-17

    This is a report that describes advanced conductor research performed by LANL in preparation for the Colloquia at the University of New Mexico.

  11. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  12. Method for preparing a thick film conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nagesh, Voddarahalli K.; Fulrath, deceased, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    A method for preparing a thick film conductor which comprises providing surface active glass particles, mixing the surface active glass particles with a thermally decomposable organometallic compound, for example, a silver resinate, and then decomposing the organometallic compound by heating, thereby chemically depositing metal on the glass particles. The glass particle mixture is applied to a suitable substrate either before or after the organometallic compound is thermally decomposed. The resulting system is then fired in an oxidizing atmosphere, providing a microstructure of glass particles substantially uniformly coated with metal.

  13. Building Energy Transparency Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transparency Report Building Energy Transparency Report This report discusses best practices in implementing benchmarking policies. It includes policy profiles from several cities ...

  14. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide ...

  15. Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example ...

  16. Influence of superconductor film composition on adhesion strength of coated conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kesgin, Ibrahim; Khatri, Narayan; Liu, Yuhao; Delgado, Louis; Galstyan, Eduard; Selvamanickam, Venkat

    2015-11-20

    The effect of high temperature superconductor (HTS) film composition on the adhesion strength of rare- earth barium copper oxide coated conductors (CCs) has been studied. It has been found that the mechanical integrity of the superconductor layer is very susceptible to the defects especially those along the ab plane, probably due to the weak interfaces between the defects and the matrix. Gd and Y in the standard composition were substituted with Sm and the number of in-plane defects was drastically reduced. Consequently, a four-fold increase in adhesion or peeling strength in Sm-based CCs was achieved compared to the standard GdYBCO samples.

  17. Testing of the 3M Company ACCR Conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, J.P.; RIzy, D.T.; Kisner, R.A.; Deve, H.E.

    2010-09-15

    The 3M Company has developed a high-temperature low-sag conductor referred to as Aluminum- Conductor Composite-Reinforced or ACCR. The conductor uses an aluminum metal matrix material to replace the steel in conventional conductors so the core has a lower density and higher conductivity. The objective of this work is to accelerate the commercial acceptance by electric utilities of these new conductor designs by testing four representative conductor classes in controlled conditions. Overhead transmission lines use bare aluminum conductor strands wrapped around a steel core strands to transmit electricity. The typical cable is referred to as aluminum-conductor steel-reinforced (ACSR). The outer strands are aluminum, chosen for its conductivity, low weight, and low cost. The center strand is of steel for the strength required to support the weight without stretching the aluminum due to its ductility. The power density of a transmission corridor has been directly increased by increasing the voltage level. Transmission voltages have increased from 115-kV to 765- kV over the past 80 years. In the United States, further increasing the voltage level is not feasible at this point in time, so in order to further increase the power density of a transmission corridor, conductor designs that increase the current carrying capability have been examined. One of the key limiting factors in the design of a transmission line is the conductor sag which determines the clearance of the conductor above ground or underlying structures needed for electrical safety. Increasing the current carrying capability of a conductor increases the joule heating in the conductor which increases the conductor sag. A conductor designed for high-temperature and lowsag operation requires an engineered modification of the conductor materials. To make an advanced cable, the 3M Company solution has been the development of a composite conductor consisting of Nextel ceramic fibers to replace the steel core and

  18. YBCO COATED CONDUCTORS (Book) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The U.S. Department of Energy s target price for the conductor is close to the current copper wire cost of 10-50kA-meter, i.e. a meter of copper type conductor carrying 1000 A ...

  19. Fluoroalkyl-phosphonic-acid-based proton conductors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluoroalkyl-phosphonic-acid-based proton conductors Fluoroalkyl-phosphonic-acid-based proton conductors A presentation to the High Temperature Membranes Working Group meeting, May 19, 2006. desmarteau.pdf (203.69 KB) More Documents & Publications HTMWG, May 18, 2009, Welcome! High Temperature Membrane Working Group Membrane Development for Medium and High Temperature PEMFC in Europe (Presentation)

  20. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  1. Non-binding conductor load bearing roller for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes a corrugated outer conductor, an inner conductor disposed within and insulated from the outer conductor by means of support insulators and an insulating gas, and a non-binding transport device for supporting and permitting movement of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly axially along the corrugated outer conductor without radial displacement and for moving without binding along corrugations of any slope less than vertical. The transport device includes two movable contacts, such as skids or rollers, supported on a common pivot lever, the pivot lever being rotatably disposed about a pivot lever axis, which pivot lever axis is in turn disposed on the periphery of a support insulator or particle trap if one is used. The movable contacts are separated axially a distance equal to the axial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor and separated radially a distance equal to the radial distance between the peaks and valleys of the corrugations of the outer conductor. The transport device has the pivot lever axis disposed parallel to the motion of travel of the inner conductor/insulating support assembly.

  2. Nanocarbon-copper thin film as transparent electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isaacs, R. A.; Zhu, H.; Preston, Colin; LeMieux, M.; Jaim, H. M. Iftekhar; Hu, L. Salamanca-Riba, L. G.; Mansour, A.; Zavalij, P. Y.; Rabin, O.

    2015-05-11

    Researchers seeking to enhance the properties of metals have long pursued incorporating carbon in the metallic host lattice in order to combine the strongly bonded electrons in the metal lattice that yield high ampacity and the free electrons available in carbon nanostructures that give rise to high conductivity. The incorporation of carbon nanostructures into the copper lattice has the potential to improve the current density of copper to meet the ever-increasing demands of nanoelectronic devices. We report on the structure and properties of carbon incorporated in concentrations up to 5 wt. % (∼22 at. %) into the crystal structure of copper. Carbon nanoparticles of 5 nm–200 nm in diameter in an interconnecting carbon matrix are formed within the bulk Cu samples. The carbon does not phase separate after subsequent melting and re-solidification despite the absence of a predicted solid solution at such concentrations in the C-Cu binary phase diagram. This material, so-called, Cu covetic, makes deposition of Cu films containing carbon with similar microstructure to the metal possible. Copper covetic films exhibit greater transparency, higher conductivity, and resistance to oxidation than pure copper films of the same thickness, making them a suitable choice for transparent conductors.

  3. Plasma bullets behavior in a tube covered by a conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xian, Y. B.; Xu, H. T.; Lu, X. P. Pei, X. K.; Gong, W. W.; Lu, Y.; Liu, D. W.; Yang, Y.

    2015-06-15

    In this work, for better applications of atmospheric pressure plasma jets, the physics of plasma streamers in a glass tube with a part of it covered by a conductor is investigated. To better understand the propagation mechanism of plasma bullets in capillary tubes passing through a curved or narrow passage for some biomedical or material applications, the propagation of plasma streamers in a tube covered by a floating conductor is investigated. For a plasma streamer propagating in a tube covered by a conductor, the plasma streamer is suppressed and becomes shorter, and a secondary streamer is generated in the tube at the downstream end of the conductor. The larger the area covered by the conductor, or the thinner the tube, the stronger the plasma streamer is inhibited. The electric potential of the conductor is measured to be as high as 6 kV. On the other hand, a higher voltage applied on the HV electrode, or a higher gas flow rate will make the secondary plasma streamer longer. It is found that the capacitor formed by the conductor outside the tube and the wall of the tube plays an important role in inhibiting the original plasma streamer and generating the secondary streamer. Moreover, the active species generated by the original plasma play important role in generating a secondary plasma streamer.

  4. High voltage switches having one or more floating conductor layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werne, Roger W.; Sampayan, Stephen; Harris, John Richardson

    2015-11-24

    This patent document discloses high voltage switches that include one or more electrically floating conductor layers that are isolated from one another in the dielectric medium between the top and bottom switch electrodes. The presence of the one or more electrically floating conductor layers between the top and bottom switch electrodes allow the dielectric medium between the top and bottom switch electrodes to exhibit a higher breakdown voltage than the breakdown voltage when the one or more electrically floating conductor layers are not present between the top and bottom switch electrodes. This increased breakdown voltage in the presence of one or more electrically floating conductor layers in a dielectric medium enables the switch to supply a higher voltage for various high voltage circuits and electric systems.

  5. Solid-state Inorganic Lithium-Ion Conductors - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Solid-state Inorganic Lithium-Ion Conductors ... milling system for preparation of electrodes for use in a solid state lithium-ion battery. ...

  6. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF PROTON CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.

    2010-02-18

    The morphological and electrical properties of yttrium (Y) and indium (In) doped barium cerate perovskites of the form BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} (with x=0-0.3) prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors with improved chemical stability. The sinterability increased with the increase of In-doping, and the perovskite phase was found in the BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} solid solutions over the range 0 {le} x {le} 0.3. The conductivities decreased (from x to x, insert quantitative values) while the tolerance to wet CO{sub 2} improved for BaIn{sub 0.3-x}Y{sub x}Ce{sub 0.7}O{sub 3-{delta}} samples with an increase of In-doping.

  7. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  8. Use of ion conductors in the pyrochemical reduction of oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    1994-01-01

    An electrochemical process and electrochemical cell for reducing a metal oxide are provided. First the oxide is separated as oxygen gas using, for example, a ZrO.sub.2 oxygen ion conductor anode and the metal ions from the reduction salt are reduced and deposited on an ion conductor cathode, for example, sodium ion reduced on a .beta.-alumina sodium ion conductor cathode. The generation of and separation of oxygen gas avoids the problem with chemical back reaction of oxygen with active metals in the cell. The method also is characterized by a sequence of two steps where an inert cathode electrode is inserted into the electrochemical cell in the second step and the metallic component in the ion conductor is then used as the anode to cause electrochemical reduction of the metal ions formed in the first step from the metal oxide where oxygen gas formed at the anode. The use of ion conductors serves to isolate the active components from chemically reacting with certain chemicals in the cell. While applicable to a variety of metal oxides, the invention has special importance for reducing CaO to Ca.degree. used for reducing UO.sub.2 and PuO.sub.2 to U and Pu.

  9. Use of ion conductors in the pyrochemical reduction of oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, W.E.; Tomczuk, Z.

    1994-02-01

    An electrochemical process and electrochemical cell for reducing a metal oxide are provided. First the oxide is separated as oxygen gas using, for example, a ZrO[sub 2] oxygen ion conductor anode and the metal ions from the reduction salt are reduced and deposited on an ion conductor cathode, for example, sodium ion reduced on a [beta]-alumina sodium ion conductor cathode. The generation of and separation of oxygen gas avoids the problem with chemical back reaction of oxygen with active metals in the cell. The method also is characterized by a sequence of two steps where an inert cathode electrode is inserted into the electrochemical cell in the second step and the metallic component in the ion conductor is then used as the anode to cause electrochemical reduction of the metal ions formed in the first step from the metal oxide where oxygen gas formed at the anode. The use of ion conductors serves to isolate the active components from chemically reacting with certain chemicals in the cell. While applicable to a variety of metal oxides, the invention has special importance for reducing CaO to Ca[sup o] used for reducing UO[sub 2] and PuO[sub 2] to U and Pu. 2 figures.

  10. Conductor design for the VLHC transmission line magnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, G.W.; Kashikhin, V.; McAshan, M.; Mazur, P.O.; Piekarz, H.; Volk, J.T.; Walker, R.

    1999-03-01

    The transmission line magnet [1] is under development for the Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) at Fermilab with the expectation that it’s cost will be several times less (per Tesla-meter) than conventional superconducting magnets. It is a dual-aperture warm-iron superferric magnet built around an 80kA superconducting transmission line. The superconductor consists of 8 Rutherford (SSC Outer) cables in an Invar pipe jacket. The conductor design requirements and development program is described. A 100kA conductor test facility based on inductive coupling is described.

  11. Transparent communications permit unmanned operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    Not-normally-manned platforms are not a new development. However, their use in harsher environments has until recently, been limited. Development of reliable communications networks capable of handling the large amounts of data required for process control in real time with distributed control systems (DCSs) has been a key factor in making the concept viable for harsher, more remote environments. The article below examines the transparent communications network and DCS installed on Pickerill field, offshore UK, by Fisher-Rosemount Systems and its operational parameters. Pickerill field, some 50 mi off the Lincolnshire coast, comprises two small unmanned platforms producing gas under remote control from Arco`s operations base at Great Yarmouth about 60 mi south. Reliable communication is required both with the two platforms offshore and with Conoco`s gas processing operators at Theddlethorpe. Fundamental to project success was the ability of the process control system to provide entirely secure and transparent communication with equipment offshore and thus enable operators at Great Yarmouth to interact with the process as if it were local to their control center.

  12. Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a

  13. Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los ... "Potentially, with future refinement of this technology, windows in a home or office ...

  14. Optically transparent and environmentally durable superhydrophobic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nanoparticles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optically transparent and environmentally durable superhydrophobic coating based on functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles ...

  15. Enhanced durability transparent superhydrophobic anti-soiling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Enhanced durability transparent superhydrophobic anti-soiling coatings for CSP applications Authors: Polyzos, Georgios 1 ; Schaeffer, Daniel A 1 ; Smith, Barton Barton ...

  16. Transparency: it's not just for windows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparency: it's not just for windows Los Alamos National Laboratory's database of environmental monitoring data is now directly viewable by the public. March 20, 2012...

  17. Atomically Bonded Transparent Superhydrophobic Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aytug, Tolga

    2015-08-01

    Maintaining clarity and avoiding the accumulation of water and dirt on optically transparent surfaces such as US military vehicle windshields, viewports, periscope optical head windows, and electronic equipment cover glasses are critical to providing a high level of visibility, improved survivability, and much-needed safety for warfighters in the field. Through a combination of physical vapor deposition techniques and the exploitation of metastable phase separation in low-alkali borosilicate, a novel technology was developed for the fabrication of optically transparent, porous nanostructured silica thin film coatings that are strongly bonded to glass platforms. The nanotextured films, initially structurally superhydrophilic, exhibit superior superhydrophobicity, hence antisoiling ability, following a simple but robust modification in surface chemistry. The surfaces yield water droplet contact angles as high as 172°. Moreover, the nanostructured nature of these coatings provides increased light scattering in the UV regime and reduced reflectivity (i.e., enhanced transmission) over a broad range of the visible spectrum. In addition to these functionalities, the coatings exhibit superior mechanical resistance to abrasion and are thermally stable to temperatures approaching 500°C. The overall process technology relies on industry standard equipment and inherently scalable manufacturing processes and demands only nontoxic, naturally abundant, and inexpensive base materials. Such coatings, applied to the optical components of current and future combat equipment and military vehicles will provide a significant strategic advantage for warfighters. The inherent self-cleaning properties of such superhydrophobic coatings will also mitigate biofouling of optical windows exposed to high-humidity conditions and can help decrease repair/replacement costs, reduce maintenance, and increase readiness by limiting equipment downtime.

  18. Multiwire conductor having greatly increased interwire resistance and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas; Suenaga, Masaki

    1984-01-17

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a tin based solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature above its melting point for a period long enough to allow a substantial amount of copper to be dissolved from the wires comprising the conductor. The copper forms the brittle intermetallic compound Cu.sub.5 Sn.sub.6 with tin in the solder. After cooling the conductor is flexed causing a random cracking of the solder, and thereby increasing the interwire resistance of the conductor. The subject invention is particularly adapted for use with braided, ribbon-type solder filled superconductors.

  19. Multiwire conductor having increased interwire resistance and good mechanical stability and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl

    1984-02-14

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature sufficient to make the solder brittle, but below the melting point of the solder. While still hot, the conductor is flexed, causing the solder to separate from the wires comprising the conductor, thereby increasing the interwire resistance. In one embodiment the conductor may be heated to a temperature above the eutectic temperature of the solder so that a controlled amount of solder is removed. The subject invention is particularly suited for use with braided, ribbon-type, solder filled superconductors.

  20. Multiwire conductor having increased interwire resistance and good mechanical stability and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.

    1982-03-15

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a solder filler. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature sufficient to make the solder brittle, but below the melting point of the solder. While still hot, the conductor is flexed, causing the solder to separate from the wires comprising the conductor, thereby increasing the interwire resistance. In one embodiment the conductor may be heated to a temperature above the eutectic temperature of the solder so that a controlled amount of solder is removed. The subject invention is particularly suited for use with braided, ribbon-type, solder filled superconductors.

  1. Multiwire conductor having greatly increased interwire resistance and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luhman, T.; Suenaga, M.

    1982-03-15

    An improved multiwire conductor of the type which is mechanically stabilized by a tin based solder filler is described. A solder filled conductor is heated to a temperature above its melting point for a period long enough to allow a substantial amount of copper to be dissolved from the wires comprising the conductor. The copper forms the brittle intermetallic compound Cu/sub 5/Sn/sub 6/ with tin in the solder. After cooling the conductor is flexed causing a random cracking of the solder, and thereby increasing the interwire resistance of the conductor. The subject invention is particularly adapted for use with braided, ribbon-type solder filled superconductors.

  2. Transparent conductive nano-composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David Bruce; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Jesse, Stephen; Hu, Bin; Garrett, Matthew; Zhao, Bin

    2013-09-24

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of forming an organic electric device that includes providing a plurality of carbon nanostructures; and dispersing the plurality of carbon nanostructures in a polymeric matrix to provide a polymeric composite, wherein when the plurality of carbon nanostructures are present at a first concentration an interface of the plurality of carbon nanostructures and the polymeric matrix is characterized by charge transport when an external energy is applied, and when the plurality of carbon nanostructures are present at a second concentration the interface of the plurality of carbon nanostructures and the polymeric matrix are characterized by exciton dissociation when an external energy is applied, wherein the first concentration is less than the second concentration.

  3. Transparent conductive nano-composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geohegan, David Bruce; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Jesse, Stephen; Hu, Bin; Garrett, Matthew; Zhao, Bin

    2011-04-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of forming an organic electric device that includes providing a plurality of carbon nanostructures; and dispersing the plurality of carbon nanostructures in a polymeric matrix to provide a polymeric composite, wherein when the plurality of carbon nanostructures are present at a first concentration an interface of the plurality of carbon nanostructures and the polymeric matrix is characterized by charge transport when an external energy is applied, and when the plurality of carbon nanostructures are present at a second concentration the interface of the plurality of carbon nanostructures and the polymeric matrix are characterized by exciton dissociation when an external energy is applied, wherein the first concentration is less than the second concentration.

  4. A Testing Platform for Validation of Overhead Conductor Aging Models and Understanding Thermal Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irminger, Philip; Starke, Michael R; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Young II, Marcus Aaron; Rizy, D Tom; Stovall, John P; Overholt, Philip N

    2014-01-01

    Power system equipment manufacturers and researchers continue to experiment with novel overhead electric conductor designs that support better conductor performance and address congestion issues. To address the technology gap in testing these novel designs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory constructed the Powerline Conductor Accelerated Testing (PCAT) facility to evaluate the performance of novel overhead conductors in an accelerated fashion in a field environment. Additionally, PCAT has the capability to test advanced sensors and measurement methods for accessing overhead conductor performance and condition. Equipped with extensive measurement and monitoring devices, PCAT provides a platform to improve/validate conductor computer models and assess the performance of novel conductors. The PCAT facility and its testing capabilities are described in this paper.

  5. Vacuum-surface flashover switch with cantilever conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2001-01-01

    A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is improved by a high-voltage, fast rise-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface.

  6. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2013-12-17

    A thin film stack (100, 200) is provided for use in electronic devices such as photovoltaic devices. The stack (100, 200) may be integrated with a substrate (110) such as a light transmitting/transmissive layer. A electrical conductor layer (120, 220) is formed on a surface of the substrate (110) or device layer such as a transparent conducting (TC) material layer (120,220) with pin holes or defects (224) caused by manufacturing. The stack (100) includes a thin film (130, 230) of metal that acts as a barrier for environmental contaminants (226, 228). The metal thin film (130,230) is deposited on the conductor layer (120, 220) and formed from a self-healing metal such as a metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block (236) is formed in or adjacent to the thin film (130, 230) of metal at or proximate to the pin holes (224) to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes (224).

  7. Improving Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Page 1 of 21 Interconnection Process Emergent ... The topic for today is: Improving Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Interconnection ...

  8. Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Iowa State University and Ames Laboratory researchers have developed a high strength, lightweight aluminum wire for high-voltage power transmission with reduced electrical resistance for overhead electrical lines. Description

  9. Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Aluminum-Alkaline Metal-Metal Composite Conductor Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Researchers have developed a high strength, lightweight aluminum wire for high-voltage power transmission with reduced electrical resistance for overhead electrical lines. High-voltage electric power transmission cables based on pure

  10. Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetime using liquid conductor -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Apparatus for measuring minority carrier lifetime using liquid conductor National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Solar power generating capacity has grown from 83 MW in 2003 to over 7,200 MW in 2012, in the U.S. alone. As the solar industry grows, there is a significant need for quality control and testing methodologies.

  11. Thermoelectric effects in organic conductors in a strong magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirichenko, O. V.; Peschanskii, V. G. Hasan, R. A.

    2007-07-15

    The linear response of the electron system of a layered conductor to the temperature gradient in this system in a strong magnetic field is investigated theoretically. Thermoelectric emf is studied as a function of the magnitude and orientation of a strong external magnetic field; the experimental investigation of this function, combined with the study of the electric and thermal resistance, allows one to completely determine the structure of the energy spectrum of charge carriers.

  12. Subtask 5: Functional nanostructured transparent electrode materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5: Functional nanostructured transparent electrode materials All papers by year Subtask 1 Subtask 2 Subtask 3 Subtask 4 Subtask 5 Jeon, K.-W. and Seo, D.-K. (2014) Concomitant...

  13. Transparency: it's not just for windows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparency: it's not just for windows Transparency: it's not just for windows Los Alamos National Laboratory's database of environmental monitoring data is now directly viewable by the public. March 20, 2012 Intellus environmental data The same environmental data used by LANL scientists can be viewed by anyone, anytime. Contact Environmental Communications & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email "The new system contains more than 9 million

  14. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2014-06-10

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber. The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target in the process chamber to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  15. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  16. High quality transparent conducting oxide thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.; Duenow, Joel N.; Barnes, Teresa; Coutts, Timothy J.

    2012-08-28

    A transparent conducting oxide (TCO) film comprising: a TCO layer, and dopants selected from the elements consisting of Vanadium, Molybdenum, Tantalum, Niobium, Antimony, Titanium, Zirconium, and Hafnium, wherein the elements are n-type dopants; and wherein the transparent conducting oxide is characterized by an improved electron mobility of about 42 cm.sup.2/V-sec while simultaneously maintaining a high carrier density of .about.4.4e.times.10.sup.20 cm.sup.-3.

  17. Lutetium oxide-based transparent ceramic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seeley, Zachary; Cherepy, Nerine; Kuntz, Joshua; Payne, Stephen A.

    2016-01-19

    In one embodiment, a transparent ceramic of sintered nanoparticles includes gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with europium having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YEu.sub.YO.sub.3, where X is any value within a range from about 0.05 to about 0.45 and Y is any value within a range from about 0.01 to about 0.2, and where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm. In another embodiment, a transparent ceramic scintillator of sintered nanoparticles, includes a body of sintered nanoparticles including gadolinium lutetium oxide doped with a rare earth activator (RE) having a chemical composition (Lu.sub.1-xGd.sub.x).sub.2-YRE.sub.YO.sub.3, where RE is selected from the group consisting of: Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy, where the transparent ceramic exhibits a transparency characterized by a scatter coefficient of less than about 10%/cm.

  18. Vertically aligned gas-insulated transmission line having particle traps at the inner conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dale, Steinar J.

    1984-01-01

    Gas insulated electrical apparatus having first and second conductors separated by an insulating support within an insulating gas environment, and particle traps disposed along the surface of the high potential conductor for trapping and inactivating foreign particles which may be present within the insulating gas medium. Several embodiments of the invention were developed which are particularly suited for vertically aligned gas insulated transmission lines. The particle traps are grooves or cavities formed into the walls of the tubular inner conductor, without extending into the hollow portion of the conductor. In other embodiments, the traps are appendages or insert flanges extending from the inner conductor, with the insulator supports contacting the appendages instead of the inner conductor.

  19. Comments on: New report offers best practice for transparent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sandia-national-laboratories-report-offers-best-practice-for-transparent-contract-language-of-pv-om-agreements...

  20. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using protection tube in conductor plug-in joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kommineni, Prasad R.

    1983-01-25

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. A plug and socket arrangement is utilized for joining adjacent sections of the inner conductor, and a protection tube is utilized inside the hollow plug to maintain proper alignment of the joint when the transmission line is bent.

  1. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using protection tube in conductor plug-in joint

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kommineni, P.R.

    1983-01-25

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. A plug and socket arrangement is utilized for joining adjacent sections of the inner conductor, and a protection tube is utilized inside the hollow plug to maintain proper alignment of the joint when the transmission line is bent. 3 figs.

  2. On the cause of conductivity degradation in sodium strontium silicate ionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jee, Y; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-01-01

    Here we present strong experimental evidence that elucidates the fundamental cause for the conductivity degradation observed in Na-SrSiO3 ionic conductor.

  3. High temperature superconducting composite conductor and method for manufacturing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holesinger, Terry G.; Bingert, John F.

    2002-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting composite conductor is provided including a high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, the high temperature superconducting composite conductor characterized as having a fill factor of greater than about 40. Additionally, the conductor can be further characterized as containing multiple cores of high temperature superconducting material surrounded by a noble metal layer, said multiple cores characterized as having substantially uniform geometry in the cross-sectional dimensions. Processes of forming such a high temperature superconducting composite conductor are also provided.

  4. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J.R.; Dominguez, F.; Johnson, A.W.; Omstead, T.R.

    1997-09-02

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten. 2 figs.

  5. Method for deposition of a conductor in integrated circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Creighton, J. Randall; Dominguez, Frank; Johnson, A. Wayne; Omstead, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    A method is described for fabricating integrated semiconductor circuits and, more particularly, for the selective deposition of a conductor onto a substrate employing a chemical vapor deposition process. By way of example, tungsten can be selectively deposited onto a silicon substrate. At the onset of loss of selectivity of deposition of tungsten onto the silicon substrate, the deposition process is interrupted and unwanted tungsten which has deposited on a mask layer with the silicon substrate can be removed employing a halogen etchant. Thereafter, a plurality of deposition/etch back cycles can be carried out to achieve a predetermined thickness of tungsten.

  6. Composite mixed oxide ionic and electronic conductors for hydrogen separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Srikanth; Pal, Uday B.; Karthikeyan, Annamalai; Hengdong, Cui

    2009-09-15

    A mixed ionic and electronic conducting membrane includes a two-phase solid state ceramic composite, wherein the first phase comprises an oxygen ion conductor and the second phase comprises an n-type electronically conductive oxide, wherein the electronically conductive oxide is stable at an oxygen partial pressure as low as 10.sup.-20 atm and has an electronic conductivity of at least 1 S/cm. A hydrogen separation system and related methods using the mixed ionic and electronic conducting membrane are described.

  7. Cubic Ionic Conductor Ceramics for Alkali Ion Batteries - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cuban Missile Crisis Cuban Missile Crisis Cuba Reconnaissance reveals Soviet missiles in Cuba. The United States blockades Cuba for 13 days until the Soviet Union agrees to remove its missiles Portal

    Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Cubic Ionic Conductor Ceramics for Alkali Ion Batteries Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Ionic conduction in cubic Na3TiP3O9N, a secondary Na-ion

  8. Fabrication of transparent ceramics using nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J; Tillotson, Thomas M; Kuntz, Joshua D; Payne, Stephen A

    2012-09-18

    A method of fabrication of a transparent ceramic using nanoparticles synthesized via organic acid complexation-combustion includes providing metal salts, dissolving said metal salts to produce an aqueous salt solution, adding an organic chelating agent to produce a complexed-metal sol, heating said complexed-metal sol to produce a gel, drying said gel to produce a powder, combusting said powder to produce nano-particles, calcining said nano-particles to produce oxide nano-particles, forming said oxide nano-particles into a green body, and sintering said green body to produce the transparent ceramic.

  9. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1986-09-09

    This patent describes a drying process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing alkoxides to form alcogels, and subsequently removing the alcohol therefrom to form aerogels, the improvement comprising the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol for the alcohol in the alcogels, and drying the resulting gels at a supercritical temperature for the solvent, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced drying time period.

  10. Ceramic to metal attachment system. [Ceramic electrode to metal conductor in MHD generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marchant, D.D.

    1983-06-10

    A composition and method are described for attaching a ceramic electrode to a metal conductor. A layer of randomly interlocked metal fibers saturated with polyimide resin is sandwiched between the ceramic electrode and the metal conductor. The polyimide resin is then polymerized providing bonding.

  11. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) ...

  12. Web Browser Interface (WBUI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) ...

  13. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, P.H.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-09-04

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO/sub 2/, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40/sup 0/C instead of at about 270/sup 0/C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementary particles or cosmic rays.

  14. Process for forming transparent aerogel insulating arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tewari, Param H.; Hunt, Arlon J.

    1986-01-01

    An improved supercritical drying process for forming transparent silica aerogel arrays is described. The process is of the type utilizing the steps of hydrolyzing and condensing aloxides to form alcogels. A subsequent step removes the alcohol to form aerogels. The improvement includes the additional step, after alcogels are formed, of substituting a solvent, such as CO.sub.2, for the alcohol in the alcogels, the solvent having a critical temperature less than the critical temperature of the alcohol. The resulting gels are dried at a supercritical temperature for the selected solvent, such as CO.sub.2, to thereby provide a transparent aerogel array within a substantially reduced (days-to-hours) time period. The supercritical drying occurs at about 40.degree. C. instead of at about 270.degree. C. The improved process provides increased yields of large scale, structurally sound arrays. The transparent aerogel array, formed in sheets or slabs, as made in accordance with the improved process, can replace the air gap within a double glazed window, for example, to provide a substantial reduction in heat transfer. The thus formed transparent aerogel arrays may also be utilized, for example, in windows of refrigerators and ovens, or in the walls and doors thereof or as the active material in detectors for analyzing high energy elementry particles or cosmic rays.

  15. Overview of Russian HEU transparency issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempf, C.R.; Bieniawski, A.

    1993-09-01

    The U.S. has signed an agreement with the Russian Federation for the purchase of 500 metric tons of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) taken from dismantled nuclear weapons. The HEU will be blended down to low-enriched uranium and will be transported to the U.S. to be used by fuel fabricators to make fuel for commercial nuclear power plants. Both the U.S. and Russia have been preparing to institute transparency measures to provide assurance that nonproliferation and arms control objectives specified in the agreement are met. This paper provides background information on the original agreement and on subsequent negotiations with the Russians, as well as discussion of technical aspects of developing transparency measures suited to the facilities and processes which are expected to be involved. Transparency has been defined as those agreed-upon measures which build confidence that arms control and non-proliferation objectives shared by the parties are met. Transparency is a departure from exhaustive, detailed arms control verification regimes of past agreements, which were based on a presumption of detecting transgressions as opposed to confirming compliance.

  16. Aerogel: a transparent insulator for solar applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.J.; Russo, R.E.; Tewari, P.H.; Lofftus, K.D.

    1985-06-01

    Aerogel is a transparent, low density, insulating material suitable for a variety of solar applications. Significant energy savings can be realized by using aerogel for a window glazing material. Other possible applications include solar collector covers, transparent insulating jackets for direct gain passive solar devices, and situations that require both transparency and good insulation. Because silica aerogel has a low density (2 to 10% solid), it has a thermal conductivity as low as 0.014 W/m/sup 0/K without evacuation, and if evacuated, lower than 0.006 W/m/sup 0/K. It provides a clear view with only slight coloring due to its weak and nearly isotropic scattering of light. This paper describes significant progress made in the past year at our laboratory in the development of aerogel. We have improved the transparency, developed new preparation methods using less toxic materials, and initiated successful experiments in drying alcogels at near ambient temperature. Optical transmission, light scattering, and electron microscopy data show that CO/sub 2/ supercritical drying of alcogels produces aerogels similar in quality to those produced by high temperature supercritical drying. These advances make the commercial production of aerogel much more feasible.

  17. Admittance of multiterminal quantum Hall conductors at kilohertz frequencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernndez, C.; Consejo, C.; Chaubet, C.; Degiovanni, P.

    2014-03-28

    We present an experimental study of the low frequency admittance of quantum Hall conductors in the [100?Hz, 1?MHz] frequency range. We show that the frequency dependence of the admittance of the sample strongly depends on the topology of the contacts connections. Our experimental results are well explained within the Christen and Bttiker approach for finite frequency transport in quantum Hall edge channels taking into account the influence of the coaxial cables capacitance. In the Hall bar geometry, we demonstrate that there exists a configuration in which the cable capacitance does not influence the admittance measurement of the sample. In this case, we measure the electrochemical capacitance of the sample and observe its dependence on the filling factor.

  18. Segmented saddle-shaped passive stabilization conductors for toroidal plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leuer, J.A.

    1990-05-01

    A large toroidal vacuum chamber for plasma generation and confinement is lined with a toroidal blanket for shielding using modules segmented in the toroidal direction. To provide passive stabilization in the same manner as a conductive vacuum chamber wall, saddle-shaped conductor loops are provided on blanket modules centered on a midplane of the toroidal chamber with horizontal conductive bars above and below the midplane, and vertical conductive legs on opposite sides of each module to provide return current paths between the upper and lower horizontal conductive bars. The close proximity of the vertical legs provided on adjacent modules without making physical contact cancel the electromagnetic field of adjacent vertical legs. The conductive bars spaced equally above and below the midplane simulate toroidal conductive loops or hoops that are continuous, for vertical stabilization of the plasma even though they are actually segmented. 5 figs.

  19. Methods and apparatus for transparent display using scattering nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia Wei; Qiu, Wenjun; Zhen, Bo; Shapira, Ofer; Soljacic, Marin

    2016-05-10

    Transparent displays enable many useful applications, including heads-up displays for cars and aircraft as well as displays on eyeglasses and glass windows. Unfortunately, transparent displays made of organic light-emitting diodes are typically expensive and opaque. Heads-up displays often require fixed light sources and have limited viewing angles. And transparent displays that use frequency conversion are typically energy inefficient. Conversely, the present transparent displays operate by scattering visible light from resonant nanoparticles with narrowband scattering cross sections and small absorption cross sections. More specifically, projecting an image onto a transparent screen doped with nanoparticles that selectively scatter light at the image wavelength(s) yields an image on the screen visible to an observer. Because the nanoparticles scatter light at only certain wavelengths, the screen is practically transparent under ambient light. Exemplary transparent scattering displays can be simple, inexpensive, scalable to large sizes, viewable over wide angular ranges, energy efficient, and transparent simultaneously.

  20. Controlling Surface Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxides | ANSER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Controlling Surface Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxides Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Controlling Surface Properties of Transparent Conducting Oxides

  1. Skin explosion of double-layer conductors in fast-rising high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaikovsky, S. A. Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2014-04-15

    An experiment has been performed to study the electrical explosion of thick cylindrical conductors using the MIG pulsed power generator capable of producing a peak current of 2.5 MA within 100?ns rise time. The experimental goal was to compare the skin explosion of a solid conductor with that of a double-layer conductor whose outer layer had a lower conductivity than the inner one. It has been shown that in magnetic fields of peak induction up to 300?T and average induction rise rate 3??10{sup 9}?T/s, the double-layer structure of a conductor makes it possible to achieve higher magnetic induction at the conductor surface before it explodes. This can be accounted for, in particular, by the reduction of the ratio of the Joule heat density to the energy density of the magnetic field at the surface of a double-layer conductor due to redistribution of the current density over the conductor cross section.

  2. Proceedings: Graphics interface '86/Vision interface '86

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers presented at the Graphics interface conference. The Graphics interface conference is a major forum for the presentation of research in computer graphics and human-computer interaction. Sponsored by the Canadian Man-Computer Communications Society, the conferene draws an international audience with papers presented from France, Great Britain, the United States and Canada. The 1986 meeting was held jointly with Vision Interface '86, sponsored by the Canadian Image Processing and Pattern Recognition Society.

  3. Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

    2014-03-04

    The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

  4. New Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells | Department of Energy Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel Cells New Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel Cells Presentation on New Polymeric Proton Conductors for Water-free and High-temperature Fuel Cells to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005. htmwg05_kerr.pdf (158.09 KB) More Documents & Publications Polyelectrolyte Materials for High Temperature Fuel Cells

  5. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel P. (Oakland, CA); Kuntz, Joshua D. (Livermore, CA); Seeley, Zachary M. (Pullman, WA); Soules, Thomas F. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-10-18

    According to one embodiment, a method for forming a transparent ceramic preform includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, adding the suspension to a mold of a desired shape, and uniformly curing the suspension in the mold for forming a preform. The suspension includes a dispersant but does not include a gelling agent. In another embodiment, a method includes creating a mixture without a gelling agent, the mixture including: inorganic particles, a solvent, and a dispersant. The inorganic particles have a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm. The method also includes agitating the mixture, adding the mixture to a mold, and curing the mixture in the mold at a temperature of less than about 80.degree. C. for forming a preform. Other methods for forming a transparent ceramic preform are also described according to several embodiments.

  6. Transparent monolithic metal ion containing nanophase aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risen, W. M., Jr.; Hu, X.; Ji, S.; Littrell, K.

    1999-12-01

    The formation of monolithic and transparent transition metal containing aerogels has been achieved through cooperative interactions of high molecular weight functionalized carbohydrates and silica precursors, which strongly influence the kinetics of gelation. After initial gelation, subsequent modification of the ligating character of the system, coordination of the group VIII metal ions, and supercritical extraction afford the aerogels. The structures at the nanophase level have been probed by photon and electron transmission and neutron scattering techniques to help elucidate the basis for structural integrity together with the small entity sizes that permit transparency in the visible range. They also help with understanding the chemical reactivities of the metal-containing sites in these very high surface area materials. These results are discussed in connection with new reaction studies.

  7. Transparent heat-spreader for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo

    2014-11-04

    An optoelectronic cooling system is equally applicable to an LED collimator or a photovoltaic solar concentrator. A transparent fluid conveys heat from the optoelectronic chip to a hollow cover over the system aperture. The cooling system can keep a solar concentrator chip at the same temperature as found for a one-sun flat-plate solar cell. Natural convection or forced circulation can operate to convey heat from the chip to the cover.

  8. TRANSPARENT COATINGS FOR SOLAR CELLS RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatkowski, P.J.; Landis, D.A.

    2013-04-16

    Todays solar cells are fabricated using metal oxide based transparent conductive coatings (TCC) or metal wires with optoelectronic performance exceeding that currently possible with Carbon Nanotube (CNT) based TCCs. The motivation for replacing current TCC is their inherent brittleness, high deposition cost, and high deposition temperatures; leading to reduced performance on thin substrates. With improved processing, application and characterization techniques Nanofiber and/or CNT based TCCs can overcome these shortcomings while offering the ability to be applied in atmospheric conditions using low cost coating processes At todays level of development, CNT based TCC are nearing commercial use in touch screens, some types of information displays (i.e. electronic paper), and certain military applications. However, the resistivity and transparency requirements for use in current commercial solar cells are more stringent than in many of these applications. Therefore, significant research on fundamental nanotube composition, dispersion and deposition are required to reach the required performance commanded by photovoltaic devices. The objective of this project was to research and develop transparent conductive coatings based on novel nanomaterial composite coatings, which comprise nanotubes, nanofibers, and other nanostructured materials along with binder materials. One objective was to show that these new nanomaterials perform at an electrical resistivity and optical transparency suitable for use in solar cells and other energy-related applications. A second objective was to generate new structures and chemistries with improved resistivity and transparency performance. The materials also included the binders and surface treatments that facilitate the utility of the electrically conductive portion of these composites in solar photovoltaic devices. Performance enhancement venues included: CNT purification and metallic tube separation techniques, chemical doping, CNT

  9. Method of forming macro-structured high surface area transparent conductive oxide electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forman, Arnold J.; Chen, Zhebo; Jaramillo, Thomas F.

    2016-01-05

    A method of forming a high surface area transparent conducting electrode is provided that includes depositing a transparent conducting thin film on a conductive substrate, where the transparent conducting thin film includes transparent conductive particles and a solution-based transparent conducting adhesive layer which serves to coat and bind together the transparent conducting particles, and heat treating the transparent conducting adhesion layer on the conductive substrate, where an increased surface area transparent conducting electrode is formed.

  10. Stress-tuned conductor-polymer composite for use in sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, James E; Read, Douglas H

    2013-10-22

    A method for making a composite polymeric material with electrical conductivity determined by stress-tuning of the conductor-polymer composite, and sensors made with the stress-tuned conductor-polymer composite made by this method. Stress tuning is achieved by mixing a miscible liquid into the polymer precursor solution or by absorbing into the precursor solution a soluble compound from vapor in contact with the polymer precursor solution. The conductor may or may not be ordered by application of a magnetic field. The composite is formed by polymerization with the stress-tuning agent in the polymer matrix. The stress-tuning agent is removed following polymerization to produce a conductor-polymer composite with a stress field that depends on the amount of stress-tuning agent employed.

  11. Metallographic autopsies of full-scale ITER prototype cable-in-conduit conductors after full cyclic testing in SULTAN: III. The importance of strand surface roughness in long twist pitch conductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sanabria, Charlie; Lee, Peter J.; Starch, William; Devred, Arnaud; Larbalestier, David C.

    2016-05-31

    As part of the ITER conductor qualification process, 3 m long Cable-in-Conduit Conductors (CICCs) were tested at the SULTAN facility under conditions simulating ITER operation so as to establish the current sharing temperature, Tcs, as a function of multiple full Lorentz force loading cycles. After a comprehensive evaluation of both the Toroidal Field (TF) and the Central Solenoid (CS) conductors, it was found that Tcs degradation was common in long twist pitch TF conductors while short twist pitch CS conductors showed some Tcs increase. However, one kind of TF conductors containing superconducting strand fabricated by the Bochvar Institute of Inorganicmore » Materials (VNIINM) avoided Tcs degradation despite having long twist pitch. In our earlier metallographic autopsies of long and short twist pitch CS conductors, we observed a substantially greater transverse strand movement under Lorentz force loading for long twist pitch conductors, while short twist pitch conductors had negligible transverse movement. With help from the literature, we concluded that the transverse movement was not the source of Tcs degradation but rather an increase of the compressive strain in the Nb3Sn filaments possibly induced by longitudinal movement of the wires. Like all TF conductors this TF VNIINM conductor showed large transverse motions under Lorentz force loading, but Tcs actually increased, as in all short twist pitch CS conductors. We here propose that the high surface roughness of the VNIINM strand may be responsible for the suppression of the compressive strain enhancement (characteristic of long twist pitch conductors). Furthermore, it appears that increasing strand surface roughness could improve the performance of long twist pitch CICCs.« less

  12. Low-loss LIGA-micromachined conductor-backed coplanar waveguide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman, Michael A.

    2004-12-01

    A mesoscale low-loss LIGA-micromachined conductor-backed coplanar waveguide is presented. The 517 {micro}m lines are the tallest uniplanar LIGA-fabricated microwave transmission lines to date, as well as the first to be constructed of copper rather than nickel. The conductor-backed micromachined CPW on quartz achieves a measured attenuation of 0.064 dB/cm at 15.5 GHz.

  13. Doped Y.sub.2O.sub.3 buffer layers for laminated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Knoxville, TN; Schoop, Urs [Westborough, MA; Goyal, Amit [Knoxville, TN; Thieme, Cornelis Leo Hans [Westborough, MA; Verebelyi, Darren T [Oxford, MA; Rupich, Martin W [Framingham, MA

    2007-08-21

    A laminated conductor includes a metallic substrate having a surface, a biaxially textured buffer layer supported by the surface of the metallic substrate, the biaxially textured buffer layer comprising Y.sub.2O.sub.3 and a dopant for blocking cation diffusion through the Y.sub.2O.sub.3, and a biaxially textured conductor layer supported by the biaxially textured buffer layer.

  14. Qualification of the US made conductors for ITER TF magnet system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, N; Hatfield, D; Miller, J; Bruzzone, P; Stepanov, B; Seber, B

    2009-10-08

    The US Domestic Agency (USDA) is one of the six suppliers of the TF conductor for ITER. In order to qualify conductors according to ITER requirements we prepared several lengths of the CICC and short samples for testing in the SULTAN facility in CRPP, Switzerland. We also fully characterized the strands that were used in these SULTAN samples. Fabrication experience and test results are presented and discussed.

  15. Qualification of the US Made Conductors for ITER TF Magnet System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Hatfield, Daniel R; Miller, John R; Bruzzone, P.; Stepanov, B.; Seber, B.

    2010-01-01

    The US Domestic Agency (USDA) is one of the six suppliers of the TF conductor for ITER. In order to qualify conductors according to ITER requirements we prepared several lengths of the CICC and short samples for testing in the SULTAN facility in CRPP, Switzerland. We also fully characterized the strands that were used in these SULTAN samples. Fabrication experience and test results are presented and discussed.

  16. Conduction Mechanisms and Structure of Ionomeric Single-Ion Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Ralph H.; Maranas, Janna K; Mueller, Karl T; Runt, James; Winey, Karen I

    2015-03-05

    Our team has designed using DFT (Gaussian) and synthesized low glass transition temperature single-ion conductors that are either polyanions that conduct small cations Li, Na, Cs or polycations that conduct small anions F, OH, Br. We utilize a wide range of complimentary experimental materials charactization tools to understand ion transport; differential scanning calorimetry, dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, linear viscoelasticity, X-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. The glass transition temperature Tg needs to be as low as possible to facilitate ion transport, so the nonionic parts of the polymer need to be polar, flexible and have strong solvation interactions with the ions. The lowest Tg we have managed for polyanions conducting Li is -60 C. In contrast, polysiloxanes with PEO side chains and tetrabutylphosphonium cationic side groups have Tg ~ -75C that barely increases with ion content, as anticipated by DFT. A survey of all polyanions in the literature suggests that Tg < -80C is needed to achieve the 10-4 S/cm conductivity needed for battery separators.

  17. THE STABILITY AND ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE PROTON CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brinkman, K.

    2010-07-06

    The morphological and electrical properties of Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Ce{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} with x varying from 0 to 1 prepared by a modified Pechini method were investigated as potential high temperature proton conductors. Dense microstructures were achieved for all the samples upon sintering at 1500 C for 5 h. The phase structure analysis indicated that perovskite phase was formed for 0 {le} x {le} 0.2, while for x larger than 0.5, impurity phases of Sr{sub 2}CeO{sub 4} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} appeared. The tolerance to H{sub 2}O for the samples improved with the increase in Sr content when exposed to boiling water, while the electrical conductivity decreased from x = 0 to 1. However, the resistance to CO{sub 2} attack at elevated temperatures was not improved within the whole x range studied.

  18. Nanostructured transparent conducting oxide electrochromic device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milliron, Delia; Tangirala, Ravisubhash; Llordes, Anna; Buonsanti, Raffaella; Garcia, Guillermo

    2016-05-17

    The embodiments described herein provide an electrochromic device. In an exemplary embodiment, the electrochromic device includes (1) a substrate and (2) a film supported by the substrate, where the film includes transparent conducting oxide (TCO) nanostructures. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes (a) an electrolyte, where the nanostructures are embedded in the electrolyte, resulting in an electrolyte, nanostructure mixture positioned above the substrate and (b) a counter electrode positioned above the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a conductive coating deposited on the substrate between the substrate and the mixture. In a further embodiment, the electrochromic device further includes a second substrate positioned above the mixture.

  19. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  20. TRANSPARENT HELIUM IN STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piro, Anthony L.; Morozova, Viktoriya S., E-mail: piro@caltech.edu [Theoretical Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., M/C 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Using simple arguments based on photometric light curves and velocity evolution, we propose that some stripped envelope supernovae (SNe) show signs that a significant fraction of their helium is effectively transparent. The main pieces of evidence are the relatively low velocities with little velocity evolution, as are expected deep inside an exploding star, along with temperatures that are too low to ionize helium. This means that the helium should not contribute to the shaping of the main SN light curve, and thus the total helium mass may be difficult to measure from simple light curve modeling. Conversely, such modeling may be more useful for constraining the mass of the carbon/oxygen core of the SN progenitor. Other stripped envelope SNe show higher velocities and larger velocity gradients, which require an additional opacity source (perhaps the mixing of heavier elements or radioactive nickel) to prevent the helium from being transparent. We discuss ways in which similar analysis can provide insights into the differences and similarities between SNe Ib and Ic, which will lead to a better understanding of their respective formation mechanisms.

  1. NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (DOE, 2009) This memorandum describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) policy for posting online the categorical exclusion determinations made by DOE NEPA Compliance Officers. Download Document NEPA Process Transparency and Openness (59.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements Second Edition (DOE, 2004) 10

  2. Powerpedia - Using Technology to Increase Transparency | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Powerpedia - Using Technology to Increase Transparency Powerpedia - Using Technology to Increase Transparency May 18, 2011 - 4:42pm Addthis The OCIO established a Department-wide wiki, Powerpedia, in early 2010 to facilitate knowledge capture and collaboration, and to increase efficiency. Leveraging lessons learned from the intelligence community's Intellipedia effort, the Department established Powerpedia to increase transparency and connect people and information together. Built on

  3. Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement Promoting NEPA Transparency and Public Engagement June 3, 2011 - 1:14pm Addthis "NEPA is, at its core, a transparency statute," said Katie Scharf, Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Deputy General Counsel, in opening a panel discussion on using information technology to support open government initiatives, engage the public, and add value to NEPA analysis. At the March 9, 2011, event - hosted by CEQ for Federal NEPA and legal staff

  4. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films. PNAS 112 ( 12), 3612-3617, DOI: 10.1073/ pnas . 1423034112 (2015). Scientific Achievement Reactively sputtered NiOx layer provides a transparent, anti-reflective, conductive, chemically stable, inherently catalytic coating that stabilizes many efficient and technologically important

  5. 15.07.10 RH P-type Transparent - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p -Type Transparent Conducting Oxide/n-Type Semiconductor Heterojunctions for Efficient and Stable Solar Water Oxidation Chen, L. et al. p -Type Transparent Conducting Oxide / n-Type Semiconductor Heterojunctions for Efficient and Stable Solar Water Oxidation. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2015, DOI: 10.1021/ jacs . 5b03536 (2015). Scientific Achievement Efficient charge conduction from the light absorber to the water oxidation catalyst was realized with a transparent,

  6. Heavy duty insulator assemblies for 500-kV bulk power transmission line with large diameter octagonalbundled conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Hayase, I.; Hirai, J.; Inove, M.; Naito, K.; Yukino, T.

    1982-11-01

    This paper describes the design procedure and the results of field tests on mechanical performances of insulator assemblies newly developed to support octagonal-bundled conductors for 500-kV bulk power transmission. Taking account of conductor-motion-induced peak tensile load, fatigue, torsional torque and others, a successful design has been achieved in two prototype assemblies for such heavy mechanical duties as encountered during conductor galloping or swing. This has been proved throughout three years of the field tests.

  7. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block Customers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2012 Net Requirements Transparency Process for SliceBlock Customers Description of Changes and a Response to Comments September 24, 2012 Background and Description of Changes:...

  8. UCSB researchers uncover fundamental limits on optical transparency...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a wide range of optoelectronic devices, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, and LCD touch screens. These materials can conduct electricity while being transparent to...

  9. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

  10. New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New York City's benchmarking and transparency policy, Local Law 84, and the results of the application of those methodologies to the early period of the policy's implementation. ...

  11. Benchmarking and Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benchmarking and Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook Prepared for by the U.S. Department of Energy, this Handbook provides both a strategic planning ...

  12. Researchers Create Transparent Lithium-Ion Battery - Joint Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory researchers have invented a transparent lithium-ion battery that is also highly flexible. It is comparable in cost to regular ...

  13. 15.07.10 RH P-type Transparent - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Efficient and Stable Solar Water Oxidation Chen, L. et al. p -Type Transparent Conducting Oxide n-Type Semiconductor Heterojunctions for Efficient and Stable ...

  14. Structural and phonon transmission study of Ge-Au-Ge eutectically bonded interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, W.B. |

    1995-07-01

    This thesis presents a structural analysis and phonon transparency investigation of the Ge-Au-Ge eutectic bond interface. Interface development was intended to maximize the interfacial ballistic phonon transparency to enhance the detection of the dark matter candidate WIMPs. The process which was developed provides an interface which produces minimal stress, low amounts of impurities, and insures Ge lattice continuity through the interface. For initial Au thicknesses of greater than 1,000 {angstrom} Au per substrate side, eutectic epitaxial growth resulted in a Au dendritic structure with 95% cross sectional and 90% planar Au interfacial area coverages. In sections in which Ge bridged the interface, lattice continuity across the interface was apparent. Epitaxial solidification of the eutectic interface with initial Au thicknesses < 500 A per substrate side produced Au agglomerations thereby reducing the Au planar interfacial area coverage to as little as 30%. The mechanism for Au coalescence was attributed to lateral diffusion of Ge and Au in the liquid phase during solidification. Phonon transmission studies were performed on eutectic interfaces with initial Au thicknesses of 1,000 {angstrom}, 500 {angstrom}, and 300 {angstrom} per substrate side. Phonon imaging of eutectically bonded samples with initial Au thicknesses of 300 {angstrom}/side revealed reproducible interfacial percent phonon transmissions from 60% to 70%. Line scan phonon imaging verified the results. Phonon propagation TOF spectra distinctly showed the predominant phonon propagation mode was ballistic. This was substantiated by phonon focusing effects apparent in the phonon imaging data. The degree of interface transparency to phonons and resulting phonon propagation modes correlate with the structure of the interface following eutectic solidification. Structural studies of samples with initial Au thickness of 1,000 {angstrom}/side appear to correspond with the phonon transmission study.

  15. Transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Soules, Thomas F.

    2012-12-25

    A method for forming a transparent ceramic preform in one embodiment includes forming a suspension of oxide particles in a solvent, wherein the suspension includes a dispersant, with the proviso that the suspension does not include a gelling agent; and uniformly curing the suspension for forming a preform of gelled suspension. A method according to another embodiment includes creating a mixture of inorganic particles, a solvent and a dispersant, the inorganic particles having a mean diameter of less than about 2000 nm; agitating the mixture; adding the mixture to a mold; and curing the mixture in the mold for gelling the mixture, with the proviso that no gelling agent is added to the mixture.

  16. Web Service Interface (API)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Service Interface (API) Engineering Services The Network OSCARS How It Works Who's Using OSCARS? OSCARS and Future Tech OSCARS Standard and Open Grid Forum OSCARS Developers Community Web Browser Interface (WBUI) Web Service Interface (API) Read More... Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools The ESnet Engineering Team Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems:

  17. High carrier concentration p-type transparent conducting oxide films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yan, Yanfa; Zhang, Shengbai

    2005-06-21

    A p-type transparent conducting oxide film is provided which is consisting essentially of, the transparent conducting oxide and a molecular doping source, the oxide and doping source grown under conditions sufficient to deliver the doping source intact onto the oxide.

  18. Transparent Conductive Nano-Composites - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Transparent Conductive Nano-Composites Nanomaterials for Applications Ranging From Photovoltaic Cells to Display Technologies Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Indium Tin Oxide, the most widely used commercial transparent conducting coating, has severe limitations such

  19. Thin Film Electronic Devices with Conductive and Transparent Gas and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moisture Permeation Barriers - Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Transmission Electricity Transmission Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Thin Film Electronic Devices with Conductive and Transparent Gas and Moisture Permeation Barriers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Transparent conducting (TC) materials are extensively used in electronics and

  20. Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Sandberg, Chester Ledlie

    2010-11-09

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

  1. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1–3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200–600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  2. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  3. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  4. Interface colloidal robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aronson, Igor; Snezhko, Oleksiy

    2015-08-04

    A magnetic colloidal system confined at the interface between two immiscible liquids and energized by an alternating magnetic field dynamically self-assembles into localized asters and arrays of asters. The colloidal system exhibits locomotion and shape change. By controlling a small external magnetic field applied parallel to the interface, structures can capture, transport, and position target particles.

  5. Thread Pool Interface (TPI)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-01

    Thread Pool Interface (TpI) provides a simple interface for running functions written in C or C++ in a thread-parallel mode. Application or library codes may need to perform operations thread-parallel on machines with multicore processors. the TPI library provides a simple mechanism for managing thread activation, deactivation, and thread-parallel execution of application-provided subprograms.

  6. Investigation of conductor swinging by wind and its application for design of compact transmission line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsujimoto, K.; Fujii, K.; Kubokawa, H.; Okomura, T.; Simojima, K.; Yoshioka, V.

    1982-11-01

    In Japan it has recently become necessary to shorten the interphase spacing in overhead transmission lines because of land limitations and economical considerations. In this connection, the authors have attempted to analyze, in-depth, the possibilities of shortened interphase spacing via conductor swinging caused by wind effects: one of the important factors in the design of more compact overhead lines. This paper describes not only the investigative results of conductor swinging that were obtained both through computer simulation and in 3 years of full scale field line testing, but also design methodology for compact overhead lines based on these results.

  7. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, Kenneth L.; Siu, Bernard K.

    1996-01-01

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method.

  8. Method and system for evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a mating surface of a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Telschow, K.L.; Siu, B.K.

    1996-07-09

    A method of evaluating integrity of adherence of a conductor bond to a substrate includes: (a) impinging a plurality of light sources onto a substrate; (b) detecting optical reflective signatures emanating from the substrate from the impinged light; (c) determining location of a selected conductor bond on the substrate from the detected reflective signatures; (d) determining a target site on the selected conductor bond from the detected reflective signatures; (e) optically imparting an elastic wave at the target site through the selected conductor bond and into the substrate; (f) optically detecting an elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate resulting from the optically imparting step; and (g) determining integrity of adherence of the selected conductor bond to the substrate from the detected elastic wave signature emanating from the substrate. A system is disclosed which is capable of conducting the method. 13 figs.

  9. Improving the Transparency of IAEA Safeguards Reporting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher; Hayman, Aaron M.; Wyse, Evan T.; Odlaug, Christopher S.

    2011-07-17

    In 2008, the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) indicated that the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Safeguards Implementation Report (SIR) has not kept pace with the evolution of safeguards and provided the IAEA with a set of recommendations for improvement. The SIR is the primary mechanism for providing an overview of safeguards implementation in a given year and reporting on the annual safeguards findings and conclusions drawn by the Secretariat. As the IAEA transitions to State-level safeguards approaches, SIR reporting must adapt to reflect these evolutionary changes. This evolved report will better reflect the IAEA's transition to a more qualitative and information-driven approach, based upon State-as-a-whole considerations. This paper applies SAGSI's recommendations to the development of multiple models for an evolved SIR and finds that an SIR repurposed as a 'safeguards portal' could significantly enhance information delivery, clarity, and transparency. In addition, this paper finds that the 'portal concept' also appears to have value as a standardized information presentation and analysis platform for use by Country Officers, for continuity of knowledge purposes, and the IAEA Secretariat in the safeguards conclusion process. Accompanying this paper is a fully functional prototype of the 'portal' concept, built using commercial software and IAEA Annual Report data.

  10. Operator interface for vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  11. III-V/Si Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, Conductive Oxide Interlayers; Article No. 263904 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: III-VSi Wafer Bonding Using Transparent, ...

  12. Fabrication of anatase precipitated glass-ceramics possessing high transparency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masai, Hirokazu; Toda, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Takumi

    2009-04-13

    Transparent anatase precipitated glass-ceramics were fabricated using ZnO as a component. The particle size of precipitated anatase is several nanometers enough to possess high transparency. The preparation of the Bi-free transparent TiO{sub 2} glass-ceramic was attained by substitution of two different kinds of oxides for bismuth oxide. It is also noteworthy that we have demonstrated the crystallization of metastable anatase in the glass-ceramics as a main phase. The present bulk anatase glass-ceramics will open up an application field for a TiO{sub 2}-containing photocatalyst.

  13. Aluminum Stabilized NbTi Conductor Test Coil Design, Fabrication, and Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Lamm, M.; Makarov, A.; Tartaglia, M.; Nakamoto, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Tanaka, K.; Yamamoto, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2011-09-01

    A new generation of precision muon conversion experiments is planned at both Fermilab and KEK. These experiments will depend upon a complex set of solenoid magnets for the production, momentum selection and transport of a muon beam to a stopping target, and for tracking detector momentum analysis of candidate conversion electrons from the target. Baseline designs for the production and detector solenoids use NbTi cable that is heavily stabilized by an extruded high RRR aluminum jacket. A U.S.-Japan research collaboration has begun whose goal is to advance the development of optimized Al-NbTi conductors, gain experience with the technology of winding coils from this material, and test the conductor performance as modest length samples become available. For this purpose, a 'conductor test' solenoid with three coils was designed and built at Fermilab. A sample of the RIKEN Al-NbTi conductor from KEK was wound into a 'test' coil; this was sandwiched between two 'field' coils wound from doubled SSC cable, to increase the peak field on the RIKEN test coil. All three solenoid coils were epoxy impregnated, and utilized aluminum outer bandage rings to apply preload to the coils when cold. The design and fabrication details, and results of the magnet quench performance tests are presented and discussed.

  14. Mechanically stable, high aspect ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G.

    1987-01-01

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substantially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  15. Mixed ionic-electronic conductor-based radiation detectors and methods of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Conway, Adam; Beck, Patrick R; Graff, Robert T; Nelson, Art; Nikolic, Rebecca J; Payne, Stephen A; Voss, Lars; Kim, Hadong

    2015-04-07

    A method of fabricating a mixed ionic-electronic conductor (e.g. TlBr)-based radiation detector having halide-treated surfaces and associated methods of fabrication, which controls polarization of the mixed ionic-electronic MIEC material to improve stability and operational lifetime.

  16. Metal-free magnetic conductor substrates for placement-immune antenna assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eubanks, Travis Wayne; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob Jeremiah

    2015-09-29

    A magnetic conductor substrate produced for mounting to an antenna includes a sheet of dielectric lattice material having a length, a width and a thickness that is less than the length and less than the width. Within the sheet of dielectric lattice material is disposed an array of dielectric elements.

  17. TSF Interface Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-03-01

    A collection of packages of classes for interfacing to sparse and dense matrices, vectors and graphs, and to linear operators. TSF (via TSFCore, TSFCoreUtils and TSFExtended) provides the application programmer interface to any number of solvers, linear algebra libraries and preconditioner packages, providing also a sophisticated technique for combining multiple packages to solve a single problem. TSF provides a collection of abstract base classes that define the interfaces to abstract vector, matrix and linear soeratormore » objects. By using abstract interfaces, users of TSF are not limiting themselves to any one concrete library and can in fact easily combine multiple libraries to solve a single problem.« less

  18. Performance Application Programming Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-10-31

    PAPI is a programming interface designed to provide the tool designer and application engineer with a consistent interface and methodology for use of the performance counter hardware found in most major microprocessors. PAPI enables software engineers to see, in near real time, the relation between software performance and processor events. This release covers the hardware dependent implementation of PAPI version 3 for the IBM BlueGene/L (BG/L) system.

  19. TRANSIMS Interface Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transims TRANSIMS Interface Development TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling TRANSIMS Studio (Figure 1) has been developed by TRACC for the TRANSIMS community as part of the TRANSIMS Open Source project. It provides an integrated development environment (IDE) for TRANSIMS by combining a number of components that work seamlessly with each other. The visible part of the IDE is the graphical user interface (GUI) that allows

  20. Transparent Metal-Organic Framework/Polymer Mixed Matrix Membranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Metal-Organic FrameworkPolymer Mixed Matrix Membranes as Water Vapor Barriers Previous Next List Bae, Youn Jue; Cho, Eun Seon; Qu, Fen; Sun, Daniel T.; Williams, ...

  1. 15.02.10 RH Transparent Catalytic - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Catalytic Nickel Oxide Protecting Films for Photoanodes Sun, K. et al. Stable ... of 15-nm metallic Ni on quartz substrates Reprinted with permission from Sun, K. et al. ...

  2. New report offers best practice for transparent contract language...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare New report offers best practice for transparent contract language of PV O&M agreements HomeNews, News & Events, SolarNew ...

  3. Net Requirements Transparency Process for Slice/Block and Block...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 As part of its Net Requirements Transparency process, on July 31, 2013 BPA published the SliceBlock and Block customers' FY2012 and forecast FY2014 Total Retail Load (TRL) and...

  4. Slip casting nano-particle powders for making transparent ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard Lee; Hollingsworth, Joel P.

    2011-04-12

    A method of making a transparent ceramic including the steps of providing nano-ceramic powders in a processed or unprocessed form, mixing the powders with de-ionized water, the step of mixing the powders with de-ionized water producing a slurry, sonifing the slurry to completely wet the powder and suspend the powder in the de-ionized water, separating very fine particles from the slurry, molding the slurry, and curing the slurry to produce the transparent ceramic.

  5. Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program November 13, 2013 The U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program reduces nuclear risk by monitoring the conversion of 500 metric tons (MT) of Russian HEU, enough material for 20,000 nuclear weapons, into low enriched uranium (LEU). This LEU is put into peaceful use in the United States, generating nearly 10% of all U.S. electrical power. The HEU Purchase

  6. Transparent Gold as a Platform for Adsorbed Protein

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroelectrochemistry: Investigation of Cytochrome c and Azurin Transparent Gold as a Platform for Adsorbed Protein Spectroelectrochemistry: Investigation of Cytochrome c and Azurin Authors: Ashur, I., Schulz, O., McIntosh, C. L., Pinkas, I., Ros, R., and Jones, A. K. Title: Transparent Gold as a Platform for Adsorbed Protein Spectroelectrochemistry: Investigation of Cytochrome c and Azurin Source: Langmuir Year: 2012 Volume: 28 Pages: 5861-5871 ABSTRACT: The majority of protein

  7. High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryMetallic structures that can be used as transparent electrodes or to enhance the performance of solar cells or LEDs.DescriptionEfforts to develop new energy sources and more energy efficient devices has lead to

  8. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2009 MEMORANDUM FOR HEADS OF D E P A R T M m ELEMENTS FROM: DANIEL B. PONE SUBJECT: NEPA Process Transparency and Openness President Obama's memorandum on "Transparency and Open Government," issued in the very first hours of his presidency on January 2 1,2009, announced his commitment to creating an unprecedented level of openness in Government. The President specifically called on executive agency heads to make information about agency operations and decisions available to the

  9. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displays and Photovoltaic Cells | Argonne National Laboratory Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Technology available for licensing: New transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings are deposited using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Provides uniform coating of complex, 3D nanostructures such as electrodes for next-generation PV cells Improved coating precision uses less material and reduces cost PDF icon

  10. Transparency and damage tolerance of patternable omniphobic lubricated surfaces based on inverse colloidal monolayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, Nicolas; Belisle, Rebecca A.; Hatton, Benjamin; Wong, Tak-Sing; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-07-31

    A transparent coating that repels a wide variety of liquids, prevents staining, is capable of self-repair and is robust towards mechanical damage can have a broad technological impact, from solar cell coatings to self-cleaning optical devices. Here we employ colloidal templating to design transparent, nanoporous surface structures. A lubricant can be firmly locked into the structures and, owing to its fluidic nature, forms a defect-free, self-healing interface that eliminates the pinning of a second liquid applied to its surface, leading to efficient liquid repellency, prevention of adsorption of liquid-borne contaminants, and reduction of ice adhesion strength. We further show how this method can be applied to locally pattern the repellent character of the substrate, thus opening opportunities to spatially confine any simple or complex fluids. The coating is highly defect-tolerant due to its interconnected, honeycomb wall structure, and repellency prevails after the application of strong shear forces and mechanical damage. The regularity of the coating allows us to understand and predict the stability or failure of repellency as a function of lubricant layer thickness and defect distribution based on a simple geometric model.

  11. Transparency and damage tolerance of patternable omniphobic lubricated surfaces based on inverse colloidal monolayers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, Nicolas; Belisle, Rebecca A.; Hatton, Benjamin; Wong, Tak-Sing; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-07-31

    A transparent coating that repels a wide variety of liquids, prevents staining, is capable of self-repair and is robust towards mechanical damage can have a broad technological impact, from solar cell coatings to self-cleaning optical devices. Here we employ colloidal templating to design transparent, nanoporous surface structures. A lubricant can be firmly locked into the structures and, owing to its fluidic nature, forms a defect-free, self-healing interface that eliminates the pinning of a second liquid applied to its surface, leading to efficient liquid repellency, prevention of adsorption of liquid-borne contaminants, and reduction of ice adhesion strength. We further show howmore » this method can be applied to locally pattern the repellent character of the substrate, thus opening opportunities to spatially confine any simple or complex fluids. The coating is highly defect-tolerant due to its interconnected, honeycomb wall structure, and repellency prevails after the application of strong shear forces and mechanical damage. The regularity of the coating allows us to understand and predict the stability or failure of repellency as a function of lubricant layer thickness and defect distribution based on a simple geometric model.« less

  12. Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

    2000-01-27

    Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ``The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic

  13. NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    NEPA Success Stories: Celebrating 40 Years of Transparency and Open Government, Environmental Law Institute, 2010.

  14. High temperature interface superconductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gozar, A.; Bozovic, I.

    2016-01-20

    High-Tc superconductivity at interfaces has a history of more than a couple of decades. In this review we focus our attention on copper-oxide based heterostructures and multi-layers. We first discuss the technique, atomic layer-by-layer molecular beam epitaxy (ALL-MBE) engineering, that enabled High-Tc Interface Superconductivity (HT-IS), and the challenges associated with the realization of high quality interfaces. Then we turn our attention to the experiments which shed light on the structure and properties of interfacial layers, allowing comparison to those of single-phase films and bulk crystals. Both ‘passive’ hetero-structures as well as surface-induced effects by external gating are discussed. Here, wemore » conclude by comparing HT-IS in cuprates and in other classes of materials, especially Fe-based superconductors, and by examining the grand challenges currently laying ahead for the field.« less

  15. Profile Interface Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allowsmore » semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.« less

  16. Apparatus and method for measuring critical current properties of a coated conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M.; Haenisch, Jens

    2012-07-24

    The transverse critical-current uniformity in a superconducting tape was determined using a magnetic knife apparatus. A critical current I.sub.c distribution and transverse critical current density J.sub.c distribution in YBCO coated conductors was measured nondestructively with high resolution using a magnetic knife apparatus. The method utilizes the strong depression of J.sub.c in applied magnetic fields. A narrow region of low, including zero, magnetic field in a surrounding higher field is moved transversely across a sample of coated conductor. This reveals the critical current density distribution. A Fourier series inversion process was used to determine the transverse J.sub.c distribution in the sample.

  17. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lü, Xujie; Howard, John W.; Chen, Aiping; Zhu, Jinlong; Li, Shuai; Wu, Gang; Dowden, Paul; Xu, Hongwu; Zhao, Yusheng; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-02-02

    We prepared antiperovskite Li3OCl superionic conductor films via pulsed laser deposition using a composite target. A significantly enhanced ionic conductivity of 2.0 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature is achieved, and this value is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of its bulk counterpart. Moreover, the applicability of Li3OCl as a solid electrolyte for Li-ion batteries is demonstrated.

  18. Priority research areas to accelerate the development of practical ultraconductive copper conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dominic F.; Burwell, Malcolm; Stillman, H.

    2015-09-01

    This report documents the findings at an Ultraconductive Copper Strategy Meeting held on March 11, 2015 in Washington DC. The aim of this meeting was to bring together researchers of ultraconductive copper in the U.S. to identify and prioritize critical non-proprietary research activities that will enhance the understanding in the material and accelerate its development into practical conductors. Every effort has been made to ensure that the discussion and findings are accurately reported in this document.

  19. Heteroclite electrochemical stability of an I based Li7P2S8I superionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liu, Zengcai; Gobet, Mallory; Pilar, Kartik; Sahu, Gayatri; Greenbaum, Steve; Liang, Chengdu

    2015-01-01

    Stability from Instability: A Li7P2S8I solid state Li-ion conductor derived from -Li3PS4 and LiI demonstrates exceptional electrochemical stability. The oxidation instability of I is subverted nullified via its incorporation into the coordinated structure. The inclusion of I also creates stability with metallic Li anode while simultaneously improving the interfacial kinetics. Low temperature membrane processability enables facile fabrication of dense membranes, making it suitable for industrial adoption.

  20. Particle trap to sheath non-binding contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.

    1984-04-24

    A non-binding particle trap to outer sheath contact for use in gas insulated transmission lines having a corrugated outer conductor. The non-binding feature of the contact according to the teachings of the invention is accomplished by having a lever arm rotatably attached to a particle trap by a pivot support axis disposed parallel to the direction of travel of the inner conductor/insulator/particle trap assembly.

  1. Photochemistry at Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenthal, Kenneth B

    2015-02-24

    We have advanced our capabilities to investigate ultrafast excited state dynamics at a liquid interface using a pump to excite molecules to higher electronic states and then probe the subsequent time evolution of the interfacial molecules with femtosecond time delayed vibrational SFG.

  2. the EXFOR interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-03-10

    The x4i package is an interface to the EXFOR nuclear data library. It simplifies retrieval of EXFOR entries and can automatically parse them, allowing one to extract cross-section (and other) data in a simple, plot-able format. x4i also understands and can parse the entire reaction string, allowing one to build a strategy for processing the data

  3. FEMCAM Analysis of SULTAN Test Results for ITER Nb3SN Cable-conduit Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhu Zhai, Pierluigi Bruzzone, Ciro Calzolaio

    2013-03-19

    Performance degradation due to filament fracture of Nb3 Sn cable-in-conduit conductors (CICCs) is a critical issue in large-scale magnet designs such as ITER which is currently being constructed in the South of France. The critical current observed in most SULTAN TF CICC samples is significantly lower than expected and the voltage-current characteristic is seen to have a much broader transition from a single strand to the CICC. Moreover, most conductors exhibit the irreversible degradation due to filament fracture and strain relaxation under electromagnetic cyclic loading. With recent success in monitoring thermal strain distribution and its evolution under the electromagnetic cyclic loading from in situ measurement of critical temperature, we apply FEMCAM which includes strand filament breakage and local current sharing effects to SULTAN tested CICCs to study Nb3 Sn strain sensitivity and irreversible performance degradation. FEMCAM combines the thermal bending effect during cool down and the EM bending effect due to locally accumulating Lorentz force during magnet operation. It also includes strand filament fracture and related local current sharing for the calculation of cable n value. In this paper, we model continuous performance degradation under EM cyclic loading based on strain relaxation and the transition broadening upon cyclic loading to the extreme cases seen in SULTAN test data to better quantify conductor performance degradation.

  4. Surface-Plasmon Enhanced Transparent Electrodes in Organic Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly III, T. H.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Tenent, R. C.; Morfa, A. J.; Rowlen, K. L.

    2008-01-01

    Random silver nanohole films were created through colloidal lithography techniques and metal vapor deposition. The transparent electrodes were characterized by uv-visible spectroscopy and incorporated into an organic solar cell. The test cells were evaluated for solar power-conversion efficiency and incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency. The incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency spectra displayed evidence that a nanohole film with 92 nm diameter holes induces surface-plasmon-enhanced photoconversion. The nanohole silver films demonstrate a promising route to removing the indium tin oxide transparent electrode that is ubiquitous in organic optoelectronics.

  5. Thyra Abstract Interface Package

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-09-01

    Thrya primarily defines a set of abstract C++ class interfaces needed for the development of abstract numerical atgorithms (ANAs) such as iterative linear solvers, transient solvers all the way up to optimization. At the foundation of these interfaces are abstract C++ classes for vectors, vector spaces, linear operators and multi-vectors. Also included in the Thyra package is C++ code for creating concrete vector, vector space, linear operator, and multi-vector subclasses as well as other utilitiesmore » to aid in the development of ANAs. Currently, very general and efficient concrete subclass implementations exist for serial and SPMD in-core vectors and multi-vectors. Code also currently exists for testing objects and providing composite objects such as product vectors.« less

  6. Popeye Project: ROV interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scates, C.R.; Hickok, D.D.; Hernandez, D.A.

    1997-04-01

    The Popeye Project in the Gulf of Mexico helped advance the technology and standardization of ROV interfaces for deepwater subsea production systems. Some of the many successful ROV operations during installation and completion were {open_quotes}first-of-it`s-kind{close_quotes} activities-enabled by many technical advances. The use and reliance upon ROV systems for support of deepwater drilling and installation operations significantly increased in the past 10 years. Shell Offshore Inc.`s (SOI) confidence in this increased capability was an important factor in many of the design decisions which characterized the innovative system. Technology advancements, which depended on effective ROV intervention, were implemented with no significant difficulties. These advancements, in particular the flying leads and seabed position methods, are available to the industry for other deepwater subsea systems. In addition, several Popeye ROV interfaces have helped advance the subsea standardization initiative; e.g., hot stabs, torque-tool end effectors, and paint color.

  7. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  8. Transportation Storage Interface

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Future Extended Storage and Transportation Transportation-Storage Interface James Rubenstone Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 2012 ♦ Knoxville, Tennessee Overview * Changing policy environment * Regulatory framework-current and future * Extended storage and transportation-technical information needs * Next Steps 2 Current Policy Environment * U.S. national policy for disposition of spent

  9. Virtual button interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  10. Standard interface file handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.; Huria, H.C. )

    1992-10-01

    This handbook documents many of the standard interface file formats that have been adopted by the US Department of Energy to facilitate communications between and portability of, various large reactor physics and radiation transport software packages. The emphasis is on those files needed for use of the VENTURE/PC diffusion-depletion code system. File structures, contents and some practical advice on use of the various files are provided.

  11. Benchmarking and Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prepared for by the U.S. Department of Energy, this Handbook provides both a strategic planning framework and standard methodologies to determined the energy and non-energy benefits of benchmarking and transparency policies and programs that recently began to proliferate in jurisdiction across the United States.

  12. Radiation-transparent windows, method for imaging fluid transfers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming; Wang, Jin

    2011-07-26

    A thin, x-ray-transparent window system for environmental chambers involving pneumatic pressures above 40 bar is presented. The window allows for x-ray access to such phenomena as fuel sprays injected into a pressurized chamber that mimics realistic internal combustion engine cylinder operating conditions.

  13. New York City Benchmarking and Transparency Policy Impact Evaluation Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, this Report provides an understanding of both the approach and methodologies used to evaluate the New York City's benchmarking and transparency policy, Local Law 84, and the results of the application of those methodologies to the early period of the policy's implementation.

  14. Methods of fabricating a conductor assembly having a curvilinear arcuate shape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinke, Rainer [Melbourne, FL

    2011-08-23

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly along a curvilinear axis. The assembly may be of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In one example, the assembly includes a structure having a curved shape extending along the axis. A surface of the structure is positioned for formation of a channel along the curved shape. The structure is rotated about a second axis. While rotating the structure, a channel is formed in the surface that results in a helical shape in the structure. The channel extends both around and along the first axis.

  15. High current density electropolishing in the preparation of highly smooth substrate tapes for coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreiskott, Sascha; Matias, Vladimir; Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Bronisz, Lawrence E.

    2009-03-31

    A continuous process of forming a highly smooth surface on a metallic tape by passing a metallic tape having an initial roughness through an acid bath contained within a polishing section of an electropolishing unit over a pre-selected period of time, and, passing a mean surface current density of at least 0.18 amperes per square centimeter through the metallic tape during the period of time the metallic tape is in the acid bath whereby the roughness of the metallic tape is reduced. Such a highly smooth metallic tape can serve as a base substrate in subsequent formation of a superconductive coated conductor.

  16. Laparoscopic simulation interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    2006-04-04

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  17. Text-Alternative Version of TAP Webinar: Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript of the June TAP webinar, Measuring the Impact of Benchmarking & Transparency - Methodologies and the NYC Example.

  18. Subaward Reporting For Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Subaward Reporting For Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) Subaward Reporting For Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) The Federal Funding and Transparency Act of 2006 (FFATA) requires full disclosure of information on entities which received Federal funding from any Department at a single searchable web site. The purpose of FFATA is to provide total transparency to the public on how appropriated dollars are spent by the Federal

  19. Multiple network interface core apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Underwood, Keith D.; Hemmert, Karl Scott

    2011-04-26

    A network interface controller and network interface control method comprising providing a single integrated circuit as a network interface controller and employing a plurality of network interface cores on the single integrated circuit.

  20. Coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arendt, Paul N.; Foltyn, Stephen R.; Stan, Liliana; Usov, Igor O.; Wang, Haiyan

    2010-06-15

    Articles are provided including a base substrate having a layer of an IBAD oriented material thereon, and, a layer of barium-containing material selected from the group consisting of barium zirconate, barium hafnate, barium titanate, barium strontium titanate, barium dysprosium zirconate, barium neodymium zirconate and barium samarium zirconate, or a cubic metal oxide material selected from the group consisting of rare earth zirconates and rare earth hafnates upon the layer of an IBAD oriented material. Such articles can further include thin films of high temperature superconductive oxides such as YBCO upon the layer of barium-containing material selected from the group consisting of barium zirconate, barium hafnate, barium titanate, barium strontium titanate, barium dysprosium zirconate, barium neodymium zirconate and barium samarium zirconate, or a cubic metal oxide material selected from the group consisting of rare earth zirconates and rare earth hafnates.

  1. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Thermoelectrics Partnership: Automotive Thermoelectric Modules with Scalable Thermo- and Electro-Mechanical Interfaces Automotive ...

  2. Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N. Brawand, University of Chicago Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces ... Year: 2016 Research Domain: Materials Science The interfaces between solids, ...

  3. Life cycle cost study for coated conductor manufacture by electron beam and pulsed laser deposition systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, J.N.

    1999-04-14

    The results of this study establish a framework for evaluation of the cost impact of many performance parameters in coated conductor manufacturing systems. Since the cost and concepts are based on early developmental results and engineering judgment, the study should be updated periodically based on latest data to enhance its usefulness. The study should be expanded to include other promising processes under consideration or development for manufacture of coated conductors. Review of this study by as wide a group of experts from industry, national laboratories and universities as possible is desirable to facilitate improving accuracy of the estimates and communication on the issues involved. The results for the case of achieving the $10/kA-m goal at a J{sub c} of 10{sup 5} a/cm{sup 2} applicable to applications requiring a magnetic field perpendicular to the direction of current flow may be viewed as somewhat discouraging. However, there is ample margin for improvement due to continued development and engineering that could enable meeting the goal of $10/kA-m.

  4. Enhancing grain boundary ionic conductivity in mixed ionic–electronic conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Ye; Fang, Shumin; Su, Dong; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-10

    Mixed ionic–electronic conductors are widely used in devices for energy conversion and storage. Grain boundaries in these materials have nanoscale spatial dimensions, which can generate substantial resistance to ionic transport due to dopant segregation. Here, we report the concept of targeted phase formation in a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ–CoFe2O4 composite that serves to enhance the grain boundary ionic conductivity. Using transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy approaches, we probe the grain boundary charge distribution and chemical environments altered by the phase reaction between the two constituents. The formation of an emergent phase successfully avoids segregation of the Gd dopant and depletion of oxygen vacancies at the Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ–Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ grain boundary. This results in superior grain boundary ionic conductivity as demonstrated by the enhanced oxygen permeation flux. Lastly, this work illustrates the control of mesoscale level transport properties in mixed ionic–electronic conductor composites through processing induced modifications of the grain boundary defect distribution.

  5. Magnetization and critical currents of tin-core multifilamentary Nb sub 3 Sn conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, A.K.; Suenaga, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents critical current and magnetization data for some multifilamentary Nb{sub 3}Sn wires that have been produced by the internal-tin method. A comparison of magnetization and transport critical current measurements show that filament bridging during heat treatment is a common occurrence leading to effective filament diameters that are sometimes an order of magnitude larger than the geometrical filament size. At present, J{sub c}'s (in the non-copper region) greater than 1300 A/mm{sup 2} at 10T have been achieved in some conductors, which also exhibit high losses. Low losses have only been seen in conductors with a high local ratio of niobium to copper. Also the use of (Nb-1%Ti) alloy instead of pure Nb helps to reduce low field loss and increase high field J{sub c}. Measurements of the temperature dependence of hysteretic loss to 5T indicate that loss decreases linearly with increasing temperature. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in β-Li3PS4 fast Li+ conductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yan; Cai, Lu; Liu, Zengcai; dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-07-06

    Our letter reports the correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in the fast Li+ conductor β-Li3PS4, one of the low-symmetry crystalline electrolyte candidates. The material has both high conductivity and good stability that serves well for the large-scale energy storage applications of all-solid-state lithium ion batteries. The anisotropic physical properties, demonstrated here by the thermal expansion coefficients, are crucial for compatibility in the solid-state system and battery performance. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction measurements were done to determine the crystal structure and thermal stability. Moreover, the crystallographic b-axis was revealed as a fast expansion direction, while negligible thermal expansion wasmore » observed along the a-axis around the battery operating temperatures. The anisotropic behavior has its structural origin from the Li+ conduction channels with incomplete Li occupancy and a flexible connection of LiS4 and PS4 tetrahedra within the framework. This indicates a strong correlation in the direction of the ionic transport in the low-symmetry Li+ conductor.« less

  7. The Calculated and Measured Resistance for Splices between Conductors in a MICE Superconducting Coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Dietderich, Dan; Higley, Hugh; Pan, Heng; Tam, Darren; Trillaud, Federic; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Xu, Feng Yu

    2009-03-19

    The resistance of superconducting joints within MICE coils is an important issue particularly for the coupling coils. The MICE tracker solenoids have only two superconducting joints in the three spectrometer set (end coil 1, the center coil and end coil 2). The AFC magnets may have only a single joint within the coil. The coupling coils may have as many as fifteen joints within the coil, due to relatively short piece lengths of the superconductor. LBNL and ICST looked at three types of coil joints. They are: (1) cold fusion butt joints, (2) side-by-side lap joints, and (3) up-down lap joints. A theoretical calculation of the joint resistance was done at LBNL and checked by ICST. After looking at the theoretical resistance of the three types of joints, it was decided that the cold welded butt joint was not an attractive alternative for joints within a MICE superconducting magnet coil. Side-by-side and up-down lap joints were fabricated at ICST using two types of soft solder between the conductors. These conductor joints were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields. The joint resistance was compared with the theoretical calculations. Measurements of splice strength were also made at 300 K and 77 K.

  8. Enhancing grain boundary ionic conductivity in mixed ionic–electronic conductors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lin, Ye; Fang, Shumin; Su, Dong; Brinkman, Kyle S.; Chen, Fanglin

    2015-04-10

    Mixed ionic–electronic conductors are widely used in devices for energy conversion and storage. Grain boundaries in these materials have nanoscale spatial dimensions, which can generate substantial resistance to ionic transport due to dopant segregation. Here, we report the concept of targeted phase formation in a Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ–CoFe2O4 composite that serves to enhance the grain boundary ionic conductivity. Using transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy approaches, we probe the grain boundary charge distribution and chemical environments altered by the phase reaction between the two constituents. The formation of an emergent phase successfully avoids segregation of the Gd dopant and depletion of oxygen vacanciesmore » at the Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ–Ce0.8Gd0.2O2₋δ grain boundary. This results in superior grain boundary ionic conductivity as demonstrated by the enhanced oxygen permeation flux. Lastly, this work illustrates the control of mesoscale level transport properties in mixed ionic–electronic conductor composites through processing induced modifications of the grain boundary defect distribution.« less

  9. Composition for forming an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, John T.; Lewis, Linda A.

    2015-12-29

    A composition for producing an optically clear, well bonded superhydrophobic coating includes a plurality of hydrophobic particles comprising an average particle size of about 200 nm or less, a binder at a binder concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 0.5 wt. %, and a solvent. The hydrophobic particles may be present in the composition at a particle concentration of from about 0.1 wt. % to about 1 wt. %. An optically transparent, superhydrophobic surface includes a substrate, a plurality of hydrophobic particles having an average particle size of about 200 nm or less dispersed over the substrate, and a discontinuous binder layer bonding the hydrophobic particles to the substrate, where the hydrophobic particles and the binder layer form an optically transparent, superhydrophobic coating.

  10. 2005 Annual Health Physics Report for HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, R

    2006-04-21

    During the 2005 calendar year, LLNL provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program (HEU-TP) in external and internal radiation protection and technical expertise into matters related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2005, there were 161 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 161 person-trips, 149 person-trips were SMVs and 12 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. Additionally, there were 11 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 3 to UEIE itself. There were two monitoring visits (source changes) that were back to back with 16 monitors. Each of these concurring visits were treated as single person-trips for dosimetry purposes. Counted individually, there were 191 individual person-visits in 2005. The LLNL Safety Laboratories Division provided the dosimetry services for the HEU-TP monitors.

  11. Compound transparent ceramics and methods of preparation thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollingsworth, Joel P.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Soules, Thomas F.; Landingham, Richard L.

    2012-12-11

    According to one embodiment, a method for forming a composite transparent ceramic preform includes forming a first suspension of oxide particles in a first solvent which includes a first dispersant but does not include a gelling agent, adding the first suspension to a first mold of a desired shape, and uniformly curing the first suspension in the first mold until stable. The method also includes forming a second suspension of oxide particles in a second solvent which includes a second dispersant but does not include a gelling agent, adding the second suspension to the stable first suspension in a second mold of a desired shape encompassing the first suspension and the second suspension, and uniformly curing the second suspension in the second mold until stable. Other methods for forming a composite transparent ceramic preform are also described according to several other embodiments. Structures are also disclosed.

  12. A novel approach to Hugoniot measurements utilizing transparent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratanduono, D. E.; Eggert, J. H.; Akin, M. C.; Chau, R.; Holmes, N. C.

    2013-01-01

    A new absolute equation of state measurement technique is described and demonstrated measuring the shock state and the refractive index of MgO up to 226GPa. This technique utilizes steady shock waves and the high-pressure transparency of MgO under dynamic shock compression and release. Hugoniot measurements performed using this technique are consistent with the previous measurements. A linear dependence of the shocked refractive index and density is observed up to 226GPa, over a magnitude greater in pressure that previous studies. The transparency of MgO along the principal Hugoniot is higher than any other material reported to date. We observe a significant change in the refractive index of MgO as the Hugoniot elastic limit is exceeded due to the transition from uniaxial to hydrostatic strain. Measurements of the elastic-plastic two-wave structure in MgO indicate a nucleation time for plastic deformation.

  13. Human-computer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Thomas G.

    2004-12-21

    The present invention provides a method of human-computer interfacing. Force feedback allows intuitive navigation and control near a boundary between regions in a computer-represented space. For example, the method allows a user to interact with a virtual craft, then push through the windshield of the craft to interact with the virtual world surrounding the craft. As another example, the method allows a user to feel transitions between different control domains of a computer representation of a space. The method can provide for force feedback that increases as a user's locus of interaction moves near a boundary, then perceptibly changes (e.g., abruptly drops or changes direction) when the boundary is traversed.

  14. Benchmarking & Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Transparency Policy and Program Impact Evaluation Handbook May 2015 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy by Navigant Consulting, Inc.and Steven Winter Associates, Inc. (This page intentionally left blank) Acknowledgments The authors wish to thank and acknowledge several organizations and individuals for their contributions to this impact evaluation handbook. Thanks are due to the following staff members of New York City's Offce of Long-term Planning and Sustainability and the Seattle

  15. Electromagnetically induced transparency with a partially standing drive field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Matsko, Andrey B.; Yu, Nan

    2007-11-15

    We study electromagnetically induced transparency in a vacuum rubidium atomic cell and show that reflected drive radiation results in the reshaping and shift of dark resonance. We show that those effects are connected with (i) Bragg reflection of the probe radiation in optically thick atomic coherent medium modulated by the standing-wave drive field, as well as with (ii) quantum interference enhanced absorption of the probe radiation in four-level N-configuration formed due to the reflected drive field.

  16. High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search High Aspect Ratio Metallic Structures for Use as Transparent Electrodes Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Polymer-based photovoltaic devices have received intense interest in recent years because of their potential to provide low-cost solar energy conversion, flexibility, manufacturability, and light weight. However, the efficiency of organic solar

  17. Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displays and Photovoltaic Cells - Energy Innovation Portal Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Precise Application of Transparent Conductive Oxide Coatings for Flat Panel Displays and Photovoltaic Cells Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p align="center"> New <em>ALD reaction chamber containing 12-in x 12-in piece of plate glass</em></p> New ALD reaction

  18. Method and apparatus for fabrication of high gradient insulators with parallel surface conductors spaced less than one millimeter apart

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA); Decker, Derek E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Optical patterns and lithographic techniques are used as part of a process to embed parallel and evenly spaced conductors in the non-planar surfaces of an insulator to produce high gradient insulators. The approach extends the size that high gradient insulating structures can be fabricated as well as improves the performance of those insulators by reducing the scale of the alternating parallel lines of insulator and conductor along the surface. This fabrication approach also substantially decreases the cost required to produce high gradient insulators.

  19. Interface-assisted molecular spintronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raman, Karthik V.

    2014-09-15

    Molecular spintronics, a field that utilizes the spin state of organic molecules to develop magneto-electronic devices, has shown an enormous scientific activity for more than a decade. But, in the last couple of years, new insights in understanding the fundamental phenomena of molecular interaction on magnetic surfaces, forming a hybrid interface, are presenting a new pathway for developing the subfield of interface-assisted molecular spintronics. The recent exploration of such hybrid interfaces involving carbon based aromatic molecules shows a significant excitement and promise over the previously studied single molecular magnets. In the above new scenario, hybridization of the molecular orbitals with the spin-polarized bands of the surface creates new interface states with unique electronic and magnetic character. This study opens up a molecular-genome initiative in designing new handles to functionalize the spin dependent electronic properties of the hybrid interface to construct spin-functional tailor-made devices. Through this article, we review this subject by presenting a fundamental understanding of the interface spin-chemistry and spin-physics by taking support of advanced computational and spectroscopy tools to investigate molecular spin responses with demonstration of new interface phenomena. Spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectroscopy is favorably considered to be an important tool to investigate these hybrid interfaces with intra-molecular spatial resolution. Finally, by addressing some of the recent findings, we propose novel device schemes towards building interface tailored molecular spintronic devices for applications in sensor, memory, and quantum computing.

  20. Seebeck Effects in N-Type and P-Type Polymers Driven Simultaneously by Surface Polarization and Entropy Differences Based on Conductor/Polymer/Conductor Thin-Film Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Dehua; Liu, Qing; Tisdale, Jeremy; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Wang, Hsin; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-15

    This paper reports Seebeck effects driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference by using intramolecular charge-transfer states in n-type and p-type conjugated polymers, namely IIDT and IIDDT, based on vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices. Large Seebeck coefficients of -898 V/K and 1300 V/K from are observed from n-type IIDT p-type IIDDT, respectively, when the charge-transfer states are generated by a white light illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Simultaneously, electrical conductivities are increased from almost insulating states in dark condition to conducting states under photoexcitation in both n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices. We find that the intramolecular charge-transfer states can largely enhance Seebeck effects in the n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference. Furthermore, the Seebeck effects can be shifted between polarization and entropy regimes when electrical conductivities are changed. This reveals a new concept to develop Seebeck effects by controlling polarization and entropy regimes based on charge-transfer states in vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices.

  1. Seebeck Effects in N-Type and P-Type Polymers Driven Simultaneously by Surface Polarization and Entropy Differences Based on Conductor/Polymer/Conductor Thin-Film Devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Dehua; Liu, Qing; Tisdale, Jeremy; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Wang, Hsin; Urbas, Augustine; Hu, Bin

    2015-04-15

    This paper reports Seebeck effects driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference by using intramolecular charge-transfer states in n-type and p-type conjugated polymers, namely IIDT and IIDDT, based on vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices. Large Seebeck coefficients of -898 V/K and 1300 V/K from are observed from n-type IIDT p-type IIDDT, respectively, when the charge-transfer states are generated by a white light illumination of 100 mW/cm2. Simultaneously, electrical conductivities are increased from almost insulating states in dark condition to conducting states under photoexcitation in both n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices. We find that the intramolecular charge-transfer states canmore » largely enhance Seebeck effects in the n-type IIDT and p-type IIDDT devices driven by both surface polarization difference and entropy difference. Furthermore, the Seebeck effects can be shifted between polarization and entropy regimes when electrical conductivities are changed. This reveals a new concept to develop Seebeck effects by controlling polarization and entropy regimes based on charge-transfer states in vertical conductor/polymer/conductor thin-film devices.« less

  2. ENGINEERED ELECTRODES AND ELECTRODE-ORGANIC INTERFACES FOR HIGH-EFFICIENCY ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin J. Marks; R.P.H. Chang; Tom Mason; Ken Poeppelmeier; Arthur J. Freeman

    2008-11-13

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer the ultimate promise of low cost, readily manufacturable, and durable solar power. While recent advances have led to cells with impressive performance levels, OPV cells have yet to break the double-digit efficiency barrier. Further gains in efficiency and durability, to that competitive with high-performance inorganic photovoltaics will require breakthroughs in transparent electrode and interfacial materials science and engineering. This project involved an integrated basic research effort carried out by an experienced and highly collaborative interdisciplinary team to address in unconventional ways, critical electrode-interfacial issues underlying OPV performance--controlling band offsets between transparent electrodes and organics, addressing current loss/leakage problems at interfaces, enhancing adhesion, interfacial stability, and device durability while minimizing cost. It synergistically combined materials and interfacial reagent synthesis, nanostructural and photovoltaic characterization, and high level quantum theory. The research foci were: 1) understanding of/development of superior transparent electrode materials and materials morphologies--i.e., better matched electronically and chemically to organic active layers, 2) understanding-based development of inorganic interfacial current-collecting/charge-blocking layers, and 3) understanding-based development of self-assembled adhesion/current-collecting/charge-blocking/cross-linking layers for high-efficiency OPV interfaces. Pursing the goal of developing the fundamental scientific understanding needed to design, fabricate, prototype and ultimately test high-efficiency OPV cells incorporating these new concepts, we achieved a record power conversion efficiency of 5.2% for an organic bulk-heterjunction solar cell.

  3. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ha, Tae-Jun

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  4. Mechanically stable, high-aspect-ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, J.G.

    1982-03-15

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor is described having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substnatially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  5. Formation of multiple levels of porous silicon for buried insulators and conductors in silicon device technologies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blewer, Robert S.; Gullinger, Terry R.; Kelly, Michael J.; Tsao, Sylvia S.

    1991-01-01

    A method of forming a multiple level porous silicon substrate for semiconductor integrated circuits including anodizing non-porous silicon layers of a multi-layer silicon substrate to form multiple levels of porous silicon. At least one porous silicon layer is then oxidized to form an insulating layer and at least one other layer of porous silicon beneath the insulating layer is metallized to form a buried conductive layer. Preferably the insulating layer and conductive layer are separated by an anodization barrier formed of non-porous silicon. By etching through the anodization barrier and subsequently forming a metallized conductive layer, a fully or partially insulated buried conductor may be fabricated under single crystal silicon.

  6. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinke, Rainer

    2011-08-09

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  7. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinke, Rainer

    2013-08-20

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  8. Method of reducing multipole content in a conductor assembly during manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meinke, Rainer

    2016-05-24

    A method for manufacture of a conductor assembly. The assembly is of the type which, when conducting current, generates a magnetic field or in which, in the presence of a changing magnetic field, a voltage is induced. In an example embodiment one or more first coil rows are formed. The assembly has multiple coil rows about an axis with outer coil rows formed about inner coil rows. A determination is made of deviations from specifications associated with the formed one or more first coil rows. One or more deviations correspond to a magnitude of a multipole field component which departs from a field specification. Based on the deviations, one or more wiring patterns are generated for one or more second coil rows to be formed about the one or more first coil rows. The one or more second coil rows are formed in the assembly. The magnitude of each multipole field component that departs from the field specification is offset.

  9. Transparent ceramic photo-optical semiconductor high power switches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werne, Roger W.; Sullivan, James S.; Landingham, Richard L.

    2016-01-19

    A photoconductive semiconductor switch according to one embodiment includes a structure of sintered nanoparticles of a high band gap material exhibiting a lower electrical resistance when excited by light relative to an electrical resistance thereof when not exposed to the light. A method according to one embodiment includes creating a mixture comprising particles, at least one dopant, and at least one solvent; adding the mixture to a mold; forming a green structure in the mold; and sintering the green structure to form a transparent ceramic. Additional system, methods and products are also presented.

  10. Nuclear transparency from quasielastic 12C(e,e'p)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rohe; O. Benhar; C.S. Armstrong; R. Asaturyan; O.K. Baker; S. Bueltmann; C. Carasco; D. Day; R. Ent; H.C. Fenker; K. Garrow; A. Gasparian; P. Gueye; M. Hauger; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; C.E. Keppel; G. Kubon; R. Lindgren; A. Lung; D.J. Mack; J.H. Mitchell; H. Mkrtchyan; D. Mocelj; K. Normand; T. Petitjean; O. Rondon; E. Segbefia; I. Sick; S. Stepanyan; L. Tang; F. Tiefenbacher; W.F. Vulcan; G. Warren; S.A. Wood; L. Yuan; M. Zeier; H. Zhu; B. Zihlmann

    2005-11-01

    We studied the reaction 12C(e,e'p) in quasielastic kinematics at momentum transfers between 0.6 and 1.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} covering the single-particle region. From this the nuclear transparency factors are extracted using two methods. The results are compared to theoretical predictions obtained using a generalization of Glauber theory described in this paper. Furthermore, the momentum distribution in the region of the 1s-state up to momenta of 300 MeV/c is obtained from the data and compared to the Correlated Basis Function theory and the Independent-Particle Shell model.

  11. Rapid process for producing transparent, monolithic porous glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-14

    A process for making transparent porous glass monoliths from gels. The glass is produced much faster and in much larger sizes than present technology for making porous glass. The process reduces the cost of making large porous glass monoliths because: 1) the process does not require solvent exchange nor additives to the gel to increase the drying rates, 2) only moderate temperatures and pressures are used so relatively inexpensive equipment is needed, an 3) net-shape glass monoliths are possible using this process. The process depends on the use of temperature to control the partial pressure of the gel solvent in a closed vessel, resulting in controlled shrinking during drying.

  12. Electromagnetically induced transparency with quantized fields in optocavity mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Sumei; Agarwal, G. S.

    2011-04-15

    We report electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using quantized fields in optomechanical systems. The weak probe field is a narrowband squeezed field. We present a homodyne detection of EIT in the output quantum field. We find that the EIT dip exists even though the photon number in the squeezed vacuum is at the single-photon level. The EIT with quantized fields can be seen even at temperatures on the order of 100 mK, thus paving the way for using optomechanical systems as memory elements.

  13. Nanoparticle Assemblies at Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Thomas P.

    2015-03-10

    A systematic study of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticles (NP) and NP-surfactants was performed. The ligands attached to both the NPs and NP-surfactants dictate the manner in which the nanoscopic materials assemble at fluid interfaces. Studies have shown that a single layer of the nanoscpic materials form at the interface to reduce the interactions between the two immiscible fluids. The shape of the NP is, also, important, where for spherical particles, a disordered, liquid-like monolayer forms, and, for nanorods, ordered domains at the interface is found and, if the monolayers are compressed, the orientation of the nanorods with respect to the interface can change. By associating end-functionalized polymers to the NPs assembled at the interface, NP-surfactants are formed that increase the energetic gain in segregating each NP at the interface which allows the NP-surfactants to jam at the interface when compressed. This has opened the possibility of structuring the two liquids by freezing in shape changes of the liquids.

  14. Sandia ATM SONET Interface Logic

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-07-21

    SASIL is used to program the EPLD's (Erasable Programmable Logic Devices) and PAL's (Programmable Array Logic) that make up a large percentage of the Sandia ATM SONET Interface (OC3 version) for the INTEL Paragon.

  15. OpenEI Community - interface

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    at www.bhfs.com BHFS and are starting to develop mock-ups for the new and improved GRR web interface. We are thrilled to have had so much feedback and input from all of...

  16. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness Under the new policy, each Program and Field Office (including the National Nuclear Security Administration and the Power Marketing Administrations) will document and post online all categorical exclusion determinations involving classes of actions listed in Appendix B of the Department's NEPA implementing procedures, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021. DOE Policy on NEPA Process Transparency and Openness

  17. Characterization of transparent zinc oxide films prepared by electrochemical reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaki, Masanobu; Omi, Takashi

    1997-06-01

    Transparent zinc oxide (ZnO) films have been grown by galvanostatic cathodic deposition onto conductive glasses from a simple aqueous zinc nitrate electrolyte maintained at 335 K. The as-deposited ZnO films were characterized with Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical transmission and absorption studies, and measurement of sheet resistivity as a function of cathodic current density. The ZnO films prepared had a wurtzite structure and exhibited an optical bandgap energy of 3.3 eV which is characteristic of ZnO. At a low cathodic current density of 0.05 mA/cm{sup 2}, ZnO films with excellent electrical characteristics have been obtained. A 2 {micro}m thick ZnO film with an optical transmittance of 72% was deposited by electrolysis for approximately 20 min at a cathodic current density of 10 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  18. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F.

    1985-06-18

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  19. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F.

    1986-04-08

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  20. Transparent electrical conducting films by activated reactive evaporation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunshah, Rointan; Nath, Prem

    1982-01-01

    Process and apparatus for producing transparent electrical conducting thin films by activated reactive evaporation. Thin films of low melting point metals and alloys, such as indium oxide and indium oxide doped with tin, are produced by physical vapor deposition. The metal or alloy is vaporized by electrical resistance heating in a vacuum chamber, oxygen and an inert gas such as argon are introduced into the chamber, and vapor and gas are ionized by a beam of low energy electrons in a reaction zone between the resistance heater and the substrate. There is a reaction between the ionized oxygen and the metal vapor resulting in the metal oxide which deposits on the substrate as a thin film which is ready for use without requiring post deposition heat treatment.

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency in paraffin-coated vapor cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.; Hohensee, M.; Walsworth, R. L. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Phillips, D. F. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Antirelaxation coatings in atomic vapor cells allow ground-state coherent spin states to survive many collisions with the cell walls. This reduction in the ground-state decoherence rate gives rise to ultranarrow-bandwidth features in electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) spectra, which can form the basis of, for example, long-time scale slow and stored light, sensitive magnetometers, and precise frequency standards. Here we study, both experimentally and theoretically, how Zeeman EIT contrast and width in paraffin-coated rubidium vapor cells are determined by cell and laser-beam geometry, laser intensity, and atomic density. Using a picture of Ramsey pulse sequences, where atoms alternately spend ''bright'' and ''dark'' time intervals inside and outside the laser beam, we explain the behavior of EIT features in coated cells, highlighting their unique characteristics and potential applications.

  2. Transparent bulk-size nanocomposites with high inorganic loading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shi; Gaume, Romain

    2015-12-14

    With relatively high nanoparticle loading in polymer matrices, hybrid nanocomposites made by colloidal dispersion routes suffer from severe inhomogeneous agglomeration, a phenomenon that deteriorates light transmission even when the refractive indices of the inorganic and organic phases are closely matched. The dispersion of particles in a matrix is of paramount importance to obtain composites of high optical quality. Here, we describe an innovative, yet straightforward method to fabricate monolithic transparent hybrid nanocomposites with very high particle loading and high refractive index mismatch tolerance between the inorganic and organic constituents. We demonstrate 77% transmission at 800 nm in a 2 mm-thick acrylate polymer nanocomposite containing 61 vol. % CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles. Modeling shows that similar performance could easily be obtained with various inorganic phases relevant to a number of photonic applications.

  3. Optically transparent, scratch-resistant, diamond-like carbon coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Ming; Lee, Deok-Hyung; Nastasi, Michael A.; Walter, Kevin C.; Tuszewski, Michel G.

    2003-06-03

    A plasma-based method for the deposition of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings is described. The process uses a radio-frequency inductively coupled discharge to generate a plasma at relatively low gas pressures. The deposition process is environmentally friendly and scaleable to large areas, and components that have geometrically complicated surfaces can be processed. The method has been used to deposit adherent 100-400 nm thick DLC coatings on metals, glass, and polymers. These coatings are between three and four times harder than steel and are therefore scratch resistant, and transparent to visible light. Boron and silicon doping of the DLC coatings have produced coatings having improved optical properties and lower coating stress levels, but with slightly lower hardness.

  4. Hot Superplastic Powder Forging for Transparent nanocrystalline Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, W. Roger

    2006-05-22

    The program explored a completely new, economical method of manufacturing nanocrystalline ceramics, Hot Superplastic Powder Forging (HSPF). The goal of the work was the development of nanocrystalline/low porosity optically transparent zirconia/alumina. The high optical transparency should result from lack of grain boundary scattering since grains will be smaller than one tenth the wavelength of light and from elimination of porosity. An important technological potential for this process is manufacturing of envelopes for high-pressure sodium vapor lamps. The technique for fabricating monolithic nanocrystalline material does not begin with powder whose particle diameter is <100 nm as is commonly done. Instead it begins with powder whose particle diameter is on the order of 10-100 microns but contains nanocrystalline crystallites <<100 nm. Spherical particles are quenched from a melt and heat treated to achieve the desired microstructure. Under a moderate pressure within a die or a mold at temperatures of 1100C to 1300C densification is by plastic flow of superplastic particles. A nanocrystalline microstructure results, though some features are greater than 100nm. It was found, for instance, that in the fully dense Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic specimens that a bicontinuous microstructure exists containing <100 nm ZrO2 particles in a matrix of Al2O3 grains extending over 1-2 microns. Crystallization, growth, phase development and creep during hot pressing and forging were studied for several compositions and so provided some details on development of polycrystalline microstructure from heating quenched ceramics.

  5. Particle trap to sheath contact for a gas-insulated transmission line having a corrugated outer conductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, William H.; Cookson, Alan H.; Yoon, Kue H.

    1984-04-10

    A particle trap to outer elongated conductor or sheath contact for gas-insulated transmission lines. The particle trap to outer sheath contact of the invention is applicable to gas-insulated transmission lines having either corrugated or non-corrugated outer sheaths. The contact of the invention includes an electrical contact disposed on a lever arm which in turn is rotatably disposed on the particle trap and biased in a direction to maintain contact between the electrical contact and the outer sheath.

  6. Optimum coil shape for a given volume of conductor to obtain maximum central field in an air core solenoid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, P.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is an expansion of engineering notes prepared in 1961 to address the question of how to wind circular coils so as to obtain the maximum axial field with the minimum volume of conductor. At the time this was a germain question because of the advent of superconducting wires which were in very limited supply, and the rapid push for generation of very high fields, with little concern for uniformity.

  7. Broad Temperature Pinning Study of 15 mol.% Zr-Added (Gd, Y)-Ba-Cu-O MOCVD Coated Conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, AX; Khatri, N; Liu, YH; Majkic, G; Galstyan, E; Selvamanickam, V; Chen, YM; Lei, CH; Abraimov, D; Hu, XB; Jaroszynski, J; Larbalestier, D

    2015-06-01

    BaZrO3 (BZO) nanocolumns have long been shown to be very effective for raising the pinning force F-p of REBa2Cu3Ox (REBCO, where RE = rare earth) films at high temperatures and recently at low temperatures too. We have successfully incorporated a high density of BZO nanorods into metal organic chemical vapor deposited (MOCVD) REBCO coated conductors via Zr addition. We found that, compared to the 7.5% Zr-added coated conductor, dense BZO nanorod arrays in the 15% Zr-added conductor are effective over the whole temperature range from 77 K down to 4.2 K. We attribute the substantially enhanced J(c) at 30 K to the weak uncorrelated pinning as well as the strong correlated pinning. Meanwhile, by tripling the REBCO layer thickness to similar to 2.8 mu m, the engineering critical current density J(e) at 30 K exceeds J(e) of optimized Nb-Ti wires at 4.2 K.

  8. Microstructure Characteristics of High Lift Factor MOCVD REBCO Coated Conductors With High Zr Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galstyan, E; Gharahcheshmeh, MH; Delgado, L; Xu, AX; Majkic, G; Selvamanickam, V

    2015-06-01

    We report the microstructural characteristics of high levels of Zr-added REBa2Cu3O7-x (RE = Gd, Y rare earth) coated conductors fabricated by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). The enhancements of the lift factor defined as a ratio of the in-field (3 T, B parallel to c-axis) critical current density (J(c)) at 30 K and self-field J(c) at 77 K have been achieved for Zr addition levels of 20 and 25 mol% via optimization of deposition parameters. The presence of strong flux pinning is attributed to the aligned nanocolumns of BaZrO3 and nanoprecipitates embedded in REBa2Cu3O7-x matrix with good crystal quality. A high density of BZO nanorods with a typical size 6-8 nm and spacing of 20 nm has been observed. Moreover, the high Zr content was found to induce a high density of intrinsic defects, including stacking faults and dislocations. The correlation between in-field performance along the c-axis and microstructure of (Gd, Y) BCO film with a high level of Zr addition is discussed.

  9. Nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connectors and method of connecting electrical conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Powell, J. G.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear qualified in-containment electrical connection comprises an insulated, sheathed instrument lead having electrical conductors extending from one end thereof to provide two exposed lead wires, a watertight cable having electrical conducting wires therein and extending from one end of the cable to provide two lead wires therefrom, two butt splice connectors each connecting the ends of respective ones of the lead wires from the instrument lead and cable, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing positioned over each butt splice connector and an adjacent portion of a respective lead wire from the cable and heat shrunk into position, a length of heat shrinkable plastic tubing on the end portion of the instrument lead adjacent the lead wires therefrom and heat shrunk thereon and a length of outer heat shrinkable plastic tubing extending over the end portion of the instrument lead and the heat shrinkable tubing thereon and over the butt splice connectors and a portion of the cable adjacent the cable lead lines, the outer heat shrinkable tubing being heat shrunk into sealing position on the instrument lead and cable.

  10. Multi-robot control interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J.; Walton, Miles C.

    2011-12-06

    Methods and systems for controlling a plurality of robots through a single user interface include at least one robot display window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot display window illustrating one or more conditions of a respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes at least one robot control window for each of the plurality of robots with the at least one robot control window configured to receive one or more commands for sending to the respective one of the plurality of robots. The user interface further includes a multi-robot common window comprised of information received from each of the plurality of robots.

  11. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxide during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.

  12. PinBus Interface Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Adgerson, Jewel D.; Sastry, Chellury; Pratt, Richard M.; Pratt, Robert G.

    2009-12-30

    On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, PNNL has explored and expanded upon a simple control interface that might have merit for the inexpensive communication of smart grid operational objectives (demand response, for example) to small electric end-use devices and appliances. The approach relies on bi-directional communication via the electrical voltage states of from one to eight shared interconnection pins. The name PinBus has been suggested and adopted for the proposed interface protocol. The protocol is defined through the presentation of state diagrams and the pins functional definitions. Both simulations and laboratory demonstrations are being conducted to demonstrate the elegance and power of the suggested approach. PinBus supports a very high degree of interoperability across its interfaces, allowing innumerable pairings of devices and communication protocols and supporting the practice of practically any smart grid use case.

  13. Nanofluidic interfaces in microfluidic networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Millet, Larry J.; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Retterer, Scott T.

    2015-09-24

    The integration of nano- and microfluidic technologies enables the construction of tunable interfaces to physical and biological systems across relevant length scales. The ability to perform chemical manipulations of miniscule sample volumes is greatly enhanced through these technologies and extends the ability to manipulate and sample the local fluidic environments at subcellular, cellular and community or tissue scales. Here we describe the development of a flexible surface micromachining process for the creation of nanofluidic channel arrays integrated within SU-8 microfluidic networks. The use of a semi-porous, silicon rich, silicon nitride structural layer allows rapid release of the sacrificial silicon dioxidemore » during the nanochannel fabrication. Nanochannel openings that form the interface to biological samples are customized using focused ion beam milling. The compatibility of these interfaces with on-chip microbial culture is demonstrated.« less

  14. Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Solar Cells | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Sorted Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films for Transparent Electrodes in Organic Solar Cells

  15. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  16. Fully transparent organic transistors with junction-free metallic network electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, Ke; Wang, Zongrong; Ren, Xiaochen; Zhang, Zhichao; Peng, Boyu; Chan, Paddy K. L.

    2015-07-20

    We utilize highly transparent, junction-free metal network electrodes to fabricate fully transparent organic field effect transistors (OFETs). The patterned transparent Ag networks are developed by polymer crack template with adjustable line width and density. Sheet resistance of the network is 6.8 Ω/sq and optical transparency in the whole visible range is higher than 80%. The bottom contact OFETs with DNTT active layer and parylene-C dielectric insulator show a maximum field-effect mobility of 0.13 cm{sup 2}/V s (average mobility is 0.12 cm{sup 2}/V s) and on/off ratio is higher than 10{sup 7}. The current OFETs show great potential for applications in the next generation of transparent and flexible electronics.

  17. An analysis of the pull strength behaviors of fine-pitch, flip chip solder interconnections using a Au-Pt-Pd thick film conductor on Low-Temperature, Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC) substrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, Fernando R.; Kilgo, Alice C.; Grazier, John Mark; Vianco, Paul Thomas; Zender, Gary L.; Hlava, Paul Frank; Rejent, Jerome Andrew

    2008-09-01

    The assembly of the BDYE detector requires the attachment of sixteen silicon (Si) processor dice (eight on the top side; eight on the bottom side) onto a low-temperature, co-fired ceramic (LTCC) substrate using 63Sn-37Pb (wt.%, Sn-Pb) in a double-reflow soldering process (nitrogen). There are 132 solder joints per die. The bond pads were gold-platinum-palladium (71Au-26Pt-3Pd, wt.%) thick film layers fired onto the LTCC in a post-process sequence. The pull strength and failure modes provided the quality metrics for the Sn-Pb solder joints. Pull strengths were measured in both the as-fabricated condition and after exposure to thermal cycling (-55/125 C; 15 min hold times; 20 cycles). Extremely low pull strengths--referred to as the low pull strength phenomenon--were observed intermittently throughout the product build, resulting in added program costs, schedule delays, and a long-term reliability concern for the detector. There was no statistically significant correlation between the low pull strength phenomenon and (1) the LTCC 'sub-floor' lot; (2) grit blasting the LTCC surfaces prior to the post-process steps; (3) the post-process parameters; (4) the conductor pad height (thickness); (5) the dice soldering assembly sequence; or (5) the dice pull test sequence. Formation of an intermetallic compound (IMC)/LTCC interface caused by thick film consumption during either the soldering process or by solid-state IMC formation was not directly responsible for the low-strength phenomenon. Metallographic cross sections of solder joints from dice that exhibited the low pull strength behavior, revealed the presence of a reaction layer resulting from an interaction between Sn from the molten Sn-Pb and the glassy phase at the TKN/LTCC interface. The thick film porosity did not contribute, explicitly, to the occurrence of reaction layer. Rather, the process of printing the very thin conductor pads was too sensitive to minor thixotropic changes to ink, which resulted in

  18. Technique for converting non-conforming hexahedral-to-hexahedral interfaces into conforming interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staten, Matthew L.; Shepherd, Jason F.; Ledoux, Frank; Shimada, Kenji; Merkley, Karl G.; Carbonera, Carlos

    2013-03-05

    A technique for conforming an interface between a first mesh and a second mesh is disclosed. A first interface surface in the first mesh and a second interface surface in the second mesh residing along the interface are identified. The first and second interface surfaces are initially non-conforming along the interface. Chords within the first and second interface surfaces that fall within a threshold separation distance of each other are paired. Sheets having chords that reside within the first or second interface surfaces are recursively inserted into or extracted from one or both of the first and second meshes until all remaining chords within the first interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the second interface surface and all remaining chords within the second interface surface are paired with corresponding chords in the first interface surface.

  19. Processing of transparent polycrystalline AlON:Ce3+ scintillators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Ching -Fong; Yang, Pin; King, Graham; Tegtmeier, Eric L.

    2015-10-23

    A new polycrystalline ceramic scintillator is reported for potential use in radiation detection and medical imaging applications. The goal was to develop cerium-activated aluminum oxynitride (AlON:Ce3+) ceramics, which can be produced using ceramic processes in comparison to the high-cost, low-yield single-crystal growth technique. A phase pure AlON:Ce3+ powder with cubic symmetry was successfully synthesized at high temperature under a reducing atmosphere to convert Ce4+ to Ce3+ in the solid solution. We explored two different activator concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol%). Fully dense and transparent AlON:Ce3+ ceramics were produced by a liquid-phase-assisted pressureless sintering. The crystal field splitting around the Ce3+more » activator in the AlON was comparable to the splitting induced by Br₋ and the Cl₋ ligands, which produced an emission spectrum perfectly matching the maximum quantum efficiency range of the photomultiplier tube for radiation detection. Both optical excitation and radiation ionizations in AlON:Ce3+ were demonstrated. Lastly, challenges and mechanisms related to the radioluminescence efficiency are discussed.« less

  20. High-performance, transparent conducting oxides based on cadmium stannate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, T.J.; Wu, X.; Mulligan, W.P.; Webb, J.M.

    1996-06-01

    We discuss the modeling of thin films of transparent conducting oxides and we compare the predictions with the observed properties of cadmium stannate. Thin films of this material were deposited using radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The Drude free-carrier model is used to model the optical and electrical properties. The model demonstrates the need for high mobilities. The free-carrier absorbance in the visible spectrum is used as a comparative figure-of-merit for cadmium stannate and tin oxide. This shows that free-carrier absorbance is much less in cadmium stannate than in tin oxide. X-ray diffraction shows that annealed films consist of a single-phase spinel structure. The post-deposition annealing sequence is shown to be crucial to forming a single phase, which is vital for optimal optical and electrical properties. The films are typically high mobility (up to 65 cm{sup 2}V{sup -1}s{sup -1}) and have carrier concentrations as high as 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. Resistivities are as low as 1.3 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm, the lowest values reported for cadmium stannate. Atomic force microscopy indicates that the root-mean-square surface roughness is approximately {+-}15A. Cadmium stannate etches readily in both hydrofluoric and hydrochloric acid, which is a commanding advantage over tin oxide. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  1. Electromagnetically induced transparency resonances inverted in magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargsyan, A.; Sarkisyan, D. E-mail: david@ipr.sci.am; Pashayan-Leroy, Y.; Leroy, C.; Cartaleva, S.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Auzinsh, M.

    2015-12-15

    The phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is investigated in a Λ-system of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 1} line in an external transverse magnetic field. Two spectroscopic cells having strongly different values of the relaxation rates γ{sub rel} are used: an Rb cell with antirelaxation coating (L ∼ 1 cm) and an Rb nanometric- thin cell (nanocell) with a thickness of the atomic vapor column L = 795 nm. For the EIT in the nanocell, we have the usual EIT resonances characterized by a reduction in the absorption (dark resonance (DR)), whereas for the EIT in the Rb cell with an antirelaxation coating, the resonances demonstrate an increase in the absorption (bright resonances (BR)). We suppose that such an unusual behavior of the EIT resonances (i.e., the reversal of the sign from DR to BR) is caused by the influence of an alignment process. The influence of alignment strongly depends on the configuration of the coupling and probe frequencies as well as on the configuration of the magnetic field.

  2. Interface Control Document for the Interface between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, Alexandre; Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Nunoya, Yoshihiko

    2011-06-01

    This document provides the interface definition and interface control between the Central Solenoid Insert Coil and the Central Solenoid Model Coil Test Facility in Japan.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of water interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Q.

    1994-12-01

    The second order nonlinear optical processes of second harmonic generation and sum frequency generation are powerful and versatile tools for studying all kinds of surfaces. They possess unusual surface sensitivity due to the symmetry properties of the second order nonlinear susceptibility. The technique of infrared-visible sum frequency generation (SFG) is particularly attractive because it offers a viable way to do vibrational spectroscopy on any surfaces accessible to light with submonolayer sensitivity. In this thesis, the author applies SFG to study a number of important water interfaces. At the air/water interface, hydrophobic solid/water and liquid/water interfaces, it was found that approximately 25% of surface water molecules have one of their hydrogen pointing away from the liquid water. The large number of unsatisfied hydrogen bonds contributes significantly to the large interfacial energy of the hydrophobic surfaces. At the hydrophilic fused quartz/water interface and a fatty acid monolayer covered water surface, the structure and orientation of surface water molecules are controlled by the hydrogen bonding of water molecules with the surface OH groups and the electrostatic interaction with the surface field from the ionization of surface groups. A change of pH value in the bulk water can significantly change the relative importance of the two interactions and cause a drastic change in orientation of the surface water molecules. SFG has also been applied to study the tribological response of some model lubricant films. Monolayers of Langmuir-Blodgett films were found to disorder orientationaly under mildly high pressure and recover promptly upon removal of the applied pressure.

  4. getnim - NIM's Command Line Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    getnim command getnim - NIM's Command Line Interface This page describes the inquiry-only command called getnim that users can use interactively and in scripts to get their account balances. GETNIM(l) NERSC GETNIM(l) NAME getnim - query the NERSC banking database for remaining allocation, resources and repository information SYNOPSIS getnim [ options ] -Rrname or getnim [ options ] -Rrname { -uuid | -Uuname } or getnim [ options ][ -D ] { -uuid | -Uuname } or getnim [ options ] -Rrname { -l | -L

  5. Electronic structure of Al-doped ZnO transparent conductive thin films studied by x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, W. H.; Sun, S. J.; Chiou, J. W.; Chou, H.; Chan, T. S.; Lin, H.-J.; Kumar, Krishna; Guo, J.-H.

    2011-11-15

    This study used O K-, Zn L{sub 3}-, Zn K-, and Al K-edges x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and O K-edge x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements to investigate the electronic structure of transparent Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin film conductors. The samples were prepared on glass substrates at a low temperature near 77 K by using a standard RF sputtering method. High-purity Ne (5N) was used as the sputtering gas. The crystallography of AZO thin films gradually transformed from the ZnO wurtize structure to an amorphous structure during sample deposition, which suggests the suitability to grow on flexible substrates, eliminating the severe degradation due to fragmentation by repeated bending. The O K- and Zn L{sub 3}-edges XANES spectra of AZO thin films revealed a decrease in the number of both O 2p and Zn 3d unoccupied states when the pressure of Ne was increased from 5 to 100 mTorr. In contrast, Al K-edges XANES spectra showed that the number of unoccupied states of Al 3p increased in conjunction with the pressure of Ne, indicating an electron transfer from Al to O atoms, and suggesting that Al doping increases the negative effective charge of oxygen ions. XES and XANES spectra of O 2p states at the O K-edge also revealed that Al doping not only raised the conduction-band-minimum, but also increased the valence-band-maximum and the band-gap. The results indicate that the reduction in conductivity of AZO thin films is due to the generation of ionic characters, the increase in band-gap, and the decrease in density of unoccupied states of oxygen.

  6. INL Multi-Robot Control Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Multi-Robot Control Interface controls many robots through a single user interface. The interface includes a robot display window for each robot showing the robot’s condition. More than one window can be used depending on the number of robots. The user interface also includes a robot control window configured to receive commands for sending to the respective robot and a multi-robot common window showing information received from each robot.

  7. Transparent building-integrated PV modules. Phase 1: Comprehensive report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-09-28

    This Comprehensive Report encompasses the activities that have been undertaken by Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with Energy Photovoltaics, Incorporated (EPV), to develop a flexible patterning system for thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules for building applications. There are two basic methods for increasing transparency/light transmission by means of patterning the PV film: widening existing scribe lines, or scribing a second series of lines perpendicular to the first. These methods can yield essentially any degree of light transmission, but both result in visible patterns of light and dark on the panel surface. A third proposed method is to burn a grid of dots through the films, independent of the normal cell scribing. This method has the potential to produce a light-transmitting panel with no visible pattern. Ornamental patterns at larger scales can be created using combinations of these techniques. Kiss + Cathcart, Architects, in conjunction with EPV are currently developing a complementary process for the large-scale lamination of thin-film PVs, which enables building integrated (BIPV) modules to be produced in sizes up to 48 in. x 96 in. Flexible laser patterning will be used for three main purposes, all intended to broaden the appeal of the product to the building sector: To create semitransparent thin-film modules for skylights, and in some applications, for vision glazing.; to create patterns for ornamental effects. This application is similar to fritted glass, which is used for shading, visual screening, graphics, and other purposes; and to allow BIPV modules to be fabricated in various sizes and shapes with maximum control over electrical characteristics.

  8. The new geospatial tools: global transparency enhancing safeguards verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pabian, Frank Vincent

    2010-09-16

    This paper focuses on the importance and potential role of the new, freely available, geospatial tools for enhancing IAEA safeguards and how, together with commercial satellite imagery, they can be used to promote 'all-source synergy'. As additional 'open sources', these new geospatial tools have heralded a new era of 'global transparency' and they can be used to substantially augment existing information-driven safeguards gathering techniques, procedures, and analyses in the remote detection of undeclared facilities, as well as support ongoing monitoring and verification of various treaty (e.g., NPT, FMCT) relevant activities and programs. As an illustration of how these new geospatial tools may be applied, an original exemplar case study provides how it is possible to derive value-added follow-up information on some recent public media reporting of a former clandestine underground plutonium production complex (now being converted to a 'Tourist Attraction' given the site's abandonment by China in the early 1980s). That open source media reporting, when combined with subsequent commentary found in various Internet-based Blogs and Wikis, led to independent verification of the reporting with additional ground truth via 'crowdsourcing' (tourist photos as found on 'social networking' venues like Google Earth's Panoramio layer and Twitter). Confirmation of the precise geospatial location of the site (along with a more complete facility characterization incorporating 3-D Modeling and visualization) was only made possible following the acquisition of higher resolution commercial satellite imagery that could be correlated with the reporting, ground photos, and an interior diagram, through original imagery analysis of the overhead imagery.

  9. Magnetic transparent conducting oxide film and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Windisch, Jr., Charles F.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2004-07-13

    Cobalt-nickel oxide films of nominal 100 nm thickness, and resistivity as low as 0.06 .OMEGA..multidot.cm have been deposited by spin-casting from both aqueous and organic precursor solutions followed by annealing at 450.degree. C. in air. Films deposited on sapphire substrates exhibit a refractive index of about 1.7 and are relatively transparent in the wavelength region from 0.6 to 10.0 .mu.m. They are also magnetic. The electrical and spectroscopic properties of the oxides have been studied as a function of x=Co/(Co+Ni) ratio. An increase in film resistivity was found upon substitution of other cations (e.g., Zn.sup.2+, Al.sup.3+) for Ni in the spinel structure. However, some improvement in the mechanical properties of the films resulted. On the other hand, addition of small amounts of Li decreased the resistivity. A combination of XRD, XPS, UV/Vis and Raman spectroscopy indicated that NiCo.sub.2 O.sub.4 is the primary conducting component and that the conductivity reaches a maximum at this stoichiometry. When x<0.67, NiO forms leading to an increase in resistivity; when x>0.67, the oxide was all spinel but the increased Co content lowered the conductivity. The influence of cation charge state and site occupancy in the spinel structure markedly affects calculated electron band structures and contributes to a reduction of p-type conductivity, the formation of polarons, and the reduction in population of mobile charge carriers that tend to limit transmission in the infrared.

  10. Transportation Storage Interface | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Storage Interface Transportation Storage Interface Regulation of Future Extended Storage and Transportation. Transportation Storage Interface (891.2 KB) More Documents & Publications Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel Status Update: Extended Storage and Transportation Waste Confidence Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel

  11. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  12. GC Commits to Transparency on Nuclear Waste Fund Fee Adequacy Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consistent with the Administration's commitment to transparency, DOE General Counsel Scott Blake Harris has decided that all future determinations as to the adequacy of the Nuclear Waste Fund fee...

  13. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore » color transparency effects.« less

  14. The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pumped Solid State Laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Use of Large Transparent Ceramics in a High Powered, Diode Pumped Solid State Laser You are accessing ...

  15. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore »color transparency effects.« less

  16. Atomistic simulation study of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a transparent overlayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim; Wu, Chengping; Zhigilei, Leonid V.; Lin, Zhibin; Hainsey, Robert F.

    2014-05-14

    The distinct characteristics of short pulse laser interactions with a metal target under conditions of spatial confinement by a solid transparent overlayer are investigated in a series of atomistic simulations. The simulations are performed with a computational model combining classical molecular dynamics (MD) technique with a continuum description of the laser excitation, electron-phonon equilibration, and electronic heat transfer based on two-temperature model (TTM). Two methods for incorporation of the description of a transparent overlayer into the TTM-MD model are designed and parameterized for Ag-silica system. The material response to the laser energy deposition is studied for a range of laser fluences that, in the absence of the transparent overlayer, covers the regimes of melting and resolidification, photomechanical spallation, and phase explosion of the overheated surface region. In contrast to the irradiation in vacuum, the spatial confinement by the overlayer facilitates generation of sustained high-temperature and high-pressure conditions near the metal-overlayer interface, suppresses the generation of unloading tensile wave, decreases the maximum depth of melting, and prevents the spallation and explosive disintegration of the surface region of the metal target. At high laser fluences, when the laser excitation brings the surface region of the metal target to supercritical conditions, the confinement prevents the expansion and phase decomposition characteristic for the vacuum conditions leading to a gradual cooling of the hot compressed supercritical fluid down to the liquid phase and eventual solidification. The target modification in this case is limited to the generation of crystal defects and the detachment of the metal target from the overlayer.

  17. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form OHMIC contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    A method of improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurim-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact.

  18. Use of separate ZnTe interface layers to form ohmic contacts to p-CdTe films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gessert, T.A.

    1999-06-01

    A method of is disclosed improving electrical contact to a thin film of a p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor comprising: depositing a first undoped layer of ZnTe on a thin film of p-type tellurium containing II-VI semiconductor with material properties selected to limit the formation of potential barriers at the interface between the p-CdTe and the undoped layer, to a thickness sufficient to control diffusion of the metallic-doped ZnTe into the p-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor, but thin enough to minimize affects of series resistance; depositing a second heavy doped p-type ZnTe layer to the first layer using an appropriate dopant; and depositing an appropriate metal onto the outer-most surface of the doped ZnTe layer for connecting an external electrical conductor to an ohmic contact. 11 figs.

  19. Low-Cost, Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Material | Department of Energy Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica Material Low-Cost, Haziness-Free, Transparent Insulation Based On a Porous Silica Material Image of porous silica material in alcohol.<br /> Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Image of porous silica material in alcohol. Photo credit: Oak Ridge National Lab Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partner: VELUX Design and Development Company USA Inc., Greenwood, SC DOE

  20. Method for producing high carrier concentration p-Type transparent conducting oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li, Xiaonan; Yan, Yanfa; Coutts, Timothy J.; Gessert, Timothy A.; Dehart, Clay M.

    2009-04-14

    A method for producing transparent p-type conducting oxide films without co-doping plasma enhancement or high temperature comprising: a) introducing a dialkyl metal at ambient temperature and a saturated pressure in a carrier gas into a low pressure deposition chamber, and b) introducing NO alone or with an oxidizer into the chamber under an environment sufficient to produce a metal-rich condition to enable NO decomposition and atomic nitrogen incorporation into the formed transparent metal conducting oxide.

  1. Interface solitons in thermal nonlinear media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Xuekai; Yang Zhenjun; Lu Daquan; Hu Wei

    2011-05-15

    We demonstrate the existence of fundamental and dipole interface solitons in one-dimensional thermal nonlinear media with a step in linear refractive index. Fundamental interface solitons are found to be always stable and the stability of dipole interface solitons depends on the difference in linear refractive index. The mass center of interface solitons always locates in the side with higher refractive index. The two intensity peaks of dipole interface solitons are unequal except under some specific conditions, which is different from their counterparts in uniform thermal nonlinear media.

  2. Surface rheology and interface stability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaklin, Melissa A.; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Walker, Lynn; Koehler, Timothy P.; Reichert, Matthew D.; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Brooks, Carlton, F.

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a mature laboratory at Sandia to measure interfacial rheology, using a combination of home-built, commercially available, and customized commercial tools. An Interfacial Shear Rheometer (KSV ISR-400) was modified and the software improved to increase sensitivity and reliability. Another shear rheometer, a TA Instruments AR-G2, was equipped with a du Nouey ring, bicone geometry, and a double wall ring. These interfacial attachments were compared to each other and to the ISR. The best results with the AR-G2 were obtained with the du Nouey ring. A Micro-Interfacial Rheometer (MIR) was developed in house to obtain the much higher sensitivity given by a smaller probe. However, it was found to be difficult to apply this technique for highly elastic surfaces. Interfaces also exhibit dilatational rheology when the interface changes area, such as occurs when bubbles grow or shrink. To measure this rheological response we developed a Surface Dilatational Rheometer (SDR), in which changes in surface tension with surface area are measured during the oscillation of the volume of a pendant drop or bubble. All instruments were tested with various surfactant solutions to determine the limitations of each. In addition, foaming capability and foam stability were tested and compared with the rheology data. It was found that there was no clear correlation of surface rheology with foaming/defoaming with different types of surfactants, but, within a family of surfactants, rheology could predict the foam stability. Diffusion of surfactants to the interface and the behavior of polyelectrolytes were two subjects studied with the new equipment. Finally, surface rheological terms were added to a finite element Navier-Stokes solver and preliminary testing of the code completed. Recommendations for improved implementation were given. When completed we plan to use the computations to better interpret the experimental data and account for the effects of the underlying bulk

  3. Improved open-circuit voltage in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells with high work function transparent electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jäger, Timo Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Reinhard, Patrick; Steinhauser, Jérôme; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.; Schwenk, Johannes

    2015-06-14

    Hydrogenated indium oxide (IOH) is implemented as transparent front contact in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells, leading to an open circuit voltage V{sub OC} enhanced by ∼20 mV as compared to reference devices with ZnO:Al (AZO) electrodes. This effect is reproducible in a wide range of contact sheet resistances corresponding to various IOH thicknesses. We present the detailed electrical characterization of glass/Mo/CIGS/CdS/intrinsic ZnO (i-ZnO)/transparent conductive oxide (TCO) with different IOH/AZO ratios in the front TCO contact in order to identify possible reasons for the enhanced V{sub OC}. Temperature and illumination intensity-dependent current-voltage measurements indicate that the dominant recombination path does not change when AZO is replaced by IOH, and it is mainly limited to recombination in the space charge region and at the junction interface of the solar cell. The main finding is that the introduction of even a 5 nm-thin IOH layer at the i-ZnO/TCO interface already results in a step-like increase in V{sub OC}. Two possible explanations are proposed and verified by one-dimensional simulations using the SCAPS software. First, a higher work function of IOH as compared to AZO is simulated to yield an V{sub OC} increase by 21 mV. Second, a lower defect density in the i-ZnO layer as a result of the reduced sputter damage during milder sputter-deposition of IOH can also add to a maximum enhanced V{sub OC} of 25 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proper choice of the front TCO contact can reduce the parasitic recombination and boost the efficiency of CIGS cells with improved corrosion stability.

  4. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung -Geun; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  5. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung -Geun; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this study, we describe an oxide/oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr₀̣.₂Ti₀.₈O₃-LaNiO₃ where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, inmore » one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7 eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.« less

  6. Conduction at a ferroelectric interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Matthew S. J.; Malashevich, Andrei; Disa, Ankit S.; Han, Myung-Guen; Chen, Hanghui; Zhu, Yimei; Ismail-Beigi, Sohrab; Walker, Frederick J.; Ahn, Charles H.

    2014-11-05

    Typical logic elements utilizing the field effect rely on the change in carrier concentration due to the field in the channel region of the device. Ferroelectric-field-effect devices provide a nonvolatile version of this effect due to the stable polarization order parameter in the ferroelectric. In this work, we describe an oxide/ oxide ferroelectric heterostructure device based on (001)-oriented PbZr??.?Ti?.?O?-LaNiO? where the dominant change in conductivity is a result of a significant mobility change in the interfacial channel region. The effect is confined to a few atomic layers at the interface and is reversible by switching the ferroelectric polarization. More interestingly, in one polarization state, the field effect induces a 1.7-eV shift of the interfacial bands to create a new conducting channel in the interfacial PbO layer of the ferroelectric.

  7. Fabrication of Transparent Capacitive Structure by Self-Assembled Thin Films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Q.; Shing, Y. J.; Hua, Feng; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Matson, Dean W.

    2008-06-01

    An approach to fabricating transparent electronic devices by using nanomaterial and nanofabrication is presented in this paper. A see-through capacitor is constructed from selfassembled silica nanoparticle layers that are stacked on the transparent substrate. The electrodes are made of indium tin oxide. Unlike the traditional processes used to fabricate such devices, the self-assembly approach enables one to synthesize the thin film layers at lower temperature and cost, and with a broader availability of nanomaterials. The vertical dimension of the selfassembled thin films can be precisely controlled, as well as the molecular order in the thin film layers. The shape of the capacitor is generated by planar micropatterning. The quartz crystal demonstrates the steady growth of the silica nanoparticle multilayer. In addition, because the nanomaterial synthesis and the device fabrication steps are separate, the device is not affected by the harsh conditions required for the material synthesis. A clear pattern is allowed over a large area on the substrate. The prepared capacitive structure has an optical transparency higher than 92% over the visible spectrum. The capacitive impedance is measured at different frequencies and fit the theoretical results. As one of the fundamental components, this type of capacitive structure can serve in the transparent circuits, interactive media and sensors, as well as being applicable to other transparent devices.

  8. Flexible feature interface for multimedia sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coffland, Douglas R.

    2009-06-09

    A flexible feature interface for multimedia sources system that includes a single interface for the addition of features and functions to multimedia sources and for accessing those features and functions from remote hosts. The interface utilizes the export statement: export "C" D11Export void FunctionName(int argc, char ** argv,char * result, SecureSession *ctrl) or the binary equivalent of the export statement.

  9. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design andmore » fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions-able to operate in harsh, changing environments-not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. In conclusion, with nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials-as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state-may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.« less

  10. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinthal, Alison; Aizenberg, Joanna

    2013-10-14

    Life creates some of its most robust, extreme surface materials not from solids but from liquids: a purely liquid interface, stabilized by underlying nanotexture, makes carnivorous plant leaves ultraslippery, the eye optically perfect and dirt-resistant, our knees lubricated and pressure-tolerant, and insect feet reversibly adhesive and shape-adaptive. Novel liquid surfaces based on this idea have recently been shown to display unprecedented omniphobic, self-healing, anti-ice, antifouling, optical, and adaptive properties. In this Perspective, we present a framework and a path forward for developing and designing such liquid surfaces into sophisticated, versatile multifunctional materials. Drawing on concepts from solid materials design and fluid dynamics, we outline how the continuous dynamics, responsiveness, and multiscale patternability of a liquid surface layer can be harnessed to create a wide range of unique, active interfacial functions-able to operate in harsh, changing environments-not achievable with static solids. We discuss how, in partnership with the underlying substrate, the liquid surface can be programmed to adaptively and reversibly reconfigure from a defect-free, molecularly smooth, transparent interface through a range of finely tuned liquid topographies in response to environmental stimuli. In conclusion, with nearly unlimited design possibilities and unmatched interfacial properties, liquid materials-as long-term stable interfaces yet in their fully liquid state-may potentially transform surface design everywhere from medicine to architecture to energy infrastructure.

  11. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Teng, H. Henry PI, The George Washington University PI, The George...

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies of electrified interfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    increased understanding of electrolyteelectrode interfaces, including the electric ... of ion distributions, solvents, and electrode surfaces and therefore cannot be used in ...

  13. NETL Research: Energy and Water Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water and Energy Interface Water and energy are inextricably linked. Because thermoelectric generation and fossil fuel extraction can impact water resources, it is critically...

  14. NanoBio Interfaces | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interfaces Group develops and utilizes hybrid nanomaterials that are not found in nature but that are inspired by nature's principles. Natural systems adopt a large degree of...

  15. NETL Research: Energy and Water Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water and Energy Interface Water and energy are inextricably linked. Because thermoelectric generation and fossil fuel extraction can impact water resources, it is critically ...

  16. Computational Design of Interfaces for Photovoltaics | Argonne...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Design of Interfaces for Photovoltaics PI Name: Noa Marom PI Email: nmarom@tulane.edu Institution: Tulane University Allocation Program: ALCC Allocation Hours at...

  17. Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and...

  18. Application Programming Interface | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    web interface, without compromising the security or anonymity of the database. The API enables the sharing of content and data between applications, meaning that third party web ...

  19. Method for sputtering a PIN amorphous silicon semi-conductor device having partially crystallized P and N-layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moustakas, Theodore D.; Maruska, H. Paul

    1985-07-09

    A high efficiency amorphous silicon PIN semiconductor device having partially crystallized (microcrystalline) P and N layers is constructed by the sequential sputtering of N, I and P layers and at least one semi-transparent ohmic electrode. The method of construction produces a PIN device, exhibiting enhanced electrical and optical properties, improved physical integrity, and facilitates the preparation in a singular vacuum system and vacuum pump down procedure.

  20. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting conductor on round core cables in magnetic fields up to 20 T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Laan, D. C.; Noyes, P. D.; Miller, G. E.; Weijers, H. W.; Willering, G. P.

    2013-02-13

    The next generation of high-ï¬eld magnets that will operate at magnetic ï¬elds substantially above 20 T, or at temperatures substantially above 4.2 K, requires high-temperature superconductors (HTS). Conductor on round core (CORC) cables, in which RE-Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (RE = rare earth) (REBCO) coated conductors are wound in a helical fashion on a flexible core, are a practical and versatile HTS cable option for low-inductance, high-field magnets. We performed the first tests of CORC magnet cables in liquid helium in magnetic fields of up to 20 T. A record critical current I{sub c} of 5021 A was measured at 4.2 K and 19 T. In a cable with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm, this value corresponds to an engineering current density J{sub e} of 114 A mm{sup -2} , the highest J{sub e} ever reported for a superconducting cable at such high magnetic fields. Additionally, the first magnet wound from an HTS cable was constructed from a 6 m-long CORC cable. The 12-turn, double-layer magnet had an inner diameter of 9 cm and was tested in a magnetic field of 20 T, at which it had an I{sub c} of 1966 A. The cables were quenched repetitively without degradation during the measurements, demonstrating the feasibility of HTS CORC cables for use in high-field magnet applications.

  1. Transparent, near-infrared organic photovoltaic solar cells for window and energy-scavenging applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunt, Richard R; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2011-03-14

    We fabricate near-infrared absorbing organic photovoltaics that are highly transparent to visible light. By optimizing near-infrared optical-interference, we demonstrate power efficiencies of 1.3±0.1% with simultaneous average visible transmission of >65% . Subsequent incorporation of near-infrared distributed-Bragg-reflector mirrors leads to an increase in the efficiency to 1.7±0.1% , approaching the 2.4±0.2% efficiency of the opaque cell, while maintaining high visible-transparency of >55% . Finally, we demonstrate that a series-integrated array of these transparent cells is capable of powering electronic devices under near-ambient lighting. This architecture suggests strategies for high-efficiency power-generating windows and highlights an application uniquely benefiting from excitonic electronics.

  2. Portable NDA Equipment for Enrichment Measurements in the HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decman, D J; Bandong, B B; Wong, J L; Valentine, J D; Luke, S J

    2008-06-02

    The Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program has used portable nondestructive assay (NDA) equipment to measure the {sup 235}U enrichment of material subject to the transparency agreement since 1997. The equipment is based on the 'enrichment meter' method and uses low-resolution sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors. Although systems using high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors can produce more accurate results we have found that the results with NaI(Tl) detectors are quite adequate for the requirements of the transparency agreement. This paper will describe the details of the equipment's operation, calibration, testing, and deployment in Russia. We will also provide a comparison of the units originally deployed in 1997 with the upgraded systems that were deployed in 2003.

  3. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; et al

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-costmore » and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.« less

  4. Transparent ultralow-density silica aerogels prepared by a two-step sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tillotson, T.M.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1991-09-01

    Conventional silica sol-gel chemistry is limited for the production of transparent ultralow-density aerogels because (1) gelation is either slow or unachievable, and (2) even when gelation is achieved, the large pore sizes result in loss of transparency for aerogels <.020 g/cc. We have developed a two-step sol-gel process that circumvents the limitations of the conventional process and allows the formation of ultralow-density gels in a matter of hours. we have found that the gel time is dependent on the catalyst concentration. After supercritical extraction, the aerogels are transparent, uncracked tiles with densities as low as .003 g/cc. 6 figs., 11 refs.

  5. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing, between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.

  6. Spray-on anti-soiling coatings that exhibit high transparency and mechanical durability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaeffer, Daniel A; Polyzos, Georgios; Smith, Barton; Lee, Dominic F; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panos G; Hunter, Scott Robert

    2014-01-01

    A superhydrophobic (SH) surface has many characteristics, one of which is its self-cleaning, anti-soiling functionality, that are desirable across various industries. A transparent, self-cleaning surface utilizes the right combination of surface chemistry and roughness that force water droplets to form high water contact angles (CA). This in turn allows droplets to easily roll off and pick up dirt and debris across the surface. In theory this is simple but in practice this can be very difficult as superhydrophobicity and optical transparency are competitive. We have developed a simple, spray-on coating based on functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles that can easily be applied to surfaces whose application requires high transparency including, but not limited to, optical sensors, photovoltaics, sights, and lenses. In addition, these coatings exhibit practical mechanical and environmental durability that allow prolonged use of the coatings in harsh environments.

  7. Atomic-Layer-Deposited Transparent Electrodes for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Demaurex, Benedicte; Seif, Johannes P.; Smit, Sjoerd; Macco, Bart; Kessels, W. M.; Geissbuhler, Jonas; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-11-01

    We examine damage-free transparent-electrode deposition to fabricate high-efficiency amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells. Such solar cells usually feature sputtered transparent electrodes, the deposition of which may damage the layers underneath. Using atomic layer deposition, we insert thin protective films between the amorphous silicon layers and sputtered contacts and investigate their effect on device operation. We find that a 20-nm-thick protective layer suffices to preserve, unchanged, the amorphous silicon layers beneath. Insertion of such protective atomic-layer-deposited layers yields slightly higher internal voltages at low carrier injection levels. However, we identify the presence of a silicon oxide layer, formed during processing,more » between the amorphous silicon and the atomic-layer-deposited transparent electrode that acts as a barrier, impeding hole and electron collection.« less

  8. Proposal for broader United States-Russian transparency of nuclear arms reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Percival, C.M.; Ingle, T.H.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1995-07-01

    During the January 1994 Summit Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin agreed on the goal of ensuring the ``transparency and irreversibility`` of the nuclear arms reduction process. As a result, negotiations are presently underway between the United States Government and the Russian Federation to confirm the stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium removed from nuclear weapons. In December 1994 the United States presented a paper to the Russian Federation proposing additional measures to provide broader transparency of nuclear arms reduction. The US Department of Energy is studying the implementation of these broader transparency measures at appropriate DOE facilities. The results of the studies include draft protocols for implementation, assessments of the implementation procedures and the impacts on the facilities and estimates of the cost to implement these measures at various facilities.

  9. Semi-transparent perovskite solar cells for tandems with silicon and CIGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailie, Colin D.; Christoforo, M. Greyson; Mailoa, Jonathan P.; Bowring, Andrea R.; Unger, Eva L.; Nguyen, William H.; Burschka, Julian; Pellet, Norman; Lee, Jungwoo Z.; Grätzel, Michael; Noufi, Rommel; Buonassisi, Tonio; Salleo, Alberto; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-12-23

    A promising approach for upgrading the performance of an established low-bandgap solar technology without adding much cost is to deposit a high bandgap polycrystalline semiconductor on top to make a tandem solar cell. We use a transparent silver nanowire electrode on perovskite solar cells to achieve a semi-transparent device. We place the semi-transparent cell in a mechanically-stacked tandem configuration onto copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and low-quality multicrystalline silicon (Si) to achieve solid-state polycrystalline tandem solar cells with a net improvement in efficiency over the bottom cell alone. Furthermore, this work paves the way for integrating perovskites into a low-cost and high-efficiency (>25%) tandem cell.

  10. Performance of Europium-Doped Strontium Iodide, Transparent Ceramics and Bismuth-loaded Polymer Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Sturm, Benjamin; ONeal, S P; Seeley, Zachary; Drury, Owen; Haselhorst, L K; Rupert, B. L.; Sanner, Robert; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hawrami, Rastgo; Shah, Kanai; Burger, Arnold; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Boatner, Lynn A

    2011-01-01

    Recently discovered scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy, single crystal SrI2(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) transparent ceramic and Bismuth-loaded plastics offer resolution and fabrication advantages compared to commercial scintillators, such as NaI(Tl) and standard PVT plastic. Energy resolution at 662 keV of 2.7% is obtained with SrI2(Eu), while 4.5% is obtained with GYGAG(Ce). A new transparent ceramic scintillator for radiographic imaging systems, GLO(Eu) offers high light yield of ~75,000 Ph/MeV, high stopping, and low radiation damage. Implementation of single crystal SrI2(Eu), Gd-based transparent ceramics, and Bi-loaded plastic scintillators can advance the state-of-the art in ionizing radiation detection systems.

  11. Performance of Europium-Doped Strontium Iodide, Transparent Ceramics and Bismuth-loaded Polymer Scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cherepy, N J; Payne, S A; Sturm, B W; O'Neal, S P; Seeley, Z M; Drury, O B; Haselhorst, L K; Rupert, B L; Sanner, R D; Thelin, P A; Fisher, S E; Hawrami, R; Shah, K S; Burger, A; Ramey, J O; Boatner, L A

    2011-08-30

    Recently discovered scintillators for gamma ray spectroscopy, single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu), GYGAG(Ce) transparent ceramic and Bismuth-loaded plastics, offer resolution and fabrication advantages compared to commercial scintillators, such as NaI(Tl) and standard PVT plastic. Energy resolution at 662 keV of 2.7% is obtained with SrI{sub 2}(Eu), while 4.5% is obtained with GYGAG(Ce). A new transparent ceramic scintillator for radiographic imaging systems, GLO(Eu) offers high light yield of 70,000 Photons/MeV, high stopping, and low radiation damage. Implementation of single crystal SrI{sub 2}(Eu), Gd-based transparent ceramics, and Bi-loaded plastic scintillators can advance the state-of-the art in ionizing radiation detection systems.

  12. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2015-11-27

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. As a result, corresponding to structural energiesmore » of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces.« less

  13. Structural modifications due to interface chemistry at metal-nitride interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, S. K.; Shao, S.; Wang, J.; Liu, X. -Y.

    2015-11-27

    Based on accurate first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, an unusual phenomenon of interfacial structural modifications, due to the interface chemistry influence is identified at two metal-nitride interfaces with strong metal-nitrogen affinity, Al/TiN {111} and Al/VN {111} interfaces. It is shown that at such interfaces, a faulted stacking structure is energetically preferred on the Al side of the interface. And both intrinsic and extrinsic stacking fault energies in the vicinity Al layers are negligibly small. However, such phenomenon does not occur in Pt/TiN and Pt/VN interfaces because of the weak Pt-N affinity. As a result, corresponding to structural energies of metal-nitride interfaces, the linear elasticity analysis predicts characteristics of interfacial misfit dislocations at metal-nitride interfaces.

  14. Electronic Durability of Flexible Transparent Films from Type-Specific Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, J; Iyer, S; Bernhardt, A; Huh, JY; Hudson, S; Fagan, J; Hobbie, E.

    2011-12-11

    The coupling between mechanical flexibility and electronic performance is evaluated for thin films of metallic and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) deposited on compliant supports. Percolated networks of type-purified SWCNTs are assembled as thin conducting coatings on elastic polymer substrates, and the sheet resistance is measured as a function of compression and cyclic strain through impedance spectroscopy. The wrinkling topography, microstructure and transparency of the films are independently characterized using optical microscopy, electron microscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy. Thin films made from metallic SWCNTs show better durability as flexible transparent conductive coatings, which we attribute to a combination of superior mechanical performance and higher interfacial conductivity.

  15. Three-terminal resistive switching memory in a transparent vertical-configuration device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ungureanu, Mariana; Llopis, Roger; Casanova, Fèlix; Hueso, Luis E.

    2014-01-06

    The resistive switching phenomenon has attracted much attention recently for memory applications. It describes the reversible change in the resistance of a dielectric between two non-volatile states by the application of electrical pulses. Typical resistive switching memories are two-terminal devices formed by an oxide layer placed between two metal electrodes. Here, we report on the fabrication and operation of a three-terminal resistive switching memory that works as a reconfigurable logic component and offers an increased logic density on chip. The three-terminal memory device we present is transparent and could be further incorporated in transparent computing electronic technologies.

  16. Optical properties of transparent glassceramics containing lithiummica nanocrystals: Crystallization effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khani, V.; Alizadeh, P.; Shakeri, M.S.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: Optical properties of transparent Li{sub 2}OMgOAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}SiO{sub 2}F glasses containing lithiummica nanocrystals are studied and crystallization condition has been evaluated and optimized to produce transparent glassceramics. Crystallization temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis and crystalline phases were identified and quantified by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy was used for morphological variations and UVvis absorption spectroscopy for comparative analysis of transparency. In order to investigate the optical properties of transparent glassceramics, optical band gap, Fermi energy level and Urbach energy are calculated. The results of the investigation illustrate that band gap is reduced with increases in crystallization time and temperature. Enhanced orderliness in the arrangement of atoms might be regarded as possible reasons for the above changes. - Highlights: The optimum temperature and time of crystallization were determined. Limica nanocrystals with size of <30 nm were formed using a two-step heat-treatment. Optical band gap and Fermi energy of nanocrystalline materials decreased with increasing of crystallization temperature and time. Urbach band tailing was decreased with increasing of crystallization condition. - Abstract: Optical properties of transparent Li{sub 2}OMgOAl{sub 2}O{sub 3}SiO{sub 2}F glasses containing lithiummica nanocrystals were studied. The crystallization condition of these glasses was evaluated and optimized to produce transparent glassceramics. Crystallization temperatures were determined by differential thermal analysis and crystalline phases were identified and quantified by X-ray diffraction. Scanning electron microscopy was used to detect morphological changes and UVvis absorption spectroscopy was used for comparative analysis of transparency. In order to investigate the optical properties of the transparent glassceramics, optical band

  17. Disorder-induced transparency in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with optical cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yongyou Dong, Guangda; Zou, Bingsuo

    2014-05-07

    Disorder influence on photon transmission behavior is theoretically studied in a one-dimensional waveguide side coupled with a series of optical cavities. For this sake, we propose a concept of disorder-induced transparency appearing on the low-transmission spectral background. Two kinds of disorders, namely, disorders of optical cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases in the waveguide side coupled with optical cavities are considered to show the disorder-induced transparency. They both can induce the optical transmission peaks on the low-transmission backgrounds. The statistical mean value of the transmission also increases with increasing the disorders of the cavity eigenfrequencies and relative phases.

  18. Package-interface thermal switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyman, N.L.

    1995-05-24

    The package-interface thermal switch (PITS) is an active temperature control device for modulating the flow of thermal energy from satellite equipment, such as electronic modules or batteries, to the satellite mounting deck which serves as a heat sink. PITS comprises a mounting bolt made of a shaped memory alloy (SMA) actuating bolt and a non-metallic rod with a helical spring surrounding it forming a mounting bolt for a satellite equipment package. At least four mounting bolts are used for installing the equipment package and are preloaded to a predetermined stress representing the desired thermal conductance between the heat sink and the package. The SMA actuating bolt is in thermal contact with the component or package and expands or contracts as the result of changing package temperature and the helical return spring forces against the SMA actuating bolt portion of the PITS, increasing (hot-on`1 condition) or decreasing (cold-off condition) the pressure of the package against the mounting deck. As the PITS changes its total length, the thermal conductance between the two objects is increased or decreased. Thus thermal conductance changes as a direct function of package temperature, resulting in active temperature control. The simple design of the PITS reduces the cost and weight of the thermal control subsystem in satellites and its high reliability eliminates the requirement for thermal design verification testing.

  19. Visual Interface for Materials Simulations

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    VIMES (Visual Inteface for Materials Simulations) is a graphical user interface (GUI) for pre- and post-processing alomistic materials science calculations. The code includes tools for building and visualizing simple crystals, supercells, and surfaces, as well as tools for managing and modifying the input to Sandia materials simulations codes such as Quest (Peter Schultz, SNL 9235) and Towhee (Marcus Martin, SNL 9235). It is often useful to have a graphical interlace to construct input for materialsmore » simulations codes and to analyze the output of these programs. VIMES has been designed not only to build and visualize different materials systems, but also to allow several Sandia codes to be easier to use and analyze. Furthermore. VIMES has been designed to be reasonably easy to extend to new materials programs. We anticipate that users of Sandia materials simulations codes will use VIMCS to simplify the submission and analysis of these simulations. VIMES uses standard OpenGL graphics (as implemented in the Python programming language) to display the molecules. The algorithms used to rotate, zoom, and pan molecules are all standard applications using the OpenGL libraries. VIMES uses the Marching Cubes algorithm for isosurfacing 3D data such as molecular orbitals or electron densities around the molecules.« less

  20. Visual Interface for Materials Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-08-01

    VIMES (Visual Inteface for Materials Simulations) is a graphical user interface (GUI) for pre- and post-processing alomistic materials science calculations. The code includes tools for building and visualizing simple crystals, supercells, and surfaces, as well as tools for managing and modifying the input to Sandia materials simulations codes such as Quest (Peter Schultz, SNL 9235) and Towhee (Marcus Martin, SNL 9235). It is often useful to have a graphical interlace to construct input for materials simulations codes and to analyze the output of these programs. VIMES has been designed not only to build and visualize different materials systems, but also to allow several Sandia codes to be easier to use and analyze. Furthermore. VIMES has been designed to be reasonably easy to extend to new materials programs. We anticipate that users of Sandia materials simulations codes will use VIMCS to simplify the submission and analysis of these simulations. VIMES uses standard OpenGL graphics (as implemented in the Python programming language) to display the molecules. The algorithms used to rotate, zoom, and pan molecules are all standard applications using the OpenGL libraries. VIMES uses the Marching Cubes algorithm for isosurfacing 3D data such as molecular orbitals or electron densities around the molecules.

  1. Paving the way to nanoionics: Atomic origin of barriers for ionic transport through interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frechero, M. A.; Rocci, M.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Kumar, Amit; Salafranca, J.; Schmidt, Rainer; Diaz-Guillen, M. R.; Dura, O. J.; Rivera-Calzada, A.; Mishra, R.; Jesse, Stephen; Pantelides, S. T.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, S. J.; Santamaria, J.; Leon, C.

    2015-12-17

    The blocking of ion transport at interfaces strongly limits the performance of electrochemical nanodevices for energy applications. The barrier is believed to arise from space-charge regions generated by mobile ions by analogy to semiconductor junctions. Here we show that something different is at play by studying ion transport in a bicrystal of yttria (9% mol) stabilized zirconia (YSZ), an emblematic oxide ion conductor. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) provides structure and composition at atomic resolution, with the sensitivity to directly reveal the oxygen ion profile. We find that Y segregates to the grain boundary at Zr sites, together with a depletion of oxygen that is confined to a small length scale of around 0.5 nm. Contrary to the main thesis of the space-charge model, there exists no evidence of a long-range O vacancy depletion layer. Combining ion transport measurements across a single grain boundary by nanoscale electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements, and density functional calculations, we show that grain-boundary-induced electronic states act as acceptors, resulting in a negatively charged core. In conclusion, besides the possible effect of the modified chemical bonding, this negative charge gives rise to an additional barrier for ion transport at the grain boundary.

  2. Paving the way to nanoionics: Atomic origin of barriers for ionic transport through interfaces

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Frechero, M. A.; Rocci, M.; Sanchez-Santolino, G.; Kumar, Amit; Salafranca, J.; Schmidt, Rainer; Diaz-Guillen, M. R.; Dura, O. J.; Rivera-Calzada, A.; Mishra, R.; et al

    2015-12-17

    The blocking of ion transport at interfaces strongly limits the performance of electrochemical nanodevices for energy applications. The barrier is believed to arise from space-charge regions generated by mobile ions by analogy to semiconductor junctions. Here we show that something different is at play by studying ion transport in a bicrystal of yttria (9% mol) stabilized zirconia (YSZ), an emblematic oxide ion conductor. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) provides structure and composition at atomic resolution, with the sensitivity to directly reveal the oxygen ion profile. We find that Y segregates to the grain boundary at Zr sites, together withmore » a depletion of oxygen that is confined to a small length scale of around 0.5 nm. Contrary to the main thesis of the space-charge model, there exists no evidence of a long-range O vacancy depletion layer. Combining ion transport measurements across a single grain boundary by nanoscale electrochemical strain microscopy (ESM), broadband dielectric spectroscopy measurements, and density functional calculations, we show that grain-boundary-induced electronic states act as acceptors, resulting in a negatively charged core. In conclusion, besides the possible effect of the modified chemical bonding, this negative charge gives rise to an additional barrier for ion transport at the grain boundary.« less

  3. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D. [Richland, WA; Udseth, Harold R. [Richland, WA; Olivares, Jose A. [Los Alamos, NM

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  4. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-10-18

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample include: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g.,{+-}2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  5. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.P.; Udseth, H.R.; Olivares, J.A.

    1989-12-05

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5--100 kVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., [+-]2--8 kVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit. 21 figs.

  6. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard P.; Udseth, Harold R.; Olivares, Jose A.

    1989-01-01

    A system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample includes: forming a solution of the sample, separating the solution by capillary electrophoresis into an eluent of constituents longitudinally separated according to their relative electrophoretic mobilities, electrospraying the eluent to form a charged spray in which the molecular constituents have a temporal distribution; and detecting or collecting the separated constituents in accordance with the temporal distribution in the spray. A first high-voltage (e.g., 5-100 KVDC) is applied to the solution. The spray is charged by applying a second high voltage (e.g., .+-.2-8 KVDC) between the eluent at the capillary exit and a cathode spaced in front of the exit. A complete electrical circuit is formed by a conductor which directly contacts the eluent at the capillary exit, or by conduction through a sheath electrode discharged in an annular sheath flow about the capillary exit.

  7. Conductive polymer/fullerene blend thin films with honeycomb framework for transparent photovoltaic application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cotlet, Mircea; Wang, Hsing-Lin; Tsai, Hsinhan; Xu, Zhihua

    2015-04-21

    Optoelectronic devices and thin-film semiconductor compositions and methods for making same are disclosed. The methods provide for the synthesis of the disclosed composition. The thin-film semiconductor compositions disclosed herein have a unique configuration that exhibits efficient photo-induced charge transfer and high transparency to visible light.

  8. Photoactive transparent nano-crystalline glass-ceramic for remazole red dye degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gad-Allah, Tarek A.; Margha, Fatma H.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Preparation and characterization of novel transparent nanocrystalline glass-ceramic. ? Precipitation of photoactive phases by using controlled heat-treatment. ? Conservation of transparency along with photoactivity. ? Using the prepared nanocrystalline glass-ceramic in water purification. -- Abstract: Transparent glass ceramic material was prepared from alkali-borosilicate glass containing titania by proper heat treatment scheme. The prepared samples were characterized using differential thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, selected area electron diffraction and UVvisible spectroscopy. The applied heat treatment program allowed the crystallization of nano-crystalline anatase, rutile, barium titanate, titanium borate and silicate phases while maintaining the transparency. The precipitated nano-crystalline anatase and rutile phases were responsible for the observed high photocatalytic activity of the prepared samples. Samples of 24.29 and 32.39 TiO{sub 2} wt% showed better efficiency for the decolorization of remazole red dye compared with commercial-TiO{sub 2} used in preparation of glass-ceramic. The reuse of prepared glass-ceramic photocatalyst with nearly same efficiency for different times was also proved.

  9. Force Control and Nonlinear Master-Slave Force Profile to Manage an Admittance Type Multi-Fingered Haptic User Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony L. Crawford

    2012-08-01

    Natural movements and force feedback are important elements in using teleoperated equipment if complex and speedy manipulation tasks are to be accomplished in remote and/or hazardous environments, such as hot cells, glove boxes, decommissioning, explosives disarmament, and space to name a few. In order to achieve this end the research presented in this paper has developed an admittance type exoskeleton like multi-fingered haptic hand user interface that secures the users palm and provides 3-dimensional force feedback to the users fingertips. Atypical to conventional haptic hand user interfaces that limit themselves to integrating the human hands characteristics just into the systems mechanical design this system also perpetuates that inspiration into the designed user interfaces controller. This is achieved by manifesting the property differences of manipulation and grasping activities as they pertain to the human hand into a nonlinear master-slave force relationship. The results presented in this paper show that the admittance-type system has sufficient bandwidth that it appears nearly transparent to the user when the user is in free motion and when the system is subjected to a manipulation task, increased performance is achieved using the nonlinear force relationship compared to the traditional linear scaling techniques implemented in the vast majority of systems.

  10. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies Thursday, October 18, 2012 - 11:00am SSRL, Bldg. 137, Rm 226 Dr. Frank Uwe Renner Max-Planck-Institut fr ...

  11. Proton storage ring: man/machine interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, R.F.; Clout, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The human interface of the Proton Storage Ring Control System at Los Alamos is described in some detail, together with the software environment in which operator interaction programs are written. Some examples of operator interaction programs are given.

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies of electrified interfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of the interface, and the incorporation of this understanding into quantitative models. ... DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: ...

  13. National Wind Technology Center Controllable Grid Interface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface 2 NWTC Test Site Siemens 2.3 MW Alstom 3 MW ... of 11 MW of variable renewable generation currently at the ... * Multi-megawatt energy storage testing ...

  14. Ultrafast electron transfer at organic semiconductor interfaces...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    copper phthalocyanine is oriented face-on with respect to the fullerene C60 acceptor yields a rate that is approximately 4 times faster than that of the edge-on oriented interface. ...

  15. 5.0 INTERFACE OF REGULATORY AUTHORITIES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5-1 5.0 INTERFACE OF REGULATORY AUTHORITIES 5.1 REGULATORY PROGRAMS The RCRA, CERCLA, and State Dangerous Waste Program overlap in many areas. In general, CERCLA was created by...

  16. Film bonded fuel cell interface configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention relates to improved elements for use in fuel cell stacks, and more particularly, to a stack having a corrosion-resistant, electrally conductive, fluid-impervious interface member therein.

  17. Generation of surface waves and low-frequency radiation under exposure of a conductor to a laser pulse focused by a cylindrical lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uryupin, S A; Frolov, A A

    2014-09-30

    We have developed a theory of generation of low-frequency radiation and surface waves under the pondermotive action of a femtosecond laser pulse irradiating a conductor along the normal and focused by a cylindrical lens. It is shown that for the chosen focusing method and specified values of laser pulse duration and flux density it is possible to significantly increase the total energy of both surface waves and low-frequency radiation. (terahertz radiation)

  18. Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for multifunctional, antifouling surfaces Title: Mobile interfaces: Liquids as a perfect structural material for ...

  19. Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Authors: Tooker, A C ; Madsen, T E ; Crowell, A ; ...

  20. Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline metals. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Science at the interface : grain boundaries in nanocrystalline ...

  1. Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chronic, Multi-Contact, Neural Interface for Deep Brain Stimulation ...

  2. Reactivity of the Gold/Water Interface During Selective Oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the GoldWater Interface During Selective Oxidation Catalysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Reactivity of the GoldWater Interface During Selective Oxidation Catalysis ...

  3. Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable Thermoelectric Automobile Exhaust Waste Heat Harvesting Devices Integration of Advanced Materials and Interfaces for Durable ...

  4. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Thermal Performance and Reliability of Bonded Interfaces Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 ...

  5. Performance of pancake coils of parallel co-wound Ag/BSCCO tape conductors in static and ramped magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwenterly, S.W.; Lue, J.W.; Lubell, M.S.; Walker, M.S.; Hazelton, D.W.; Haldar, P.; Rice, J.A.; Hoehn, J.G. Jr.; Motowidlo, L.R.

    1994-12-31

    Critical Currents are reported for several Ag/BSCCO single-pancake coils in static magnetic fields ranging from 0 to 5 T and temperatures from 4.2 K to 105 K. The sample coils were co-wound of one to six tape conductors in parallel. Since the closed loops formed in such an arrangement could lead to eddy current heating or instability in changing fields, one of the coils was also tested in helium gas, in fields ramped at rates of up to 1.5 T/s. For these quasi-adiabatic tests, at each temperature the transport current was set just below the critical value for a preset static field of 3.3 or 4.9 T. The field was then rapidly ramped down to zero, held for 20 sec, and then ramped back up to the original value. The maximum observed temperature transient of about 1.7 K occurred at 9 K, for a field change of 4.75 T. The temperature transients became negligible when the sample was immersed in liquid helium. Above 30 K, the transients were below 1 K. These results give confidence that parallel co-wound HTSC coils are stable in a rapidly-ramped magnetic field, without undue eddy current heating.

  6. Parameters influencing the deposition of methylammonium lead halide iodide in hole conductor free perovskite-based solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Bat-El; Gamliel, Shany; Etgar, Lioz

    2014-08-01

    Perovskite is a promising light harvester for use in photovoltaic solar cells. In recent years, the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells has been dramatically increased, making them a competitive source of renewable energy. An important parameter when designing high efficiency perovskite-based solar cells is the perovskite deposition, which must be performed to create complete coverage and optimal film thickness. This paper describes an in-depth study on two-step deposition, separating the perovskite deposition into two precursors. The effects of spin velocity, annealing temperature, dipping time, and methylammonium iodide concentration on the photovoltaic performance are studied. Observations include that current density is affected by changing the spin velocity, while the fill factor changes mainly due to the dipping time and methylammonium iodide concentration. Interestingly, the open circuit voltage is almost unaffected by these parameters. Hole conductor free perovskite solar cells are used in this work, in order to minimize other possible effects. This study provides better understanding and control over the perovskite deposition through highly efficient, low-cost perovskite-based solar cells.

  7. Characterization of Alloys with Potential for Application in Cable-in-Conduit Conductors for High-Field Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, R.P.; Miller, J.R.; Toplosky, V.J.

    2004-06-28

    Since the introduction of the cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) concept, a variety of alloys have been proposed for fabricating the jacket. The jacket provides primary containment of the supercritical helium coolant and is typically also the primary structural component for the magnet. These functions create requirements for strength, toughness, weldability, and fabricability in tubular form. When the CICC uses Nb3Sn, there are additional requirements to accommodate the manufacturing and heat-treatment processes for the superconductor as well as its strain-sensitive performance during operation. Both of the present favorite jacket alloys, Incoloy 908 and modified (ultra-low carbon) 316LN, have both demonstrated acceptable functionality as well as a few undesirable features. In this paper, we present data from cryogenic mechanical tests on a group of heat-resistant, high-strength superalloys that appear to offer equal or better mechanical performance (e.g. strength, toughness, and modulus) while mitigating the undesirable aspects (e.g. SAGBO in the case of I908 and thermal-expansion mismatch with Nb3Sn in the case of 316LN). Data are presented for each alloy in the as-received and aged conditions. These alloys are presently being considered as candidates for use in the next-generation hybrid magnet for the NHMFL but may also be of interest to the fusion and energy storage communities.

  8. Magnetic field and field orientation dependence of the critical current density in Bi-2212 round wires and other HTS conductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, J.O.; Holesinger, T.G.; Coulter, J.Y.; Maley, M.P.

    1996-10-01

    The authors have performed measurements of the magnetic field dependence of the critical current density J{sub c} of Bi-2212/Ag round wire produced by isothermal melt processing. In contrast to the case for flat tape, there is very little dependence of J{sub c} on the direction of the magnetic field as it is rotated normal to the wire axis, which is the direction of the nominal current flow. However, when the angle of the magnetic field direction is rotated from normal to the wire axis to parallel to that axis, J{sub c} at 64 K and 0.2 T increases by more than a factor of four. Again, this is in contrast to the results observed for Bi-2212/Ag and Bi-2223/Ag flat tapes, which show no anisotropy under similar experimental conditions. They can explain these differences in angular anisotropy by referring to the microstructure of these two conductor types, which have distinctly different types of grain alignment. They discuss the general behavior of the dependence of J{sub c} on the orientation of a magnetic field for high temperature superconductors.

  9. An Air-Stable Na3SbS4 Superionic Conductor Prepared by a Rapid and Economic Synthetic Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Hood, Zachary; Peng, Rui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Wu, Zili; An, Ke; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state sodium batteries, using abundant sodium resources and solid electrolyte, hold much promise for safe, low cost, large-scale energy storage. To realize the practical applications of all solid Na-ion batteries at ambient temperature, the solid electrolytes are required to have high ionic conductivity, chemical stability, and ideally, easy preparation. Ceramic electrolytes show higher ionic conductivity than polymers, but they often require extremely stringent synthesis conditions, either high sintering temperature above 1000 C or long-time, low-energy ball milling. Herein, we report a new synthesis route for Na3SbS4, a novel Na superionic conductor that needs much lower processing temperature below 200 C and easy operation. This new solid electrolyte exhibits a remarkable ionic conductivity of 1.05 mS cm-1 at 25 C and is chemically stable under ambient atmosphere. This synthesis process provides unique insight into the current state-of-the-art solid electrolyte preparation and opens new possibilities for the design of similar materials.

  10. An Air-Stable Na3SbS4 Superionic Conductor Prepared by a Rapid and Economic Synthetic Procedure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Yan; Hood, Zachary; Peng, Rui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Wu, Zili; An, Ke; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-01

    All-solid-state sodium batteries, using abundant sodium resources and solid electrolyte, hold much promise for safe, low cost, large-scale energy storage. To realize the practical applications of all solid Na-ion batteries at ambient temperature, the solid electrolytes are required to have high ionic conductivity, chemical stability, and ideally, easy preparation. Ceramic electrolytes show higher ionic conductivity than polymers, but they often require extremely stringent synthesis conditions, either high sintering temperature above 1000 C or long-time, low-energy ball milling. Herein, we report a new synthesis route for Na3SbS4, a novel Na superionic conductor that needs much lower processing temperature below 200 Cmore » and easy operation. This new solid electrolyte exhibits a remarkable ionic conductivity of 1.05 mS cm-1 at 25 C and is chemically stable under ambient atmosphere. This synthesis process provides unique insight into the current state-of-the-art solid electrolyte preparation and opens new possibilities for the design of similar materials.« less

  11. Performance Evaluation of K-DEMO Cable-in-conduit Conductors Using the Florida Electro-Mechanical Cable Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Yuhu

    2013-07-16

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for design of the Toroidal Field (TF) insert coil, which will allow validation of the performance of significant lengths of the conductors to be used in the full scale TF coils in relevant conditions of field, current density and mechanical strain. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) will build the TF insert which will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test facility at JAEA, Naka, Japan. Three dimensional mathematical model of TF Insert was created based on the initial design geometry data, and included the following features: orthotropic material properties of superconductor material and insulation; external magnetic field from CSMC, temperature dependent properties of the materials; pre-compression and plastic deformation in lap joint. Major geometrical characteristics of the design were preserved including cable jacket and insulation shape, mandrel outline, and support clamps and spacers. The model is capable of performing coupled structural, thermal, and electromagnetic analysis using ANSYS. Numerical simulations were performed for room temperature conditions; cool down to 4K, and the operating regime with 68kA current at 11.8 Tesla background field. Numerical simulations led to the final design of the coil producing the required strain levels on the cable, while simultaneously satisfying the ITER magnet structural design criteria.

  12. Humidity Effect on Nanoscale Electrochemistry in Solid Silver Ion Conductors and the Dual Nature of Its Locality

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Sangmo; Strelcov, Evgheni; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Tselev, Alexander; Noh, Tae Won; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2015-01-07

    Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is a powerful tool to investigate electrochemistry in nanoscale volumes. While most SPM-based studies have focused on reactions at the tip-surface junction, charge and mass conservation requires coupled and intrinsically non-local cathodic and anodic processes that can be significantly affected by ambient humidity. Here, we explore the role of water in both cathodic and anodic processes, associated charge transport, and topographic volume changes depending on the polarity of tip bias. The first-order reversal curve current-voltage technique combined with simultaneous detection of the sample topography, referred to as FORC-IVz, was applied to a silver solid ion conductor.more » We found that the protons generated from water affect silver ionic conduction, silver particle formation and dissolution, and mechanical integrity of the material. This work highlights the dual nature (simultaneously local and non-local) of electrochemical SPM studies, which should be considered for comprehensive understanding of nanoscale electrochemistry.« less

  13. Nonlinear space charge dynamics in mixed ionic-electronic conductors: Resistive switching and ferroelectric-like hysteresis of electromechanical response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morozovska, Anna N.; Morozovsky, Nicholas V.; Eliseev, Eugene A.; Varenyk, Olexandr V.; Kim, Yunseok; Strelcov, Evgheni; Tselev, Alexander; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2014-08-14

    We performed self-consistent modelling of nonlinear electrotransport and electromechanical response of thin films of mixed ionic-electronic conductors (MIEC) allowing for steric effects of mobile charged defects (ions, protons, or vacancies), electron degeneration, and Vegard stresses. We establish correlations between the features of the nonlinear space-charge dynamics, current-voltage, and bending-voltage curves for different types of the film electrodes. A pronounced ferroelectric-like hysteresis of the bending-voltage loops and current maxima on the double hysteresis current-voltage loops appear for the electron-transport electrodes. The double hysteresis loop with pronounced humps indicates a memristor-type resistive switching. The switching occurs due to the strong nonlinear coupling between the electronic and ionic subsystems. A sharp meta-stable maximum of the electron density appears near one open electrode and moves to another one during the periodic change of applied voltage. Our results can explain the nonlinear nature and correlation of electrical and mechanical memory effects in thin MIEC films. The analytical expression proving that the electrically induced bending of MIEC films can be detected by interferometric methods is derived.

  14. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  15. Understanding and Design of Polymer Device Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahn, Antoine

    2015-10-26

    The research performed under grant DE-FG02-04ER46165 between May 2008 and April 2011 focused on the understanding and control of interfaces of organic semiconductors in general, and polymer interfaces more specifically. This work was a joined effort by three experimentalists and a theoretician. Emphasis was placed on the determination of the electronic structure of these interfaces, i.e. the relative energy position of molecular levels across these interfaces. From these electronic structures depend the injection, extraction and transport of charge carriers into, from and across, respectively, all (opto)electronic devices made of these semiconductors. A significant fraction of our work focused on ways to modify and optimize interfaces, for example via chemical doping of the semiconductors to reduce interface energy barriers or via deposition of ultra-thin work function-reducing polymer or self-assembled monolayers of dipolar molecules. Another significant fraction of our work was devoted to exploring alternate and unconventional interface formation methods, in particular the soft-contact lamination of both metal contacts and polymer overlayers on top of polymer films. These methods allowed us to better understand the impact of hot metal atom evaporation on a soft organic surface, as well as the key mechanisms that control the energetics of polymer/polymer heterojunctions. Finally, a significant fraction of the research was directed to understanding the electronic structure of buried polymer heterojunctions, in particular within donor/acceptor blends of interest in organic photovoltaic applications. The work supported by this grant resulted in 17 publications in some of the best peer-reviewed journals of the field, as well as numerous presentations at US and international conferences.

  16. Single-walled carbon nanotube transparent conductive films fabricated by reductive dissolution and spray coating for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Arias, Ana Claudia; Catheline, Amlie; Ligsay, Kathleen; Kim, Kee-Chan; Fogden, Sin; Chen, Zhihua; Facchetti, Antonio

    2014-12-22

    Solutions of unbundled and unbroken single-walled carbon nanotubes have been prepared using a reductive dissolution process. Transparent conductive films spray-coated from these solutions show a nearly twofold improvement in the ratio of electrical conductivity to optical absorptivity versus those deposited from conventional aqueous dispersions, due to substantial de-aggregation and sizable nanotube lengths. These transparent electrodes have been utilized to fabricate P3HT-PCBM organic solar cells achieving power conversion efficiencies up to 2.3%, comparable to those of solar cells using indium tin oxide transparent electrodes.

  17. Investigation of fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent E-shaped patch antenna for terahertz communications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anand, S. E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com Darak, Mayur Sudesh E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com Kumar, D. Sriram E-mail: darak.mayur@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    In this paper, a fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent E-shaped patch antenna is designed and its radiation performance is analyzed in the 705 – 804 GHz band. As optically transparent antennas can be mounted on optical display, they facilitate the reduction of overall system size. The proposed antenna design is simulated using electromagnetic solver - Ansys HFSS and its characteristics such as impedance bandwidth, directivity, radiation efficiency and gain are observed. Results show that the fluorine-doped tin oxide based optically transparent patch antenna overcomes the conventional patch antenna limitations and thus the same can be used for solar cell antenna used in satellite systems.

  18. Growth and optical properties of partially transparent Eu doped CaF{sub 2} ceramic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Manoranjan Sen, Shashwati Pitale, S. S. Goutam, U. K. Shinde, Seema Patra, G. D. Gadkari, S. C.

    2014-04-24

    Partially transparent ceramic of 2 at.% Eu doped CaF{sub 2} have been grown preferentially towards [111] direction. For this purpose, Eu doped CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles (size?12 nm) obtained by a low temperature solution growth method has been pressed at 1000C under vacuum. The preferentially grown ceramic shows 15% transparency within the visible range of spectrum. As confirmed by the X-ray diffraction result, the hot pressed ceramic exhibits reduced lattice volume than the nanopowder. It indicates Eu{sup 3+} as the dominant substituting ions at the Ca{sup 2+} sites of CaF{sub 2} lattice in the hot pressed ceramic material. It is corroborated by the photoluminescence results of hot pressed ceramic which shows strong red emission corresponding to Eu{sup 3+} sites. However, photoluminescence of nanopowder exhibits intense peak in the blue region of the spectrum which is characteristics of Eu2+ sites.

  19. Overview of transparency issues under the US-Russian highly enriched uranium purchase agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bieniawski, A.J.; Dougherty, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The US has signed an Agreement with the Russian Federation for the purchase of 500 metric tons of highly enriched uranium (HEU) derived from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons. The BEU will be blended down to low-enriched uranium (LEU) in Russia and will be transported to the US to be used by fuel Fabricators to make fuel for commercial nuclear power plants. Both the United States and Russia have been preparing to institute transparency measures to provide confidence that the nonproliferation, physical protection, and material control and accounting requirements specified in the Agreement are met. This paper provides a background on the Agreement and subsequent on-going negotiations to develop transparency measures suited to the facilities and processes which are expected to be involved.

  20. Health and safety considerations for U. S. monitors in the Russian transparency program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boggs, C. J.

    1998-10-22

    In 1993 the US and the Russian Federation signed an agreement allowing the US to purchase highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Russia over a 20-year period. This Highly Enriched Uranium Purchase Agreement permits the purchase of 500 metric tons of HEU from dismantled Russian nuclear weapons in the form of low-enriched uranium (LEU) for use as power reactor fuel in the US. Under the HEU Agreement, the US and Russia are cooperating in a ''Transparency Program'' to ensure that arms control and nonproliferation objectives are being met. The Transparency Program measures, which are a departure from traditional, intrusive measures of verification, include sending individuals from the US to Russia to monitor the processing of the HEU.

  1. Tuning optical properties of transparent conducting barium stannate by dimensional reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yuwei; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming; Singh, David J.

    2015-01-30

    We report calculations of the electronic structure and optical properties of doped n-type perovskite BaSnO3 and layered perovskites. While doped BaSnO3 retains its transparency for energies below the valence to conduction band onset, the doped layered compounds exhibit below band edge optical conductivity due to transitions from the lowest conduction band. This gives absorption in the visible for Ba2SnO4. It is important to minimize this phase in transparent conducting oxide (TCO) films. Ba3Sn2O7 and Ba4Sn3O10 have strong transitions only in the red and infrared, respectively. Thus, there may be opportunities for using these as wavelength filtering TCO.

  2. Low-loss metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hai-ming; Liu, Shao-bin Liu, Si-yuan; Ding, Guo-wen; Yang, Hua; Yu, Zhi-yang; Zhang, Hai-feng; Wang, Shen-yun

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, a low-loss and high transmission analogy of electromagnetically induced transparency based on electric toroidal dipolar response is numerically and experimentally demonstrated. It is obtained by the excitation of the low-loss electric toroidal dipolar response, which confines the magnetic field inside a dielectric substrate with toroidal geometry. The metamaterial electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) structure is composed of the cut wire and asymmetric split-ring resonators. The transmission level is as high as 0.88, and the radiation loss is greatly suppressed, which can be proved by the surface currents distributions, the magnetic field distributions, and the imaginary parts of the effective permeability and permittivity. It offers an effective way to produce low-loss and high transmission metamaterial EIT.

  3. ZnO:H indium-free transparent conductive electrodes for active-matrix display applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Shuming Wang, Sisi

    2014-12-01

    Transparent conductive electrodes based on hydrogen (H)-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) have been proposed for active-matrix (AM) display applications. When fabricated with optimal H plasma power and optimal plasma treatment time, the resulting ZnO:H films exhibit low sheet resistance of 200 Ω/◻ and high average transmission of 85% at a film thickness of 150 nm. The demonstrated transparent conductive ZnO:H films can potentially replace indium-tin-oxide and serve as pixel electrodes for organic light-emitting diodes as well as source/drain electrodes for ZnO-based thin-film transistors. Use of the proposed ZnO:H electrodes means that two photomask stages can be removed from the fabrication process flow for ZnO-based AM backplanes.

  4. Radiation Heat Transfer in 3 Dimensions for Semi-Transparent Materials....

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-02

    The RAD3D software solves the critical heat transfer mechanisms that occur in production glass furnaces. The code includes state-of-the-art solution algorithms for efficient radiant interaction of the heating elements, furnace walls and internal furnace components. The code specifically solves the coupled radiative and conductive heating of semi-transparent materials such as glass to calculate the temperature distribution in the glass during processing.

  5. Improving Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Interconnection Process: Emergent Utility Practices and State Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 3, 2015 "Improving Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Interconnection Process: Emergent Utility Practices and State Requirements" Joslyn Sato, Hawaiian Electric Companies Michael Conway, Borrego Solar Systems, Inc. Kristen Ardani and Emerson Reiter, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2 Purpose of Today's Meeting * Learn how data reporting requirements for interconnection vary across States, how tracking and data reporting for interconnection requests is evolving

  6. Improving Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Interconnection Process: Emergent Utility Practices and State Requirements Transcript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transparency for the Distributed PV Page 1 of 21 Interconnection Process Emergent Utility Practices and State Requirements Kristen Adrani, Emerson Reiter, Joslyn Sato, Michael Conway Page 1 of 21 [Speaker: Kristen Ardani] Cover Slide: Thank you everyone for joining us for today's quarterly meeting of the Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative, or the DGIC. My name is Kristen Ardani. I'm a solar analyst here at NREL and I'll be moderating today's discussion. The topic for today

  7. New report offers best practice for transparent contract language of PV O&M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agreements offers best practice for transparent contract language of PV O&M agreements - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery

  8. Optically transparent and environmentally durable superhydrophobic coating based on functionalized SiO2 nanoparticles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schaeffer, Daniel A.; Polizos, Georgios; Smith, D. Barton; Lee, Dominic F.; Hunter, Scott R.; Datskos, Panos G.

    2015-01-09

    Optical surfaces such as mirrors and windows that are exposed to outdoor environmental conditions are susceptible to dust buildup and water condensation. The application of transparent superhydrophobic coatings on optical surfaces can improve outdoor performance via a self-cleaning effect similar to the Lotus effect. The contact angle (CA) of water droplets on a typical hydrophobic flat surface varies from 100° to 120°. Adding roughness or microtexture to a hydrophobic surface leads to an enhancement of hydrophobicity and the CA can be increased to a value in the range of 16≥0° to 175°. This result is remarkable because such behavior cannotmore » be explained using surface chemistry alone. When surface features are on the order of 100 nm or smaller, surfaces exhibit superhydrophobic behavior and maintain their optical transparency. In this work we discuss our results on transparent superhydrophobic coatings that can be applied across large surface areas. We have used functionalized silica nanoparticles to coat various optical elements and have measured the contact angle and optical transmission between 190 to 1100 nm on these elements. The functionalized silica nanoparticles were dissolved in a solution of the solvents isopropyl alcohol and 4-chlorobenzotrifluoride (PCBTF) and a proprietary ceramic binder (Cerakote ). Finally, this solution was spin-coated onto a variety of test glass substrates, and following a curing period of about 30 minutes, these coatings exhibited superhydrophobic behavior with a static CA ≥160°.« less

  9. Adsorption of polymer chains at penetrable interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerasimchuk, I. V.; Sommer, J.-U.; Gerasimchuk, V. S.

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the problem of adsorption (localization) of polymer chains in the system of two penetrable interfaces within the mean-field approximation. The saturation of the polymer system in the limit case of zero bulk concentration is studied. We find the exact solution of this mean-field polymer adsorption problem that opens the possibility to treat various localization problems for polymer chains in such environments using appropriate boundary conditions. The exact solution is controlled by a single scaling variable that describes the coupling between the interfaces due to the polymer chains. We obtain a nonmonotonic behavior of the amount of adsorbed polymers as a function of the distance between the interfaces. This leads to a high-energy and a low-energy phase for the double layer with respect to the amount of polymers localized. At the saturation point, we find the total energy of the system and determine the force acting between the interfaces to be strictly attractive and to monotonically decay to zero when the interface distance increases.

  10. NREL's Controllable Grid Interface for Testing Renewable Energy Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gevorgian, V.

    2014-09-01

    This presentation is an overview of NREL's Controllable Grid Interface capabilities for testing renewable energy technologies.

  11. Advanced Thermal Interface Materials (TIMs) for Power Electronics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.

    2009-05-01

    This presentation describes our progress in the area of thermal interface materials for power electronics applications.

  12. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D.; Fought, Eric R.

    1989-01-01

    A moving belt interface for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer.

  13. Interface for liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, B.D.; Fought, E.R.

    1989-09-19

    A moving belt interface is described for real-time, high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC)/mass spectrometer (MS) analysis which strips away the HPLC solvent as it emerges from the end of the HPLC column and leaves a residue suitable for mass-spectral analysis. The interface includes a portable, stand-alone apparatus having a plural stage vacuum station, a continuous ribbon or belt, a drive train magnetically coupled to an external drive motor, a calibrated HPLC delivery system, a heated probe tip and means located adjacent the probe tip for direct ionization of the residue on the belt. The interface is also capable of being readily adapted to fit any mass spectrometer. 8 figs.

  14. Electronic structure of the SiN{sub x}/TiN interface: A model system for superhard nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patscheider, Joerg; Hellgren, Niklas; Haasch, Richard T.; Petrov, Ivan; Greene, J. E.

    2011-03-15

    Nanostructured materials such as nanocomposites and nanolaminates--subjects of intense interest in modern materials research--are defined by internal interfaces, the nature of which is generally unknown. Nevertheless, the interfaces often determine the bulk properties. An example of this is superhard nanocomposites with hardness approaching that of diamond. TiN/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposites (TiN nanocrystals encapsulated in a fully percolated SiN{sub x} tissue phase) and nanolaminates, in particular, have attracted much attention as model systems for the synthesis of such superhard materials. Here, we use in situ angle-resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/TiN(001), Si/TiN(001), and Ti/TiN(001) bilayer interfaces, in which 4-ML-thick overlayers are grown in an ultrahigh vacuum system by reactive magnetron sputter deposition onto epitaxial TiN layers on MgO(001). The thickness of the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}, Si, and Ti overlayers is chosen to be thin enough to insure sufficient electron transparency to probe the interfaces, while being close to values reported in typical nanocomposites and nanolaminates. The results show that these overlayer/TiN(001) interfaces have distinctly different bonding characteristics. Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} exhibits interface polarization through the formation of an interlayer, in which the N concentration is enhanced at higher substrate bias values during Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} deposition. The increased number of Ti-N bonds at the interface, together with the resulting polarization, strengthens interfacial bonding. In contrast, overlayers of Si and, even more so, metallic Ti weaken the interface by minimizing the valence band energy difference between the two phases. A model is proposed that provides a semiquantitative explanation of the interfacial bond strength in nitrogen-saturated and nitrogen-deficient Ti-Si-N nanocomposites.

  15. Computational Investigations of Solid-Liquid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Asta

    2011-08-31

    In a variety of materials synthesis and processing contexts, atomistic processes at heterophase interfaces play a critical role governing defect formation, growth morphologies, and microstructure evolution. Accurate knowledge of interfacial structure, free energies, mobilities and segregation coefficients are critical for predictive modeling of microstructure evolution, yet direct experimental measurement of these fundamental interfacial properties remains elusive in many cases. In this project first-principles calculations were combined with molecular-dynamics (MD) and Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations, to investigate the atomic-scale structural and dynamical properties of heterophase interfaces, and the relationship between these properties and the calculated thermodynamic and kinetic parameters that influence the evolution of phase transformation structures at nanometer to micron length scales. The topics investigated in this project were motivated primarily by phenomena associated with solidification processing of metals and alloys, and the main focus of the work was thus on solid-liquid interfaces and high-temperature grain boundaries. Additional efforts involved first-principles calculations of coherent solid-solid heterophase interfaces, where a close collaboration with researchers at the National Center for Electron Microscopy was undertaken to understand the evolution of novel core-shell precipitate microstructures in aluminum alloys.

  16. TMACS Test Procedure TP011: Panalarm Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seghers, R.; Washburn, S.J.

    1994-05-24

    The TMACS Software Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. The TMACS Test Plan (WHC-SD-WM-TP-148) is fulfilled when all Test Cases are approved. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Panalarm Interface functions.

  17. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.; Barinaga, Charles J.

    1995-01-01

    An improvement to the system and method for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity.

  18. Apparatus and procedure to characterize the surface quality of conductors by measuring the rate of cathode emission as a function of surface electric field strength

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mestayer, Mac; Christo, Steve; Taylor, Mark

    2014-10-21

    A device and method for characterizing quality of a conducting surface. The device including a gaseous ionizing chamber having centrally located inside the chamber a conducting sample to be tested to which a negative potential is applied, a plurality of anode or "sense" wires spaced regularly about the central test wire, a plurality of "field wires" at a negative potential are spaced regularly around the sense, and a plurality of "guard wires" at a positive potential are spaced regularly around the field wires in the chamber. The method utilizing the device to measure emission currents from the conductor.

  19. Surface and mechanical properties of transparent polycrystalline YAG fabricated by SPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmero, P.; Bonelli, B.; Fantozzi, G.; Spina, G.; Bonnefont, G.; Montanaro, L.; Chevalier, J.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ultrasonication as effective, un-polluting dispersion route for YAG powders. • Annealing in the 700–900 °C range to increase the transparency. • Oxygen vacancies more crucial on the transmittance than C contamination. • SPS reliable method for transparent and ultra-fine polycrystalline YAG. • Very high hardness (16.5–17 GPa) for the fully dense, fine materials. - Abstract: YAG powder was synthesised by reverse-strike co-precipitation, calcined at 1000 °C and dispersed by either ball-milling with α-alumina (BM{sub A}) or zirconia (BMz) spheres or by ultrasonication (US). All the dispersed powders were consolidated by SPS to nearly theoretical density, but only the US powder gave rise to a transparent material (transmittance of about 60% at 600 nm, 1 mm thickness), characterised by an ultra-fine microstructure (average size of 330 nm). In the BM materials, Raman spectroscopy allowed to evidence some phonon vibrational shifts due to secondary phases deriving from pollution by the milling media, not detectable by XRD because present in small amounts. The transmittance of the as-sintered US sample was further increased by annealing in air at 900 °C; this was assigned to the restoration of some oxygen vacancies created in the reducing environment of the SPS chamber, as evidenced by XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). Finally, US samples sintered in the 1250–1400 °C were submitted to a basic mechanical characterisation, showing a very good hardness, in spite of a moderate fracture toughness, especially for the fully dense and fine-grained materials sintered at 1300–1350 °C.

  20. The role of opacity and transparency in achieving strategic stability in South Asia.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajain, Arpit; Ashraf, Tariq Mahmud

    2005-08-01

    According to international relations theory, deterrence can be used as a tool to achieve stability between potentially hostile nations. India and Pakistan's long history of periodic crises raises the question of how they can achieve deterrence stability. 'Transparency' describes the flow of information between parties and plays a key role in establishing a deterrence relationship. This paper studies the balance needed between opacity and transparency in nuclear topics for the maintenance of deterrence stability between India and Pakistan. States with nuclear weapons are postulated to implement transparency in four categories: potential, capability, intent, and resolve. The study applies these categories to the nuclear components of the ongoing India-Pakistan Composite Dialogue Working Group for Peace and Security including CBMs. To focus our efforts, we defined four scenarios to characterize representative strategic/military/political conditions. The scenarios are combinations of these two sets of opposite poles: competition - cooperation; extremism - moderation (to be understood primarily in a religious/nationalistic sense). We describe each scenario in terms of select focal areas (nuclear doctrine, nuclear command and control, nuclear stockpile, nuclear delivery/defensive systems, and conventional force posture). The scenarios help frame the realm of possibilities, and have been described in terms of expected conditions for the focal areas. We then use the conditions in each scenario to prescribe a range of information-sharing actions that the two countries could take to increase stability. We also highlight the information that should not be shared. These actions can be political (e.g., declarations), procedural (e.g., advance notice of certain military activities), or technologically based (e.g., seismic monitoring of the nuclear test moratorium).

  1. Ge Interface Engineering with Ozone-oxidation for Low Interface State Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuzum, Duygu; Krishnamohan, T.; Pethe, Abhijit J.; Okyay, Ali, K.; Oshima, Yasuhiro; Sun, Yun; McVittie, Jim P.; Pianetta, Piero A.; McIntyre, Paul C.; Saraswat, Krishna C.; /Stanford U., CIS

    2008-06-02

    Passivation of Ge has been a critical issue for Ge MOS applications in future technology nodes. In this letter, we introduce ozone-oxidation to engineer Ge/insulator interface. Interface states (D{sub it}) values across the bandgap and close to conduction bandedge were extracted using conductance technique at low temperatures. D{sub it} dependency on growth conditions was studied. Minimum D{sub it} of 3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} V{sup -1} was demonstrated. Physical quality of the interface was investigated through Ge 3d spectra measurements. We found that the interface and D{sub it} is strongly affected by the distribution of oxidation states and quality of the suboxide.

  2. Transparent hydrogel with enhanced water retention capacity by introducing highly hydratable salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Yuanyuan; Xiang, Feng; Wang, Hong E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu; Chen, Baohong; Zhou, Jinxiong; Suo, Zhigang E-mail: suo@seas.harvard.edu

    2014-10-13

    Polyacrylamide hydrogels containing salt as electrolyte have been used as highly stretchable transparent electrodes in flexible electronics, but those hydrogels are easy to dry out due to water evaporation. Targeted, we try to enhance water retention capacity of polyacrylamide hydrogel by introducing highly hydratable salts into the hydrogel. These hydrogels show enhanced water retention capacity in different level. Specially, polyacrylamide hydrogel containing high content of lithium chloride can retain over 70% of its initial water even in environment with relative humidity of only 10% RH. The excellent water retention capacities of these hydrogels will make more applications of hydrogels become possible.

  3. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgstrm, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  4. Transparent TiO2 nanotube array photoelectrodes prepared via two-step anodization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, Jin Young; Zhu, Kai; Neale, Nathan R.; Frank, Arthur J.

    2014-04-04

    Two-step anodization of transparent TiO2 nanotube arrays has been demonstrated with aid of a Nb-doped TiO2 buffer layer deposited between the Ti layer and TCO substrate. Enhanced physical adhesion and electrochemical stability provided by the buffer layer has been found to be important for successful implementation of the two-step anodization process. As a result, with the proposed approach, the morphology and thickness of NT arrays could be controlled very precisely, which in turn, influenced their optical and photoelectrochemical properties.

  5. Amorphous semiconducting and conducting transparent metal oxide thin films and production thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Perkins, John; Van Hest, Marinus Franciscus Antonius Maria; Ginley, David; Taylor, Matthew; Neuman, George A.; Luten, Henry A.; Forgette, Jeffrey A.; Anderson, John S.

    2010-07-13

    Metal oxide thin films and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a metal oxide thin film may comprise introducing at least two metallic elements and oxygen into a process chamber to form a metal oxide. The method may also comprise depositing the metal oxide on a substrate in the process chamber. The method may also comprise simultaneously controlling a ratio of the at least two metallic elements and a stoichiometry of the oxygen during deposition. Exemplary amorphous metal oxide thin films produced according to the methods herein may exhibit highly transparent properties, highly conductive properties, and/or other opto-electronic properties.

  6. Damp-Heat Induced Degradation of Transparent Conducting Oxides for Thin Film Solar Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, J.; Noufi, R.; Li, X.; DeHart, C.; To, B.

    2008-05-01

    The objectives are: (1) To achieve a high long-term performance reliability for the thin-film CIGS PV modules with more stable materials, device structure designs, and moisture-resistant encapsulation materials and schemes; (2) to evaluate the DH stability of various transparent conducting oxides (TCOs); (3) to identify the degradation mechanisms and quantify degradation rates; (4) to seek chemical and/or physical mitigation methods, and explore new materials. It's important to note that direct exposure to DH represents an extreme condition that a well-encapsulated thin film PV module may never experience.

  7. Graphene as transparent and current spreading electrode in silicon solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behura, Sanjay K. Nayak, Sasmita; Jani, Omkar; Mahala, Pramila

    2014-11-15

    Fabricated bi-layer graphene (BLG) has been studied as transparent and current spreading electrode (TCSE) for silicon solar cell, using TCAD-Silvaco 2D simulation. We have carried out comparative study using both Ag grids and BLG as current spreading electrode (CSE) and TCSE, respectively. Our study reveals that BLG based solar cell shows better efficiency of 24.85% than Ag-based cell (21.44%), in all of the critical aspects, including generation rate, recombination rate, electric field, potential and quantum efficiency. Further BLG based cell exhibits pronounce rectifying behavior, low saturation current, and good turn-on voltage while studying in dark.

  8. Tuning band alignment using interface dipoles at the Pt/anatase TiO2 interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tachikawa, Takashi; Minohara, Makoto; Hikita, Yasuyuki; Bell, Christopher; Hwang, Harold Y.

    2015-10-27

    The Schottky barrier heights at the Pt/TiO2 (001) junctions are modulated over 0.8 eV by inserting <1 nm of LaAlO3. The large electric field in the LaAlO3 is stabilized by preserving the continuity of in-plane lattice symmetry at the oxide interface. Lastly, these results greatly expand the application of dipole engineering to versatile polycrystalline metal/binary oxide functional interfaces.

  9. Architecture for coated conductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foltyn, Stephen R.; Arendt, Paul N.; Wang, Haiyan; Stan, Liliana

    2010-06-01

    Articles are provided including a base substrate having a layer of an oriented cubic oxide material with a rock-salt-like structure layer thereon, and, a layer of epitaxial titanium nitride upon the layer of an oriented cubic oxide material having a rock-salt-like structure. Such articles can further include thin films of high temperature superconductive oxides such as YBCO upon the layer of epitaxial titanium nitride or upon a intermediate buffer layer upon the layer of epitaxial titanium nitride.

  10. Light Duty Utility Arm interface control document plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engstrom, J.W.

    1994-12-27

    This document describes the interface control documents that will be used to identify and control interface features throughout all phases of the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) development and design. After the system is built, delivered and installed in the Cold Test Facility and later at the tank farm, the Interface Control Documents can be used in maintaining the configuration control process. The Interface Control Document will consist of Interface Control Drawings and a data base directly tied to the Interface Control Drawings. The data base can be used as an index to conveniently find interface information. Design drawings and other text documents that contain interface information will appear in the database. The Interface Control Drawings will be used to document and control the data and information that define the interface boundaries between systems, subsystems and equipment. Also, the interface boundaries will define the areas of responsibility for systems and subsystems. The drawing will delineate and identify all the physical and functional interfaces that required coordination to establish and maintain compatibility between the co-functioning equipment, computer software, and the tank farm facilities. An appendix contains the Engineering interface control database system riser manual.

  11. Interface effect in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2014-06-28

    This paper intends to theoretically investigate the effect of the interfaces on the Rashba spin splitting of two coupled quantum wells. The results show that the interface related Rashba spin splitting of the two coupled quantum wells is both smaller than that of a step quantum well which has the same structure with the step quantum well in the coupled quantum wells. And the influence of the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction of the coupled quantum wells is larger than that of a step quantum well. It demonstrates that the spin relaxation time of the two coupled quantum wells will be shorter than that of a step quantum well. As for the application in the spintronic devices, a step quantum well may be better than the coupled quantum wells, which is mentioned in this paper.

  12. Garden Banks 388 ROV interface systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granhaug, O.; Brewster, D.; Soliah, J.; Dubea, C.

    1995-12-31

    ROV systems integration has become an important part of the planning and implementation of deep water field development. This paper provides an overview of the GB 388 subsea development project and describes the ROV interface systems in use on the various subsea production components. The paper continues with an account of the purpose-built ROV system developed for the project. Finally, the paper describes in some detail the specialized ROV tooling and intervention systems that have been developed to assist in the installation, operation and maintenance of the subsea production equipment. The subsea intervention solutions developed for the GB 388 development project have direct application to all deep water field development projects. ROV interface systems are an integral part of current and future subsea completion technology.

  13. Capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard D.; Severs, Joanne C.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is an interface between a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary end and an electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end, for transporting an anolyte sample from a capillary electrophoresis separation capillary to a electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary. The interface of the present invention has: (a) a charge transfer fitting enclosing both of the capillary electrophoresis capillary end and the electrospray ionization mass spectrometry emitter capillary end; (b) a reservoir containing an electrolyte surrounding the charge transfer fitting; and (c) an electrode immersed into the electrolyte, the electrode closing a capillary electrophoresis circuit and providing charge transfer across the charge transfer fitting while avoiding substantial bulk fluid transfer across the charge transfer fitting. Advantages of the present invention have been demonstrated as effective in providing high sensitivity and efficient analyses.

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - Interface_Pstrak

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Activities Related to Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel David W. Pstrak Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission NTSF Session: Interface Between Storage and Transportation May 14, 2014 Overview * Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel * Extended Storage * Waste Confidence Current Status * Yucca Mountain Update * Summary Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage

  15. VMS software for the Jorway-411 interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorries, T.; Moore, C.; Pordes, R.; White, V.

    1987-05-01

    This report describes a Software Package used to access CAMAC through the Jorway-411 Interface, for use on VAX/VMS systems. The software can be used to access parallel and/or serial CAMAC branch highways, and multiple Jorways may be connected to the VAX UNIBUS or MicroVax QBUS. The software available includes a VAX/VMS device driver for the JORWAY-411 and support routines and programs that access the driver. The software is accompanied by extensive documentation.

  16. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur

    1996-08-06

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  17. Combined electrophoresis-electrospray interface and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.D.; Udseth, H.R.; Barinaga, C.J.

    1995-06-13

    An improvement to the system and method is disclosed for analyzing molecular constituents of a composition sample that comprises improvements to an electrospray ionization source for interfacing to mass spectrometers and other detection devices. The improvement consists of establishing a unique electrical circuit pattern and nozzle configuration, a metallic coated and conical shaped capillary outlet, coupled with sizing of the capillary to obtain maximum sensitivity. 10 figs.

  18. Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces | Argonne Leadership

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Facility electronic properties of aqueous solutions of NaCl with density functional theory and hybrid functionals The INCITE team computed the electronic properties of aqueous solutions of NaCl with density functional theory and hybrid functionals. For some samples with many body perturbation theory (GW), they determined the interplay of cations and anions on the energy levels of the solution. Alex Gaiduk, University of Chicago Computational Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Interfaces

  19. Status of the United States-Russian Federation safeguards, transparency and irreversibility (STI) initiative for nuclear arms reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czajkowski, A.F.; Bieniawski, A.J.; Percival, C.M.

    1996-12-31

    The US-Russian Federation initiative to provide safeguards, transparency, and irreversibility (STI) of nuclear arms reductions has been emphasized by several Presidential Joint Summit Statements as well as various agreements between the two parties. Beginning with the US and Russian Federation agreement in March, 1994, to host reciprocal inspections to confirm the stockpiles of plutonium removed from nuclear weapons, the US and Russia have been negotiating an STI regime to increase the transparency and irreversibility of nuclear arms reduction. In December, 1994, the US presented a paper to the Russian Federation proposing a regime of specific transparency measures to provide broader transparency and irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions. Presently the US considers STI to consist of the following measures: (1) agreement for cooperation (AFC); (2) stockpile data exchange agreement (SDEA); (3) mutual reciprocal inspections (MRI); (4) spot checks to confirm data exchanges (SC); and (5) limited Chain of Custody of Warheads Being Dismantled (LCC). The US and Russian have begun negotiations, which are in various stages of progress, on the first three of these measures. This paper will present a brief historical background of STI and discuss the transparency measures including the status of negotiation for each of the measures.

  20. Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Fantoni, Moris; Busto, Mirko; Genon, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

  1. Study of transparent and nontransparent regimes of implosion in star wire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, V. V.; Astanovitskiy, A. L.; Papp, D.; Altemara, S. D.; Chittenden, J. P.; Bland, S. N.; Jones, B.

    2010-10-15

    Star wire arrays were used to control the imploding plasma flows and study plasma interpenetration. These arrays consisted of linear 'rays' aligned azimuthally and extending from the vertical axis. Star arrays with two close located wires ('gates') instead of a single wire on the inner cylinder were studied for transparent and nontransparent regimes of propagation of imploding plasma through the gates. Nontransparent mode of collision is typical for regular star wire arrays and it was also observed in Al stars with gate wires of regular length and with the gate width of 0.3-2 mm. The cascade process of implosion in stars and trapping of imploding plasma in 1-2 mm gates were modeled with the three-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamics code. The intermediate semitransparent mode of collision was observed in Al stars with long Al 'gate' wires. A transparent mode was observed in Al stars with long stainless steel or W gate wires. Applications of wire arrays with controlled plasma flows are discussed.

  2. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-12-16

    We report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergentmore » semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. In conclusion, since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.« less

  3. Novel Iron-based ternary amorphous oxide semiconductor with very high transparency, electronic conductivity, and mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malasi, A.; Taz, H.; Farah, A.; Patel, M.; Lawrie, Benjamin; Pooser, R.; Baddorf, A.; Duscher, G.; Kalyanaraman, R.

    2015-12-16

    We report that ternary metal oxides of type (Me)2O3 with the primary metal (Me) constituent being Fe (66 atomic (at.) %) along with the two Lanthanide elements Tb (10 at.%) and Dy (24 at.%) can show excellent semiconducting transport properties. Thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition at room temperature followed by ambient oxidation showed very high electronic conductivity (>5 × 104 S/m) and Hall mobility (>30 cm2/V-s). These films had an amorphous microstructure which was stable to at least 500 °C and large optical transparency with a direct band gap of 2.85 ± 0.14 eV. This material shows emergent semiconducting behavior with significantly higher conductivity and mobility than the constituent insulating oxides. In conclusion, since these results demonstrate a new way to modify the behaviors of transition metal oxides made from unfilled d- and/or f-subshells, a new class of functional transparent conducting oxide materials could be envisioned.

  4. Structure and chemistry of sol-gel derived transparent silica aerogel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, P.H.; Lofftus, K.D.; Hunt, A.J.

    1985-02-01

    Transparent silica aerogels are being studied because of their excellent thermal insulation properties for window glazing materials. The chemistry of the base catalyzed Si(OC/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 4/ sol-gel process to produce transparent aerogels is presented. The results of a factorial design set of experiments are discussed in which five process parameters are simultaneously varied. The goal of these experiments was to optimize the process conditions and to analyze the importance of various parameters in improving the properties of the aerogel. A novel technique of ambient temperature supercritical drying of alcogels is described. In this process, supercritical drying occurs at less than or equal to40/sup 0/C instead of at greater than or equal to270/sup 0/C and greater than or equal to1700 PSI (12 MPa), by substituting CO/sub 2/ for alcohol in the alcogel. The time of drying is reduced from 2 to 3 days to 8 to 10 hours. It is shown that light scattering, microstructural properties and other characteristics of aerogels produced by this process and by the high temperature supercritical drying are similar.

  5. Universal programming interface with concurrent access

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-10-07

    There exist a number of devices with a positioning nature of operation, such as mechanical linear stages, temperature controllers, or filterwheels with discrete state, and most of them have different programming interfaces. The Universal Positioner software suggests the way to handle all of them is with a single approach, whereby a particular hardware driver is created from the template and by translating the actual commands used by the hardware to and from the universal programmingmore » interface. The software contains the universal API module itself, the demo simulation of hardware, and the front-end programs to help developers write their own software drivers along with example drivers for actual hardware controllers. The software allows user application programs to call devices simultaneously without race conditions (multitasking and concurrent access). The template suggested in this package permits developers to integrate various devices easily into their applications using the same API. The drivers can be stacked; i.e., they can call each other via the same interface.« less

  6. Correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in β-Li3PS4 fast Li+ conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan; Cai, Lu; Liu, Zengcai; dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-07-06

    Our letter reports the correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in the fast Li+ conductor β-Li3PS4, one of the low-symmetry crystalline electrolyte candidates. The material has both high conductivity and good stability that serves well for the large-scale energy storage applications of all-solid-state lithium ion batteries. The anisotropic physical properties, demonstrated here by the thermal expansion coefficients, are crucial for compatibility in the solid-state system and battery performance. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction measurements were done to determine the crystal structure and thermal stability. Moreover, the crystallographic b-axis was revealed as a fast expansion direction, while negligible thermal expansion was observed along the a-axis around the battery operating temperatures. The anisotropic behavior has its structural origin from the Li+ conduction channels with incomplete Li occupancy and a flexible connection of LiS4 and PS4 tetrahedra within the framework. This indicates a strong correlation in the direction of the ionic transport in the low-symmetry Li+ conductor.

  7. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface bilayers Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model ...

  8. Systems and methods for monitoring a solid-liquid interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stoddard, Nathan G; Lewis, Monte A.; Clark, Roger F

    2013-06-11

    Systems and methods are provided for monitoring a solid-liquid interface during a casting process. The systems and methods enable determination of the location of a solid-liquid interface during the casting process.

  9. Dynamics and pattern selection at the crystal-melt interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummins, H.Z.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses: light scattering at the crystal-melt interface; morphological instability and pattern selection; and sidebranching.

  10. Commercial Building Energy Asset Scoring Tool Application Programming Interface

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    slides from June 14, 2013 webinar on the commercial building energy asset scoring tool application programming interface

  11. Thermal Interface Materials for Power Electronics Applications: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Kelly, K.; Eesley, G.

    2008-07-01

    The thermal resistance of the thermal interface material layer greatly affects the maximum temperature of the power electronics.

  12. Electronic Structure of Buried Interfaces - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Zachary

    2015-08-25

    In the electronics behind computer memory storage, the speed and size are dictated by the performance of permanent magnets inside devices called read heads. Complicated magnets made of stacked layers of thin films can be engineered to have properties that yield more energy storage and faster switching times compared to conventional iron or cobalt magnets. The reason is that magnetism is a result of subtle interactions amongst electrons; just how neurons come together on large scales to make cat brains and dog brains, ensembles of electrons interact and become ferromagnets and paramagnets. These interactions make magnets too difficult to study in their entirety, so I focus on the interfaces between layers, which are responsible for the coupling materials physicists hope to exploit to produce next-generation magnets. This project, I study a transition metal oxide material called LSCO, Lanthanum Cobaltite, which can be a paramagnet or a ferromagnet depending on how you tweak the electronic structure. It exhibits an exciting behavior: its sum is greater than the sum of its parts. When another similar material called a LSMO, Lanthanum Manganite, is grown on top of it, their interface has a different type of magnetism from the LSCO or the LSMO! I hope to explain this by demonstrating differently charged ions in the interface. The typical method for quantifying this is x-ray absorption, but all conventional techniques look at every layer simultaneously, averaging the interfaces and the LSCO layers that we want to characterize separately. Instead, I must use a new reflectivity technique, which tracks the intensity of reflected x-rays at different angles, at energies near the absorption peaks of certain elements, to track changes in the electronic structure of the material. The samples were grown by collaborators at the Takamura group at U.C. Davis and probed with this “resonant reflectivity” technique on Beamline 2-1 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

  13. Process for making film-bonded fuel cell interfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur; Terry, Peter L.

    1990-07-03

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. A multi-layer arrangement for the interface provides bridging electrical contact with a hot-pressed resin filling the void space.

  14. Perovskite Sr-doped LaCrO3 as a new p-type transparent conducting oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongliang; Du, Yingge; Papadogianni, Alexandra; Bierwagen, Oliver; Sallis, Shawn; Piper, Louis F. J.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Sushko, Petr; Chambers, Scott A.

    2015-09-16

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) constitute a unique class of materials which combine the seemingly mutually exclusive properties of electrical conductivity and optical transparency in a single material. TCOs are useful for a wide range of applications including solar cells, displays, light emitting diodes and transparent electronics. Simple post-transition metal oxides such as ZnO, In2O3 and SnO2 are wide gap insulators in which the ionic character generates an oxygen 2p-derived valence band (VB) and a metal s-derived conduction band (CB), resulting in large optical band gaps (>3.0 eV) and excellent n-type conductivity when donor doped. In contrast, the development of efficient p-type TCOs remains a global materials challenge. Converting n-type oxides to p-type analogs by acceptor doping is extremely difficult and these materials display poor conductivity.

  15. Accurate gradient approximation for complex interface problems in 3D by an improved coupling interface method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu, Yu-Chen, E-mail: ycshu@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Mathematics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences (South), Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Chern, I-Liang, E-mail: chern@math.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Mathematics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Mathematics Division, National Center for Theoretical Sciences (Taipei Office), Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chien C., E-mail: mechang@iam.ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Most elliptic interface solvers become complicated for complex interface problems at those exceptional points where there are not enough neighboring interior points for high order interpolation. Such complication increases especially in three dimensions. Usually, the solvers are thus reduced to low order accuracy. In this paper, we classify these exceptional points and propose two recipes to maintain order of accuracy there, aiming at improving the previous coupling interface method [26]. Yet the idea is also applicable to other interface solvers. The main idea is to have at least first order approximations for second order derivatives at those exceptional points. Recipe 1 is to use the finite difference approximation for the second order derivatives at a nearby interior grid point, whenever this is possible. Recipe 2 is to flip domain signatures and introduce a ghost state so that a second-order method can be applied. This ghost state is a smooth extension of the solution at the exceptional point from the other side of the interface. The original state is recovered by a post-processing using nearby states and jump conditions. The choice of recipes is determined by a classification scheme of the exceptional points. The method renders the solution and its gradient uniformly second-order accurate in the entire computed domain. Numerical examples are provided to illustrate the second order accuracy of the presently proposed method in approximating the gradients of the original states for some complex interfaces which we had tested previous in two and three dimensions, and a real molecule ( (1D63)) which is double-helix shape and composed of hundreds of atoms.

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor instability at spherical interfaces between viscous fluids: Fluid/vacuum interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrones, Guillermo; Carrara, Mark D.

    2015-05-01

    For a spherical interface of radius R separating two different homogeneous regions of incompressible viscous fluids under the action of a radially directed acceleration, we perform a linear stability analysis in terms of spherical surface harmonics Y n to derive the dispersion relation. The instability behavior is investigated by computing the growth rates and the most-unstable modes as a function of the spherical harmonic degree n. This general methodology is applicable to the entire parameter space spanned by the Atwood number, the viscosity ratio, and the dimensionless number B = (αRΡ²2/μ²²/³ R (where αR, Ρ2 and μ2 are the local radial acceleration at the interface, and the density and viscosity of the denser overlying fluid, respectively). While the mathematical formulation here is general, this paper focuses on instability that arises at a spherical viscous fluid/vacuum interface as there is a great deal to be learned from the effects of one-fluid viscosity and sphericity alone. To quantify and understand the effect that curvature and radial accelerationhave on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a comparison of the growth rates, under homologous driving conditions, between the planar and spherical interfaces is performed. The derived dispersion relation for the planar interface accounts for an underlying finite fluid region of thickness L and normal acceleration αR. Under certain conditions, the development of the most-unstable modes at a spherical interface can take place via the superposition of two adjacent spherical harmonics Yn and Yn+1. This bimodality in the evolution of disturbances in the linear regime does not have a counterpart in the planar configuration where the most-unstable modes are associated with a unique wave number.

  17. Rayleigh-Taylor instability at spherical interfaces between viscous fluids: Fluid/vacuum interface

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terrones, Guillermo; Carrara, Mark D.

    2015-05-01

    For a spherical interface of radius R separating two different homogeneous regions of incompressible viscous fluids under the action of a radially directed acceleration, we perform a linear stability analysis in terms of spherical surface harmonics Y n to derive the dispersion relation. The instability behavior is investigated by computing the growth rates and the most-unstable modes as a function of the spherical harmonic degree n. This general methodology is applicable to the entire parameter space spanned by the Atwood number, the viscosity ratio, and the dimensionless number B = (αRΡ²2/μ²²)¹/³ R (where αR, Ρ2 and μ2 are the localmore » radial acceleration at the interface, and the density and viscosity of the denser overlying fluid, respectively). While the mathematical formulation here is general, this paper focuses on instability that arises at a spherical viscous fluid/vacuum interface as there is a great deal to be learned from the effects of one-fluid viscosity and sphericity alone. To quantify and understand the effect that curvature and radial accelerationhave on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a comparison of the growth rates, under homologous driving conditions, between the planar and spherical interfaces is performed. The derived dispersion relation for the planar interface accounts for an underlying finite fluid region of thickness L and normal acceleration αR. Under certain conditions, the development of the most-unstable modes at a spherical interface can take place via the superposition of two adjacent spherical harmonics Yn and Yn+1. This bimodality in the evolution of disturbances in the linear regime does not have a counterpart in the planar configuration where the most-unstable modes are associated with a unique wave number.« less

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability at spherical interfaces between viscous fluids: Fluid/vacuum interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrones, Guillermo; Carrara, Mark D.

    2015-05-01

    For a spherical interface of radius R separating two different homogeneous regions of incompressible viscous fluids under the action of a radially directed acceleration, we perform a linear stability analysis in terms of spherical surface harmonics Y n to derive the dispersion relation. The instability behavior is investigated by computing the growth rates and the most-unstable modes as a function of the spherical harmonic degree n. This general methodology is applicable to the entire parameter space spanned by the Atwood number, the viscosity ratio, and the dimensionless number B = (?R?2/?)/ R (where ?R, ?2 and ?2 are the local radial acceleration at the interface, and the density and viscosity of the denser overlying fluid, respectively). While the mathematical formulation here is general, this paper focuses on instability that arises at a spherical viscous fluid/vacuum interface as there is a great deal to be learned from the effects of one-fluid viscosity and sphericity alone. To quantify and understand the effect that curvature and radial accelerationhave on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a comparison of the growth rates, under homologous driving conditions, between the planar and spherical interfaces is performed. The derived dispersion relation for the planar interface accounts for an underlying finite fluid region of thickness L and normal acceleration ?R. Under certain conditions, the development of the most-unstable modes at a spherical interface can take place via the superposition of two adjacent spherical harmonics Yn and Yn+1. This bimodality in the evolution of disturbances in the linear regime does not have a counterpart in the planar configuration where the most-unstable modes are associated with a unique wave number.

  19. Implementing virtual reality interfaces for the geosciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bethel, W.; Jacobsen, J.; Austin, A.; Lederer, M.; Little, T.

    1996-06-01

    For the past few years, a multidisciplinary team of computer and earth scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been exploring the use of advanced user interfaces, commonly called {open_quotes}Virtual Reality{close_quotes} (VR), coupled with visualization and scientific computing software. Working closely with industry, these efforts have resulted in an environment in which VR technology is coupled with existing visualization and computational tools. VR technology may be thought of as a user interface. It is useful to think of a spectrum, ranging the gamut from command-line interfaces to completely immersive environments. In the former, one uses the keyboard to enter three or six-dimensional parameters. In the latter, three or six-dimensional information is provided by trackers contained either in hand-held devices or attached to the user in some fashion, e.g. attached to a head-mounted display. Rich, extensible and often complex languages are a vehicle whereby the user controls parameters to manipulate object position and location in a virtual world, but the keyboard is the obstacle in that typing is cumbersome, error-prone and typically slow. In the latter, the user can interact with these parameters by means of motor skills which are highly developed. Two specific geoscience application areas will be highlighted. In the first, we have used VR technology to manipulate three-dimensional input parameters, such as the spatial location of injection or production wells in a reservoir simulator. In the second, we demonstrate how VR technology has been used to manipulate visualization tools, such as a tool for computing streamlines via manipulation of a {open_quotes}rake.{close_quotes} The rake is presented to the user in the form of a {open_quotes}virtual well{close_quotes} icon, and provides parameters used by the streamlines algorithm.

  20. Geophysical subsurface imaging and interface identification.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendley, Kevin; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Day, David Minot; Robinson, Allen Conrad; Weiss, Chester Joseph

    2005-09-01

    Electromagnetic induction is a classic geophysical exploration method designed for subsurface characterization--in particular, sensing the presence of geologic heterogeneities and fluids such as groundwater and hydrocarbons. Several approaches to the computational problems associated with predicting and interpreting electromagnetic phenomena in and around the earth are addressed herein. Publications resulting from the project include [31]. To obtain accurate and physically meaningful numerical simulations of natural phenomena, computational algorithms should operate in discrete settings that reflect the structure of governing mathematical models. In section 2, the extension of algebraic multigrid methods for the time domain eddy current equations to the frequency domain problem is discussed. Software was developed and is available in Trilinos ML package. In section 3 we consider finite element approximations of De Rham's complex. We describe how to develop a family of finite element spaces that forms an exact sequence on hexahedral grids. The ensuing family of non-affine finite elements is called a van Welij complex, after the work [37] of van Welij who first proposed a general method for developing tangentially and normally continuous vector fields on hexahedral elements. The use of this complex is illustrated for the eddy current equations and a conservation law problem. Software was developed and is available in the Ptenos finite element package. The more popular methods of geophysical inversion seek solutions to an unconstrained optimization problem by imposing stabilizing constraints in the form of smoothing operators on some enormous set of model parameters (i.e. ''over-parametrize and regularize''). In contrast we investigate an alternative approach whereby sharp jumps in material properties are preserved in the solution by choosing as model parameters a modest set of variables which describe an interface between adjacent regions in physical space. While

  1. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publication List For The Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport (FIRST) Energy Frontier Research Center * = Solely Supported by the FIRST Center ** = Not Solely Supported by the FIRST Center *Achtyl, J.L.; Unocic, R.R.; Xu, L.; Yu, C.; Raju, M.; Zhang, W.; Sacci, R.L.; Vlassiouk, I.V.; Fulvio P.F.; Ganesh, P.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Dai, S.; van Duin, A.C.T.; Neurock, M.; Geiger, F.M. Aqueous Proton Transfer across Single Layer Graphene. Nat. Comm. 2015, 6, 6539, [10.1038/ncomms7539]. *

  2. Thin film electronic devices with conductive and transparent gas and moisture permeation barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Simpson, Lin Jay

    2015-07-28

    Thin film electronic devices (or stacks integrated with a substrate) that include a permeation barrier formed of a thin layer of metal that provides a light transmitting and electrically conductive layer, wherein the electrical conductive layer is formed on a surface of the substrate or device layer such as a transparent conducting material layer with pin holes or defects caused by manufacturing and the thin layer of metal is deposited on the conductive layer and formed from a self-healing metal that forms self-terminating oxides. A permeation plug or block is formed in or adjacent to the thin film of metal at or proximate to the pin holes to block further permeation of contaminants through the pin holes.

  3. Impacts of humidity and temperature on the performance of transparent conducting zinc oxide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granata, Jennifer E.; Yaklin, Melissa A.; Schneider, Duane Allen; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Norman, Kirsten

    2010-06-01

    The impact of humidity and temperature on a zinc oxide based transparent conducting oxide (TCO) was assessed under accelerated aging conditions. An in situ electroanalytical method was used to monitor the electrical properties for a conducting zinc oxide under controlled atmospheric (humidity, temperature and irradiation) conditions. A review of thin film photovoltaic (PV) literature has shown one major failure mode of cells/modules is associated with the ingress of water into modules in the field. Water contamination has been shown to degrade the performance of the TCO in addition to corroding interconnects and other conductive metals/materials associated with the module. Water ingress is particularly problematic in flexible thin film PV modules since traditional encapsulates such as poly(ethyl vinyl acetate) (EVA) have high water vapor transmission rates. The accelerated aging studies of the zinc oxide based TCOs will allow acceleration factors and kinetic parameters to be determined for reliability purposes.

  4. Data Mining-Aided Crystal Engineering for the Design of Transparent Conducting Oxides: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, C.; Kim, K.; Berry, J. J.; Lee, J.; Jones, W. B.

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to accelerate the pace of material discovery processes by systematically visualizing the huge search space that conventionally needs to be explored. To this end, we demonstrate not only the use of empirical- or crystal chemistry-based physical intuition for decision-making, but also to utilize knowledge-based data mining methodologies in the context of finding p-type delafossite transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). We report on examples using high-dimensional visualizations such as radial visualization combined with machine learning algorithms such as k-nearest neighbor algorithm (k-NN) to better define and visualize the search space (i.e. structure maps) of functional materials design. The vital role of search space generated from these approaches is discussed in the context of crystal chemistry of delafossite crystal structure.

  5. Thermal properties of the optically transparent pore-free nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Morales, J. R.; Garay, J. E.; Balandin, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    The authors report results of investigation of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia. The optically transparent pore-free bulk samples were prepared via the spark plasma sintering process to ensure homogeneity. Thermal conductivity K was measured by two different techniques. It was found that the pore-free nanostructured bulk zirconia is an excellent thermal insulator with the room-temperature Kapprox1.7-2.0 W/m K. It was also shown that the 'phonon-hopping' model can accurately describe specifics of K dependence on temperature and the grain size. The obtained results are important for optimization of zirconia properties for specific applications in advanced electronics and coatings.

  6. Coordination Between the HEU Transparency Program and the Material Protection, Control and Accountability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaser, J.; Hernandez, J.; Dougherty, D.; Bieniawski, A.; Cahalane, P.; Mastal, E.

    2000-06-30

    DOE sponsored programs such as Material Protection Control and Accountability (MPC&A) and implementation of the Highly-Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program send US personnel into Russian nuclear facilities and receive Russian representatives from these programs. While there is overlap in the Russian nuclear facilities visited by these two programs, there had not been any formal mechanism to share information between them. Recently, an MPC&A/HEU Working Group was developed to facilitate the sharing of appropriate information and to address concerns expressed by Minatom and Russian facility personnel such as US visit scheduling conflicts. This paper discusses the goals of the Working Group and ways it has helped to allow the programs to work more efficiently with the Russian facilities.

  7. Transparent electrodes in silicon heterojunction solar cells: Influence on contact passivation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tomasi, Andrea; Sahli, Florent; Seif, Johannes Peter; Fanni, Lorenzo; de Nicolas Agut, Silvia Martin; Geissbuhler, Jonas; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Nicolay, Sylvain; Barraud, Loris; Niesen, Bjoern; et al

    2015-10-26

    Charge carrier collection in silicon heterojunction solar cells occurs via intrinsic/doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer stacks deposited on the crystalline silicon wafer surfaces. Usually, both the electron and hole collecting stacks are externally capped by an n-type transparent conductive oxide, which is primarily needed for carrier extraction. Earlier, it has been demonstrated that the mere presence of such oxides can affect the carrier recombination in the crystalline silicon absorber. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the impact of this phenomenon on both the electron and hole collecting sides, including its consequences for the operating voltages of silicon heterojunction solarmore » cells. As a result, we define guiding principles for improved passivating contact design for high-efficiency silicon solar cells.« less

  8. Transparent electrodes in silicon heterojunction solar cells: Influence on contact passivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomasi, Andrea; Sahli, Florent; Seif, Johannes Peter; Fanni, Lorenzo; de Nicolas Agut, Silvia Martin; Geissbuhler, Jonas; Paviet-Salomon, Bertrand; Nicolay, Sylvain; Barraud, Loris; Niesen, Bjoern; De Wolf, Stefaan; Ballif, Christophe

    2015-10-26

    Charge carrier collection in silicon heterojunction solar cells occurs via intrinsic/doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon layer stacks deposited on the crystalline silicon wafer surfaces. Usually, both the electron and hole collecting stacks are externally capped by an n-type transparent conductive oxide, which is primarily needed for carrier extraction. Earlier, it has been demonstrated that the mere presence of such oxides can affect the carrier recombination in the crystalline silicon absorber. Here, we present a detailed investigation of the impact of this phenomenon on both the electron and hole collecting sides, including its consequences for the operating voltages of silicon heterojunction solar cells. As a result, we define guiding principles for improved passivating contact design for high-efficiency silicon solar cells.

  9. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO{sub 2} film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  10. Atomic Physics Effects on Convergent, Child-Langmuir Ion Flow between Nearly Transparent Electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santarius, John F.; Emmert, Gilbert A.

    2013-11-07

    Research during this project at the University of Wisconsin Fusion Technology Institute (UW FTI) on ion and neutral flow through an arbitrary, monotonic potential difference created by nearly transparent electrodes accomplished the following: (1) developed and implemented an integral equation approach for atomic physics effects in helium plasmas; (2) extended the analysis to coupled integral equations that treat atomic and molecular deuterium ions and neutrals; (3) implemented the key deuterium and helium atomic and molecular cross sections; (4) added negative ion production and related cross sections; and (5) benchmarked the code against experimental results. The analysis and codes treat the species D0, D20, D+, D2+, D3+, D and, separately at present, He0 and He+. Extensions enhanced the analysis and related computer codes to include He++ ions plus planar and cylindrical geometries.

  11. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael Y.

    2007-09-11

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the re quest, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  12. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael Y.

    2010-09-21

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the request, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  13. System of and method for transparent management of data objects in containers across distributed heterogenous resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Reagan W.; Rajasekar, Arcot; Wan, Michael Y.

    2004-01-13

    A system of and method for maintaining data objects in containers across a network of distributed heterogeneous resources in a manner which is transparent to a client. A client request pertaining to containers is resolved by querying meta data for the container, processing the request through one or more copies of the container maintained on the system, updating the meta data for the container to reflect any changes made to the container as a result processing the request, and, if a copy of the container has changed, changing the status of the copy to indicate dirty status or synchronizing the copy to one or more other copies that may be present on the system.

  14. The Superconductors That Magnets Really Want: What Stands in the Way? (Superconductors for Accelerator Use: What Next and How Close is the Ideal Conductor?)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Larbalestier, David [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory] [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida, United States

    2010-01-08

    There are over 5000 superconducting materials but only about 5 have ever been useful for applications in magnets, while HEP, which has been so vital for the development of superconducting magnet technology has made virtually every magnet out of just one, the simple bcc alloy Nb-Ti with Tc of 9 K and upper critical field ~ 14T (at 2K). Significant demonstrations of the capability of the brittle intermetallic Nb3Sn have shown that fields of more than 15 T can be generated in dipole form. But Nb-Ti and Nb3Sn are staid, conventional superconductors, far from the cutting edge of superconducting science research where cuprates like YBa2Cu3O7-x and Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox remain at the scientific forefront and in 2008 were joined by the recently discovered Fe-As pnictide superconductors. What could it mean to have materials for magnets with 10 times the Tc of Nb-Ti (90-120 K) and 3 or more times the critical field (100-240 T)? One enormous barrier is that higher Tc so far always means more complexity and a more localized superconducting interaction which is sensitive to local loss of superconductivity. The issue that has made the cuprate high temperature superconductors so hard to apply is that grain boundaries which form a 3D network in any practical wire form, easily acquire degraded superconducting properties. But conductors can now be made with extreme texture so that grain boundaries are minimized. Moreover almost practical conductors of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox and YBa2Cu3O7-x are now are in production and in late 2008 we were, at the Magnet Lab, able to make small solenoids operating at high current density in fields of 32 and almost 34 T respectively. Within the HEP community, there is enthusiasm to embrace HTS conductors for new very high field machines that could, like the Muon Collider, use fields of 30-50 T. In my talk I would like to explore the underlying science controlling such potential applications.

  15. Mechanical interface having multiple grounded actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Kenneth M.; Levin, Mike D.; Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for interfacing the motion of a user-manipulable object with a computer system includes a user object physically contacted or grasped by a user. A 3-D spatial mechanism is coupled to the user object, such as a stylus or a medical instrument, and provides three degrees of freedom to the user object. Three grounded actuators provide forces in the three degrees of freedom. Two of the degrees of freedom are a planar workspace provided by a closed-loop linkage of members, and the third degree of freedom is rotation of the planar workspace provided by a rotatable carriage. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between actuators and the user object and include drums coupled to the carriage, pulleys coupled to grounded actuators, and flexible cables transmitting force between the pulleys and the drums. The flexibility of the cable allows the drums to rotate with the carriage while the pulleys and actuators remain fixed to ground. The interface also may include a floating gimbal mechanism coupling the linkage to the user object. The floating gimbal mechanism includes rotatably coupled gimbal members that provide three degrees of freedom to the user object and capstan mechanisms coupled between sensors and the gimbal members for providing enhanced sensor resolution.

  16. Dead Reckoning Pedometer Graphical User Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-26

    The Dead Reckoning Pedometer Graphical User Interface (DRP GUI) software is tasked with maturing the technology described in a WSRC patent application. This patent application describes an electronic navigation system that records human foot movements, in three dimensions, for the purpose of determining position, distance, and speed of a walking person. The simiplest form of the apparatus consists of a magnetometer (an instrument that measures magnetic field strength) on one foot and a small permanentmore » magnet on another foot with pressure sensors on each foot. When a person takes a step, the foot will hit the ground and produce a signal on the pressure sensor. This will trigger a reading of the magnetometer so that the relative position of one foot to the other can be calculated. This same process is repeated for each step. The DRP could be very useful for tracking emergency personnel such as firemen, policemen, and paramedics when they travel within a building. Technologies such as global positioning systems to not work within buildings. The goal of the DRP GUI V1.0.0 software is to provide a three-dimensional graphical user interface that will allow WSRC to demonstrate the DRP concepts to potential patent licensees. It is hoped that a partnership will allow WSRC and another company to further develop the DRP technology and software into a commercial product.« less

  17. EnergyPlus Graphical User Interface

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-01-04

    LBNL, Infosys Technologies and Digital Alchemy are developing a free, comprehensive graphical user interface (GUI) that will enable EnergyPlus to be used more easily and effectively by building designers and other professionals, facilitating its widespread adoption. User requirements have been defined through a series of practitioner workshops. A new schematic editor for HVAC systems will be combined with different building envelope geometry generation tools and IFC-based BIM import and export. LBNL and Digital Alchemy havemore » generated a detailed function requirements specification, which is being implemented in software by Infosys, LBNL and and Digital Alchemy. LBNL and practitioner subcontractors will develop a comprehensive set of templates and libraries and will perform extensive testing of the GUI before it is released in Q3 2011. It is planned to use an Open Platfom approach, in which a comprehensive set of well documented Application Programming Interfaces (API's) would be provided to facilitate both the development of third party contributions to the official, standard GUI and the development of derivative works.« less

  18. Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-18

    Sparse systems of linear equations arise in many engineering applications, including finite elements, finite volumes, and others. The solution of linear systems is often the most computationally intensive portion of the application. Depending on the complexity of problems addressed by the application, there may be no single solver capable of solving all of the linear systems that arise. This motivates the desire to switch an application from one solver librwy to another, depending on themore » problem being solved. The interfaces provided by solver libraries differ greatly, making it difficult to switch an application code from one library to another. The amount of library-specific code in an application Can be greatly reduced by having an abstraction layer between solver libraries and the application, putting a common "face" on various solver libraries. One such abstraction layer is the Finite Element Interface to Linear Solvers (EEl), which has seen significant use by finite element applications at Sandia National Laboratories and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.« less

  19. Human-system Interfaces for Automatic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins,J.; Fleger, S.; Barnes V.

    2010-11-07

    Automation is ubiquitous in modern complex systems, and commercial nuclear- power plants are no exception. Automation is applied to a wide range of functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, and response implementation. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting personnel in nearly all aspects of system operation. In light of its increasing use and importance in new- and future-plants, guidance is needed to conduct safety reviews of the operator's interface with automation. The objective of this research was to develop such guidance. We first characterized the important HFE aspects of automation, including six dimensions: levels, functions, processes, modes, flexibility, and reliability. Next, we reviewed literature on the effects of all of these aspects of automation on human performance, and on the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs). Then, we used this technical basis established from the literature to identify general principles for human-automation interaction and to develop review guidelines. The guidelines consist of the following seven topics: automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, our study identified several topics for additional research.

  20. Development and experience of large conductor cable 35-kV joints at the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calderon, F.; Findon, E.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) places a high priority on developing its distribution system in the most reliable and cost-effective manner. At higher distribution voltages, such as 34.5-kV, jointing systems which are easily, consistently, and quickly installed by both utility and contracted personnel offer significant economic advantages. With increasing loads and higher load densities at LADWP, the use of 34.5-kV, cross-linked polyethylene (CLP) aluminum, 1000-kcmil cable is becoming more common to meet customer load requirements. Two methods of jointing this large conductor cable were historically used, although each method had limitations. This paper provides an overview of LADWP's distribution system, past jointing techniques, the investigation and evaluation of alternate approaches, and the field experience with the joint selected for use.

  1. Straddle Carrier Interface and Dispatching System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-09-13

    SCIDS is the Data Dispatching and Transfer Point (DDTP) component of a straddle carrier-based radiation detection system developed for the DOE Megaports Initiative for scanning shipping containers in transshipment ports. Its purpose is to communicate with a Radiation Detection Straddle Carrier (RDSC) developed by Detector Networks International, sending commands to the RDSC and receiving sensor data from the RDSC. Incoming sensor and status data from the RDSC is forwarded to a back-end data storage andmore » display system that is external to SCIDS. SCIDS provides a graphical user interface for port operations personnel that displays location and status of the RDSC and status of each container in the port, and accepts commands from the operator directing the scanning operations of the RDSC.« less

  2. Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. ); Pope, R.B. )

    1992-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

  3. User Interface Program for secure electronic tags

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Y.; Koehl, E.R.; Carlson, R.D.; Raptis, A.C.

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes and documents the efforts of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in developing a secure tag communication user interface program comprising a tag monitor and a communication tool. This program can perform the same functions as the software that was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), but it is enhanced with a user-friendly screen. It represents the first step in updating the TRANSCOM Tracking System (TRANSCOM) by incorporating a tag communication screen menu into the main menu of the TRANSCOM user program. A working version of TRANSCOM, enhanced with ANL secure-tag graphics, will strongly support the Department of Energy Warhead Dismantlement/Special Nuclear Materials Control initiatives. It will allow commercial satellite tracking of the movements and operational activities of treaty-limited items and transportation vehicles throughout Europe and the former USSR, as well as the continental US.

  4. User interface for a tele-operated robotic hand system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Anthony L

    2015-03-24

    Disclosed here is a user interface for a robotic hand. The user interface anchors a user's palm in a relatively stationary position and determines various angles of interest necessary for a user's finger to achieve a specific fingertip location. The user interface additionally conducts a calibration procedure to determine the user's applicable physiological dimensions. The user interface uses the applicable physiological dimensions and the specific fingertip location, and treats the user's finger as a two link three degree-of-freedom serial linkage in order to determine the angles of interest. The user interface communicates the angles of interest to a gripping-type end effector which closely mimics the range of motion and proportions of a human hand. The user interface requires minimal contact with the operator and provides distinct advantages in terms of available dexterity, work space flexibility, and adaptability to different users.

  5. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  6. Interface for Parallel I/O from Componentized Visualization Algorithms

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-09-16

    The software is an interface layer over file I/O with features specifically designed for efficient parallel reads and writes. The interface provides multiple concrete implementations that easily allow the replacement of one interface with another. This feature allows a reader or writer implementation to work independently of whether parallel file I/O is available or desired. The software also contains extensions to some readers to allow it to use the file I/O functionality.

  7. Corrosion protected, multi-layer fuel cell interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feigenbaum, Haim; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1986-01-01

    An improved interface configuration for use between adjacent elements of a fuel cell stack. The interface is impervious to gas and liquid and provides resistance to corrosion by the electrolyte of the fuel cell. The multi-layer configuration for the interface comprises a non-cupreous metal-coated metallic element to which is film-bonded a conductive layer by hot pressing a resin therebetween. The multi-layer arrangement provides bridging electrical contact.

  8. Enhanced magnetization at the Cr/MgO(001) interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroy, M.-A.; Bataille, A. M. Ott, F.; Wang, Q.; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Bertran, F.; Le Fèvre, P.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Vlad, A.; Coati, A.; Garreau, Y.; Hauet, T.; Andrieu, S.; Gatel, C.

    2015-12-21

    We report on the magnetization at the Cr/MgO interface, which we studied through two complementary techniques: angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and polarized neutron reflectivity. We experimentally observe an enhanced interface magnetization at the interface, yet with values much smaller than the ones reported so far by theoretical and experimental studies on Cr(001) surfaces. Our findings cast some doubts on the interpretations on previous works and could be useful in antiferromagnetic spin torque studies.

  9. Controllable Grid Interface Test System | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controllable Grid Interface Test System NREL's controllable grid interface (CGI) test system can reduce certification testing time and costs while providing system engineers with a better understanding of how wind turbines, photovoltaic inverters, and energy storage systems react to disturbances on the electric power system. The controllable grid interface is the first test facility in the United States that has fault simulation capabilities. It allows manufacturers and system operators to

  10. Novel Nanostructured Interface Solution for Automotive Thermoelectric Modules Application

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents nanostructured thermal/electrical interface tapeŽ concept involving carbon nanotube and metal nanowire films to improve thermomechanical cycling behavior of automotive TEGs

  11. Structure, defects, and strain in silicon-silicon oxide interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kova?evi?, Goran Pivac, Branko

    2014-01-28

    The structure of the interfaces between silicon and silicon-oxide is responsible for proper functioning of MOSFET devices while defects in the interface can deteriorate this function and lead to their failure. In this paper we modeled this interface and characterized its defects and strain. MD simulations were used for reconstructing interfaces into a thermodynamically stable configuration. In all modeled interfaces, defects were found in the form of three-coordinated silicon atom, five coordinated silicon atom, threefold-coordinated oxygen atom, or displaced oxygen atom. Three-coordinated oxygen atom can be created if dangling bonds on silicon are close enough. The structure and stability of three-coordinated silicon atoms (P{sub b} defect) depend on the charge as well as on the electric field across the interface. The negatively charged P{sub b} defect is the most stable one, but the electric field resulting from the interface reduces that stability. Interfaces with large differences in periodic constants of silicon and silicon oxide can be stabilized by buckling of silicon layer. The mechanical stress resulted from the interface between silicon and silicon oxide is greater in the silicon oxide layer. Ab initio modeling of clusters representing silicon and silicon oxide shows about three time larger susceptibility to strain in silicon oxide than in silicon if exposed to the same deformation.

  12. Zero interface tensions at the deconfining phase transition for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    gauge theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Zero interface tensions at the deconfining phase transition for a matrix model of a SU() gauge theory Authors: ...

  13. Synthesis of metal silicide at metal/silicon oxide interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthesis of metal silicide at metalsilicon oxide interface by electronic excitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of metal silicide at metalsilicon oxide ...

  14. From coherent to incoherent mismatched interfaces: A generalized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Physical interpretation: SSand Af : Thermodynamic driving forces deforming the interface. YS: Work of stretching one crystal holding the other fixed i.e. altering tbestiructui'e of ...

  15. Interface design principles for high-performance organic semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) are a promising cost-effective candidate in next generation ... transfer state at the interface, which greatly limits the power conversion efficiency. ...

  16. Interface Surprises May Motivate Novel Oxide Electronic Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Often one string takes others with it." Borisevich led a project that made a surprising discovery: intrinsic electric fields can drive oxygen diffusion at interfaces in engineered ...

  17. Electrode-Immune System Interface Monitor through Neural Stimulation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electrode-Immune System Interface Monitor through Neural Stimulation in American Cockroach ... of Science (DOE SC) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: CHEM

  18. Basic research needs and opportunities on interfaces in solar materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Czanderna, A. W.; Gottschall, R. J.

    1981-04-01

    The workshop on research needs and recommended research programs on interfaces in solar energy conversion devices was held June 30-July 3, 1980. The papers deal mainly with solid-solid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas interfaces, sometimes involving multilayer solid-solid interfaces. They deal mainly with instrumental techniques of studying these interfaces so they can be optimized, so they can be fabricated with quality control and so changes with time can be forecast. The latter is required because a long lifetime (20 yrs is suggested) is necessary for economic reasons. Fifteen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  19. Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces LPICM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces (LPICM) Place: Palaiseau, France Zip: 91128 Sector: Carbon Product: Research department of the Ecole Polytechnique in...

  20. Control of membrane permeability in air-stable droplet interface...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Air-stable droplet interface bilayers (airDIBs) on oil-infused surfaces are versatile model membranes for synthetic biology applications, including biosensing of airborne species. ...

  1. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interface tracking simulation capability for predicting ... and the surrounding shearing fluid for realistic flows. ... model drop and bubble interactions in a domain ...

  2. Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Atomic-scale chemical quantification of oxide interfaces using energy-dispersive X-ray ... ANTIFERROMAGNETISM; ASYMMETRY; BISMUTH COMPOUNDS; DIFFUSION; EPITAXY; ...

  3. A narrow window of Rabi frequency for competition between electromagnetically induced transparency and Raman absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ray-Yuan; Fang, Wei-Chia; Lee, Ming-Tsung; He, Zong-Syun; Ke, Bai-Cian; Lee, Yi-Chi; Tsai, Chin-Chun

    2010-01-15

    This investigation clarifies the transition phenomenon between the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and Raman absorption in a ladder-type system of Doppler-broadened cesium vapor. A competition window of this transition was found to be as narrow as 2 MHz defined by the probe Rabi frequency. For a weak probe, the spectrum of EIT associated with quantum interference suggests that the effect of the Doppler velocity on the spectrum is negligible. When the Rabi frequency of the probe becomes comparable with the effective decay rate, an electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) dip emerges at the center of the power broadened EIT peak. While the Rabi frequency of the probe exceeds the effective decay rate, decoherence that is generated by the intensified probe field occurs and Raman absorption dominates the interaction process, yielding a pure absorption spectrum; the Doppler velocity plays an important role in the interaction. A theory that is based on density matrix simulation, with or without the Doppler effect, can qualitatively fit the experimental data. In this work, the coherence of atom-photon interactions is created or destroyed using the probe Rabi frequency as a decoherence source.

  4. Structural stability of transparent conducting films assembled from length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Harris; G. R. S. Iyer; D. O. Simien; J. A. Fagan; J. Y. Huh; J. Y. Chung; S. D. Hudson; J. Obrzut; J. F. Douglas; C. M. Stafford; E. K. Hobbie

    2011-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films show significant promise for transparent electronics applications that demand mechanical flexibility, but durability remains an outstanding issue. In this work, thin membranes of length purified single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are uniaxially and isotropically compressed by depositing them on prestrained polymer substrates. Upon release of the strain, the topography, microstructure, and conductivity of the films are characterized using a combination of optical/fluorescence microscopy, light scattering, force microscopy, electron microscopy, and impedance spectroscopy. Above a critical surface mass density, films assembled from nanotubes of well-defined length exhibit a strongly nonlinear mechanical response. The measured strain dependence reveals a dramatic softening that occurs through an alignment of the SWCNTs normal to the direction of prestrain, which at small strains is also apparent as an anisotropic increase in sheet resistance along the same direction. At higher strains, the membrane conductivities increase due to a compression-induced restoration of conductive pathways. Our measurements reveal the fundamental mode of elasto-plastic deformation in these films and suggest how it might be suppressed.

  5. Improving Transparency in the Reporting of Safeguards Implementation: FY11 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toomey, Christopher; Odlaug, Christopher S.; Wyse, Evan T.

    2011-09-30

    In 2008, the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation (SAGSI) indicated that the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) Safeguards Implementation Report (SIR) has not kept pace with the evolution of safeguards and provided the IAEA with a set of recommendations for improvement. The SIR is the primary mechanism for providing an overview of safeguards implementation in a given year and reporting on the annual safeguards findings and conclusions drawn by the Secretariat. As the IAEA transitions to State-level safeguards approaches, SIR reporting must adapt to reflect these evolutionary changes. This evolved report will better reflect the IAEA's transition to a more qualitative and information-driven approach, based upon State-as-a-whole considerations. This paper applies SAGSI's recommendations to the development of multiple models for an evolved SIR and finds that an SIR repurposed as a 'safeguards portal' could significantly enhance information delivery, clarity, and transparency. In addition, this paper finds that the 'portal concept' also appears to have value as a standardized information presentation and analysis platform for use by Country Officers, for continuity of knowledge purposes, and the IAEA Secretariat in the safeguards conclusion process. Accompanying this paper is a fully functional prototype of the 'portal' concept, built using commercial software and IAEA Annual Report data and available for viewing at http://safeguardsportal.pnnl.gov.

  6. Preparation of transparent conducting B-doped ZnO films by vacuum arc plasma evaporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyata, Toshihiro; Honma, Yasunori; Minami, Tadatsugu

    2007-07-15

    Highly transparent and conductive B-doped ZnO (BZO) thin films have been prepared by a newly developed vacuum arc plasma evaporation method that provided high-rate film depositions using sintered BZO pellets and fragments. The obtained electrical and optical properties of the deposited BZO thin films were considerably affected by the deposition conditions as well as the preparation method of the BZO pellets and fragments used. The lowest thin film resistivity was obtained with a B doping content [B/(B+Zn) atomic ratio] of approximately 1 at. %. A resistivity as low as 5x10{sup -4} {omega} cm and an average transmittance above about 80% in the wavelength range of 400-1300 nm were obtained in BZO films prepared with a thickness above approximately 400 nm at a substrate temperature of 200 deg. C. In addition, a low resistivity of 7.97x10{sup -4} {omega} cm and average transmittances above about 80% in the visible wavelength range were obtained in a BZO film prepared at a substrate temperature of 100 deg. C and an O{sub 2} gas flow rate of 10 SCCM (SCCM denotes cubic centimeter per minute at STP). The deposition rate of BZO films was typically 170 nm/min with a cathode plasma power of 4.5 kW.

  7. Towards more transparent and reproducible omics studies through a common metadata checklist and data publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolker, Eugene; Ozdemir, Vural; Martens , Lennart; Hancock, William S.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Anderson, Nathaniel; Aynacioglu, Sukru; Baranova, Ancha; Campagna, Shawn R.; Chen, Rui; Choiniere, John; Dearth, Stephen P.; Feng, Wu-Chun; Ferguson, Lynnette; Fox, Geoffrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Grossman, Robert; Heath, Allison; Higdon, Roger; Hutz, Mara; Janko, Imre; Jiang, Lihua; Joshi, Sanjay; Kel, Alexander; Kemnitz, Joseph W.; Kohane, Isaac; Kolker, Natali; Lancet, Doron; Lee, Elaine; Li, Weizhong; Lisitsa, Andrey; Llerena, Adrian; MacNealy-Koch, Courtney; Marhsall, Jean-Claude; Masuzzo, Paolo; May, Amanda; Mias, George; Monroe, Matthew E.; Montague, Elizabeth; Monney, Sean; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Noronha, Santosh; Omenn, Gilbert; Rajasimha, Harsha; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Sheehan, Jerry; Smarr, Larry; Smith, Charles V.; Smith, Todd; Snyder, Michael; Rapole, Srikanth; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Stanberry, Larissa; Stewart, Elizabeth; Toppo, Stefano; Uetz, Peter; Verheggen, Kenneth; Voy, Brynn H.; Warnich, Louise; Wilhelm, Steven W.; Yandl, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Biological processes are fundamentally driven by complex interactions between biomolecules. Integrated high-throughput omics studies enable multifaceted views of cells, organisms, or their communities. With the advent of new post-genomics technologies omics studies are becoming increasingly prevalent yet the full impact of these studies can only be realized through data harmonization, sharing, meta-analysis, and integrated research,. These three essential steps require consistent generation, capture, and distribution of the metadata. To ensure transparency, facilitate data harmonization, and maximize reproducibility and usability of life sciences studies, we propose a simple common omics metadata checklist. The proposed checklist is built on the rich ontologies and standards already in use by the life sciences community. The checklist will serve as a common denominator to guide experimental design, capture important parameters, and be used as a standard format for stand-alone data publications. This omics metadata checklist and data publications will create efficient linkages between omics data and knowledge-based life sciences innovation and importantly, allow for appropriate attribution to data generators and infrastructure science builders in the post-genomics era. We ask that the life sciences community test the proposed omics metadata checklist and data publications and provide feedback for their use and improvement.

  8. High performance transparent conducting films of cadmium indate prepared by RF sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, T.J.; Wu, X.; Mulligan, W.P.

    1996-12-31

    The authors are examining various spinel-structured thin films (e.g., Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) to develop higher-quality transparent conducting oxides (TCO) than more conventional materials such as indium tin oxide. Here, they report on cadmium indate (CdIn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CIO), which is another member of this family. Thin films of CIO were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, from an oxide target, onto borosilicate glass substrates. The variables included the substrate temperature, sputtering gas composition, and pressure. Film properties were measured before and after heat treatment. Characterization involved Hall effect measurements, optical and infrared spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and atomic-force microscopy. Film resistivities as low as 2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {Omega}cm were achieved for a film thickness of 0.55 {micro}m. The transmittance was 90% in the visible region of the spectrum, without correction for substrate losses and without an anti-reflection coating. The plasma resonance occurred at longer wavelengths than for other materials and this, with a bandgap of approximately 3.1 eV, presents a wide window for optical transmittance. The highest mobility was 54 cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and the highest carrier concentration was 7.5 {times} 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}.

  9. Growth of oriented vanadium pentaoxide nanostructures on transparent conducting substrates and their applications in photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hongjiang; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Xinling; Chen, Zhang; Cao, Chuanxiang; Luo, Hongjie; Kanehira, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    A novel, hydrothermal and hard-template-free method was developed for the first time to grow oriented, single-crystalline monoclinic VO{sub 2} (B) flower-like nanorod films on transparent conductive fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates. The length and morphology of the nanorods can be tuned by changing the growth parameters, such as growth time and initial precursor concentration. The flower-like V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films were obtained after post-calcination treatment of VO{sub 2} (B) films. The photocatalytic activity of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films was investigated by the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under UV and visible light. The prepared V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good photocatalytic performance (74.6% and 63% under UV and visible light for 210 min, respectively) and more practical application in industry. - Graphical abstract: Flower nanostructured vanadium oxide film was prepared by hydrothermal reaction for photocatalysis application. - Highlights: Monoclinic VO{sub 2} nanorod array and flower-like nanostructure were directly grown on FTO substrate by hydrothermal reaction. The growth mechanism was analyzed by FESEM at different time. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} flower-like nanostructure film was obtained after calcining VO{sub 2} film. V{sub 2}O{sub 5} film exhibited good light activity and potential application in photocatalysis.

  10. Processing of transparent polycrystalline AlON:Ce3+ scintillators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ching -Fong; Yang, Pin; King, Graham; Tegtmeier, Eric L.

    2015-10-23

    A new polycrystalline ceramic scintillator is reported for potential use in radiation detection and medical imaging applications. The goal was to develop cerium-activated aluminum oxynitride (AlON:Ce3+) ceramics, which can be produced using ceramic processes in comparison to the high-cost, low-yield single-crystal growth technique. A phase pure AlON:Ce3+ powder with cubic symmetry was successfully synthesized at high temperature under a reducing atmosphere to convert Ce4+ to Ce3+ in the solid solution. We explored two different activator concentrations (0.5 and 1.0 mol%). Fully dense and transparent AlON:Ce3+ ceramics were produced by a liquid-phase-assisted pressureless sintering. The crystal field splitting around the Ce3+ activator in the AlON was comparable to the splitting induced by Br₋ and the Cl₋ ligands, which produced an emission spectrum perfectly matching the maximum quantum efficiency range of the photomultiplier tube for radiation detection. Both optical excitation and radiation ionizations in AlON:Ce3+ were demonstrated. Lastly, challenges and mechanisms related to the radioluminescence efficiency are discussed.

  11. TRANSMISSION AND EMISSION OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES IN SEMI-TRANSPARENT SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocharov, Leon; Usoskin, Ilya; Laitinen, Timo; Vainio, Rami

    2014-06-01

    While major solar energetic particle (SEP) events are associated with coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks in solar wind, accurate SEP measurements reveal that more than one component of energetic ions exist in the beginning of the events. Solar electromagnetic emissions, including nuclear gamma-rays, suggest that high-energy ions could also be accelerated by coronal shocks, and some of those particles could contribute to SEPs in interplanetary space. However, the CME-driven shock in solar wind is thought to shield any particle source beneath the shock because of the strong scattering required for the diffusive shock acceleration. In this Letter, we consider a shock model that allows energetic particles from the possible behind-shock source to appear in front of the shock simultaneously with SEPs accelerated by the shock itself. We model the energetic particle transport in directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field in a spherical shock expanding through the highly turbulent magnetic sector with an embedded quiet magnetic tube, which makes the shock semi-transparent for energetic particles. The model energy spectra and time profiles of energetic ions escaping far upstream of the shock are similar to the profiles observed during the first hour of some gradual SEP events.

  12. High performance transparent conducting films of cadmium indate prepared by RF sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, T.J.; Wu, X.; Mulligan, W.P.

    1996-04-01

    The authors are examining various spinel-structured thin films (e.g., Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}, Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) to develop higher-quality transparent conducting oxides (TCO) than more conventional materials such as indium tin oxide. Here, the authors report on cadmium indate (CdIn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, CIO), which is another member of this family. Thin films of CIO were deposited by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering, from an oxide target, onto borosilicate glass substrates. The variables included the substrate temperature, sputtering gas composition, and pressure. Film properties were measured before and after heat treatment. Characterization involved Hall effect measurements, optical and infrared spectrophotometry, X-ray diffraction, and atomic-force microscopy. Film resistivities as low as 2.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {Omega} cm were achieved for a film thickness of 0.55 {micro}m. The transmittance was 90% in the visible region of the spectrum, without correction for substrate losses and without an anti-reflection coating. The plasma resonance occurred at longer wavelengths than for other materials and this, with a bandgap of approximately 3.1 eV, presents a wide window for optical transmittance. The highest mobility was 54 cm{sup 2} V{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} and the highest carrier concentration was 7.5 {times} 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}.

  13. Carrier Selective, Passivated Contacts for High Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells based on Transparent Conducting Oxides

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Young, David L.; Nemeth, William; Grover, Sachit; Norman, Andrew; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Lee, Benjamin G.; LaSalvia, Vincenzo; Stradins, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We describe the design, fabrication and results of passivated contacts to n-type silicon utilizing thin SiO2 and transparent conducting oxide layers. High temperature silicon dioxide is grown on both surfaces of an n-type wafer to a thickness <50 Å, followed by deposition of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) and a patterned metal contacting layer. As deposited, the thin-film stack has a very high J0,contact, and a non-ohmic, high contact resistance. However, after a forming gas anneal, the passivation quality and the contact resistivity improve significantly. The contacts are characterized by measuring the recombination parameter of the contact (J0,contact) and the specificmore » contact resistivity (ρcontact) using a TLM pattern. The best ITO/SiO2 passivated contact in this study has J0,contact = 92.5 fA/cm2 and ρcontact = 11.5 mOhm-cm2. These values are placed in context with other passivating contacts using an analysis that determines the ultimate efficiency and the optimal area fraction for contacts for a given set of (J0,contact, ρcontact) values. The ITO/SiO2 contacts are found to have a higher J0,contact, but a similar ρcontact compared to the best reported passivated contacts.« less

  14. A transparent Pyrex ?-reactor for combined in situ optical characterization and photocatalytic reactivity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionigi, F.; Hansen, O.; Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology, Nanotech, Building 345 East, Technical University of Denmark, DTU, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby ; Nielsen, M. G.; Chorkendorff, I.; Vesborg, P. C. K.; Pedersen, T.

    2013-10-15

    A new Pyrex-based ?-reactor for photocatalytic and optical characterization experiments is presented. The reactor chamber and gas channels are microfabricated in a thin poly-silicon coated Pyrex chip that is sealed with a Pyrex lid by anodic bonding. The device is transparent to light in the UV-vis-near infrared range of wavelengths (photon energies between ?0.4 and ?4.1 eV). The absorbance of a photocatalytic film obtained with a light transmission measurement during a photocatalytic reaction is presented as a proof of concept of a photocatalytic reactivity measurement combined with in situ optical characterization. Diffuse reflectance measurements of highly scattering photocatalytic nanopowders in a sealed Pyrex ?-reactor are also possible using an integrating sphere as shown in this work. These experiments prove that a photocatalyst can be characterized with optical techniques after a photocatalytic reaction without removing the material from the reactor. The catalyst deposited in the cylindrical reactor chamber can be illuminated from both top and bottom sides and an example of application of top and bottom illumination is presented.

  15. Investigation of Some Transparent Metal Oxides as Damp Heat Protective Coating for CIGS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Yan, F.; Zaaunbrecher, B.; To, B.; Perkins, J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the protective effectiveness of some transparent metal oxides (TMO) on CIGS solar cell coupons against damp heat (DH) exposure at 85oC and 85% relative humidity (RH). Sputter-deposited bilayer ZnO (BZO) with up to 0.5-um Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer and 0.2-um bilayer InZnO were used as 'inherent' part of device structure on CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG. Sputter-deposited 0.2-um ZnSnO and atomic layer deposited (ALD) 0.1-um Al2O3 were used as overcoat on typical BZO/CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG solar cells. The results were all negative -- all TMO-coated CIGS cells exhibited substantial degradation in DH. Combining the optical photographs, PL and EL imaging, SEM surface micro-morphology, coupled with XRD, I-V and QE measurements, the causes of the device degradations are attributed to hydrolytic corrosion, flaking, micro-cracking, and delamination induced by the DH moisture. Mechanical stress and decrease in crystallinity (grain size effect) could be additional degrading factors for thicker AZO grown on CdS/CIGS.

  16. Low-resistivity photon-transparent window attached to photo-sensitive silicon detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holland, Stephen Edward

    2000-02-15

    The invention comprises a combination of a low resistivity, or electrically conducting, silicon layer that is transparent to long or short wavelength photons and is attached to the backside of a photon-sensitive layer of silicon, such as a silicon wafer or chip. The window is applied to photon sensitive silicon devices such as photodiodes, charge-coupled devices, active pixel sensors, low-energy x-ray sensors and other radiation detectors. The silicon window is applied to the back side of a photosensitive silicon wafer or chip so that photons can illuminate the device from the backside without interference from the circuit printed on the frontside. A voltage sufficient to fully deplete the high-resistivity photosensitive silicon volume of charge carriers is applied between the low-resistivity back window and the front, patterned, side of the device. This allows photon-induced charge created at the backside to reach the front side of the device and to be processed by any circuitry attached to the front side. Using the inventive combination, the photon sensitive silicon layer does not need to be thinned beyond standard fabrication methods in order to achieve full charge-depletion in the silicon volume. In one embodiment, the inventive backside window is applied to high resistivity silicon to allow backside illumination while maintaining charge isolation in CCD pixels.

  17. Static and dynamic behavior of ultrathin cobalt nanowires embedded in transparent matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roussigné, Y.; Chérif, S. M.; Stashkevich, A. A.; Vidal, F.; Zheng, Y.

    2015-12-21

    Two self-assembly of ultrathin Co nanowires (NWs) embedded in a CeO{sub 2} matrix was grown on SrTiO{sub 3}(001) and oxidized Si(001) substrates. A common feature of the two arrays of NWs is the small diameter of the wires, falling in the 4–5 nm range. Combined with their length, the aspect ratio is large enough to ensure large magnetostatic anisotropy with an easy axis along the axis of the nanowires as revealed by magnetometry measurements. The Brillouin light scattering technique has been used to investigate the behavior of the spin waves under a field perpendicular to the NWs axes. The transparency of the matrix ensures the penetration of the probing light inside the sample. Importantly, Brillouin light scattering from the magnetic modes obeys the volume Bragg condition, which is characteristic of the configuration in which the observed modes are propagating along the nanowires and due to their very small diameter are nearly constant across the section. Both series of experimental results are satisfactorily analyzed by means of a single analytical model, based on a mean-field approach, assuming the presence at remanence of two populations of NWs with up and down magnetizations and including the dipolar coupling between the cylinders.

  18. In-situ characterization of growth and interfaces in a-Si:H devices. Final subcontract report, 1 May 1991--31 May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, R.W.; Wronski, C.R.; An, I.; Lu, Y.; Nguyen, H.V. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    This report describes work to identify materials parameters that can quantitatively describe the solar cell performance correctly in the initial and stabilized states and are consistent with a microscopic model of the metastable defect site. The objective is to be accomplished by applying results of in-situ analyses of a-Si:H surfaces and the transparent conducting oxide (TCO)/p/i interfaces to complement the present understanding of the electronic properties of materials and devices. A second objective of the program is to demonstrate, characterize, and understand improved doped and undoped ``wide-gap`` materials for use in achieving 15% stabilized photovoltaic modules (``wide-gap`` materials are defined as those materials with a band gap of at least 1.9 eV).

  19. Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Surface and Interface Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home About Us Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences > Radiation & Solid Interactions > Nanomaterials Sciences > Surface & Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Carlos Gutierrez Carlos Gutierrez Manager Resources Department Folder 01114 Sharepoint Visit Our Labs Grest Group Nanorheology Research (514 KB PDF) Interfacial Force Microscopy Group (701 KB PDF)

  20. Enzyme Activity and Biomolecule Templating at Liquid and Solid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey W. Blanch

    2004-12-01

    There are two main components of this research program. The first involves studies of the adsorption and catalytic activity of proteins at fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces; the second employs biological macromolecules as templates at the solid-liquid interface for controlled crystallization of inorganic materials, to provide materials with specific functionality.