Sample records for transfer state zip

  1. City: State: Zip: Logo embroidered on left chest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ Name: Address: City: State: Zip: Phone: Logo embroidered on left chest D. SHORT Black Athletic Grey Maroon Logo embroidered on left chest Left chest pocket Back box pleat for ease of movement Logo embroidered on left chest TOTALS Pre-shrunk 100% cotton Double-needle stitched Adult S M L XL

  2. Name (last, first, middle initial) Date of birth City, State, ZIP/Postal code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Name (last, first, middle initial) Date of birth Address City, State, ZIP/Postal code Province or less. 1. Proponents of cognitive enhancement--the use of "smart pills," deep brain stimulation

  3. Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water heating systems in the Tri-cities and surrounding area 2382 Solar Heating equipment installationBusiness Name Year Founded Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact First Name Contact Last Name URL Products/Services NAICS Code NAICS Description Energy Northwest 1957 PO Box 968 Richland

  4. State Oil and Gas Board State Oil and Gas Board Address Place Zip Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCity CorpSpringfield,WindForeign ExchangeStateBoard

  5. Zipping mechanism for force-generation by growing filament bundles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Kuehne; Reinhard Lipowsky; Jan Kierfeld

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the force generation by polymerizing bundles of filaments, which form because of short-range attractive filament interactions. We show that bundles can generate forces by a zipping mechanism, which is not limited by buckling and operates in the fully buckled state. The critical zipping force, i.e. the maximal force that a bundle can generate, is given by the adhesive energy gained during bundle formation. For opposing forces larger than the critical zipping force, bundles undergo a force-induced unbinding transition. For larger bundles, the critical zipping force depends on the initial configuration of the bundles. Our results are corroborated by Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Ventura College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Ventura College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet If you are taking classes that are part of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at Ventura College (VC), you) #12;Ventura College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority of majors at PSU

  7. Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reverse Transfer Associate Degree Initiative Agreement Michigan State University & Lake Michigan students who have transferred to Michigan State University (MSU) in completing an associate's degree at Lake Michigan College (LMC). This initiative is an extension of the transfer agreements already

  8. South Puget Sound Community College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    South Puget Sound Community College Portland State University Transfer Worksheet Transferring to Portland State University (PSU) with a Direct Transfer Agreement (DTA) Associates degree from South Puget) #12;South Puget Sound Community College Portland State University 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority

  9. State-to-state dynamics of molecular energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentry, W.R.; Giese, C.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research program is to elucidate the elementary dynamical mechanisms of vibrational and rotational energy transfer between molecules, at a quantum-state resolved level of detail. Molecular beam techniques are used to isolate individual molecular collisions, and to control the kinetic energy of collision. Lasers are used both to prepare specific quantum states prior to collision by stimulated-emission pumping (SEP), and to measure the distribution of quantum states in the collision products by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The results are interpreted in terms of dynamical models, which may be cast in a classical, semiclassical or quantum mechanical framework, as appropriate.

  10. REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF SLC39A4 (ZIP4) AND SLC39A5 (ZIP5) IN THE ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO ZINC AVAILABILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Benjamin Patrick

    2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    REGULATORY MECHANISMS OF SLC39A4 (ZIP4) AND SLC39A5 (ZIP5) IN THE ADAPTIVE RESPONSE TO ZINC AVAILABILITY by Copyright 2009 Benjamin Patrick Weaver B.S., Biochemistry, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, 2001 M.S., Biological Sciences... of esoteric conversations, and for your friendship. Thank you for putting up with me and for always listening. The friendship of some other previous lab members: Yong Li for your friendship and suffering my mispronounced Chinese. Taiho Kambe...

  11. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Escher; G. Bensky; J. Clausen; G. Kurizki; L. Davidovich

    2010-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  12. Dynamical control of quantum state transfer within hybrid open systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, B M; Clausen, J; Kurizki, G; Davidovich, L

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze quantum state-transfer optimization within hybrid open systems, from a "noisy" (write-in) qubit to its "quiet" counterpart (storage qubit). Intriguing interplay is revealed between our ability to avoid bath-induced errors that profoundly depend on the bath-memory time and the limitations imposed by leakage out of the operational subspace. Counterintuitively, under no circumstances is the fastest transfer optimal (for a given transfer energy).

  13. Theoretical analysis of perfect quantum state transfer with superconducting qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick W. Strauch; Carl J. Williams

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting quantum circuits, fabricated with multiple layers, are proposed to implement perfect quantum state transfer between nodes of a hypercube network. For tunable devices such as the phase qubit, each node can transmit quantum information to any other node at a constant rate independent of the distance between qubits. The physical limits of quantum state transfer in this network are theoretically analyzed, including the effects of disorder, decoherence, and higher-order couplings.

  14. Verification Checklist Home Address: City: State: Zip:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    completed. o o HVAC System Quality Installation Rater Checklist completed. o o Moisture Control 1.1 Drain or sump pump installed in basements and crawlspaces (Exception:...

  15. Excited State Energy Transfer Pathways in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers. 4. Asymmetric Energy Transfer in the Heterodimer Mutant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    pair in wild type where the energy transfer rates along the two branches are very similar. ThusExcited State Energy Transfer Pathways in Photosynthetic Reaction Centers. 4. Asymmetric Energy state energy transfer occurs from the monomeric bacteriochlorophylls, B, and bacteriopheophytins, H

  16. Optimal transfer of an unknown state via a bipartite operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Liu; Yu Guo; D. L. Zhou

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental task in quantum information science is to transfer an unknown state from particle $A$ to particle $B$ (often in remote space locations) by using a bipartite quantum operation $\\mathcal{E}^{AB}$. We suggest the power of $\\mathcal{E}^{AB}$ for quantum state transfer (QST) to be the maximal average probability of QST over the initial states of particle $B$ and the identifications of the state vectors between $A$ and $B$. We find the QST power of a bipartite quantum operations satisfies four desired properties between two $d$-dimensional Hilbert spaces. When $A$ and $B$ are qubits, the analytical expressions of the QST power is given. In particular, we obtain the exact results of the QST power for a general two-qubit unitary transformation.

  17. Dark resonances for ground state transfer of molecular quantum gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manfred J. Mark; Johann G. Danzl; Elmar Haller; Mattias Gustavsson; Nadia Bouloufa; Olivier Dulieu; Houssam Salami; Tom Bergeman; Helmut Ritsch; Russell Hart; Hanns-Christoph Nägerl

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    One possible way to produce ultracold, high-phase-space-density quantum gases of molecules in the rovibronic ground state is given by molecule association from quantum-degenerate atomic gases on a Feshbach resonance and subsequent coherent optical multi-photon transfer into the rovibronic ground state. In ultracold samples of Cs_2 molecules, we observe two-photon dark resonances that connect the intermediate rovibrational level |v=73,J=2> with the rovibrational ground state |v=0,J=0> of the singlet $X^1\\Sigma_g^+$ ground state potential. For precise dark resonance spectroscopy we exploit the fact that it is possible to efficiently populate the level |v=73,J=2> by two-photon transfer from the dissociation threshold with the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) technique. We find that at least one of the two-photon resonances is sufficiently strong to allow future implementation of coherent STIRAP transfer of a molecular quantum gas to the rovibrational ground state |v=0,J=0>.

  18. Steady-state bumpless transfer under controller uncertainty using the state/output feedback topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, K.; Lee, A.H.; Bentsman, J.; Taft, C.W. [University of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Linear quadratic (LQ) bumpless transfer design introduced recently by Turner and Walker gives a very convenient and straightforward computational procedure for the steady-state bumpless transfer operator synthesis. It is, however, found to be incapable of providing convergence of the output of the offline controller to that of the online controller in several industrial applications, producing bumps in the plant output in the wake of controller transfer. An examination of this phenomenon reveals that the applications in question are characterized by a significant mismatch, further referred to as controller uncertainty, between the dynamics of the implemented controllers and their models used in the transfer operator computation. To address this problem, while retaining the convenience of the Turner and Walker design, a novel state/output feedback bumpless transfer topology is introduced that employs the nominal state of the offline controller and, through the use of an additional controller/model mismatch compensator, also the offline controller output. A corresponding steady-state bumpless transfer design procedure along with the supporting theory is developed for a large class of systems. Due to these features, it is demonstrated to solve a long-standing problem of high-quality steady-state bumpless transfer from the industry standard low-order nonlinear multiloop PID-based controllers to the modern multiinput-multioutput (MIMO) robust controllers in the megawatt/throttle pressure control of a typical coal-fired boiler/turbine unit.

  19. Property:Zip | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon TwitterZip Jump to: navigation, search This is a

  20. ZipZone Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,Eaga Solar LtdZhonghuiteZim'sZipZone

  1. Bullet trains and steam engines: Exogenous attention zips but endogenous attention chugs along

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanRullen, Rufin

    Bullet trains and steam engines: Exogenous attention zips but endogenous attention chugs along: Chakravarthi, R., & VanRullen, R. (2011). Bullet trains and steam engines: Exogenous attention zips

  2. Arabidopsis thalianafrom Polarization Transfer Solid-State NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Paul B [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Tuo [Ames Laboratory; Park, Yong Bum [Pennsylvania State University; Cosgrove, Daniel J [Pennsylvania State University; Hong, Mei [Ames Laboratory

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Polysaccharide-rich plant cell walls are hydrated under functional conditions, but the molecular interactions between water and polysaccharides in the wall have not been investigated. In this work, we employ polarization transfer solid-state NMR techniques to study the hydration of primary-wall polysaccharides of the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. By transferring water 1H polarization to polysaccharides through distance- and mobility-dependent 1H–1H dipolar couplings and detecting it through polysaccharide 13C signals, we obtain information about water proximity to cellulose, hemicellulose, and pectins as well as water mobility. Both intact and partially extracted cell wall samples are studied. Our results show that water–pectin polarization transfer is much faster than water–cellulose polarization transfer in all samples, but the extent of extraction has a profound impact on the water–polysaccharide spin diffusion. Removal of calcium ions and the consequent extraction of homogalacturonan (HG) significantly slowed down spin diffusion, while further extraction of matrix polysaccharides restored the spin diffusion rate. These trends are observed in cell walls with similar water content, thus they reflect inherent differences in the mobility and spatial distribution of water. Combined with quantitative analysis of the polysaccharide contents, our results indicate that calcium ions and HG gelation increase the amount of bound water, which facilitates spin diffusion, while calcium removal disrupts the gel and gives rise to highly dynamic water, which slows down spin diffusion. The recovery of spin diffusion rates after more extensive extraction is attributed to increased water-exposed surface areas of the polysaccharides. Water–pectin spin diffusion precedes water–cellulose spin diffusion, lending support to the single-network model of plant primary walls in which a substantial fraction of the cellulose surface is surrounded by pectins.

  3. Implementation of State Transfer Hamiltonians in Spin Chains with Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappellaro, Paola

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear spin systems and magnetic resonance techniques have provided a fertile platform for experimental investigation of quantum state transfer in spin chains. From the first observation of polarization transfer, predating ...

  4. Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University (MSU) and Lake Michigan College (LMC) Reverse Transfer Agreement Transcript Release Form Please complete, sign, and return this release form to: Michigan State University of the Registrar at Michigan State University in writing. SIGNATURE: _______________________________________ DATE

  5. Electrostatic zipping actuators and their applications to MEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrostatic actuation is the most common and well-developed method of generating motion on the micro scale. To overcome the challenge of providing both high force and large displacement, electrostatic zipping actuators ...

  6. Nonlinear State Space Model of a Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Masoud Vaezi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    state space representation of a hydraulic wind energy transfer for a single wind turbine systemNonlinear State Space Model of a Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Masoud Vaezi1 , Majid Deldar1 1, IUPUI. Gearless hydraulic wind power systems are considered as nonlinear models because of some discrete

  7. Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations of excited state double-proton transfer in 7-azaindole dimers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, William H.

    Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations of excited state double-proton transfer in 7-azaindole chemical re- action. In this paper we report the first application of molecular dynamics simulation methods to model the excited state double-proton transfer dynamics involved in the tau- tomerization reaction

  8. United States-Mexico electricity transfers: Of alien electrons and the migration of undocumented environmental burdens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandara, A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article intends to set forth the necessity for reform in the United States policy and procedures regarding approval of power transfers between the United States and Mexico. In order to do this, the article will review the history of electrical power transfers between the United States and Mexico (Part II), analyze recent regulatory changes in the United States and Mexico which may result in increased power exports to Mexico (Part III), evaluate the extent to which the present permit and authorization system in the United States considers the increased environmental burden of such power transfers (Part IV), and, where appropriate, propose some procedural and policy reforms that could take into account the environmental burdens generated by the production of power destined for transfer across the United States-Mexico border (Part V).

  9. A Review of Perfect State Transfer and its Application as a Constructive Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alastair Kay

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the subject of perfect state transfer; how one designs the (fixed) interactions of a chain of spins so that a quantum state, initially inserted on one end of the chain, is perfectly transferred to the opposite end in a fixed time. The perfect state transfer systems are then used as a constructive tool to design Hamiltonian implementations of other primitive protocols such as entanglement generation and signal amplification in measurements, before showing that, in fact, universal quantum computation can be implemented in this way.

  10. Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Protein folding by zipping and assembly S. Banu Ozkan* , G. Albert Wu* , John D. Chodera, CA, May 2, 2007 (received for review April 13, 2006) How do proteins fold so quickly? Some denatured proteins fold to their native structures in only microseconds, on average, implying that there is a folding

  11. Engineering interactions for quasiperfect transfer of polariton states through nonideal bosonic networks of distinct topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moraes Neto, G. D. de; Moussa, M. H. Y. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Ponte, M. A. de [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Regional do Cariri, 63010-970 Juazeiro do Norte, CE (Brazil)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a scheme for quasiperfect transfer of polariton states from a sender to a spatially separated receiver, both composed of high-quality cavities filled by atomic samples. The sender and the receiver are connected by a nonideal transmission channel --the data bus-- modelled by a network of lossy empty cavities. In particular, we analyze the influence of a large class of data-bus topologies on the fidelity and transfer time of the polariton state. Moreover, we also assume dispersive couplings between the polariton fields and the data-bus normal modes in order to achieve a tunneling-like state transfer. Such a tunneling-transfer mechanism, by which the excitation energy of the polariton effectively does not populate the data-bus cavities, is capable of attenuating appreciably the dissipative effects of the data-bus cavities. After deriving a Hamiltonian for the effective coupling between the sender and the receiver, we show that the decay rate of the fidelity is proportional to a cooperativity parameter that weighs the cost of the dissipation rate against the benefit of the effective coupling strength. The increase of the fidelity of the transfer process can be achieved at the expense of longer transfer times. We also show that the dependence of both the fidelity and the transfer time on the network topology is analyzed in detail for distinct regimes of parameters. It follows that the data-bus topology can be explored to control the time of the state-transfer process.

  12. Excited-state energy transfer pathways in photosynthetic reaction centers: 5. Oxidized and triplet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    - spectively, are similar to that for energy transfer to 1 P ($190 fs)À1 in wild type measured by eitherExcited-state energy transfer pathways in photosynthetic reaction centers: 5. Oxidized and triplet excited special pairs as energy acceptors Brett A. King, Tim B. McAnaney, Alex de Winter, Steven G. Boxer

  13. Combined theoretical and experimental studies of proton migration and transfer in the solid state 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Martins, David Manuel

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen bonds are of great interest in the solid state due to their importance in structural, functional and dynamical properties of chemical systems. Moderate hydrogen bonds have been linked with proton transfer, whereas ...

  14. The transfer of training and skills by Texas State 4-H Council members: A qualitative study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruce, Jacklyn Antoinette

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    THE TRANSFER OF TRAINING AND SKILLS BY TEXAS STATE 4-H COUNCIL MEMBERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY A Dissertation by JACKLYN ANTOINETTE BRUCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2003 Major Subject: Agricultural Education THE TRANSFER OF TRAINING AND SKILLS BY TEXAS STATE 4-H COUNCIL MEMBERS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY A Dissertation by JACKLYN ANTOINETTE BRUCE...

  15. ARCHITECTURE OF A CHARGE-TRANSFER STATE REGULATING LIGHT HARVESTING IN A PLANT ANTENNA PROTEIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Graham; Ahn, Tae Kyu; Avenson, Thomas J.; Ballottari, Matteo; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Bassi, Roberto; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-dependent quenching of excess absorbed light energy (qE) is a vital mechanism for regulating photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. All of the physiological characteristics of qE have been positively correlated with charge-transfer between coupled chlorophyll and zeaxanthin molecules in the light-harvesting antenna of photosystem II (PSII). In this work, we present evidence for charge-transfer quenching in all three of the individual minor antenna complexes of PSII (CP29, CP26, and CP24), and we conclude that charge-transfer quenching in CP29 involves a de-localized state of an excitonically coupled chlorophyll dimer. We propose that reversible conformational changes in CP29 can `tune? the electronic coupling between the chlorophylls in this dimer, thereby modulating the energy of the chlorophylls-zeaxanthin charge-transfer state and switching on and off the charge-transfer quenching during qE.

  16. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  17. ccsd00000983 Quantum state transfer between elds and atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ground state sublevels appears as a good candidate for the storage and manipulation of quantum can be mapped onto the long-lived atomic spin associated to the ground state sublevels of the #3;-type without dissipation through the medium. However, the storage has only been demonstrated for classical

  18. Molecular dynamics of excited state intramolecular proton transfer: 3-hydroxyflavone in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, Michael A.; Coker, David F. [Department of Chemistry, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultrafast enol-keto photoisomerization in the lowest singlet excited state of 3-hydroxyflavone is investigated using classical molecular dynamics in conjunction with empirical valence bond (EVB) potentials for the description of intramolecular interactions, and a molecular mechanics and variable partial charge model, dependent on transferring proton position, for the description of solute-solvent interactions. A parallel multi-level genetic program was used to accurately fit the EVB potential energy surfaces to high level ab initio data. We have studied the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction in three different solvent environments: methylcyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol. The effects of the environment on the proton transfer time and the underlying mechanisms responsible for the varied time scales of the ESIPT reaction rates are analyzed. We find that simulations with our EVB potential energy surfaces accurately reproduce experimentally determined reaction rates, fluorescence spectra, and vibrational frequency spectra in all three solvents. Furthermore, we find that the ultrafast ESIPT process results from a combination of ballistic transfer, and intramolecular vibrational redistribution, which leads to the excitation of a set of low frequency promoting vibrational modes. From this set of promoting modes, we find that an O-O in plane bend and a C-H out of plane bend are present in all three solvents, indicating that they are fundamental to the ultrafast proton transfer. Analysis of the slow proton transfer trajectories reveals a solvent mediated proton transfer mechanism, which is diffusion limited.

  19. Experimental protocol for high-fidelity heralded photon-to-atom quantum state transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Kurz; Michael Schug; Pascal Eich; Jan Huwer; Philipp Müller; Jürgen Eschner

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantum network combines the benefits of quantum systems regarding secure information transmission and calculational speed-up by employing quantum coherence and entanglement to store, transmit, and process information. A promising platform for implementing such a network are atom-based quantum memories and processors, interconnected by photonic quantum channels. A crucial building block in this scenario is the conversion of quantum states between single photons and single atoms through controlled emission and absorption. Here we present an experimental protocol for photon-to-atom quantum state conversion, whereby the polarization state of an absorbed photon is mapped onto the spin state of a single absorbing atom with >95% fidelity, while successful conversion is heralded by a single emitted photon. Heralded high-fidelity conversion without affecting the converted state is a main experimental challenge, in order to make the transferred information reliably available for further operations. We record >80/s successful state transfer events out of 18,000/s repetitions.

  20. Name ________________________________________________ Birth Date ____/_____/_____ SS# ______-______-_________ Home Address __________________________________________ City ________________ State ______ Zip _______

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    Coordinator UK College of Engineering Extended Campus 4810 Alben Barkley Drive P.O. Box 7380 Paducah, KY 42002): _________________________________________________________________ Are you, a parent, or a spouse an employee of any of the following: Cole Lumber Harper Industries Paducah

  1. On the transfer of atmospheric energy from the Gulf of Mexico to the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knight, Richard William

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ON THE TRANSFER OF ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY FROM THE GULP OF MEXICO TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES A Thesis RICHARD WILLIAM KNIGHT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Deoember 1972 Ma)or Sub)ect: Meteorology ON THE TRANSFER OF ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO TO THE CONTINENTAL UNITED STATES A Thesis RICHARD WILLIAM KNIGHT Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of ommittee...

  2. Proton inventory investigations of acyl transfer reactions: transition state structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Jacob Floyd

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The presence of an isotopic label does not alter the electron1c environment of the trans1t1on state, therefore, its structure rema1ns unchanged. Deuterium solvent isotope effects, secondary deuterium isotope effects and a relatively new method, the proton 1.... Other less concentrated buffer solutions were prepared by dilution of the 0. 200 M solutions and adjusting the ionic strength to 0. 20 M with sodium chloride. Solutions at other values of n, the atom fraction of deuterium, were prepared by mixing...

  3. Quantum-state transfer in spin chains via isolated resonance of terminal spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamil Korzekwa; Pawe? Machnikowski; Pawe? Horodecki

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a quantum-state transfer protocol in a spin chain that requires only the control of the spins at the ends of the quantum wire. The protocol is to a large extent insensitive to inhomogeneity caused by local magnetic fields and perturbation of exchange couplings. Moreover, apart from the free evolution regime, it allows one to induce an adiabatic spin transfer, which provides the possibility of performing the transfer on demand. We also show that the amount of information leaking into the central part of the chain is small throughout the whole transfer process (which protects the information sent from being eavesdropped) and can be controlled by the magnitude of the external magnetic field.

  4. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  5. Name Name Address Place Zip Category Sector Telephone number Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu anMicrogreenMoonNASA/AmesNS Solar05Zip Category Sector

  6. Property:Incentive/Cont2Zip | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpmGrossGenDept JumpZip Jump to:

  7. Property:Incentive/Cont4Zip | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:PrecourtOid Jump to:DocketFlowGpmGrossGenDept JumpZip

  8. Transition-State Charge Transfer Reveals Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic Carbon-Hydrogen Bond Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    @scripps.edu To capture the powerful potential of metal-mediated carbon- hydrogen (C-H) bond activation, it is essentialTransition-State Charge Transfer Reveals Electrophilic, Ambiphilic, and Nucleophilic Carbon, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, and The Scripps Research Institute, Jupiter

  9. Bound State Transfer Matrix for AdS5 x S5 Superstring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleb Arutyunov; Marius de Leeuw; Ryo Suzuki; Alessandro Torrielli

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply the algebraic Bethe ansatz technique to compute the eigenvalues of the transfer matrix constructed from the general bound state S-matrix of the light-cone AdS5 x S5 superstring. This allows us to verify certain conjectures on the quantum characteristic function, and to extend them to the general case.

  10. Quantum State Transfer in a Two-dimensional Regular Spin Lattice of Triangular Shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Miki; Satoshi Tsujimoto; Luc Vinet; Alexei Zhedanov

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum state transfer in a triangular domain of a two-dimensional, equally-spaced, spin lat- tice with non-homogeneous nearest-neighbor couplings is analyzed. An exact solution of the one- excitation dynamics is provided in terms of 2-variable Krawtchouk orthogonal polynomials that have been recently defined. The probability amplitude for an excitation to transit from one site to another is given. For some values of the parameters, perfect transfer is shown to take place from the apex of the lattice to the boundary hypotenuse.

  11. High-efficiency quantum state transfer and quantum memory using a mechanical oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyob A. Sete; H. Eleuch

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze an optomechanical system that can be used to efficiently transfer a quantum state between an optical cavity and a distant mechanical oscillator coupled to a second optical cavity. We show that for a moderate mechanical Q-factor it is possible to achieve a transfer efficiency of $99.4\\%$ by using adjustable cavity damping rates and destructive interference. We also show that the quantum mechanical oscillator can be used as a quantum memory device with an efficiency of $96\\%$ employing a pulsed optomechanical coupling. Although the mechanical dissipation slightly decreases the efficiency, its effect can be significantly reduced by designing a high-Q mechanical oscillator.

  12. Robust state transfer with high fidelity in spin-1/2 chains by Lyapunov control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. C. Shi; X. L. Zhao; X. X. Yi

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Lyapunov control, we present a scheme to realize state transfer with high fidelity by only modulating the boundary spins in a quantum spin-1/2 chain. Recall that the conventional transmission protocols aim at nonstationary state (or information) transfer from the first spin to the end spin at a fixed time. The present scheme possesses the following advantages. First, the scheme does not require precise manipulations of the control time. Second, it is robust against uncertainties in the initial states and fluctuations in the control fields. Third, the controls are exerted only on the boundary sites of the chain. It works for variable spin-1/2 chains with different periodic structures and has good scalability. The feasibility to replace the control fields by square pules is explored, which simplifies the realization in experiments.

  13. Intra-amygdala infusion of the protein kinase Mzeta inhibitor ZIP disrupts foreground context fear memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helmstetter, Fred J.

    Intra-amygdala infusion of the protein kinase Mzeta inhibitor ZIP disrupts foreground context fear-pseudosubstrate inhibitory peptide (ZIP) remains in the brain after infusion. Here, we demon- strate that foreground context the brain by 24 h after infusion. These data contribute to a growing body of lit- erature that demonstrates

  14. State detection using coherent Raman repumping and two-color Raman transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuah, Boon Leng; Lewty, Nicholas C.; Barrett, Murray D. [Center for Quantum Technologies and Department of Physics, National University of Singapore, 3 Science Drive 2, 117543 Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate state detection based on coherent Raman repumping and a two-color Raman state transfer. The Raman coupling during detection selectively eliminates unwanted dark states in the fluorescence cycle without compromising the immunity of the desired dark state to off-resonant scattering. We demonstrate this technique using {sup 137}Ba{sup +} where a combination of Raman coupling and optical pumping leaves the metastable state, D{sub 3/2} |F''=3,m{sub F}{sup ''}=3>, optically dark and immune to off-resonant scattering. All other states are strongly coupled to the upper P{sub 1/2} levels. We achieve a single-shot state-detection efficiency of 89.6(3)% in a 1-ms integration time, limited almost entirely by technical imperfections. Shelving to |F{sup ''}=3,m{sub F}{sup ''}=3> before detection is performed via a two-color Raman transfer with a fidelity of 1.00(3).

  15. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing Chen; Yong Li; Z. Song; C. -P. Sun

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus. First show that the data bus has an energy gap between the ground and first-excited states in the single-particle case induced by the impurity in the single particle case. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations were performed for a finite system; the results show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  16. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theophilou, Iris, E-mail: i.theophilou@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grunberg Institut (PGI) Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)] [Peter Grunberg Institut (PGI) Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tassi, M.; Thanos, S. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, ‘Demokritos’ National Center for Scientific Research, 15310 Athens (Greece)] [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, ‘Demokritos’ National Center for Scientific Research, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  17. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umer Farooq; Abolfazl Bayat; Stefano Mancini; Sougato Bose

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatically preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic classical information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  18. Adiabatic many-body state preparation and information transfer in quantum dot arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umer Farooq; Abolfazl Bayat; Stefano Mancini; Sougato Bose

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum simulation of many-body systems are one of the most interesting tasks of quantum technology. Among them is the preparation of a many-body system in its ground state when the vanishing energy gap makes the cooling mechanisms ineffective. Adiabatic theorem, as an alternative to cooling, can be exploited for driving the many-body system to its ground state. In this paper, we study two most common disorders in quantum dot arrays, namely exchange coupling fluctuations and hyperfine interaction, in adiabatically preparation of ground state in such systems. We show that the adiabatic ground state preparation is highly robust against those disorder effects making it good analog simulator. Moreover, we also study the adiabatic classical information transfer, using singlet-triplet states, across a spin chain. In contrast to ground state preparation the transfer mechanism is highly affected by disorder and in particular, the hyperfine interaction is very destructive for the performance. This suggests that for communication tasks across such arrays adiabatic evolution is not as effective and quantum quenches could be preferable.

  19. Selective transfer of superposition of coherent states by exploiting a cavity QED system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Behzadi; S. Kazemi Rudsary

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme on the basis of a N+2 identical single-mode coupled-cavity QED system for selective transfer of a qubit constructed from superposition of standard coherent states. The cavities arranged in such way that the intermediate or channel cavity is connected uniformly to the sender and N receiver cavities. We consider N different ternary sets of identical QDs whose QDs have been distributed in the sender, channel and one of the receiver cavities respectively. We demonstrate a situation in which the dynamics of the system is confined selectively in a sub sector belongs to one of the ternary set of QDs. This selective dynamics is able to transfer the coherent state-constructed qubit (CSCQ) from the sender party to the desired receiver one reliably. Also, we illustrate that the scheme is optimally robust due to dissipations arises from photon losses in the cavities.

  20. Peierls distorted chain as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. X. Huo; Ying Li; Z. Song; C. P. Sun

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We systematically study the transfer of quantum state of electron spin as the flying qubit along a half-filled Peierls distorted tight-binding chain described by the Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model, which behaves as a quantum data bus. This enables a novel physical mechanism for quantum communication with always-on interaction: the effective hopping of the spin carrier between sites $A$ and $B$ connected to two sites in this SSH chain can be induced by the quasi-excitations of the SSH model. As we prove, it is the Peierls energy gap of the SSH quasi-excitations that plays a crucial role to protect the robustness of the quantum state transfer process. Moreover, our observation also indicates that such a scheme can also be employed to explore the intrinsic property of the quantum system.

  1. Calculation of unsteady-state heat and mass transfer in steam injection wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruddy, Kenneth Edward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) and (5) are defined as the fluid flow equations for the gas and liquid phases, respectively. Mass Balance E uation The thermodynamic system under consideration is a vertical cylindri- cal conduit as depicted in figure 1. A mass balance applied... Equation Method of Solution. RESULTS Comparison with Field Data. Comparison with Results from Steady-State Mass Transfer Model CONCLUSIONS NOMENCLATURE . REFERENCES APPENDIX A: TURBULENCE FACTOR. APPENDIX B: RELATIVE FLUID CONDUCTIVITT. Page vi...

  2. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  3. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  4. State Transfer Between a Mechanical Oscillator and Microwave Fields in the Quantum Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Palomaki; J. W. Harlow; J. D. Teufel; R. W. Simmonds; K. W. Lehnert

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, macroscopic mechanical oscillators have been coaxed into a regime of quantum behavior, by direct refrigeration [1] or a combination of refrigeration and laser-like cooling [2, 3]. This exciting result has encouraged notions that mechanical oscillators may perform useful functions in the processing of quantum information with superconducting circuits [1, 4-7], either by serving as a quantum memory for the ephemeral state of a microwave field or by providing a quantum interface between otherwise incompatible systems [8, 9]. As yet, the transfer of an itinerant state or propagating mode of a microwave field to and from a mechanical oscillator has not been demonstrated owing to the inability to agilely turn on and off the interaction between microwave electricity and mechanical motion. Here we demonstrate that the state of an itinerant microwave field can be coherently transferred into, stored in, and retrieved from a mechanical oscillator with amplitudes at the single quanta level. Crucially, the time to capture and to retrieve the microwave state is shorter than the quantum state lifetime of the mechanical oscillator. In this quantum regime, the mechanical oscillator can both store and transduce quantum information.

  5. Laser Transferable Polymer-Ionic Liquid Separator/Electrolytes for Solid-State Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Microbatteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Craig B.

    Laser Transferable Polymer-Ionic Liquid Separator/Electrolytes for Solid-State Rechargeable Lithium-Ion characterized by ac-impedance spectroscopy and in lithium- ion microbatteries. Size and weight percent effects be laser transferred onto a substrate to form a solid separator/electrolyte layer for a lithium ion power

  6. Guidelines for Selection of University Libraries' Materials for Transfer to the Northwest Ohio Regional Book Depository, Bowling Green State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Regional Book Depository, Bowling Green State University Materials in the Wm. T. Jerome LibraryGuidelines for Selection of University Libraries' Materials for Transfer to the Northwest Ohio and in the Ogg Science Library are subject to an ongoing process for selection and transfer to the Northwest Ohio

  7. Transfer of Spatial Reference Frame Using Singlet States and Classical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Bahder

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple protocol is described for transferring spatial direction from Alice to Bob (two spatially separated observers) up to inversion. The two observers are assumed to share quantum singlet states and classical communication. The protocol assumes that Alice and Bob have complete free will (measurement independence) and is based on maximizing the Shannon mutual information between Alice and Bob's measurement outcomes. Repeated use of this protocol for each spatial axis of Alice allows transfer of a complete 3-dimensional reference frame, up to inversion of each of the axes. The technological complexity of this protocol is similar to that needed for BB84 quantum key distribution, and hence is much simpler to implement than recently proposed schemes for transmission of reference frames. A second protocol based on a Bayesian formalism is also presented.

  8. Functional genomics analysis of the arabidopsis ABI5 bZIP transcription factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hur, Jung-Im

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    zipper (bZIP) transcription factors are identified by interaction with ABA responsive cis-regulatory elements. The transcription factor ABI5 is one of these. It regulates gene expression during embryogenesis and in response to ABA. An ABA...

  9. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blom, Alex Jason

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  10. Decoherence problem in quantum state transfer via an engineered spin chain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lan Zhou; Jing Lu; Tao Shi; C. P. Sun

    2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A perfect quantum state transfer(QST) has been shown in an engineered spin chain with "always-on interaction". Here, we consider a more realistic problem for such a protocol, the quantum decoherence induced by a spatially distributed environment, which is universally modeled as a bath of harmonic oscillators. By making use of the irreducible tensor method in angular momentum theory, we investigate the effect of decoherence on the efficiency of QST for both cases at zero and finite temperatures. We not only show the generic exponential decay of QST efficiency as the number of sites increase, but also find some counterintuitive effect, the QST can be enhanced as temperature increase.

  11. Identification of bZIP interaction partners of viral proteins HBZ, MEQ, BZLF1, and K-bZIP using coiled-coil arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinke, Aaron Wade

    Basic-region leucine-zipper transcription factors (bZIPs) contain a segment rich in basic amino acids that can bind DNA, followed by a leucine zipper that can interact with other leucine zippers to form coiled-coil homo- ...

  12. Quantum recurrence and fractional dynamic localization in ac-driven perfect state transfer Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longhi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.longhi@fisi.polimi.it

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum recurrence and dynamic localization are investigated in a class of ac-driven tight-binding Hamiltonians, the Krawtchouk quantum chain, which in the undriven case provides a paradigmatic Hamiltonian model that realizes perfect quantum state transfer and mirror inversion. The equivalence between the ac-driven single-particle Krawtchouk Hamiltonian H{sup -hat} (t) and the non-interacting ac-driven bosonic junction Hamiltonian enables to determine in a closed form the quasi energy spectrum of H{sup -hat} (t) and the conditions for exact wave packet reconstruction (dynamic localization). In particular, we show that quantum recurrence, which is predicted by the general quantum recurrence theorem, is exact for the Krawtchouk quantum chain in a dense range of the driving amplitude. Exact quantum recurrence provides perfect wave packet reconstruction at a frequency which is fractional than the driving frequency, a phenomenon that can be referred to as fractional dynamic localization.

  13. Emulating quantum state transfer through a spin-1 chain on a 1D lattice of superconducting qutrits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joydip Ghosh

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-1 systems, in comparison to spin-1/2 systems, offer a better security for encoding and transfer of quantum information, primarily due to their larger Hilbert spaces. Superconducting artificial atoms possess multiple energy-levels, thereby capable of emulating higher-spin systems. Here we consider a 1D lattice of nearest-neighbor-coupled superconducting transmon systems, and devise a scheme to transfer an arbitrary qutrit-state (a state encoded in a three-level quantum system) across the chain. We assume adjustable couplings between adjacent transmons, derive an analytic constraint for the control-pulse, and show how to satisfy the constraint to achieve a high-fidelity state-transfer under current experimental conditions. Our protocol thus enables enhanced quantum communication and information processing with promising superconducting qutrits.

  14. Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drive Evergreen Colorado http www EverSealedWindows com Rockies Area Ferris State University Ferris State University Big Rapids Michigan http www ferrisstateuniversity com...

  15. UNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    program in order to reduce Federal employee's contribution to traffic congestion and air pollutionUNITED STATES AIR FORCE OUTSIDE THE NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION BENEFIT PROGRAM): ____________ City (Residence): __________________________State: _______________ Zip Code: ________________ Air Force

  16. STUDENT / PARENT INFORMATION MAIL DELIVERY ON CAMPUS The information below provides the basic information you need to send and receive United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    West Street Address (if applicable) 522 Thurstin Ave. Bowling Green State University Bowling Green State University City, State and Zip Code Bowling Green, OH 43403-4603 Please note that BGSU has its own zip code, 43403, which is unique from the city of Bowling Green (43402). Please ensure to include

  17. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in nonaqueous electrolyte solutions: Temperature dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, Tuhin; Gazi, Harun Al Rasid; Biswas, Ranjit [Department of Chemical, Biological and Macromolecular Sciences and Unit for Nanoscience and Technology, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector III, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature dependence of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile (P4C) in ethyl acetate (EA), acetonitrile (ACN), and ethanol at several concentrations of lithium perchlorate (LiClO{sub 4}) has been investigated by using the steady state and time resolved fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. The temperature range considered is 267-343 K. The temperature dependent spectral peak shifts and reaction driving force (-{Delta}G{sub r}) in electrolyte solutions of these solvents can be explained qualitatively in terms of interaction between the reactant molecule and ion-atmosphere. Time resolved studies indicate that the decay kinetics of P4C is biexponential, regardless of solvents, LiClO{sub 4} concentrations, and temperatures considered. Except at higher electrolyte concentrations in EA, reaction rates in solutions follow the Arrhenius-type temperature dependence where the estimated activation energy exhibits substantial electrolyte concentration dependence. The average of the experimentally measured activation energies in these three neat solvents is found to be in very good agreement with the predicted value based on data in room temperature solvents. While the rate constant in EA shows a electrolyte concentration induced parabolic dependence on reaction driving force (-{Delta}G{sub r}), the former in ethanol and ACN increases only linearly with the increase in driving force (-{Delta}G{sub r}). The data presented here also indicate that the step-wise increase in solvent reorganization energy via sequential addition of electrolyte induces the ICT reaction in weakly polar solvents to crossover from the Marcus inverted region to the normal region.

  18. Molecular Cell Interaction of a DNA Zip Code with the Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brickner, Jason

    Molecular Cell Article Interaction of a DNA Zip Code with the Nuclear Pore Complex Promotes H2A codes'' in the promoters of yeast genes confer interaction with the NPC and localization at the nuclear, they remain at the nuclear periphery for several generations, primed for reactivation. Tran- scriptional

  19. Analysis and behavioral modeling of the Finite State Machines of the Xpress Transfer Protocol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madduri, Venkateswara Rao

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF THE 3. 4 SPECIFICATION OF THE XTP FINITE STATE MACHINES . A. XTP Context Manager State Machine B. XTP Output State Machine C. XTP Sync State Machine. D. XTP Rate Control State Machine E. XTP Control-Send State Machine. . . F. XTP Input State... control parameters 26 II XTP context manager state transition table[12]. III XTP output state machine transition table [12]. IV XTP sync state machine transition table[12]. 40 V XTP rate control state machine transition table[12]. VI XTP control...

  20. The low-lying {pi}{sigma}* state and its role in the intramolecular charge transfer of aminobenzonitriles and aminobenzethyne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jae-Kwang; Fujiwara, Takashige; Kofron, William G. [Department of Chemistry and Center for Laser and Optical Spectroscopy, University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325-3601 (United States); Zgierski, Marek Z.; Lim, Edward C. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic absorption spectra of the low-lying {pi}{pi}* and {pi}{sigma}* states of several aminobenzonitriles and 4-dimethylaminobenzethyne have been studied by time-resolved transient absorption and time-dependent density functional theory calculation. In acetonitrile, the lifetime of the {pi}{sigma}*-state absorption is very short (picoseconds or subpicosecond) for molecules that exhibit intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), and very long (nanoseconds) for those that do not. Where direct comparison of the temporal characteristics of the {pi}{sigma}*-state and the ICT-state transients could be made, the formation rate of the ICT state is identical to the decay rate of the {pi}{sigma}* state within the experimental uncertainty. These results are consistent with the {pi}{sigma}*-mediated ICT mechanism, L{sub a} ({pi}{pi}*){yields}{pi}{sigma}*{yields}ICT, in which the decay rate of the {pi}{sigma}* state is determined by the rate of the solvent-controlled {pi}{sigma}*{yields}ICT charge-shift reaction. The {pi}{pi}*{yields}{pi}{sigma}* state crossing does not occur in 3-dimethylaminobenzonitrile or 2-dimethylaminobenzonitrile, as predicted by the calculation, and 4-aminobenzonitrile and 4-dimethylaminobenzethyne does not exhibit the ICT reaction, consistent with the higher energy of the ICT state relative to the {pi}{sigma}* state.

  1. 614 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 4, APRIL 2003 Jitter Transfer Characteristics of Delay-Locked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Thomas H.

    614 IEEE JOURNAL OF SOLID-STATE CIRCUITS, VOL. 38, NO. 4, APRIL 2003 Jitter Transfer and experimental re- sults on the jitter transfer of delay-locked loops (DLLs). Through a -domain model, we show that in a widely used DLL configuration, jitter peaking always exists and high-frequency jitter does not get

  2. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

  3. Determination of vaporization efficiencies and overall mass transfer coefficients from a packed absorber at steady state operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Ronald

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    material balances for each component ano each element of packing. They are obtained by writing a balance on the vapor phase only, the liquid phase only, and the combined phases, Tne resulting equations are given by I'j+I v I ? v. + N dz = 0 5 '+1 N... be rearranged to give the "mass transfer relationship, " ji ji or L L yji ji ji jixji When equation (3-17) is stated in terms of liquid mole fractions and vaporization efficiencies, the following expression is obtained r j+1 N dz = (K af ) . S[(1 V ji j...

  4. APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION TO UNDECIDED-GRAD CLASSIFICATION For Office Use Only GRADUATE SCHOOL, WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    ) (State) (Zip) (County if Washington) Gender M F Date of Birth Place of Birth Are you a citizen of the U State University: Fall (year) Spring (year) Summer (year) Location: Pullman Spokane Tri-Cities Vancouver

  5. Oil and Gas Company Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and Gas Company Address Place Zip Website Abu

  6. Enhancing the efficiency of organic LEDs through spin-orbit coupling of charge-transfer states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivoire, Kelley (Kelley E.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the possibility of enhancing the efficiency of small molecule organic light-emitting diodes through spin-orbit effects is examined. Because only singlet spin states, statistically one quarter of the total ...

  7. Integration of Solid-State Nanopores in Microfluidic Networks via Transfer Printing of Suspended Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Tarun

    Solid-state nanopores have emerged as versatile single-molecule sensors for applications including DNA sequencing, protein unfolding, micro-RNA detection, label-free detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms, and mapping ...

  8. Excited states and electron transfer in solution : models based on density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalczyk, Timothy Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our understanding of organic materials for solar energy conversion stands to benefit greatly from accurate, computationally tractable electronic structure methods for excited states. Here we apply two approaches based on ...

  9. Intrinsic Case Study of Advisors’ Perceptions of Advising International Transfer Students Transitioning from a Two-Year College to a Land-Grant University in the Southwest Region of the United States 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sousa, David Alexandre

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This qualitative intrinsic case study examined advisor’s perceptions of advising transitioning international transfer students transferring from a two-year college to a land-grant institution in the southwest region on the United States. Literature...

  10. Quantum State and Process Tomography of Energy Transfer Systems via Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel Yuen-Zhou; Jacob J. Krich; Masoud Mohseni; Alán Aspuru-Guzik

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The description of excited state dynamics in multichromophoric systems constitutes both a theoretical and experimental challenge in modern physical chemistry. An experimental protocol which can systematically characterize both coherent and dissipative processes at the level of the evolving quantum state of the chromophores is desired. In this article, we show that a carefully chosen set of polarization controlled two-color heterodyned photon-echo experiments can be used to reconstruct the time-evolving density matrix of the one-exciton manifold of a heterodimer. This possibility in turn allows for a complete description of the excited state dynamics via quantum process tomography (QPT). Calculations on the dimer show that QPT can reveal rich information about system-bath interactions, which otherwise appear nontrivially hidden in the polarization monitored in standard four-wave mixing experiments. Our study presents a novel method for analyzing condensed phase experiments with a quantum information processing perspective.

  11. Excited states and energy transfer among DNA bases in double helices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    spectroscopy. The present article points out contentious questions regarding the nature of the excited states at the University of Stockholm (Sweden) in 1988. He joined CNRS in 1991 where he is presently research director. He a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Bern (Switzerland). He worked in the field of gas phase

  12. Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .com Manufacturing/wholesale trade/service/retail 3251 Basic chemical manufacturing Plasma Biofuels 2007 P.O. Box://plasmetc orp.com/ Plasma Biofuels currently uses Induction-Coupled Plasma (ICP) gasifiers with various IP

  13. Address State: Zip: All participants: please complete the form below and return it to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    to UCDEA Contact the Retiree Center via e-mail: retireecenter@ucdavis.edu or telephone: (530) 752-5182

  14. LAST NAME: FIRST NAME: M.I.: MAILING ADDRESS: CITY: STATE: ZIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    AND ISI S INFORMATION ORIGINAL ISIS TRANSACTION NUMBER: ______________ AMOUNT CREDITED TO ISIS: $______________ NEW ISIS TRANSACTION NUMBER: ______________ REFUND DUE CUSTOMER: $______________ DATE PROCESSED IN ISIS: Distribution: White-Accounting Yellow-Customer CREDIT STUDENT (ISIS) ACCOUNT REFUND (CHECK

  15. Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WA 99352 (509) 987-7728 howdy@andyet .net Adam Brault http://andyet.n et/ &yet makes web software Concepts & Designs 1989 2750 Salk Ave Ste 102 Richland WA 99354 (509) 539-5094 srsomers@clin ecom.net Scott-0123 sjones@arculu s.net Stanley Jones http://www.arc ulus.net Design, Engineering, Interior Design, Project

  16. Business Name Year Address City State Zip Phone Email Address Contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WA 99352 (509) 987-7728 howdy@andyet .net Adam Brault http://andyet.ne t/ &yet makes web software Concepts & Designs 1989 2750 Salk Ave Ste 102 Richland WA 99354 (509) 539-5094 srsomers@clin ecom.net Scott 99336 (509) 783-0123 sjones@arculu s.net Stanley Jones http://www.arcu lus.net Design, Engineering

  17. 2009 Carb Sequestration Workshop Presentations for Download (zipped) 1. Click on Title to go to presentations and download.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Jeffrey J.

    Laboratory Geochemical Tools for Monitoring Geologic Carbon Sequestration, (David Cole, ORNL) Andre Duguid-surface carbon sequestration T.S. Ramakrishnan (Jim Johnson, speaker) Schlumberger Capacity and Injectivity2009 Carb Sequestration Workshop Presentations for Download (zipped) 1. Click on Title to go

  18. Perfect and flexible quantum state transfer in the hybrid system atom coupled-cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno F. C. Yabu-uti; José A. Roversi

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a system composed of $N$ coupled cavities and two-level atoms interacting one at a time. Adjusting appropriately the atom-field detuning, and make the hopping rate of photons between neighboring cavities, $A$, greater than the atom-field coupling $g$ (i.e. $A>>g$), we can eliminate the interaction of the atom with the nonresonant normal modes reducing the dynamics to the interaction of the atom with only a single-mode. As an application of this interaction, we analyze the transmission of an arbitrary atomic quantum state between distant coupled cavities. In the ideal case, we obtain a flexible and perfect quantum communication. Considering the influence of dissipation an interesting parity effect emerge and we obtain $N$ maximum in which it is still possible to achieve a quantum communication more efficient than a purely classical channel between the ends. We also studied important sources of imperfections in procedure execution.

  19. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, August 1, 1989--December 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  20. Description of TASHA: Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Chen, N.C.; Nelson, W.R.; Yoder, G.L.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the code used to perform Thermal Analysis of Steady-State-Heat-Transfer for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor (TASHA). More specifically, the code is designed for thermal analysis of the fuel elements. The new code reflects changes to the High Flux Isotope Reactor steady-state thermal-hydraulics code. These changes were aimed at both improving the code`s predictive ability and allowing statistical thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis to be performed. A significant portion of the changes were aimed at improving the correlation package in the code. This involved incorporating more recent correlations for both single-phase flow and two-phase flow thermal limits, including the addition of correlations to predict the phenomenon of flow excursion. Since the code was to be used in the design of the ANS, changes were made to allow the code to predict limiting powers for a variety of thermal limits, including critical heat flux, flow excursion, incipient boiling, oxide spallation, maximum centerline temperature, and surface temperature equal to the saturation temperature. Statistical uncertainty analysis also required several changes to the code itself as well as changes to the code input format. This report describes these changes in enough detail to allow the reader to interpret code results and also to understand where the changes were made in the code programming. This report is not intended to be a stand alone report for running the code, however, and should be used in concert with the two previous reports published on the original code. Sample input and output files are also included to help accomplish these goals. In addition, a section is included that describes requirements for a new, more modem code that the project planned to develop.

  1. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, April 1, 1984-March 31, 1985. [EDTA-radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. Our research, which utilizes the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: (1) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; (2) the control of the quantum yield of formation of redox products; and (3) the mechanisms by which reduced species interact with water to yield H/sub 2/ homogeneously and heterogeneously. Research activities are summarized for the following: (1) reaction of methyl viologen with EDTA-radicals; (2) solution medium control of photoredox yields; (3) photochemistry of methyl viologen charge-transfer complexes; (4) thermal reduction of methyl viologen in alkaline solution; (5) formation of dihydrogen from reduced methyl viologen; and (6) photophysics of Cr(III)-polypyridyl complexes.

  2. Excited-state dynamics of the Tm3+ ions and Tm3+ ~ Ho3+ energy transfers in LiYF4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1463 Excited-state dynamics of the Tm3+ ions and Tm3+ ~ Ho3+ energy transfers in LiYF4 A. Brenier considérant deux types de sites. Plus compliquée, la dynamique de fluorescence anti-Stokes est décrite désexcitation à l'intérieur d'un même centre Tm3 +, une relaxation croisée entre ions Tm3+ adjacents du type 3H4

  3. Observation of breakup transfer process for the bound states of {sup 16}O populated from {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction at 20 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Thompson, I. J.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Golda, K. S.; Babu, A.; Singh, D.; Ray, S.; Mitra, A. K. [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, L-414, Livermore CA 94551 (United States); Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi 110067 (India); Physics Department, Ramkrishna Vivekananda University, Belur, Howrah (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The deuteron angular distribution for the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d){sup 16}O* has been measured at 20 MeV populating bound and unbound states of {sup 16}O. Analysis shows a dominance of breakup induced alpha transfer in comparison to a direct alpha transfer process for the bound states. The effect increases as the excitation energy of {sup 16}O decreases, maximizing at the ground state.

  4. Dispersed-flow film boiling in rod-bundle geometry: steady-state heat-transfer data and correlation comparisons. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G. L.; Morris, D. G.; Mullins, C. B.; Ott, L. J.; Reed, D. A.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of six film boiling correlations and one single-phase vapor correlation has been made using data from 22 steady state upflow rod bundle tests (series 3.07.9). Bundle fluid conditions were calculated using energy and mass conservation considerations. Results of the steady state film boiling tests support the conclusions reached in the analysis of prior transient tests 3.03.6AR, 3.06.6B, and 3.08.6C. Comparisons between experimentally determined and correlation-predicted heat transfer coefficients, are presented.

  5. Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    Michigan State University Community Music School -Detroit GIFT IN KIND VALUATION AND INTENT FORM recognizes the gift intentions of: Donor: Address: City: State: Zip Telephone: Email: to Michigan State University through the Michigan State University Foundation. This gift of: (Please include model & serial

  6. Photodegradation of oligomeric polyesters containing anthraquinone and 1,2-diamine units. Single electron transfer induced cation radical bond cleavage in the solid state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leon, J.W.; Whitten, D.G. (Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States))

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oligomeric polyesters containing light-absorbing anthraquinone electron acceptor chromophores and fragmentable 1,2-diamine donors have been synthesized. Irradiation with [lambda] [ge] 340 nm in solution or as solid films results in photooxidative C-C bond cleavage of the 1,2-diamine units yielding essentially the same products in either case. The solid state photodegradation reaction was monitored using size exclusion chromatography and was found to be substantially less efficient than the corresponding solution reaction. This is attributed to an inefficient forward electron transfer step and the possibility of an induced reversibility of the fragmentation. The efficiency of photodegradation is suggested to be dependent on the donor/acceptor orientations in the solid state. 49 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Solid State Electron Transfer via Bacterial Nanowires: Contributions Toward a Mechanistic Understanding of Geophysical Response of Biostimulated Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estella Atekwana

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The degradation of organic matter by microorganisms provides a source of electrical potential or so-called 'self potential' (SP) that can be measured by using a voltmeter. During this process electrons are being produced as a waste-product and bacterial cells have to dispose of these to allow for the complete biodegradation of organic matter. Especially in anaerobic microbial communities, exo-cellular electron transfer is the most important driving force behind this process and organisms have developed different, but also similar, ways to transfer electrons to other microorganisms. Recently, it has been postulated that direct electron transfer from cell-to-cell is actually done by 'hard-wired' microorganisms. This shuttling of electrons is most likely done by certain c-type cytochromes that form the functional part of electrically conductive nanowires. In this study we investigated if nanowires can explain the geoelectrical (self potential and spectral induced polarization) signals observed at some biostimulated environments such as DOE sites. The objectives of our project are to: (1) investigate any temporal changes in the geophysical signatures (Self Potential (SP) and Induced Polarization (IP)) associated with nanowires of the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type and mtrc/omcA deletion mutant, (2) demonstrate that mutant strains of bacteria that produce nonconductive nanowires do not contribute to geoelectrical responses. We accomplished the following: (1) Provided training to students and a postdoctoral fellow that worked on the project, (2) Conducted several SP & IP measurements correlating the distribution of nanowires and SIP/SP signals in partial fulfillment of object No. 1 and 2. On the following we will report and discuss the results of our last experiment with some emphasis on the source mechanisms of both SP and IP associated with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, wild type in sand columns.

  8. Going to Work: Filling Out an Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Rosemarie

    2000-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ______________________________________________________________________ City__________________________ State ___________ ZIP Code ____________________ Phone: Day __________________________________________________________________ Night ________________________________________________________________ Schools Attended Name... ______________________________________________________________________________________ Zip ________________________________________________________________________________________ Telephone __________________________________________________________________________________ Age...

  9. Water-soluble polystyrene latexes as photoredox media. 1. Interfacial fluorescence quenching and triplet-state electron transfer from pyrene and 1-pyrenebutyric acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsiao, J.S.; Webber, S.E. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

    1993-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Aromatic chromophores (pyrene and 1-pyrenebutyric acid) have been adsorbed on water-soluble polystyrene latex particles (commercially referred to as microspheres) from the aqueous phase. The fluorescence properties and quenching efficiencies of these chromophores have been measured using a zwitterionic viologen SPV (4,4[prime]-bipyridino-l,l[prime]-bis(propanesulfonate)). The quenching mechanism has been found to be diffusion controlled. The electron-transfer quenching of the triplet state by SPV was characterized. Triplet-state quenching does not occur for pyrene embedded in these polystyrene latexes in aqueous solution, which is attributed to the hydrophobic protection of the pyrene from the approach of water-soluble SPV. On the other hand, the efficiencies of charge separation for l-pyrenebutyric acid both in homogeneous aqueous solution and adsorbed on polystyrene latexes in aqueous solution were found to be high. It is proposed that the amphiphilic l-pyrenebutyric acid molecules prefer to reside at the aqueous interface of the latexes. These results demonstrate that [open quotes]compartmentalization[close quotes] of ion pairs, produced by redox quenching, can be achieved when l-pyrenebutyric acid molecules are located at these interfaces. This provides a strategy for more efficient utilization of excited-state redox processes. 17 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Impact of environmentally induced fluctuations on quantum mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational pigment states in photosynthetic energy transfer and 2D electronic spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujihashi, Yuta; Ishizaki, Akihito

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, nuclear vibrational contribution signatures in 2D electronic spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest, in particular as regards interpretation of the oscillatory transients observed in light-harvesting complexes. These transients have dephasing times that persist for much longer than theoretically predicted electronic coherence lifetime. As a plausible explanation for this long-lived spectral beating in 2D electronic spectra, quantum-mechanically mixed electronic and vibrational states (vibronic excitons) were proposed by Christensson et al. [J. Phys. Chem. B 116, 7449 (2012)] and have since been explored. In this work, we address a dimer which produces little beating of electronic origin in the absence of vibronic contributions, and examine the impact of protein-induced fluctuations upon electronic-vibrational quantum mixtures by calculating the electronic energy transfer dynamics and 2D electronic spectra in a numerically accurate manner. It is found that, at cryogenic temperatures, the e...

  11. ADDRESS: STATE: ZIP: Please complete the appropriate section of this form along with your check made payable to UC Regents.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomases, Becca

    @ucdavis.edu or telephone: (530) 752-5182 No tickets will be sent. You will receive a reminder via e-mail prior to the event

  12. Name AKA_FKA Contract # Start Date End Date Contract Scope City State Zip Phone Site Last Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    experience Fossil OR 97830 541.763.2725 3 Ashland Pediatrics AFF-2009-1389 04/15/2010 06/30/2015 Nursing students clinical learning experience Ashland OR 97520 541.482.8114 1 Ashland School District #5 AFF-2012-0933 07/01/2012 06/30/2017 Nursing students clinical learning experience Ashland OR 97520 541.482.8771 6

  13. Numerical simulation of the fluid flow and heat transfer processes during scavenging in a two-stroke engine under steady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro Gouveia, M. de; Reis Parise, J.A. dos; Nieckele, A.O. (Pontificia Univ. Catolica, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of the scavenging process in a two-stroke flat-piston model engine has been developed. Air enters the cylinder circumferentially, inducting a three-dimensional turbulent swirling flow. The problem was modeled as a steady-state axisymmetric flow through a cylinder with uniform wall temperature. The steady-state regime was simulated by assuming the piston head fixed at the bottom dead center. The calculation was performed employing the {kappa}-{epsilon} model of turbulence. A comparison of the results obtained for the flow field with available experimental data showed very good agreement, and a comparison with an available numerical solution revealed superior results. The effects of the Reynolds number, inlet port angles, and engine geometry on the flow and in-cylinder heat transfer characteristics were investigated. The Nusselt number substantially increases with larger Reynolds numbers and a smaller bore-to-stroke ratio. It is shown that the positioning of the exhaust value(s) is the main parameter to control the scavenging process.

  14. Data Communication Principles Reliable Data Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramkumar, Mahalingam

    Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer Data Communication Basics Mahalingam Ramkumar Mississippi State University, MS September 8, 2014 Ramkumar CSE 4153 / 6153 #12;Data Communication Principles Switching Reliable Data Transfer 1 Data Communication Principles Data Rate of a Communication

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    proposed in the petition would allow the installation of electric motor-driven natural gas compression://www.energy.ca.gov/sitingcases_pre-1999/index.html. The staff analysis, when published, will also be posted on the website. If you would __________________________________________________________________________________________________ CITY STATE ZIP CODE PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO THE COMMISSION DECISION TO INSTALL NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION

  16. Logo Sheet for Arizona State University All logo configurations are available in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Logo Sheet for Arizona State University All logo configurations are available in the following (includes entire logo suite) Zip Archive (includes entire logo suite) The caption below each logo refers to the digital file name. Logo download page: http://www.asu.edu/gsm/downloads_logo.html Email gsm

  17. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} reaction intermediate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara [Max-Planck-Institut fuer biophysikalische Chemie, Spektroskopie und Photochemische Kinetik, 37070 Goettingen (Germany); Kovalenko, Sergey A. [Institut fuer Chemie, Humboldt Universitaet zu Berlin, Brook-Taylor Strasse 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times {tau}{sub 1} and {tau}{sub 2} are observed. This means that the reversible LE<-->ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with {tau}{sub 1}(LE)<{tau}{sub 1}(ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel in 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a {pi}{sigma}* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF{sub 3}, and C(=O)OC{sub 2}H{sub 2} p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state, as only the C-C{identical_to}N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.

  18. USHE TRANSFER ARTICULATION 2013-2014 WEBER U of U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Berg, Jur

    USHE TRANSFER ARTICULATION 2013-2014 WEBER U of U Course Course Footnotes ACTG 1010 PRACT ACCTNG of the World 3 E ANTH 2030 Principles of Archaeology 3 ANTH 2030 A WEBER STATE UNIVERISTY 1 #12;USHE TRANSFER

  19. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

  20. Assistance to state underground injection control programs and the oil and gas industry with class 2 injection well data management and technology transfer. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paque, M.J.

    1995-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Injection Practices Research Foundation (UIPRF) administered a grant project funded by the US Department of Energy relating to Class 2 injection well operations in various primacy and direct implementation states throughout the country. This effort provided substantial benefits to state regulatory agencies and oil and gas producing companies. It enhanced the protection of the environment through the protection of ground water resources and improved oil and gas production operations within affected states. This project involved the following accomplishment: (1) Completed the design and installation of the only comprehensive, fully relational PC-Based Oil and Gas regulatory data management system (the Risk Based Data Management System) in the country. Additionally, training and data conversion was conduced and the RBDMS User`s Guide and the RBDMS Administrator`s Guide were completed. (2) State wide Area-Of-Review (AOR) workshop were held in California and Oklahoma and a national three-day workshop was held in Kansas City, Missouri where 24 state oil and gas agencies were represented.

  1. The Nature of the Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State in p-Pyrrolocyanobenzene (PBN) and Other Derivatives of Benzene Substituted by Electron Donor and Acceptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Yehuda

    -Pyrrolocyanobenzene (PBN) and Other Derivatives of Benzene Substituted by Electron Donor and Acceptor Groups Shmuel Zilberg analysis of these compounds, in which benzene is substituted by an electron withdrawing group of benzene and is of a covalent nature. Light emission from this state is due to local excitation

  2. Transferring Data at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transfering data - whether over the wide area network...

  3. Energetics of protein charge transfer and photosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matyushov, Dmitry

    Energetics of protein charge transfer and photosynthesis Dmitry Matyushov Arizona State scheme is to snap a proton from solution! #12; Bacterial photosynthesis e 0.25 eV lost in two

  4. Do(es) your child(ren) have any medical conditions, special needs or take any medication we need to be aware of? Street City State Zip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : _____________________________________________________________________________________________ My child is free from contagious/ communicable diseases: YES_____ NO_____ If NO, please explain: _____________________________________________________________________________________________ NOTE: IC3 reserves the right to refuse care to any child who appears to have a contagious

  5. Transfer Guide: Forestry-Business -1 -Revised: 1 August 2010 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Guide: Forestry-Business - 1 - Revised: 1 August 2010 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING WORKSHEET Colorado Community Colleges Colorado State University Bachelor of Science Degree ­ Forestry forestry-business concentration This planning worksheet represents a guide for community college students

  6. Preliminary Heat Transfer Studies for the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Transfer Piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HECHT, S.L.

    2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer studies were made to determine the thermal characteristics of double-shell tank transfer piping under both transient and steady-state conditions. A number of design and operation options were evaluated for this piping system which is in its early design phase.

  7. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  8. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  9. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  10. INTRAMOLECULAR CHARGE AND ENERGY TRANSFER IN MULTICHROMOPHORIC AROMATIC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Lim

    2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A concerted experimental and computational study of energy transfer in nucleic acid bases and charge transfer in dialkylaminobenzonitriles, and related electron donor-acceptor molecules, indicate that the ultrafast photoprocesses occur through three-state conical interactions involving an intermediate state of biradical character.

  11. Heat Transfer Guest Editorial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

  12. Dynamics of heat transfer between nano systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs; Girish S. Agarwal

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a dynamical theory of heat transfer between two nano systems. In particular, we consider the resonant heat transfer between two nanoparticles due to the coupling of localized surface modes having a finite spectral width. We model the coupled nanosystem by two coupled quantum mechanical oscillators, each interacting with its own heat bath, and obtain a master equation for the dynamics of heat transfer. The damping rates in the master equation are related to the lifetimes of localized plasmons in the nanoparticles. We study the dynamics towards the steady state and establish connection with the standard theory of heat transfer in steady state. For strongly coupled nano particles we predict Rabi oscillations in the mean occupation number of surface plasmons in each nano particle.

  13. Tri-State Electric Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas Zip: 75248 Sector:Tri-State

  14. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  15. A FAST MULTILEVEL ALGORITHM FOR THE SOLUTION OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS OF CONDUCTIVERADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER EQUATIONS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer. This system of equations­Brakhage algorithm. Key words. conductive­radiative heat transfer, multilevel algorithm, compact fixed point problems integro­differential equations that model steady­state combined conductive­radiative heat transfer

  16. HIGEE Mass Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

    HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

  17. MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

  18. Tunable transfer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 29, 2013 Scientists gain first quantitative insights into electron transfer from minerals to microbes Scientists have gained the first quantitative insights into electron...

  19. Technology Transfer Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

  20. Bus transfer analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

  1. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  2. Collisional population transfer in yterbium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schauer, Martin Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torgerson, Justin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Danielson, Jeremy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Xinxin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Ahn - Tuan [UNIV OF PITTSBURGH; Wang, Li - Bang [NATIONAL TSING HUA UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-lived metastable states of Yb+ ions are used for atomic frequency standards, precision measurements, and quantum information research. The effect of population trapping and transfer in these states must be well understood. We report here the transfer of Yb+ ions into the long-lived {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} state by means of collisions between He buffer gas and Yb+ ions held in a linear Paul trap. Transfer rates were measured as functions of buffer-gas pressure and repump-laser power, and the collisional population transfer rates were extracted. The measured transfer rate coefficients are 8.32(75)x10-11 and 8.65(33)x10-11 cm3/s for the collisional processes {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}, respectively.

  3. Trinity University Portland State University Updated 3/21/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Trinity University Portland State University Updated 3/21/2013 Transfer Worksheet College-level transferable academic courses taken at the Trinity University (Trinity) will transfer to Portland State and to help in planning your transfer. PSU is on a quarter system. Since Trinity is on a semester system, your

  4. MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS – A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

    2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

  5. POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR TRANSFER MENTOR AS A STAFF MEMBER Thank you for your interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff

  6. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  7. HEAT AND MOISTURE TRANSFER THROUGH CLOTHING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.between convective heat transfer and mass transferConvective and radiative heat transfer coefficients for

  8. Heat and moisture transfer through clothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelker, Conrad; Hoffmann, Sabine; Kornadt, Oliver; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. C. Eberhart (ed), Heat transfer in medicine and biology.Convective and radiative heat transfer coefficients forbetween convective heat transfer and mass transfer

  9. Microsoft Word - VIPERS instructions.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Name Number Recipient Information Number Fill in if applicable and Street and Street City, State Recipient Information City, State and ZIP Code and ZIP Code 11. COMPUTATION OF...

  10. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  11. Transfer reactions at ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    64 Ni+ 64 Ni Strong entrance-channel dependence of fusion enhancement Beckerman et al., PRL 45, 1472 (1980), PRC 25, 837 (1982) Coupling of transfer channels, in addition to...

  12. Exciton/Charge-transfer Electronic Couplings in Organic Semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Difley, Seth

    Charge transfer (CT) states and excitons are important in energy conversion processes that occur in organic light emitting devices (OLEDS) and organic solar cells. An ab initio density functional theory (DFT) method for ...

  13. Analyses of power system vulnerability and total transfer capability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Xingbin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    limits. Both steady state and dynamic security assessments are included in the process of obtaining total transfer capability. Particularly, the effect of FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission Systems) devices on TTC is examined. FACTS devices have been shown...

  14. Transfer information remotely via noise entangled coherent channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El Allati; N. Metwally; Y. Hassouni

    2010-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, a generalized protocol of quantum teleportation is suggested to investigate the possibility of remotely transfer unknown multiparities entangled coherent state. A theoretical technique is introduced to generate maximum entangled coherent states which are used as quantum channels. We show that the mean photon number plays a central role on the fidelity of the transferred information. The noise parameter can be considered as a control parameter only for small values of the mean photon number.

  15. Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammer, David

    Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

  16. NSF Workshop on Available Transfer Capability, Urbana IL, USA, June 1997 INITIAL CONCEPTS FOR APPLYING SENSITIVITY TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the experience in computing transfer ca- pabilities concerns line #ow limits and uses DC load #ow power system case with a loading and transfer schedule at which the power system is secure. The base transfer transfer is in- creased, the power system state evolves and eventually some security criterion is violated

  17. Vibrational energy transfer in ultracold molecule - molecule collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goulven Quéméner; Naduvalath Balakrishnan; Roman V. Krems

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a rigorous study of vibrational relaxation in p-H2 + p-H2 collisions at cold and ultracold temperatures and identify an efficient mechanism of ro-vibrational energy transfer. If the colliding molecules are in different rotational and vibrational levels, the internal energy may be transferred between the molecules through an extremely state-selective process involving simultaneous conservation of internal energy and total rotational angular momentum. The same transition in collisions of distinguishable molecules corresponds to the rotational energy transfer from one vibrational state of the colliding molecules to another.

  18. Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

  19. Applied heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer principles are discussed with emphasis on the practical aspects of the problems. Correlations for heat transfer and pressure drop from several worldwide sources for flow inside and outside of tubes, including finned tubes are presented, along with design and performance calculations of heat exchangers economizers, air heaters, condensers, waste-heat boilers, fired heaters, superheaters, and boiler furnaces. Vibration analysis for tube bundles and heat exchangers are also discussed, as are estimating gas-mixture properties at atmospheric and elevated pressures and life-cycle costing techniques. (JMT)

  20. Three Dimensional Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel

    2000-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative Transfer (RT) effects play a crucial role in the thermal history of the intergalactic medium. Here I discuss recent advances in the development of numerical methods that introduce RT to cosmological hydrodynamics. These methods can also readily be applied to time dependent problems on interstellar and galactic scales.

  1. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  2. Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

  3. Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

  4. QER- Comment of Energy Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Lee Hanse Executive Vice President Interstate Energy Transfer Mobile - 210 464 2929 Office - 210 403 6455

  5. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  6. Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    't be determined A correlation for Sherwood number (Sh) based on di i l l i b d l i Sh diff idimensional analysis for mass transfer with convection: I l f d fl d b (l b l )­ Internal forced flow: inside a tube (laminar A in fluid medium B in a flow with characteristic velocity and size characteristic d: kA = f(d, w, (= fluid

  7. Columbia College Portland State University Updated 1/31/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    Columbia College Portland State University Updated 1/31/2014 Transfer Worksheet If you are taking classes that are part of the Intersegmental General Education Transfer Curriculum (IGETC) at Columbia College, you can rest assured that those credits will also transfer to Portland State University (PSU

  8. Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

  9. Michigan State University Northwestern Michigan College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan State University and Northwestern Michigan College Reverse Transfer Transcript Release Michigan State University 426 Auditorium Road, Room 150 East Lansing, MI 48824-2603 Phone: (517) 355 Northwestern Michigan College _____________________ Please forward a transcript to: Northwestern Michigan

  10. Electromagnetically induced absorption due to transfer of coherence and to transfer of population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M. [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel); Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H. [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 52900 (Israel)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absorption spectrum of a weak probe, interacting with a driven degenerate two-level atomic system, whose ground and excited hyperfine states are F{sub g,e}, can exhibit narrow peaks at line center. When the pump and probe polarizations are different, F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1 and F{sub g}>0, the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) peak has been shown to be due to the transfer of coherence (TOC) between the excited and ground states via spontaneous decay. We give a detailed explanation of why the TOC that leads to EIA (EIA-TOC) can only take place when ground-state population trapping does not occur, that is, when F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1. We also explain why EIA-TOC is observed in open systems. We show that EIA can also occur when the pump and probe polarizations are identical and F{sub e}=F{sub g}+1. This EIA is analogous to an effect that occurs in simple two-level systems when the collisional transfer of population (TOP) from the ground state to a reservoir is greater than that from the excited state. For a degenerate two-level system, the reservoir consists of the Zeeman sublevels of the ground hyperfine state, and of other nearby hyperfine states that do not interact with the pump. We will also discuss the four-wave mixing spectrum under the conditions where EIA-TOC and EIA-TOP occur.

  11. Muon transfer from hydrogen to helium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bystritskii, V.M.; Dzhelepov, V.P.; Petrukhin, V.I.; Rudenko, A.I.; Suvorov, V.M.; Filchenkov, V.V.; Khovanskii, N.N.; Khomenko, B.A.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that ..mu../sup -/ mesons stopped in a gas mixture of hydrogen, helium, and xenon (hydrogen pressure about 20 atmospheres, helium and xenon densities relative to hydrogen 0.05--2 and approx.10/sup -4/ respectively) are transferred from the p..mu.. atoms in the ground state to helium atoms at a rate lambda/sub He/ = (3.6 +- 1.0)x10/sup 8/ sec/sup -1/. The result is in good agreement with the calculations in which a novel mesic-molecular mechanism of p..mu..-atom charge exchange with helium nuclei is taken into account. The dependence of the probability for p..mu..-atom formation in the ground state on the helium density is measured. An analysis of this dependence and a comparison of it with the corresponding data for ..pi../sup -/ mesons indicate that muons can also be transferred from excited levels of p..mu.. atoms at a rate higher than in the case of p..pi.. atoms (transfer constant ..lambda../sub ..mu../ = 3.8 +- 0.3 compared with ..lambda../sub ..pi../ = 1.84 +- 0.09).

  12. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, James C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoover, Mark A. (Idaho Falls, ID); May, Kay W. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ross, Maurice J. (Pocatello, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  13. Data Transfer and Access

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  14. Technology Transfer Reporting Form

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon |1999Energy-Technology TransferThis

  15. Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon Freid, et al.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the feasibility of a multi-kilowatt wireless radio frequency (RF) power system to transfer power between lunar base facilities. Initial analyses, show that wireless power transfer (WPT) systems can be more efficient and less expensive than traditional wired approaches for certain lunar and terrestrial applications. The study includes evaluations of the fundamental limitations of lunar WPT systems, the interrelationships of possible operational parameters, and a baseline design approach for a notionial system that could be used in the near future to power remote facilities at a lunar base. Our notional system includes state-of-the-art photovoltaics (PVs), high-efficiency microwave transmitters, low-mass large-aperture high-power transmit antennas, high-efficiency large-area rectenna receiving arrays, and reconfigurable DC combining circuitry.

  16. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce. Their achievements and recognized capabilities are what make the accomplishments cataloged here possible. Without them, none of these transactions would occur.

  17. Origin State Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  18. Origin State Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, STB data Origin State Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Alabama...

  19. Technology transfer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology transfer Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne Read more about Technology Development and Commercialization at Argonne New Director to lead Technology...

  20. University of Puget Sound Portland State University Updated 1/2/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caughman, John

    University of Puget Sound Portland State University Updated 1/2/2013 Transfer Worksheet College-level transferable academic courses taken at University of Puget Sound will transfer to Portland State University;University of Puget Sound Portland State University Updated 1/2/2013 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS The majority

  1. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  2. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  3. General Relativistic Radiative Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Knop; P. H. Hauschildt; E. Baron

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in spherically symmetric systems that are influenced by the effects of general relativity (GR). We utilize a comoving wavelength ansatz that allows to resolve spectral lines throughout the atmosphere. The used numerical solution is an operator splitting (OS) technique that uses a characteristic formal solution. The bending of photon paths and the wavelength shifts due to the effects of GR are fully taken into account, as is the treatment of image generation in a curved spacetime. We describe the algorithm we use and demonstrate the effects of GR on the radiative transport of a two level atom line in a neutron star like atmosphere for various combinations of continuous and line scattering coefficients. In addition, we present grey continuum models and discuss the effects of different scattering albedos on the emergent spectra and the determination of effective temperatures and radii of neutron star atmospheres.

  4. Network analysis of proton transfer in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shevchuk, Roman; Rao, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.rao@frias.uni-freiburg.de [Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Soft Matter Research, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Agmon, Noam [Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton transfer in macromolecular systems is a fascinating yet elusive process. In the last ten years, molecular simulations have shown to be a useful tool to unveil the atomistic mechanism. Notwithstanding, the large number of degrees of freedom involved make the accurate description of the process very hard even for the case of proton diffusion in bulk water. Here, multi-state empirical valence bond molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with complex network analysis are applied to study proton transfer in liquid water. Making use of a transition network formalism, this approach takes into account the time evolution of several coordinates simultaneously. Our results provide evidence for a strong dependence of proton transfer on the length of the hydrogen bond solvating the Zundel complex, with proton transfer enhancement as shorter bonds are formed at the acceptor site. We identify six major states (nodes) on the network leading from the “special pair” to a more symmetric Zundel complex required for transferring the proton. Moreover, the second solvation shell specifically rearranges to promote the transfer, reiterating the idea that solvation beyond the first shell of the Zundel complex plays a crucial role in the process.

  5. Single and pair neutron transfers at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Michelagnoli, C.; Stefanini, A. M.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Szilner, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Italy); Ruder Boskovic Institute, HR-10 001 Zagreb (Croatia); Pollarolo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Colo, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Mason, P.; Farnea, E.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Scarlassara, F.; Ur, C. A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Padova, and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Gadea, A. [IFIC, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Haas, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Jelavic-Malenica, D.; Soic, N. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, HR-10 001 Zagreb (Croatia); Marginean, N. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, R-077125, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multinucleon transfer cross sections in the {sup 96}Zr+{sup 40}Ca system have been measured, in inverse kinematics, at bombarding energies ranging from the Coulomb barrier to {approx}25% below. Targetlike recoils have been identified in A, Z and velocity with the large solid angle magnetic spectrometer PRISMA. The experimental data for one- and two-neutron transfer channels have been compared with semiclassical microscopic calculations. For the two-neutron transfer channels the relevance of the transitions to the ground state and to the 0{sup +} excited states of {sup 42}Ca are discussed by employing, for the reaction mechanism, the successive approximation. It is found that the transition to the 0{sup +} state at {approx}6 MeV, whose wave function is dominated by the two neutrons in the 2p{sub 3/2} shell, is much larger than the ground state one. The comparison with the inclusive data reveals that transitions to states with high multipolarity and non-natural parity are important. This suggests that more complex two-particle correlations have to be incorporated in the treatment of the transfer process.

  6. Study of transfer and breakup reactions with the plastic box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stokstad, R.G.; Albiston, C.R.; Bantel, M.; Chan, Y.; Countryman, P.J.; Gazes, S.; Harvey, B.G.; Homeyer, H.; Murphy, M.J.; Tserruya, I.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of transfer reactions with heavy-ion projectiles is complicated by the frequent presence of three or more nuclei in the final state. One prolific source of three-body reactions is the production of a primary ejectile in an excited state above a particle threshold. A subset of transfer reactions, viz., those producing ejectiles in bound states, can be identified experimentally. This has been accomplished with a 4..pi.. detector constructed of one-millimeter-thick scintillator paddles of dimension 20 cm x 20 cm. The paddles are arranged in the form of a cube centered around the target with small entrance and exit apertures for the beam and the projectile-like fragments, (PLF). The detection of a light particle (e.g., a proton or an alpha particle) in coincidence with a PLF indicates a breakup reaction. The absence of any such coincidence indicates a reaction in which all the charge lost by the projectile was transferred to the target. With this technique we have studied the transfer and breakup reactions induced by 220 and 341 MeV /sup 20/Ne ions on a gold target. Ejectiles from Li to Ne have been measured at several scattering angles. The absolute cross sections, angular distributions and energy spectra for the transfer and breakup reactions are presented. Relatively large cross sections are observed for the complete transfer of up to seven units of charge (i.e., a nitrogen nucleus). The gross features and trends in the energy spectra for transfer and breakup reactions are similar. However, small differences, in particular for the widths of the energy spectra, are significant. 20 references.

  7. Robust energy transfer mechanism via precession resonance in nonlinear turbulent wave systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel D. Bustamante; Brenda Quinn; Dan Lucas

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust energy transfer mechanism is found in nonlinear wave systems, which favours transfers towards modes interacting via triads with nonzero frequency mismatch, applicable in meteorology, nonlinear optics and plasma wave turbulence. We introduce the concepts of truly dynamical degrees of freedom and triad precession. Transfer efficiency is maximal when the triads' precession frequencies resonate with the system's nonlinear frequencies, leading to a collective state of synchronised triads with strong turbulent cascades at intermediate nonlinearity. Numerical simulations confirm analytical predictions.

  8. Study of heat transfer in attics with a small scale simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katipamula, Srinivas

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Chairman of Advisory Committee: W. D. Turner An experimental study concerned with different modes of heat. transfer in fibrous and cellulose insulating material is presented. A series of experiments was conducted using an attic simulator... to deter- mine the effects of ventilation on attic heat transfer. and the effect of infrared radiation on the thcrn&al conductivity of th& insulation sys- tem and on attic heat transfer. All the tests were perl'ormed at, steady state conditions...

  9. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed.

  10. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

  11. adoptively transferred indium-111: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Afshin J. 140 Mass transfer andMass transfer and Mass transfer andMass transfer and Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: eknik Mass transfer andMass transfer and arationste Mass...

  12. FREQUENCY SHAPED LINEAR OPTIMAL CONTROL WXTH TRANSFER FUNCTION RICCATI EQUATIONS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Barratt

    and numerical tool in optimal control problems associated with linear systems having state space descriptions optimal controllers for known multivariable linear stochastic systems. There are some inherent robustnessFREQUENCY SHAPED LINEAR OPTIMAL CONTROL WXTH TRANSFER FUNCTION RICCATI EQUATIONS* John B. Moore** D

  13. AFGa: Time and frequency transfer (ATF2010 joint session)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo-Young

    of Astronomy and Astrophysics, China (SRS), 2 Karoo Array Telescope, South Africa, 3 Brigham Young University TRANSFER S-H. Yang1 , C. B. Lee1 , J. K. Lee1 , S. J. Lee2 , 1 KRISS, South Korea, 2 CNU, South Korea 2) V. K. Jordanova, Los Alamos National Laboratory, United States 2. PLASMA WAVES AND HIGH ENERGY

  14. Fast population transfer engineering of three-level systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Chen; J. G. Muga

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We design, by invariant-based inverse engineering, resonant laser pulses to perform fast population transfers in three-level systems. The efficiency and laser intensities are examined for different protocols. The energy cost to improve the fidelity is quantified. The laser intensities can be reduced by populating the intermediate state and by multi-mode driving.

  15. Research Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael P.

    aware that conventional irreversible digi- tal logic technology, which dissipates the entire energy progress in the energy efficiency of digital technologies will Dr. Frank is employed by Florida StateResearch Memo Energy Transfer and Recovery Efficiencies for Adiabatic Charging with Various Driving

  16. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  17. Generalized Theory of Forster-Type Nonradiative Energy Transfer in Nanostructures with Mixed Dimensionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Generalized Theory of Forster-Type Nonradiative Energy Transfer in Nanostructures with Mixed, Athens, Ohio 45701, United States ABSTRACT: Forster-type nonradiative energy transfer (NRET) is widely that models Forster-type NRET for the cases of mixed dimensionality including all combinations

  18. Allene and pentatetraene cations as models for intramolecular charge transfer: Vibronic coupling Hamiltonian and conical intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markmann, Andreas

    and pentatetraene. Our aim is to simulate dynamically the charge transfer process when one component is artificiallyAllene and pentatetraene cations as models for intramolecular charge transfer: Vibronic coupling online 13 April 2005 We consider the vibronic coupling effects involving cationic states with degenerate

  19. Heat Transfer Operators Associated with Quantum Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ç. Aksak; S. Turgut

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Any quantum operation applied on a physical system is performed as a unitary transformation on a larger extended system. If the extension used is a heat bath in thermal equilibrium, the concomitant change in the state of the bath necessarily implies a heat exchange with it. The dependence of the average heat transferred to the bath on the initial state of the system can then be found from the expectation value of a hermitian operator, which is named as the heat transfer operator (HTO). The purpose of this article is the investigation of the relation between the HTOs and the associated quantum operations. Since, any given quantum operation on a system can be realized by different baths and unitaries, many different HTOs are possible for each quantum operation. On the other hand, there are also strong restrictions on the HTOs which arise from the unitarity of the transformations. The most important of these is the Landauer erasure principle. This article is concerned with the question of finding a complete set of restrictions on the HTOs that are associated with a given quantum operation. An answer to this question has been found only for a subset of quantum operations. For erasure operations, these characterizations are equivalent to the generalized Landauer erasure principle. For the case of generic quantum operations however, it appears that the HTOs obey further restrictions which cannot be obtained from the entropic restrictions of the generalized Landauer erasure principle.

  20. Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

  1. Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to...

  2. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems AnalysisVOLUME I A HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES ATOMIC

  3. Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is working with Heads of Departmental Elements, DOE senior leaders and subject-matter-experts to capture and transfer the knowledge and experiences...

  4. Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

  5. The Cost of Concreteness: The Effect of Nonessential Information on Analogical Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckler, Andrew F.

    . Kaminski, Vladimir M. Sloutsky, and Andrew F. Heckler The Ohio State University Most theories of analogical domain (e.g., Kotovsky, Hayes, & Simon, 1985; Zhang & Norman, 1994). Second, transfer is more likely

  6. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

  7. Single photoelectron spin detection and angular momentum transfer in a gate defined quantum dot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takafumi Fujita; Kazuhiro Morimoto; Haruki Kiyama; Giles Allison; Marcus Larsson; Arne Ludwig; Sascha R. Valentin; Andreas D. Wieck; Akira Oiwa; Seigo Tarucha

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent innovations in fabricating nanoscale confined spin systems have enabled investigation of fundamental quantum correlations between single quanta of photons and matter states. Realization of quantum state transfer from photon polarization to electron spin using gate defined quantum dots (QDs) may give evidence of preserved coherence of angular momentum basis states at the photon-spin interface. The interface would enlarge the concept of quantum information technology, in which single photogenerated electron spins are manipulated with the dots, but this remains a serious challenge. Here, we report the detection of single electron spins generated by polarized single photons via a double QD (DQD) to verify the angular momentum transfer from single photons to single electrons. Pauli spin blockade (PSB) is used to project the photoelectron spin state onto the up or down spin state. Our result promises the realization of coherent quantum state transfer and development of hybrid photon and spin quantum technology.

  8. Intramolecular photo-induced electron transfer in a rigid anthracene-N, N-dimethylaniline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsek, D.W.; Yang, N.C. Yang (Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry); Niemczyk, M.P.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)-5, 14-ethanopentacene (1) was synthesized and spectroscopic behaviors investigated. Results suggest that 1 undergoes photoinduced electron transfer (PET) in solvents more polar than saturated hydrocarbons. The resulting charge-transfer (CT) state undergoes CT fluorescence efficiently in solvents of low dielectric constants. Fluorescence excitation studies of the CT emission reveal the existence of an EDA interaction in the ground state. The implications of these results are discussed.

  9. Intramolecular photo-induced electron transfer in a rigid anthracene-N, N-dimethylaniline system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minsek, D.W.; Yang, N.C. Yang [Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Niemczyk, M.P.; Svec, W.A.; Wasielewski, M.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    2-(N,N-Dimethylamino)-5, 14-ethanopentacene (1) was synthesized and spectroscopic behaviors investigated. Results suggest that 1 undergoes photoinduced electron transfer (PET) in solvents more polar than saturated hydrocarbons. The resulting charge-transfer (CT) state undergoes CT fluorescence efficiently in solvents of low dielectric constants. Fluorescence excitation studies of the CT emission reveal the existence of an EDA interaction in the ground state. The implications of these results are discussed.

  10. Intercombination Effects in Resonant Energy Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Vaillant; R. M. Potvliege; M. P. A. Jones

    2015-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a near-degeneracy between the initial state and a state with a different spin quantum number. We also consider a case of four atoms in a spin chain, and show that a spin impurity can resonantly hop along the chain. By engineering the many-body energy levels of the spin-chain, the breakdown of $LS$ coupling due to inter-electronic effects in individual atoms can be mapped onto a spatial separation of the total spin and the total orbital angular momentum along the spin chain.

  11. Intercombination Effects in Resonant Energy Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaillant, C L; Jones, M P A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effect of intercombination transitions in excitation hopping processes such as those found in F\\"orster resonance energy transfer. Taking strontium Rydberg states as our model system, the breakdown of $LS$-coupling leads to weakly allowed transitions between Rydberg states of different spin quantum number. We show that the long-range interactions between two Rydberg atoms can be affected by these weakly allowed spin transitions, and the effect is greatest when there is a near-degeneracy between the initial state and a state with a different spin quantum number. We also consider a case of four atoms in a spin chain, and show that a spin impurity can resonantly hop along the chain. By engineering the many-body energy levels of the spin-chain, the breakdown of $LS$ coupling due to inter-electronic effects in individual atoms can be mapped onto a spatial separation of the total spin and the total orbital angular momentum along the spin chain.

  12. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  13. Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallouk, T.E.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

  14. A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

  15. A Theoretical Investigation Into Energy Transfer In Photosynthetic Open Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, David M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis looks at the electronic energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, in which evidence of long-lived coherence has been observed in 2-dimensional infrared experiments. I use three techniques: the numerically exact Hierarchical Equations of Motion, and the perturbative Redfield and Foerster theories, the latter of which ignores quantum coherence in the transfer. Both of the approximate methods perform very well - and while oscillations in site populations (a hallmark of coherence) are present in the exact transfer dynamics and absent in the dynamics of Foerster theory, the latter gives a reasonable prediction of transfer rates and steady-state populations, despite being incoherent - suggesting that coherence is not vital for the dynamics of transfer. Since Foerster theory is very inexpensive to run and performs so well, I then apply it to calculate the effects of static disorder in bacteriochlorophyll site energies and of a more structured spectral density. Ultimately, the energy transfer i...

  16. Discrepancy between hadron matter and quark-gluon matter in net charge transfer fluctuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai-Mei Zhou; Xiao-Mei Li; Bao-Guo Dong; Ben-Hao Sa

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A parton and hadron cascade model, PACIAE, is employed to investigate the net charge transfer fluctuation within $|\\eta|$=1 in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=200 GeV. It is turned out that the observable of net charge transfer fluctuation, $\\kappa$, in hadronic final state (HM) is nearly a factor of 3 to 5 larger than that in initial partonic state (QGM). However, only twenty percent of the net charge transfer fluctuation in the QGM can survive the hadronization

  17. Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Tengfei

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

  18. Canister Transfer System Description Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane/hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  19. CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  20. Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Hamilton

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

  1. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tang

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  2. Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery Department of Mechanical 8. Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery S. M. You Department of Mechanical 8 Transfer Visualization Committee organized two photo gallery sessions in 1998. The International Heat Transfer Photo Gallery was held at the l la' International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC) in Kyongju

  3. Radiative transfer in molecular lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Asensio Ramos; J. Trujillo Bueno; J. Cernicharo

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The highly convergent iterative methods developed by Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995) for radiative transfer (RT) applications are generalized to spherical symmetry with velocity fields. These RT methods are based on Jacobi, Gauss-Seidel (GS), and SOR iteration and they form the basis of a new NLTE multilevel transfer code for atomic and molecular lines. The benchmark tests carried out so far are presented and discussed. The main aim is to develop a number of powerful RT tools for the theoretical interpretation of molecular spectra.

  4. Energy Transfer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005 at Iowa WindUnion7Transfer Energy Transfer Below

  5. A framework for evaluation of technology transfer programs. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this volume is to describe a framework with which DOE can develop a program specific methodology to evaluate it`s technology transfer efforts. This approach could also be applied to an integrated private sector technology transfer organization. Several benefits will be realized from the application of this work. While the immediate effect will be to assist program managers in evaluating and improving program performance, the ultimate benefits will accrue to the producing industry, the states, and the nation in the form of sustained or increased domestic oil production. This benefit depends also, of course, on the effectiveness of the technology being transferred. The managers of the Technology Transfer program, and the larger federal oil and gas R&D programs, will be provided with a means to design and assess the effectiveness of program efforts as they are developed, tested and performed. The framework allows deficiencies in critical aspects of the program to be quickly identified, allowing for timely corrections and improvements. The actual process of developing the evaluation also gives the staff of the Oil R&D Program or Technology Transfer subprogram the opportunity to become oriented to the overall program goals. The structure and focus imposed by the evaluation paradigm will guide program staff in selecting activities which are consistent with achieving the goals of the overall R&D program.

  6. Heat transfer from nanoparticles: a corresponding state analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    temperatures using laser heating of nanoparticles [8, 9, 10], even reaching the melting point of gold particles is relevant to experiments in which a fluid is locally heated using selective absorption of radiation by solid surfaces, lo- cal heating of fluids by selective absorption from nanoparti- cles, with possible biomedical

  7. Quantum State Protection and Transfer Using Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keane, Kyle Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    relaxation . . . . . . . . .1.5 Superconducting ? ux-biasedCorrection Algorithms for Superconducting Qubits,” APS Marchand correction for superconducting qubits,” Phys. Rev. A,

  8. Integration of Heat Transfer, Stress, and Particle Trajectory Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thuc Bui; Michael Read; Lawrence ives

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Calabazas Creek Research, Inc. developed and currently markets Beam Optics Analyzer (BOA) in the United States and abroad. BOA is a 3D, charged particle optics code that solves the electric and magnetic fields with and without the presence of particles. It includes automatic and adaptive meshing to resolve spatial scales ranging from a few millimeters to meters. It is fully integrated with CAD packages, such as SolidWorks, allowing seamless geometry updates. The code includes iterative procedures for optimization, including a fully functional, graphical user interface. Recently, time dependent, particle in cell capability was added, pushing particles synchronically under quasistatic electromagnetic fields to obtain particle bunching under RF conditions. A heat transfer solver was added during this Phase I program. Completed tasks include: (1) Added a 3D finite element heat transfer solver with adaptivity; (2) Determined the accuracy of the linear heat transfer field solver to provide the basis for development of higher order solvers in Phase II; (3) Provided more accurate and smoother power density fields; and (4) Defined the geometry using the same CAD model, while maintaining different meshes, and interfacing the power density field between the particle simulator and heat transfer solvers. These objectives were achieved using modern programming techniques and algorithms. All programming was in C++ and parallelization in OpenMP, utilizing state-of-the-art multi-core technology. Both x86 and x64 versions are supported. The GUI design and implementation used Microsoft Foundation Class.

  9. Mass Transfer from Giant Donors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovskii, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

  10. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df the fuel rod, and the volumetric generation rate is known to vary sinusoidally with distance along the rod to exist between the surface of the rod and the water. Axial conduction can be neglected in rod and fluid

  11. Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairbanks, Richard R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

  12. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  13. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele [Gorlaeus Laboratories, Leiden Institute of Chemistry, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9502, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Neugebauer, Johannes [Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  14. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traeger, R.K.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

  15. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy Resources, (5) Hydrogen Technology Learning Centers, (6) Fossil Energy, and (7) Rebuild America.

  16. Group transfer and electron transfer reactions of organometallic complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atwood, J.D.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1994, despite the disruptions, the authors have made progress in several aspects of their research on electron transfer reactions between organometallic complexes. This summary covers three areas that are relatively complete: (1) reactions between metal carbonyl anions and metal carbonyl halides, (2) reactions of hydrido- and alkyl-containing anions (RFe(CO){sup {minus}}{sub 4} and RW (CO){sub 5}{sup {minus}}) with metal carbonyl cations and (3) reactions of a seventeen-electron complex (Cp{asterisk}Cr(CO){sub 3}{lg_bullet}) with metal carbonyl derivatives. Two areas of examination that have just begun (possible carbene transfer and the possible role of metal carbonyl anions in carbon-hydrogen bond activation) will also be described.

  17. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitten, D.G.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the work described in this report is on single electron transfer reactions of excited states which culminate in the formation of stable or metastable even electron species. For the most part the studies have involved even electron organic substrates which are thus converted photochemically to odd electron species and then at some stage reconvert to even electron products. These reactions generally fall into two rather different categories. In one set of studies we have examined reactions in which the metastable reagents generated by single electron transfer quenching of an excited state undergo novel fragmentation reactions, chiefly involving C-C bond cleavage. These reactions often culminate in novel and potentially useful chemical reactions and frequently have the potential for leading to new chemical products otherwise unaffordable by conventional reaction paths. In a rather different investigation we have also studied reactions in which single electron transfer quenching of an excited state is followed by subsequent reactions which lead reversibly to metastable two electron products which, often stable in themselves, can nonetheless be reacted with each other or with other reagents to regenerate the starting materials with release of energy. 66 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  19. On the true nature of transfer reactions leading to the complete fusion of projectile and target

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Mouze; C. Ythier

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of nucleons in hot-fusion reactions occurs within 0.17 yoctosecond, in a new state of nuclear matter. We suggest that the same state should show itself in an early stage of the phenomena occurring in nucleus-nucleus collisions realized at relativistic energies.

  20. Photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer in bisviologen-linked porphyrin in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirota, Junji; Okura, Ichiro (Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Yokohama (Japan))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bisviologen-linked porphyrin (p-PC[sub 4]V[sub A]C[sub 4]V[sub B]), in which two viologens are connected with porphyrin through methylene chain ([minus](CH[sub 2])[sub 4][minus]) was prepared, and photoinduced singlet state of the porphyrin was quenched by the bonded viologen due to photoinduced intramolecular electron transfer from the photoexcited singlet state of porphyrin in the bonded viologen. The rate constant of the intramolecular electron transfer was 3.10 [times] 10[sup 8] s[sup [minus]1]. The photoexcited triplet state was also quenched by the bonded viologen. The rate constant of intramolecular electron transfer via the photoexcited triplet state was 2.19 [times] 10[sup 5] s[sup [minus]1]. 23 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt From: eschaput esandc@prodigy.net Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 10:31 PM To: GC-62 Subject: Attn: Technology Transfer Questions We have...

  2. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araujo, P. T.

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate ...

  3. Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurs, André

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

  4. Engineering nanocarbon interfaces for electron transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilmer, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-transfer reactions at nanometer-scale interfaces, such as those presented by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), are important for emerging optoelectronic and photovoltaic technologies. Electron transfer also ...

  5. Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

  6. Academic Knowledge Transfer in Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slater, Mark David

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4.3 Digital Library Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 4.43.1.1 Digital Libraries . . . . . . . . . . . .A Prototype Personal Digital Library Knowledge Transfer

  7. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE HEAT TRANSFER FROM A BUOYANT GAS PLUME TO A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Temperature E. Heat Transfer Model 1. Determining the Ceiling Heat Transfer 2. Ceiling Heat Transfer

  8. Measurement of Spin-Transfer Observables in ppp ! at 1:637 GeV=c B. Bassalleck,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutz, Hartmut

    Measurement of Spin-Transfer Observables in ppp ! at 1:637 GeV=c B. Bassalleck,1 A. Berdoz,2 C; published 31 October 2002) Spin-transfer observables for ppp ! have been measured using a transversely on exclusive ppp ! YYY near threshold, including cross-sections and final-state polarization and spin corre

  9. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S. [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The Institute for Biophysical Dynamics, and The James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D. [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Graduate Program in the Biophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  10. Convective Heat Transfer and Reference Free-stream Temperature Determination near the Casing of an Axial Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    of an Axial Flow Turbine B. Gumusel 2 and C. Camci 1 Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory Department on the casing of an axial flow turbine. The goal is to develop an accurate steady-state heat transfer method for the comparison of various casing surface and tip designs used for turbine performance improvements. The free

  11. Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

  12. Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

  13. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  14. Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Stephen U. S. (Lisle, IL); Eastman, Jeffrey A. (Naperville, IL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

  15. Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Alterna(ve Roadmap For Transfer Students 8/11/14 EE Program #12;Transfer with the roadmap · NEXT STEP: ­ Share this with all other transfer students and make 1 (LACKING ES220) SEE THE ROADMAP: h`p://www.sonoma.edu/engineering/bsee/bsee_roadmap

  16. Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford www.isis-innovation.com #12;Isis Innovation Ltd Oxford Technology Transfer IP, Patents, Licences, Spin-outs, Material Sales, Seed Funds, Isis Angels Network Oxford Expertise Consulting, Services Isis Consulting Business Technology Transfer and Innovation

  17. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2007 ­ 2009 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  18. Transferring to The University of New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2009 ­ 2011 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

  19. Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcuse, W.; Waligura, A.J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the US Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). This substantial program of technology transfer was initiated in 1976. The United States Departments of State and Energy, the Arms control and Disarmament Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have each accepted responsibility for parts of the Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards. Funding is provided by state through the Foreign Assistance Act. This report provides a discussion of this program.

  20. Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    AU TH O R PR O O F Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies in Rotating Research Facilities CENGIZ CAMCI Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department The present paper deals with the experimental aero-heat transfer studies performed in rotating turbine

  1. Solid state rapid thermocycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A solid state heat exchanger with a first well and second well is coupled to a power module. A thermoelectric element is coupled to the first well, the second well, and the power module, is configured to transfer thermal energy from the first well to the second well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a first direction, and is configured to transfer thermal energy from the second well to the first well when current from the power module flows through the thermoelectric element in a second direction. A controller may be coupled to the thermoelectric elements, and may switch the direction of current flowing through the thermoelectric element in response to a determination by sensors coupled to the wells that the amount of thermal energy in the wells falls below or exceeds a pre-determined threshold.

  2. Noise-induced quantum coherence in photosynthetic complexes with multiple energy transfer pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri V. Voronine; Konstantin E. Dorfman; Bin Cao; Amitabh Joshi

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigate exciton relaxation dynamics in molecular aggregates based on model photosynthetic complexes under various conditions of incoherent excitation. We show that noise-induced quantum coherence is generated between spatially-separated exciton states which belong to the same or different energy transfer pathways, coupled via real and virtual transfer processes. Such quantum coherence effects may be used to improve light-harvesting efficiency and to reveal quantum phenomena in biology.

  3. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  4. Expression of the bovine DNA (cytosine 5) methyltransferase family during preimplantation development and aberrations induced by somatic cell nuclear transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golding, Michael Cameron

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Bovine preimplantation embryos derived from nuclear transfer experiments exhibit a global state of genomic hypermethylation that likely account for the large number of developmental abnormalities observed to date. The ...

  5. Intramolecular, photoinduced electron transfer in ruthenium(II) bipyridine-quinone complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opperman, K.A.; Mecklenburg, S.L.; Meyer, T.J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption spectroscopy and transient emission spectroscopy were used to follow intramolecular electron transfer quenching after metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitation of Ru(II)bipyridine-quinone complexes. Studies of various N-((4{prime}methyl-2-2{prime}-bipyridyl)-4-methyl)-9,10-anthraquinone-2-carboxamide (bpy-AQ) complexes, revealed that these complexes quench by rapid electron transfer from ligand radical excited states to the metal center. A donor-chromophore-acceptor complex with the bpy-AQ ligand and the (10-[4({prime}-methyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridin-4-yl)methylphenothiazine)] (bpy-PTZ) ligand displays redox separation on excitation.

  6. Polarization transfer in (p,n) reactions at 495 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taddeucci, T.N.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polarization transfer observables have been measured with the NTOF facility at LAMPF for (p,n) reactions at 495 MeV. Measurements of the longitudinal polarization transfer parameter D{sub LL} for transitions to discrete states at 0{degrees} show convincing evidence for tensor interaction effects. Complete sets of polarization transfer observables have been measured for quasifree (p,n) reactions on {sup 2}H, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca at a scattering angle of 18{degrees}. These measurements show no evidence for an enhancement in the isovector spin longitudinal response. 19 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Long-distance photoinitiated electron transfer through polyene molecular wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Johnson, D.G.; Svec, W.A.; Kersey, K.M.; Cragg, D.E.; Minsek, D.W.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-chain polyenes can be used as molecular wires to facilitate electron transfer between a photo-excited donor and an acceptor in an artificial photosynthetic system. The authors present data here on two Zn-porphyrin-polyene-anthraquinone molecules possessing either 5 or 9 all trans double bonds between the donor and acceptor, 1 and 2. The center-to-center distances between the porphyrin and the quinone in these relatively rigid molecules are 25 A for 1 and 35 A for 2. Selective picosecond laser excitation of the Zn-porphyrin in 1 and 2 results in the very rapid transfer of an electron to the anthraquinone in < 2 ps and 10 ps, respectively. The resultant radical ion pairs recombine with tau = 10 ps for 1 and tau = 25 ps for 2. The electron transfer rates remain remarkably rapid over these long distances. The involvement of polyene radical cations in the mechanism of the radical ion pair recombination reaction is clear from the transient absorption spectra of 1 and 2, which show strong absorbances in the near-infrared. The strong electronic coupling between the Zn-porphyrin and the anthraquinone provided by low-lying states of the polyene make it possible to transfer an electron rapidly over very long distances.

  8. Energy Transfer between Throats from a 10d Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. v. Harling; A. Hebecker; T. Noguchi

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Strongly warped regions, also known as throats, are a common feature of the type IIB string theory landscape. If one of the throats is heated during cosmological evolution, the energy is subsequently transferred to other throats or to massless fields in the unwarped bulk of the Calabi-Yau orientifold. This energy transfer proceeds either by Hawking radiation from the black hole horizon in the heated throat or, at later times, by the decay of throat-localized Kaluza-Klein states. In both cases, we calculate in a 10d setup the energy transfer rate (respectively decay rate) as a function of the AdS scales of the throats and of their relative distance. Compared to existing results based on 5d models, we find a significant suppression of the energy transfer rates if the size of the embedding Calabi-Yau orientifold is much larger than the AdS radii of the throats. This effect can be partially compensated by a small distance between the throats. These results are relevant, e.g., for the analysis of reheating after brane inflation. Our calculation employs the dual gauge theory picture in which each throat is described by a strongly coupled 4d gauge theory, the degrees of freedom of which are localized at a certain position in the compact space.

  9. Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

  10. Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, O.C.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

  11. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization andComputer SimulationsConcentrating SolarAboutTransfers

  12. Data Transfer Nodes Yield Results!

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDanielDTN Data Transfer Nodes

  13. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers Historical

  14. Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C. bescii CelA, a highlyTransfers

  15. Efficiency of energy transfer in a light-harvesting system under quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandra Olaya-Castro; Chiu Fan Lee; Francesca Fassioli Olsen; Neil F. Johnson

    2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the role of quantum coherence in the efficiency of excitation transfer in a ring-hub arrangement of interacting two-level systems, mimicking a light-harvesting antenna connected to a reaction center as it is found in natural photosynthetic systems. By using a quantum jump approach, we demonstrate that in the presence of quantum coherent energy transfer and energetic disorder, the efficiency of excitation transfer from the antenna to the reaction center depends intimately on the quantum superposition properties of the initial state. In particular, we find that efficiency is sensitive to symmetric and asymmetric superposition of states in the basis of localized excitations, indicating that initial state properties can be used as a efficiency control parameter at low temperatures.

  16. Dry Transfer Facility #1 - Ventilation Confinement Zoning Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.D. Draper

    2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to establish the preliminary Ventilation Confinement Zone (VCZ) for the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF). The results of this document is used to determine the air quantities for each VCZ that will eventually be reflected in the development of the Ventilation Flow Diagrams. The calculations contained in this document were developed by D and E/Mechanical-HVAC and are intended solely for the use of the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department in its work regarding the HVAC system for the Dry Transfer Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department should be consulted before use of the calculation for purposes other than those stated herein or used by individuals other than authorized personnel in D and E/Mechanical-HVAC department.

  17. Transferring PACE Assessments Upon Home Sale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Coughlin, Jason; Fuller, Merrian; Zimring, Mark

    2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant barrier to investing in renewable energy and comprehensive energy efficiency improvements to homes across the country is the initial capital cost. Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing is one of several new financial models broadening access to clean energy by addressing this upfront cost issue. Recently, the White House cited PACE programs as an important element of its 'Recovery through Retrofit' plan. The residential PACE model involves the creation of a special clean energy financing district that homeowners elect to opt into. Once opted in, the local government (usually at the city or county level) finances the upfront investment of the renewable energy installation and/or energy efficiency improvements. A special lien is attached to the property and the assessment is paid back as a line item on the property tax bill. As of April 2010, 17 states have passed legislation to allow their local governments to create PACE programs, two already have the authority to set up PACE programs, and over 10 additional states are actively developing enabling legislation. This policy brief analyzes one of the advantages of PACE, which is the transferability of the special assessment from one homeowner to the next when the home is sold. This analysis focuses on the potential for the outstanding lien to impact the sales negotiation process, rather than the legal nature of the lien transfer itself. The goal of this paper is to consider what implications a PACE lien may have on the home sales negotiation process so that it can be addressed upfront rather than risk a future backlash to PACE programs. If PACE programs do expand at a rapid rate, the chances are high that there will be other cases where prospective buyers uses PACE liens to negotiate lower home prices or require repayment of the lien as a condition of sale. As a result, PACE programs should highlight this issue as a potential risk factor for the sake of full disclosure. A good example of this is in Boulder County where the following statement is included in the ClimateSmart PACE program materials: 'Please Note: There is no legal requirement that the loan be paid off when you refinance or sell your home. However, this may be an item subject to negotiation with a future buyer and may also be a matter of negotiation with the mortgage lender.' Such candid disclosure for what might be a low risk event can be debated. However, a selling point of PACE programs is the transferability of the lien to the new homeowner. To the degree this benefit is questioned, PACE programs may end up looking more like home equity loan financing, with the associated debt repaid at closing, rather than property-based financing that remains with the improved home. While it is possible that upfront disclosure might negatively impact participation rates in PACE programs, it also will protect the integrity of a PACE program in later years if such situations come to pass. Ideally, this will become less of an issue over time as more homebuyers understand the positive economic and societal benefits of owning a home with clean energy features.

  18. Transfer of Credit Request -Student This transfer of request can be performed before or after the class is taken. It is suggested to apply for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    . In the College Name Contains, City Name Contains or State fields, enter search data. If you cannot find) that will receive the transfer of credit request. 12. Enter the Tufts Term when Course taken. 13. Enter any Comments request the addition of your college to the master list. 6. Click Search. Search results return below

  19. Oligomer and mixed-metal compounds potential multielectron transfer catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rillema, D.P.

    1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Projects related to the design and characterization of multimetallic complexes has proceeded forward with a number of achievements. First, photoprocesses in hydrogel matrices lead to the conclusion that cationic metallochromophores could be ion exchanged into a hydrogel matrix ({kappa}-carageenan) and substantial photocurrents could be generated. Second, X-ray structures of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+}, Ru(bpm){sub 3}{sup 2+} and Ru(bpz){sub 3}{sup 2+}, where bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, bpm is 2,2{prime}-bipyrimidine and bpz is 2,2{prime}-bipyrizine, were obtained and revealed similar Ru-N bond distances in each complex even though their {sigma}-donor and {pi}-acceptor character differ markedly. The structure parameters are expected to provide theoreticians with the information needed to probe the electronic character of the molecular systems and provide us with direction in our synthetic strategies. Third, a copper(I) complex was synthesized with a dimeric-ethane-bridged, 1,10-phenanthroline ligand that resulted in isolation of a bimetallic species. The copper(I) complex did luminesce weakly, suggesting that the dimer possesses potential electron transfer capability. Fourth, the photophysical properties of (Re(CO){sub 4}(L-L)){sup +}, where L-L = heterocyclic diimine ligands, and Pt(bph)X{sub 2}, where bph = the dianion of biphenyl and X = CH{sub 3}CN, py or ethylendiamine, displayed luminescence at high energy and underwent excited-state electron transfer. Such high energy emitters provide high driving forces for undergoing excited-state electron transfer. Fifth, both energy and electron transfer were observed in mixed-metal complexes bridged by 1,2-bis(2,2{prime}-bipyridyl-4{prime}-yl) ethane.

  20. Entrepreneurial Programs | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    economic development in the region and state is to support the creation of new start-ups businesses that can will license ORNL technology and focus on developing commercial...

  1. Controllable Adiabatic Manipulation of the Qubit State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. P. Berman. A. R. Bishop; F. Borgonovi; V. I. Tsifrinovich

    2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a scheme which implements a controllable change of the state of the target spin qubit in such a way that both the control and the target spin qubits remain in their ground states. The interaction between the two spins is mediated by an auxiliary spin, which can transfer to its excited state. Our scheme suggests a possible relationship between the gate and adiabatic quantum computation.

  2. A literature Review on Radioactivity Transfer to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as possible. Suggestions for further research have also been given. INIS descriptors; CESIUM 137; DEPOSITION be exposed by ingestion of contaminated terrestial foodstuffs. Even though the intermediate transfer

  3. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for "Outstanding Commercialization Success" from the Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer. On October 4, 2012, the NETL team who developed this alloy received...

  4. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal increase in...

  5. AQUATIC PLANT CONTROL RESEARCH PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . Michael Smart, John W. Barko Environmental Laboratory DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY Waterways Experiment. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) PO Box 631 Vicksburg, MS NUMBER ORGANIZATION (If IIPplicable) US Army Corps of Engineers 8c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code

  6. Acoustically Enhanced Boiling Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. W. Douglas; M. K. Smith; A. Glezer

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic field is used to increase the critical heat flux (CHF) of a flat-boiling-heat-transfer surface. The increase is a result of the acoustic effects on the vapor bubbles. Experiments are performed to explore the effects of an acoustic field on vapor bubbles in the vicinity of a rigid-heated wall. Work includes the construction of a novel heater used to produce a single vapor bubble of a prescribed size and at a prescribed location on a flatboiling surface for better study of an individual vapor bubble's reaction to the acoustic field. Work also includes application of the results from the single-bubble heater to a calibrated-copper heater used for quantifying the improvements in CHF.

  7. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, Philip (Overland Park, KS); Watterson, Carl (Kansas City, MO)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  8. The transfer from nuclear development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s task of cleaning up the extensive nuclear weapons complex is of such enormous proportions that there can be no definitive solution that can be adjusted to a predictable cost. The cleanup and disposition of hazardous wastes in many cases will take thirty or more years. In the near term, the economic impact affecting the communities and large number of displaced workers is a significant concern to the Department and the nation. However, before a useful transfer of DOE land, facilities, and sites to the public for economic development can be realized, a consistent and comprehensive process of compliance with regulatory requirements needs to be established. The simultaneous pursuit of these goals creates an unprecedented challenge to the Department of Energy and the US.

  9. TARGETED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TO US INDEPENDENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) continued pursuing its mission of assisting U.S. independent oil and gas producers with timely, informed technology decisions during Fiscal Year 2004 (FY04). PTTC has active grassroots programs through its 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and 2 satellite offices. They bring research and academia to the table via their association with geological surveys and engineering departments. The regional directors interact with independent oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and other cooperative outreach efforts. PTTC's Headquarters (HQ) staff receives direction from a National Board of Directors predominantly comprised of American natural gas and oil producers to plan and manage the overall technology transfer program. PTTC HQ implements a comprehensive communications program by interconnecting the talents of the National Board, 10 Regional Producer Advisory Groups (PAG) and the RLOs with industry across the U.S. PTTC effectively combines federal funding through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy, namely the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil with state and industry contributions to share application of upstream technologies. Ultimately, these efforts factor in to provide a safe, secure and reliable energy supply for American consumers. This integrated resource base, combined with industry volunteers guiding PTTC's activities and the dedication of national and regional staff, are achieving notable results regarding domestic production figures. PTTC is increasingly recognized as a critical resource for information and access to technologies by providing direct contact with research, development and demonstration (RD&D) results. A key to the program is demonstrating proven technologies that can be applied broadly and rapidly. This technical progress report summarizes PTTC's accomplishments during FY04. Activities remained at high levels. Board and staff interaction has defined strategic thrusts to further outreach. Networking, involvement in technical activities and an active exhibit schedule are increasing PTTC's sphere of influence with both producers and the service sector. PTTC's reputation for unbiased bottom line information stimulates cooperative ventures with other organizations. Efforts to build the contact database and a growing E-mail Technology Alert service are expanding PTTC's audience.

  10. MassMass transfer andtransfer and MassMass transfer andtransfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Heat conductivity T'1 Heat flux h" (W/m2), local and overall heat transfer coeffients h1 Heat transfer coefficientcoefficient /1/1 Mass flow species A:interface a p A = A mol/s M f1 (L) 2 (G) Mass transfer rate per area: A = A/a = "A mol/(m2·s) 1 (L) 2 (G) xi C1.i M t f ffi i t k x C y 1.i AA !!! Mass transfer coefficients

  11. Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award expenditure 2012/13 by value On 1 October 2013 we were funding 125 active awards through our Technology

  12. Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    Summary Weusedthreemethodstomeasureboundarylayer conductance to heat transfer (gbH) and water vapor of transpiration). The boundary layer conductance to heat transfer is small enough that leaf temperature can become diffusion, the boundary layer around a leaf also provides resistance to the transfer of heat between a leaf

  13. Transfer Guide: Forest Management -1 -Revised: 10 August 2012 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING WORKSHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transfer Guide: Forest Management - 1 - Revised: 10 August 2012 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING management concentration This planning worksheet represents a guide for community college students-Hrs Grade MAT 125 Survey of Calculus 4 #12;Transfer Guide: Forest Management - 2 - Revised: 10 August 2012

  14. Quantum Information Transfer between Topological and Superconducting Qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang-Yu Hong; Jing-Li Fu; Zhi-Yan Zhu

    2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scheme that enables a strong Jaynes-Cummings coupling between a topological qubit and a superconducting flux qubit. The coupling strength is dependent on the phase difference between two superconductors on a topological insulator and may be expediently controlled by a phase controller. With this coherent coupling and single-qubit rotations arbitrary unitary operations on the two-qubit hybrid system of topological and flux qubits can be performed. Numerical simulations show that quantum state transfer and entanglement distributing between the topological and superconducting flux qubits may be performed with high fidelity.

  15. Theory of exciton transfer and diffusion in conjugated polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barford, William, E-mail: william.barford@chem.ox.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Tozer, Oliver Robert [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); University College, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 4BH (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a theory of Förster-type exciton transfer between conjugated polymers. The theory is built on three assumptions. First, we assume that the low-lying excited states of conjugated polymers are Frenkel excitons coupled to local normal modes, and described by the Frenkel-Holstein model. Second, we assume that the relevant parameter regime is ?? < J, i.e., the adiabatic regime, and thus the Born-Oppenheimer factorization of the electronic and nuclear degrees of freedom is generally applicable. Finally, we assume that the Condon approximation is valid, i.e., the exciton-polaron wavefunction is essentially independent of the normal modes. The resulting expression for the exciton transfer rate has a familiar form, being a function of the exciton transfer integral and the effective Franck-Condon factors. The effective Franck-Condon factors are functions of the effective Huang-Rhys parameters, which are inversely proportional to the chromophore size. The Born-Oppenheimer expressions were checked against DMRG calculations, and are found to be within 10% of the exact value for a tiny fraction of the computational cost. This theory of exciton transfer is then applied to model exciton migration in conformationally disordered poly(p-phenylene vinylene). Key to this modeling is the assumption that the donor and acceptor chromophores are defined by local exciton ground states (LEGSs). Since LEGSs are readily determined by the exciton center-of-mass wavefunction, this theory provides a quantitative link between polymer conformation and exciton migration. Our Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the exciton diffusion length depends weakly on the conformation of the polymer, with the diffusion length increasing slightly as the chromophores became straighter and longer. This is largely a geometrical effect: longer and straighter chromophores extend over larger distances. The calculated diffusion lengths of ?10 nm are in good agreement with experiment. The spectral properties of the migrating excitons are also investigated. The emission intensity ratio of the 0-0 and 0-1 vibronic peaks is related to the effective Huang-Rhys parameter of the emitting state, which in turn is related to the chromophore size. The intensity ratios calculated from the effective Huang-Rhys parameters are in agreement with experimental spectra, and the time-resolved trend for the intensity ratio to decrease with time was also reproduced as the excitation migrates to shorter, lower energy chromophores as a function of time. In addition, the energy of the exciton state shows a logarithmic decrease with time, in agreement with experimental observations.

  16. OSWER source book: Training and technology-transfer resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The OSWER Source Book consolidates information on the numerous training and other technology transfer resources sponsored by EPA's Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response (OSWER) and others. The OSWER Source Book provides descriptions of training courses, videos and publications of interest to Federal and State personnel working in solid and hazardous waste management. The OSWER Source Book should be especially useful to Federal personnel working in programs under authorities of the RCRA, CERCLA, SARA, or other similar Federal environmental management and restoration programs.

  17. Bioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    fluid and molecular transport Cornell Datta Ugrad heat and mass fundamentals Datta fluid mechBioheat and Mass Transfer Educational Initiatives for ASME K-17 Committee Ken Diller University of Texas #12;Outline of Presentation · Summary of submitted bioheat and mass transfer syllabi from K-17

  18. MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahey, Richard T.

    MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL AND CHAOS THEORY" RICHARD T. LAHEY, JR. Center for Multiphase Research Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Troy and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

  19. BRYANT UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT TRANSFER FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blais, Brian

    BRYANT UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL STUDENT TRANSFER FORM Bryant University requires this form at __________________________________to provide the information requested below in order to complete my transfer to Bryant University for International Admission Bryant University Office of Admission 1150 Douglas Pike Smithfield, RI 02917 (401) 232

  20. "Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    become an increasingly popular technology for waste heat recovery in the last few years. The efficiency"Developing novel heat transfer diagnostics for nanosystems." Patrick Hopkins Assistant Professor Young Investigator Award for heat transfer across solid/fluid interfaces · 2013 AFOSR Young Investigator

  1. WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech.genet@grenoble-em.com Website: www.nanoeconomics.eu Abstract. Nanotechnologies are often presented as breakthrough innovations. This article investigates the model of knowledge transfer in the nanotechnologies in depth, by comparing

  2. Photoinduced electron transfer processes in homogeneous and microheterogeneous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitten, D.G.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The studies have focused on rapid, efficient bond-fragmentation reactions initiated through photoinduced electron transfer. Electron transfer induced fragmentation of a number of donors have been examined, especially 1,2 diamines and related compounds. Two of the amines fragment with rate constants of 3 [times] 10[sup 8] to 2 [times] 10[sup 9] M[sup [minus]1]sec[sup [minus]1]. A series of amino-substituted pinacols and related compounds have also been examined; they undergo similar but slower fragmentation processes when converted to their cation radicals by photoinduced electron transfer. The studies with linked and polymeric electron donor- electron acceptor coupled molecules have also progressed. Several polymers containing diamine repeat units and anthraquinone or nitroaromatic acceptors have also been prepared that can be photoactivated by visible irradiation; they fragment efficiently in solution and photodegrade even in the solid state. The studies of singlet oxygen initiated fragmentation reactions of diamines, amino alcohols, and aminoketones have nearly been completed. Attention have been turned to fragmentable electron acceptors such as p- cyanobenzyl bromide; irradiation of electron donors such as methyl- or methoxy-naphthalenes can initiate efficient fragmentation of the electron deficient bromide.

  3. Determination of the electronics transfer function for current transient measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Scharf; Robert Klanner

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a straight-forward method for determining the transfer function of the readout of a sensor for the situation in which the current transient of the sensor can be precisely simulated. The method relies on the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms. The specific example is a planar silicon pad diode connected with a 50 $\\Omega $ cable to an amplifier followed by a 5 GS/s sampling oscilloscope. The charge carriers in the sensor were produced by picosecond lasers with light of wavelengths of 675 and 1060 nm. The transfer function is determined from the 1060 nm data with the pad diode biased at 1000 V. It is shown that the simulated sensor response convoluted with this transfer function provides an excellent description of the measured transients for the laser light of both wavelengths, at voltages 50 V above the depletion voltage of about 90 V up to the maximum applied voltage of 1000 V. The method has been developed for the precise measurement of the dependence of the drift velocity of electrons and holes in high-ohmic silicon on crystal orientation, electric field and temperature. It can also be applied for the analysis of transient-current measurements of radiation-damaged solid state sensors, as long as sensors properties, like high-frequency capacitance, are not too different.

  4. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN), Blocksome; Michael A. (Rochester, MN), Parker; Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  5. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  6. Enhanced heat transfer for thermionic power modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.C.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermionic power module is capable of operating at very high heat fluxes, which in turn serve to reduce capital costs. The most efficient operation also requires uniform heat fluxes. The development of enhanced heat transfer systems is required to meet the demand for high heat fluxes (>20 w/cm/sup 2/) at high temperatures (>1500K) which advanced thermionic power modules place upon combustion systems. Energy transfer from the hot combustion gases may take place by convection, radiation, or a combination of radiation and convection. Enhanced convective heat transfer with a jet impingement system has been demonstrated in a thermionic converter. The recently-developed cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer system has also been applied to a thermionic converter. By comparing the jet impingement and cellular ceramic radiative heat transfer systems, an appropriate system may be selected for utilization in advanced thermionic power modules. Results are reported.

  7. Chapter Two Transfer Function Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajic, Zoran

    invariant systems. Modern control theory has its foundation in the state space approach; classical control, analysis, and design of control systems can be performed in two domains, namely in the time and frequency control theory and practice due to the extensive support from modern packages for computer-aided control

  8. Carrier transfer from InAs quantum dots to ErAs metal nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haughn, C. R.; Chen, E. Y.; Zide, J. M. O.; Doty, M. F., E-mail: doty@udel.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Steenbergen, E. H.; Bissell, L. J.; Eyink, K. G. [AFRL/RXAN, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Erbium arsenide (ErAs) is a semi-metallic material that self-assembles into nanoparticles when grown in GaAs via molecular beam epitaxy. We use steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence to examine the mechanism of carrier transfer between indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots and ErAs nanoparticles in a GaAs host. We probe the electronic structure of the ErAs metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and the optoelectronic properties of the nanocomposite and show that the carrier transfer rates are independent of pump intensity. This result suggests that the ErAs MNPs have a continuous density of states and effectively act as traps. The absence of a temperature dependence tells us that carrier transfer from the InAs quantum dots to ErAs MNPs is not phonon assisted. We show that the measured photoluminescence decay rates are consistent with a carrier tunneling model.

  9. {gamma} spectroscopy around doubly magic {sup 48}Ca by heavy-ion transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Silvia [Department of Physics, University of Milano and INFN, Milano (Italy)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    {gamma} spectroscopy of neutron-rich nuclei around {sup 48}Ca is performed by the heavy-ion transfer reaction {sup 48}Ca on {sup 64}Ni at 282 MeV, with the PRISMA-CLARA setup at Legnaro Laboratory. Angular distributions, polarizations and lifetimes analysis probe spin and parities of several excited states, shading lights on their configuration. In the one neutron transfer channels, {sup 49}Ca and {sup 47}Ca, states arising by coupling a single particle to the 3{sup -} phonon of {sup 48}Ca are observed, showing the robustness of nuclear collectivity in rather light systems. The work demonstrates the feasibility of complete in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy with heavy-ion transfer reactions and provides a method that can be further exploited in the future with heavy targets and radioactive beams.

  10. Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latiolais, M. Paul

    Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014 Transfer Worksheet College-level transferable academic courses taken at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC;Harrisburg Area Community College Portland State University Updated 8/29/2014 2. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

  11. Resonant charge transfer of hydrogen Rydberg atoms incident at a Cu(100) projected band-gap surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbard, J A; Kohlhoff, M; Rennick, C J; So, E; Ford, M; Softley, T P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge transfer (ionization) of hydrogen Rydberg atoms (principal quantum number $n=25-34$) incident at a Cu(100) surface is investigated. Unlike fully metallic surfaces, where the Rydberg electron energy is degenerate with the conduction band of the metal, the Cu(100) surface has a projected bandgap at these energies, and only discrete image states are available through which charge transfer can take place. Resonant enhancement of charge transfer is observed at hydrogen principal quantum numbers for which the Rydberg energy matches the energy of one of the image states. The integrated surface ionization signals show clear periodicity as the energies of states with increasing $n$ come in and out of resonance with the image states. The velocity dependence of the surface ionization dynamics is also investigated. Decreased velocity of the incident H atom leads to a greater mean distance of ionization and a lower field required to extract the ion. The surface-ionization profiles (signal versus applied field) ...

  12. Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells Xue Xia, Justin C. Tokash, Fang Zhang, Peng Liang, Xia Huang,*, and Bruce E. Logan*,, State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, P

  13. Development and assessment of a coupled strategy for conjugate heat transfer with Large Eddy Simulation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the temperature and pressure levels reached in the combustor, and therefore the engine efficiency. Numerical simulations of the thermal interaction between fluid flows and solids offer new design paths to diminish converge to steady thermal states. There are two basic approaches to solve Conjugate Heat Transfer (CHT

  14. FLORIDA ATLANTIC UNIVERSITY 2012-2013 TRANSFER STUDENT MANUAL COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING & COMPUTER SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    SCIENCE TRANSFER PROGRAM OF STUDY AT A FLORIDA COMMUNITY/STATE COLLEGE FOR THE MAJOR IN OCEAN ENGINEERING institution. Lower level coursework required for the major in Ocean Engineering: Students are encouraged, Geomatics, Mechanical, and Ocean Engineering majors: MAC x281 Calculus for Engineers I 4 /MAC x311 Calculus

  15. Bit-encoding and quantum transfer of Aharonov-Bohm phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiago Prudencio

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) phases has achieved a state-of-the-art in mesoscopic systems with manipulation and control of the AB effect. The possibility of transfer information enconded in such systems to light increases the possible scenarios where the information can be manipulated and transfered. In this paper we propose a bit-enconding of AB phases contrasting with the usual codifications using chirality or flux orientation. We propose a quantum transfer of the AB phase to a coherent state superposition, leading to the possibility of transfering AB phases to non-classical states of light and store the bit information enconded in this phase to a light mode field. We also discuss the storage of a string of bits enconded by AB phases in a product state and show that this scheme can be implemented to store a string of bits in high-Q or multimode cavities. Our propose can also be useful to further progress in methods of quantum information associated to modern techniques in synthetic gauge fields.

  16. Condensation heat transfer in square, triangular, and semi-circular mini-channels Melanie Derby a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peles, Yoav

    , and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180, United States b Department was the coolant. The heat transfer rate was obtained through a coolant-side energy balance. To obtain condensation. An energy balance on the fluid-to-fluid heat exchanger measured heat duty while sensors in two obstructed

  17. Proton transfer via a transient linear water-molecule chain in a membrane protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerwert, Klaus

    Proton transfer via a transient linear water-molecule chain in a membrane protein Erik Freiera,1-resolution protein ground-state structures of proton pumps and channels have revealed internal protein-bound water. An illustration of the formation of a pro- tonated protein-bound water cluster that is actively involved in proton

  18. technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer Vienna University of Technology | Research and Transfer Support | Claudia Doubek. Researchers focused on low building costs, easy assembly and long service life. Investment costs as well as control and maintenance costs are extremely reduced in relation to state of the art expansion joints. Long

  19. Oswer source book. Volume 1. Training and technology transfer resources, 1992-1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The OSWER Source Book provides a consolidated listing of training and technology transfer resources of potential interest to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), State, and local government personnel concerned with solid and hazardous waste management. Volume I contains information on OSWER training (including the CERCLA Education Center), publications, videotapes, information systems and software, and support programs.

  20. Volume 33, number 2 OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS May 1980 THE PROCESS OF ENERGY TRANSFER BETWEENEXCITED SODIUM ATOMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroud Jr., Carlos R.

    Volume 33, number 2 OPTICS COMMUNICATIONS May 1980 THE PROCESS OF ENERGY TRANSFER BETWEENEXCITED SODIUM ATOMS J. KRASINSKI, T. STACEWICZ Institute of Experimental Physics WarsawUniversity, 00681 Warsaw,Poland(nX) denotes the sodium atom in one of the higher excited states. The energy difference AE is supplied

  1. Transfer operators and topological field theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igor V. Ovchinnikov

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer operator (TO) formalism of the dynamical systems (DS) theory is reformulated here in terms of the recently proposed cohomological theory (ChT) of stochastic differential equations (SDE). It turns out that the stochastically generalized TO (GTO) of the DS theory is the finite-time ChT Fokker-Planck evolution operator. As a result comes the supersymmetric trivialization of the so-called sharp trace and sharp determinant of the GTO, with the former being the Witten index of the ChT. Moreover, the Witten index is also the stochastic generalization of the Lefschetz index so that it equals the Euler characteristic of the (closed) phase space for any flow vector field, noise metric, and temperature. The enabled possibility to apply the spectral theorems of the DS theory to the ChT Fokker-Planck operators allows to extend the previous picture of the spontaneous topological supersymmetry (Q-symmetry) breaking onto the situations with negative ground state's attenuation rate. The later signifies the exponential growth of the number of periodic solutions/orbits in the large time limit, which is the unique feature of chaotic behavior proving that the spontaneous breakdown of Q-symmetry is indeed the field-theoretic definition and stochastic generalization of the concept of deterministic chaos. In addition, the previously proposed low-temperature classification of SDE's, i.e., thermodynamic equilibrium / noise-induced chaos ((anti-)instanton condensation) / ordinary chaos (non-integrability), is complemented by the discussion of the high-temperature regime where the sharp boundary between the noise-induced and ordinary chaotic phases must smear out into a crossover, and at even higher temperatures the Q-symmetry is restored. An unambiguous resolution of the Ito-Stratonovich dilemma in favor of the Stratonovich approach and/or Weyl quantization is also presented.

  2. Net receipts sharing and transfer of federal mineral responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCannon, S. (Colorado Dept. of Natural Resources, Denver, CO (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two interrelated issues - the policy of net receipt sharing and the [open quotes]Mineral Royalty Transfer Study[close quotes] that was submitted to Congress in June of this year by the Minerals Management Service of the Department of Interior are discussed. The 1993 Interior Appropriations Act, P.L. 102-381, which was signed by the president on October 5, 1992, includes a provision that, in addition to costing states $37.5 million has a few other problems: It may be illegal, it flies in the face of the Mineral Leasing Act, it sets a frightening precedent, it is bad public policy and it ignores the substantial contribution of states to federal mineral development. This provision is known as net receipt sharing. The advantages and disadvantages of this Act are discussed.

  3. Single-collision studies of energy transfer and chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentini, J.J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research focus in this group is state-to-state dynamics of reaction and energy transfer in collisions of free radicals such as H, OH, and CH{sub 3} with H{sub 2}, alkanes, alcohols and other hydrogen-containing molecules. The motivation for the work is the desire to provide a detailed understanding of the chemical dynamics of prototype reactions that are important in the production and utilization of energy sources, most importantly in combustion. The work is primarily experimental, but with an important and growing theoretical/computational component. The focus of this research program is now on reactions in which at least one of the reactants and one of the products is polyatomic. The objective is to determine how the high dimensionality of the reactants and products differentiates such reactions from atom + diatom reactions of the same kinematics and energetics. The experiments use highly time-resolved laser spectroscopic methods to prepare reactant states and analyze the states of the products on a single-collision time scale. The primary spectroscopic tool for product state analysis is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectroscopy. CARS is used because of its generality and because the extraction of quantum state populations from CARS spectra is straightforward. The combination of the generality and easy analysis of CARS makes possible absolute cross section measurements (both state-to-state and total), a particularly valuable capability for characterizing reactive and inelastic collisions. Reactant free radicals are produced by laser photolysis of appropriate precursors. For reactant vibrational excitation stimulated Raman techniques are being developed and implemented.

  4. Radiative heat transfer in porous uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, S.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to low thermal conductivity and high emissivity of UO{sub 2}, it has been suggested that radiative heat transfer may play a significant role in heat transfer through pores of UO{sub 2} fuel. This possibility was computationally investigated and contribution of radiative heat transfer within pores to overall heat transport in porous UO{sub 2} quantified. A repeating unit cell was developed to model approximately a porous UO{sub 2} fuel system, and the heat transfer through unit cells representing a wide variety of fuel conditions was calculated using a finite element computer program. Conduction through solid fuel matrix as wekk as pore gas, and radiative exchange at pore surface was incorporated. A variety of pore compositions were investigated: porosity, pore size, shape and orientation, temperature, and temperature gradient. Calculations were made in which pore surface radiation was both modeled and neglected. The difference between yielding the integral contribution of radiative heat transfer mechanism to overall heat transport. Results indicate that radiative component of heat transfer within pores is small for conditions representative of light water reactor fuel, typically less than 1% of total heat transport. It is much larger, however, for conditions present in liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel; during restructuring of this fuel type early in life, the radiative heat transfer mode was shown to contribute as much as 10-20% of total heat transport in hottest regions of fuel.

  5. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  6. TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGE Creating a Geologic Play- EnergyTri-State Motor

  7. Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

  8. Theory of ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer from a bulk semiconductor to a quantum dot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Andrew M., E-mail: andyras@gmail.com; Ramakrishna, S.; Weiss, Emily A.; Seideman, Tamar, E-mail: t-seideman@northwestern.edu [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes analytical and numerical results from a model Hamiltonian method applied to electron transfer (ET) from a quasicontinuum (QC) of states to a set of discrete states, with and without a mediating bridge. Analysis of the factors that determine ET dynamics yields guidelines for achieving high-yield electron transfer in these systems, desired for instance for applications in heterogeneous catalysis. These include the choice of parameters of the laser pulse that excites the initial state into a continuum electronic wavepacket and the design of the coupling between the bridge molecule and the donor and acceptor. The vibrational mode on a bridging molecule between donor and acceptor has an influence on the yield of electron transfer via Franck-Condon factors, even in cases where excited vibrational states are only transiently populated. Laser-induced coherence of the initial state as well as energetic overlap is crucial in determining the ET yield from a QC to a discrete state, whereas the ET time is influenced by competing factors from the coupling strength and the coherence properties of the electronic wavepacket.

  9. Mother and Daughter Reports about Upward Transfers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, I-Fen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I-Fen Lin Bowling Green State University Department ofResearch at Bowling Green State University and by the

  10. HEAT TRANSFER IN UNDERGROUND HEATING EXPERIMENTS IN GRANITE, STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Session on Heat Transfer in Nuclear Waste Disposal, C'.heat transfer processes associated with underground nuclear wasteheat transfer and related processes in an un­ derground environment similar to that expected in a mined nuclear waste

  11. Heat transfer pathways in underfloor air distribution (UFAD) systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauman, F.; Jin, H.; Webster, T.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is little radiative heat transfer and little impact on thereturn air extrac- tion and heat transfer to the plenum. ItUFAD is often used and heat transfer out of the room through

  12. United States

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - I United States Department of Energy D lSCk Al M E R "This book was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United...

  13. Radiative heat transfer between dielectric bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svend-Age Biehs

    2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development of a scanning thermal microscope (SThM) has led to measurements of radiative heat transfer between a heated sensor and a cooled sample down to the nanometer range. This allows for comparision of the known theoretical description of radiative heat transfer, which is based on fluctuating electrodynamics, with experiment. The theory itself is a macroscopic theory, which can be expected to break down at distances much smaller than 10-8m. Against this background it seems to be reasonable to revisit the known macroscopic theory of fluctuating electrodynamics and of radiative heat transfer.

  14. HEAT TRANSFER DURING THE SHOCK-INDUCED IGNITION OF AN EXPOLSIVE GAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heperkan, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings of the 1963 Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanicsto the Journal of Heat Transfer HEAT TRANSFER DURING THETechniques for Heat Transfer and Force Measurements in a

  15. Review and comparison of nanofluid thermal conductivity and heat transfer enhancements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L.; Choi, S. U.S.; Energy Systems; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Korea Inst. of Energy Research

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a detailed literature review and an assessment of results of the research and development work forming the current status of nanofluid technology for heat transfer applications. Nanofluid technology is a relatively new field, and as such, the supporting studies are not extensive. Specifically, experimental results were reviewed in this study regarding the enhancement of the thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer of nanofluids relative to conventional heat transfer fluids, and assessments were made as to the state-of-the-art of verified parametric trends and magnitudes. Pertinent parameters of particle volume concentration, particle material, particle size, particle shape, base fluid material, temperature, additive, and acidity were considered individually, and experimental results from multiple research groups were used together when assessing results. To this end, published research results from many studies were recast using a common parameter to facilitate comparisons of data among research groups and to identify thermal property and heat transfer trends. The current state of knowledge is presented as well as areas where the data are presently inconclusive or conflicting. Heat transfer enhancement for available nanofluids is shown to be in the 15-40% range, with a few situations resulting in orders of magnitude enhancement.

  16. Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case for excitation-induced hydrogen dissociation on hydrogenated Regulating energy transfer of excited carriers and the case...

  17. NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

  18. Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Records Management Procedures for Storage, Transfer and Retrieval of Records from WNRC Develop and maintain a...

  19. Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution: Calculation of the pH Molecular Dynamics Investigation of Ferrous-Ferric Electron Transfer in a Hydrolyzing Aqueous Solution:...

  20. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  1. Redox-linked conformation change and electron transfer between...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes, including electron transfer from dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria to minerals. One of the pathways that could trigger electron transfer between proteins and...

  2. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  3. ENERGY TRANSFER Shelley Corman Executive Vice President, Interstate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    depiction of Energy Transfer assets 2 More than 72,000 miles of natural gas, NGL, crude, and refined products pipelines ENERGY TRANSFER INTERSTATES CONNECTING SUPPLY AND...

  4. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solvation. Abstract: The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used...

  5. Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility Transfer Lines to Connect Liquid Waste Facilities and Salt Waste Processing Facility October...

  6. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics. Intermittent Single-Molecule Interfacial Electron Transfer Dynamics. Abstract: We report on single molecule...

  7. Analysis of Heat Transfer in Metal Hydride Based Hydrogen Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, W.H. Jr.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a transient heat transfer analysis to model the heat transfer in the Pd/k packed column, and the impact of adding metallic foam.

  8. Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced...

  9. SciTech Connect: Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in Green Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Energy Transfer and Cytochrome Oxidation in Green Bacteria In this paper we...

  10. NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenterDioxide CaptureSee theOilNREL in theState andPrograms

  11. Entrepreneurial Programs | Tech Transfer | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavyDepartmentebba SignEconomic Development |

  12. Effects of partial charge-transfer solute -- solvent interactions in absorption spectra of aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous and alcoholic solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Ar'ev; N. I. Lebovka; E. A. Solovieva

    2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for study of charge-transfer interactions between solute molecules and solvent based on the comparison of the ratios of spectral shifts of different electronic transitions in solute molecules in chemically inert solvent is proposed. The method is applicable to molecules that do not change their dipole moment on excitation. As an example, a presence of charge transfer interactions in higher electronic states of aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, phenanthrene, and naphthalene) dissolved in water and alcohols was demonstrated.

  13. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  14. Business Plan Competitions and Technology Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, C.M.; Perry, T.D., IV

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of business plan competitions, with a focus on the NREL-hosted Industry Growth Forum, and how it helps cleantech startups secure funding and transfer their technology to market.

  15. Vectorial electron transfer in spatially ordered arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, M.A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress was made on synthesis of new materials for directional electron transfer (block copolymers and helical oligopeptides), preparation and characterization of anisotropic composites bearing organics and inorganics, electrocatalysis (redox-activated catalysts), and surface modifications of metals and semiconductors.

  16. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division by the University of California Pavement Research Center. The University of California Pavement Research Center Using innovative research and sound engineering principles to improve pavement structures, materials

  17. Evaluating Water Transfers in Irrigation Districts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghimire, Narishwar

    2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The participation of irrigation districts (IDs) in surface water transfers from agriculture-to-municipal uses is studied by examining IDs’ economic and political behavior, comparing their performance with non-districts (non-IDs), and analyzing...

  18. Environment assisted energy transfer in dimer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Salman, E-mail: sksafi@comsats.edu.pk [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Chak Shahzad, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ibrahim, M.; Khan, M.K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of collective and multilocal environments on the energy transfer between the levels of a dimer is studied. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated by considering coupling of collective environment with the levels of the dimer in the presence of both two individuals and mutually correlated multilocal environments. It is shown that every way of coupling we consider assists, though differently, the probability of transition between the levels of dimer. The probability of transition is strongly enhanced when the two local environments are mutually correlated. -- Highlights: • The dynamics of energy transfer between the levels of a dimer are studied. • Coupling of collective as well as individual environments are considered. • The environments are in spin star configurations. • The environment assists the energy transfer between the levels. • For correlated multilocal environments, the transition probability is almost 100%.

  19. Wireless energy transfer between anisotropic metamaterials shells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José, E-mail: jsdehesa@upv.es

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strongly coupled Radial Photonic Crystals shells is investigated as a potential alternative to transfer electromagnetic energy wirelessly. These sub-wavelength resonant microstructures, which are based on anisotropic metamaterials, can produce efficient coupling phenomena due to their high quality factor. A configuration of selected constitutive parameters (permittivity and permeability) is analyzed in terms of its resonant characteristics. The coupling to loss ratio between two coupled resonators is calculated as a function of distance, the maximum (in excess of 300) is obtained when the shells are separated by three times their radius. Under practical conditions an 83% of maximum power transfer has been also estimated. -- Highlights: •Anisotropic metamaterial shells exhibit high quality factors and sub-wavelength size. •Exchange of electromagnetic energy between shells with high efficiency is analyzed. •Strong coupling is supported with high wireless transfer efficiency. •End-to-end energy transfer efficiencies higher than 83% can be predicted.

  20. Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, R. E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT-TRACED FLUID TRANSFER LINES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either steam or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat...

  1. Radiative transfer for the FIRST era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Trujillo Bueno

    2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a brief overview of some recent advances in numerical radiative transfer, which may help the molecular astrophysics community to achieve new breakthroughs in the interpretation of spectro-(polarimetric) observations.

  2. Clean Boiler Waterside Heat Transfer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This revised ITP tip sheet on cleaning boiler water-side heat transfer surfaces provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  3. Geometrical Rabi transitions between decoupled quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingxiang Zhou; Ari Mizel

    2008-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A periodic perturbation such as a laser field cannot induce transitions between two decoupled states for which the transition matrix element vanishes. We show, however, that if in addition some system parameters are varied adiabatically, such transitions become possible via adiabatic-change-induced excitations to other states. We demonstrate that full amplitude transfer between the two decoupled states can be achieved, and more significantly, the evolution of the system only depends on its path in parameter space. Our technique then provides a valuable means of studying nontrivial geometrical dynamics via auxiliary states with large energy splittings.

  4. An energy relaxation tolerant approach to quantum entanglement, information transfer, and gates with superconducting-quantum-interference-device qubits in cavity QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Chuiping; Chu, Shih-I; Han, Siyuan

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A scheme is proposed for realizing quantum entanglement, information transfer, CNOT gates, and SWAP gates with supercoiiducting-quantum-interference-device (SQUID) qubits in cavity QED. In the scheme, the two logical states ...

  5. Ultrafast and selective coherent population transfer in four-level atoms by a single frequency chirped few-cycle pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parvendra Kumar; Amarendra K. Sarma

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report and propose a simple scheme to achieve the ultrafast and selective population transfer in four-level atoms by utilizing a single frequency chirped few-cycle pulse. It is demonstrated that the almost complete population may be transferred to the preselected state of atoms just by manipulating the so called chirp offset parameter. The robustness of the scheme against the variation of laser pulse parameters is also investigated. The proposed scheme may also be useful for the selective population transfer in molecules.

  6. Evolution of technology transfer in Latin America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahl, L.F. (Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, NY (USA))

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses how Latin American countries have grown up buying technology, transferring technology from more developed nations, and attempting to adapt it to their own countries for their own environment. Although this is the approach that was and is necessary, there are still some shortfalls that have occurred in the process of licensing and acquisition of technology. Governments around the world also have had powerful impacts on technology transfer. Those in Latin America are no exception.

  7. Mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomaa, H.G. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Tiverton, Ontario (Canada); Landau, J. [Univ. of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB (Canada); Tawell, A.M.A. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of mass transfer at vertically oscillating surfaces is presented. It takes into account the interaction between forced and natural convection and can be used under conditions where the fluid velocity outside the boundary layer changes direction. Because of the good agreement with experimental data, the model can explain the multi-fold increase in mass transfer coefficient obtained under oscillatory conditions. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Nanoparticle enhanced ionic liquid heat transfer fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Elise B.; Visser, Ann E.; Bridges, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joshua R.; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L.

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer fluid created from nanoparticles that are dispersed into an ionic liquid is provided. Small volumes of nanoparticles are created from e.g., metals or metal oxides and/or alloys of such materials are dispersed into ionic liquids to create a heat transfer fluid. The nanoparticles can be dispersed directly into the ionic liquid during nanoparticle formation or the nanoparticles can be formed and then, in a subsequent step, dispersed into the ionic liquid using e.g., agitation.

  9. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  10. Coherent transfer of light polarization to electron spins in a semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideo Kosaka; Hideki Shigyou; Yasuyoshi Mitsumori; Yoshiaki Rikitake; Hiroshi Imamura; Takeshi Kutsuwa; Koichiro Arai; Keiichi Edamatsu

    2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the superposition of light polarization states is coherently transferred to electron spins in a semiconductor quantum well. By using time-resolved Kerr rotation we observe the initial phase of Larmor precession of electron spins whose coherence is transferred from light. To break the electron-hole spin entanglement, we utilized the big discrepancy between the transverse g-factors of electrons and light holes. The result encourages us to make a quantum media converter between flying photon qubits and stationary electron spin qubits in semiconductors.

  11. Photodissociation and charge transfer dynamics of negative ions studied with femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanni, Martin T.

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation presents studies aimed at understanding the potential energy surfaces and dynamics of isolated negative ions, and the effects of solvent on each. Although negative ions play important roles in atmospheric and solution phase chemistry, to a large extent the ground and excited state potential energy surfaces of gas phase negative ions are poorly characterized, and solvent effects even less well understood. In an effort to fill this gap, the author's coworkers and the author have developed a new technique, anion femtosecond photoelectron spectroscopy, and applied it to gas phase photodissociation and charge transfer processes. Studies are presented that (1) characterize the ground and excited states of isolated and clustered anions, (2) monitor the photodissociation dynamics of isolated and clustered anions, and (3) explore the charge-transfer-to-solvent states of atomic iodide clustered with polar and non-polar solvents.

  12. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids” Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  13. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  14. RECENT ADVANCES in HEAT and MASS TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    Bashir Suleiman ,UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Dagmar Janacova, CZECH REPUBLIC Jonas Gylys, LITHUANIA Jurij Krope Ali Elghalban, PAKISTAN Andrejs Reinfelds, LATVIA Andris Buikis, LATVIA Asad Salem, UNITED STATES, UNITED STATES Milivoje Kostic, UNITED STATES Mohammadmasoud Azhdari moghaddam, IRAN Nenad Kazic

  15. Proceedings of HT2009 2009 ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhixiong "James"

    -dependent radiation and conduction bio-heat transfer model. Ultrashort pulsed radiation transport in the cylindrical a combined transient heat transfer and Pennes bio-heat transfer model is developed to simulate the heat transfer models; and concluded that the Pennes model is still the most practical for fast prediction

  16. Analysis of heat transfer in unlooped and looped pulsating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    , Tubing Abstract An advanced heat transfer model for both unlooped and looped Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs

  17. COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 7) #12;COST TRANSFERS TO FEDERALLY FUNDED AWARDS California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California: A cost transfer is an after-the-fact transfer of costs (labor or non-labor) from a sponsored or non

  18. ME 339 Heat Transfer ABET EC2000 syllabus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Yakar, Adela

    ME 339­ Heat Transfer Page 1 ABET EC2000 syllabus ME 339 ­ Heat Transfer Spring 2010 Required convection; radiation; introduction to phase change heat transfer and to heat exchangers. Prerequisite(s): ME, Fundamentals of Heat and Mass Transfer, 6th ed., Wiley Other Required Material: NA Course Objectives

  19. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  20. GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through WirelessSachin Hirve April 30, 2008April 30, 2008 Contents:Contents: What is Software Radio?What is Software Radio? USRPUSRP ­­ MultiMulti--functional hardwarefunctional hardware GNU RadioGNU Radio Previous Work

  1. Heat transfer 1990. Proceedings of the ninth international heat transfer conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetsroni, G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains the proceedings of the Ninth International Heat Transfer Conference. Included in Volume 6 are the following chapters: Local void fraction measurements in finned tube bundles, Unsteady heat and mass transfer in low two-phase flows and The effect of physical properties on drop size in annular flow.

  2. From Frster resonance energy transfer to coherent resonance energy transfer and back

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee "Gov"

    From Förster resonance energy transfer to coherent resonance energy transfer and back A wheen o at Urbana-Champaign, Loomis Laboratory of Physics, 1110 West Green Street,, Urbana IL 61801-3080, Telephone-mail:gov@illinois.edu ABSTRACT Photosynthesis converts solar energy into chemical energy. It provides food and oxygen; and

  3. Intergenerational transfers and the social discount rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, R.B.; Norgaard, R.B.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the relationship between intergenerational asset transfers and the choice of the discount rate for use in cost-benefit analysis in a model of a competitive overlapping generations economy constrained by a socially managed exhaustible resource. Provided that there are no distortions in capital markets and that all agents hold perfect foresight, cost-benefit techniques will result in a Pareto efficient resource allocation if the discount rate is set equal to the market rate of interest. But since the path of the interest rate depends on the level of intergenerational transfers, cost-benefit techniques do not ensure a socially desirable distribution of welfare between generations; a social optimum will result only if intergenerational transfers are properly chosen and enforced. Decentralized private altruism may result in intergenerational transfers that both present and future individuals would agree are too small if members of the present generation attach positive weight to the general welfare of future generations, not simply their personal descendants. In a world where intergenerational transfers are non-optimal, second-best policy-making may imply a constrained optimum that is inefficient. Together, these findings suggest that cost-benefit analysis is at best a partial criterion to policy formulation that should be used only in conjunction with ethical principles that define the proper distribution of welfare between present and future generations.

  4. Information Transfer Fidelity in Networks of Spins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edmond Jonckheere; Frank Langbein; Sophie Schirmer

    2014-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks of spins, or spintronic networks, are given an Information Transfer Fidelity (ITF) derived from an upper bound on the probability of transmission of the excitation from one spin to another. It is shown that this theoretical bound can be reached asymptotically in time under certain conditions. The process of achieving maximum transfer probability is given a dynamical model, the translation on the torus, and the time to reach the maximum probability is estimated using the simultaneous Diophantine approximation computationally implemented using a variant of the Lenstra-Lenstra-Lov\\'asz (LLL) algorithm. The ITF induces a prametric on the network. For a ring with homogeneous couplings, it is shown that this prametric satisfies the triangle inequality, opening up the road to an ITF geometry, which turns out to be completely different from the geometry of the physical arrangement of the spin in the spintronic device. It is shown that transfer fidelities and transfer times can be improved by means of simple controls taking the form of strong localized magnetic fields, opening up the possibility for intelligent design of spintronic networks and dynamic routing of information encoded in such networks. The approach is much more flexible than engineering the couplings to favor some transfers.

  5. Attosecond timing the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S. X. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    By solving the three-dimensional, time-dependent Schroedinger equation, we have demonstrated that the ultrafast charge-transfer process in ion-atom collisions can be mapped out with attosecond extreme uv (xuv) pulses. During the dynamic-charge transfer from the target atom to the projectile ion, the electron coherently populates the two sites of both nuclei, which can be viewed as a 'short-lived' molecular state. A probing attosecond xuv pulse can instantly unleash the delocalized electron from such a ''transient molecule,'' so that the resulting photoelectron may exhibit a ''double-slit'' interference. On the contrary, either reduced or no photoelectron interference will occur if the attosecond xuv pulse strikes well before or after the collision. Therefore, by monitoring the photoelectron interference visibility, one can precisely time the ultrafast charge-transfer process in atomic collisions with time-delayed attosecond xuv pulses.

  6. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting antenna systems. They contain thousands of pigment molecules - bacteriochlorophylls (BChls)- that are organized into supramolecular aggregates and form a very efficient network for excitonic energy migration. Here, we present a theoretical study of excitation energy transfer (EET) in the chlorosome based on experimental evidence of the molecular assembly. Our model for the exciton dynamics throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular structure, and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. The simulation results reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to se...

  7. STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION John Hickenlooper Governor Lt. Gov. Joseph A OF HIGHER EDUCATION Colorado State University-Ft Collins #12;FINAL Statewide Transfer Articulation Agreement Education. The guarantees and limitations below describe the minimum requirements to which all participating

  8. Chirped pulse excitation of two-atom Rydberg states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuznetsova, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze excitation of two ground state atoms to a double Rydberg state by a two-photon chirped optical pulse in the regime of adiabatic rapid passage. For intermediate Rydberg-Rydberg interaction strengths, relevant for atoms separated by $\\sim$ten $\\mu$m, adiabatic excitation can be achieved at experimentally feasible Rabi frequencies and chirp rates of the pulses, resulting in high transfer efficiencies. We also study the adiabatic transfer between ground and Rydberg states as a means to realize a controlled phase gate between atomic qubits.

  9. Transfer Mentor Responsibilities Your goal as a transfer mentor is to help your mentee(s) become comfortable with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Transfer Mentor Responsibilities Goals: Your goal as a transfer mentor is to help your mentee become a mentor? : The transition to life as a college student is a different experience for everyone make a transfer student's transition smooth. Not only will the Transfer Mentor Program be a great

  10. Base closure: Environmental concerns for transfer of a ``GOCO`` facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, M.R.; Dent, M.J.; McLaurin, E.S.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Faced with funding restrictions, cutbacks and fiscal restraints, the United States Department of Defense (DOD), over the next few years will be required to downsize its military personnel and equipment and divest or transfer some of its facilities. A program of procedures used to assess the environmental conditions of a government facility for transfer to non-federal ownership is required. An environmental site assessment or an Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is a program that can be used to evaluate the environmental conditions at a facility and whether it is in compliance with existing environmental regulations. An EBS will be required at both the large military bases and the smaller Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) facilities. This presentation focuses on a case study of an EBS conducted at a GOCO facility in the upper midwest. The unique challenge offered at this site, as opposed to other military bases, is that the property consisted primarily of manufacturing areas. The use of hazardous substances and petroleum products by several defense contractors over the years resulted in environmental concerns that may have affected soil and ground water. Since this site is one of the first divestitures of a GOCO facility, the data collection process, environmental findings, recommendations and unique problems associated with a GOCO facility can serve as a model for future GOCO divestitures.

  11. Radiative Heat Transfer between Neighboring Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier Garcia de Abajo

    2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The near-field interaction between two neighboring particles is known to produce enhanced radiative heat transfer. We advance in the understanding of this phenomenon by including the full electromagnetic particle response, heat exchange with the environment, and important radiative corrections both in the distance dependence of the fields and in the particle absorption coefficients. We find that crossed terms of electric and magnetic interactions dominate the transfer rate between gold and SiC particles, whereas radiative corrections reduce it by several orders of magnitude even at small separations. Radiation away from the dimer can be strongly suppressed or enhanced at low and high temperatures, respectively. These effects must be taken into account for an accurate description of radiative heat transfer in nanostructured environments.

  12. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald F. Duttlinger; E. Lance Cole

    2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization to address the increasingly urgent need to improve the technology-transfer process in the U.S. upstream petroleum industry. Coordinated from a Headquarters (HQ) office in Houston, PTTC maintains an active grassroots program executed by 10 Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) and two satellite offices (Figure 1). Regional Directors interact with domestic oil and gas producers through technology workshops, resource centers, websites, newsletters, technical publications and cooperative outreach efforts. HQ facilitates inter-regional technology transfer and implements a comprehensive communications program. Active volunteers on the National Board and in Producer Advisory Groups (PAGs) in each of the 10 regions focus effort in areas that will create the most impact for domestic producers. Focused effort by dedicated individuals across the country has enabled PTTC to achieve the milestones outlined in Appendix A.

  13. Heat transfer in gas tungsten arc welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smartt, H.B.; Stewart, J.A.; Einerson, C.J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat transferred from an electrode negative, argon gas tungsten arc to an anode has been measured for a wide range of conditions suitable for mechanized welding applications. The results are given as (1) the arc efficiency; and (2) the anode heat and current input distribution functional shapes and radii for various anode materials and groove shapes over a wide range of current and voltage, using different electrode geometries, as well as both He and Ar-He shielding gases. The nominal arc is Gaussian with a diameter of about 4 mm and a heat transfer efficiency to the anode of about 75%. Variations from these values are discussed in terms of current knowledge of the electrical and thermal energy transport mechanisms. A new method of measuring the heat transferred from the arc to the anode, using a boiling liquid nitrogen calorimeter, has been developed which gives rapid, accurate values.

  14. Note on specific chiral ensembles of statistical hydrodynamics: "order function" for transition of turbulence transfer scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Zhou Zhu

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic helicity signatures the parity symmetry breaking, chirality, of the flow. Statistical hydrodynamics thus respect chirality, as symmetry breaking and restoration are key to their fundamentals, such as the spectral transfer direction and its mechanism. Homochiral sub-system of three-dimensional (3D) Navier-Stokes isotropic turbulence has been numerically realized with helical representation technique to present inverse energy cascade [Biferale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., {\\bf 108}, 164501 (2012)]. The situation is analogous to 2D turbulence where inverse energy cascade, or more generally energy-enstrophy dual cascade scenario, was argued with the help of a negative temperature state of the absolute equilibrium by Kraichnan. Indeed, if the helicity in such a system is taken to be positive without loss of generality, a corresponding negative temperature state can be identified [Zhu et al., J. Fluid Mech., {\\bf 739}, 479 (2014)]. Here, for some specific chiral ensembles of turbulence, we show with the corresponding absolute equilibria that even if the helicity distribution over wavenumbers is sign definite, different \\textit{ansatzes} of the shape function, defined by the ratio between the specific helicity and energy spectra $s(k)=H(k)/E(k)$, imply distinct transfer directions, and we could have inverse-helicity and forward-energy dual transfers (with, say, $s(k)\\propto k^{-2}$ resulting in absolute equilibrium modal spectral density of energy $U(k)=\\frac{1}{\\alpha +\\beta k^{-2}}$, exactly the enstrophy one of two-dimensional Euler by Kraichan), simultaneous forward transfers (with $s(k)=constant$), or even no simply-directed transfer (with, say, non-monotonic $s(k) \\propto \\sin^2k$), besides the inverse-energy and forward-helicity dual transfers (with, say, $s(k)=k$ as in the homochiral case).

  15. Calibrating the MKAR array using transfer functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renwald, M. D. (Marie D.); Taylor, S. R. (Steven R.); Wallace, Terry C.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing regional discriminants (RDs) at any given seismic station requires a ground-truth database of waveforms from both earthquakes and explosions. Recently installed stations used for seismic monitoring have no single charge explosions on which to base discriminants. We have developed a procedure to map information from surrogate stations, having a long recording history, to newly installed operational stations. We investigated a method to compute transfer functions using known effective 13Ds for a database of earthquakes and explosions located near the Lop Nor nuclear test site and recorded at the KNET array in Kyrgyzstan. For specific source-station paths, transfer functions work well. However, preliminary analysis of India and Pakistan nuclear tests indicate strong azimuthal dependence in the construction of reliable transfer functions. The success of the preliminary work suggests we can apply the same technique to calibrate the recently installed MKAR array using the Global Seismic Network station MAKZ as a surrogate. Both MKAR, an 11-element array operational since 2000, and MAKZ (including its earlier counterpart MAK), operating very broadband instruments since 1994, are located in Eastern Kazakhstan and separated by 25 km. To perform the calibration requires additional considerations not taken into account during the initial investigation: (1) utilizing amplitude spectra, rather than using RDs, to calculate transfer functions; (2) computing transfer functions for a range of azimuths, as we believe the transfer function are azimuthally dependent; and (3) determining whether working with each array element separately or developing a single-input/multiple-output model will provide more stable results and better error estimates.

  16. About convective heat transfer in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashkevich, R.I. [Kamchatsky Complex Department of NIPIgeotherm Institute, Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky (Russian Federation)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The interphase fluid-rock heat exchange in convective beat transfer in geothermal systems is investigated Nonlinear model of interphase heat exchange is suggested. Calculation for one dimension case and comparison with known Anzelius-Schumann solution is presented Generalized type block heat transfer model is formulated. The model is adequate for case of geothermal systems and reservoir when a rock block size is comparable with filtration path length. Criterion equations for nonstationary coefficients of interphase heat exchange we presented these equations were obtained in laboratory experiments with diorites.

  17. Modelling Heat Transfer of Carbon Nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xin-She

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modelling heat transfer of carbon nanotubes is important for the thermal management of nanotube-based composites and nanoelectronic device. By using a finite element method for three-dimensional anisotropic heat transfer, we have simulated the heat conduction and temperature variations of a single nanotube, a nanotube array and a part of nanotube-based composite surface with heat generation. The thermal conductivity used is obtained from the upscaled value from the molecular simulations or experiments. Simulations show that nanotube arrays have unique cooling characteristics due to its anisotropic thermal conductivity.

  18. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  19. TOPAZ3D. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, A.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1992-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functional representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.

  20. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN); Bryan, William Louis (Knoxville, TN); Kress, Reid (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  1. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Bryan, William Louis; Kress, Reid

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  2. Geometrical effects on energy transfer in disordered open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mohseni; A. Shabani; S. Lloyd; Y. Omar; H. Rabitz

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore various design principles for efficient excitation energy transport in complex quantum systems. We investigate energy transfer efficiency in randomly disordered geometries consisting of up to 20 chromophores to explore spatial and spectral properties of small natural/artificial Light-Harvesting Complexes (LHC). We find significant statistical correlations among highly efficient random structures with respect to ground state properties, excitonic energy gaps, multichromophoric spatial connectivity, and path strengths. These correlations can even exist beyond the optimal regime of environment-assisted quantum transport. For random configurations embedded in spatial dimensions of 30 A and 50 A, we observe that the transport efficiency saturates to its maximum value if the systems contain 7 and 14 chromophores respectively. Remarkably, these optimum values coincide with the number of chlorophylls in (Fenna-Matthews-Olson) FMO protein complex and LHC II monomers, respectively, suggesting a potential natural optimization with respect to chromophoric density.

  3. Convective heat-transfer predictions and experiments in an IC engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of heat transfer in engines is critical to engine efficiency, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions, engine-component thermal stress analysis, as well as engine cycle simulation accuracy. However, the relationship between pressure, heat-release rate, turbulent flow, and the heat transfer is not known. Previous engine heat-transfer models, including the law-of-the-wall used for multi-dimensional calculations, are based on a steady-state incompressible flow which is not the case in engines. A new heat-transfer model was developed which is based on an approximate solution of the linearized and normalized one-dimensional energy equation. An empirical turbulent viscosity relation has been used to include the effects of turbulence. The response of this equation to a unit step function was acquired by multi-parameter fit to the numerical solution. The effects of initial thermal boundary layer formed before compression were also considered. The proposed heat-transfer model was extended to include the effects of combustion. Thus, the relationship between pressure variation, spatially-resolved heat-release rate, local flow condition, initial thermal boundary layer, and the surface heat flux and temperature profile was developed.

  4. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perlík, Václav; Cranston, Laura J; Cogdell, Richard J; Lincoln, Craig N; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Man?al, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial energy transfer in photosynthesis occurs between the light-harvesting pigments and on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that F\\"orster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which leads to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited state as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid el...

  5. Structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer in Si/Ge superlattices: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Pengfei; Zhang, Yuwen, E-mail: zhangyu@missouri.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211 (United States); Yang, Mo [College of Energy and Power Engineering, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, Shanghai 200093 (China)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The structural, dynamic, and vibrational properties during heat transfer process in Si/Ge superlattices are studied by analyzing the trajectories generated by the ab initio Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation. The radial distribution functions and mean square displacements are calculated and further discussions are made to explain and probe the structural changes relating to the heat transfer phenomenon. Furthermore, the vibrational density of states of the two layers (Si/Ge) are computed and plotted to analyze the contributions of phonons with different frequencies to the heat conduction. Coherent heat conduction of the low frequency phonons is found and their contributions to facilitate heat transfer are confirmed. The Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation outputs in the work show reasonable thermophysical results of the thermal energy transport process and shed light on the potential applications of treating the heat transfer in the superlattices of semiconductor materials from a quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulation perspective.

  6. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Electron Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Holman; Ling Zang; Ruchuan Liu; David M. Adams

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research are threefold: (1) to develop methods for the study electron transfer processes at the single molecule level, (2) to develop a series of modifiable and structurally well defined molecular and nanoparticle systems suitable for detailed single molecule/particle and bulk spectroscopic investigation, (3) to relate experiment to theory in order to elucidate the dependence of electron transfer processes on molecular and electronic structure, coupling and reorganization energies. We have begun the systematic development of single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) of electron transfer and summaries of recent studies are shown. There is a tremendous need for experiments designed to probe the discrete electronic and molecular dynamic fluctuations of single molecules near electrodes and at nanoparticle surfaces. Single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) has emerged as a powerful method to measure properties of individual molecules which would normally be obscured in ensemble-averaged measurement. Fluctuations in the fluorescence time trajectories contain detailed molecular level statistical and dynamical information of the system. The full distribution of a molecular property is revealed in the stochastic fluctuations, giving information about the range of possible behaviors that lead to the ensemble average. In the case of electron transfer, this level of understanding is particularly important to the field of molecular and nanoscale electronics: from a device-design standpoint, understanding and controlling this picture of the overall range of possible behaviors will likely prove to be as important as designing ia the ideal behavior of any given molecule.

  7. Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Technology Afshin Izadian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Hydraulic Wind Power Transfer Technology Afshin Izadian Purdue School of Engineering and Technology of renewable energy tax credits in general and a gap in wind energy breakthroughs in particular have caused high cost of wind energy and technological dependency on countries such as China and Germany. Reducing

  8. A Gentle Introduction to Precomputed Radiance Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Manuel M.

    in computer graphics, and many algorithms have been developed to try to reproduce the visual complexity with the support of modern graphics hardware. Precomputed Radiance Transfer (PRT) is a new graphics technique of the rendering equation to a subset of the light transport paths that handle only energy exchange among diffuse

  9. Financial Implications of Intergenerational Farm Transfers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Devin Richard

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and management. The model assists in creating a before and after comparative analysis of succession for a large, medium, and small sized representative farm in Texas. Eight methods of farm transfer are analyzed: a will, trust, buy-sell and lease-to-buy agreements...

  10. LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT THISMATERIALTRANSFERAGREEMENT("Agreement to as the "RECIPIENT," the parties to this Agreement being referred to individually as a "Party," and collectively Nuclear Security Administration. Certain MATERIAL has been developed in the course of the PROVIDER

  11. PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    the road." In recent years, increasing amounts of crumb rubber from recycled tires have been added solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL. 1, NO. 2 § Rubber Roads: Waste Tires Find a Home By Larry Santucci, PE Pavement Specialist

  12. Hadron structure at small momentum transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Walcher

    2008-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Giving three examples, the form factors of the nucleon, the polarisability of the charged pion and the interference of the $S_{11}(1535)$ with the $D_{13}(1520)$ excitation of the nucleon in the $\\eta p$-decay channel, it is argued that the hadron structure at low momentum transfer is highly significant for studying QCD.

  13. Records Management Office RECORDS TRANSFER REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    Records Management Office RECORDS TRANSFER REQUEST Department Name and Budget Code number Office permission to destroy) Date received in Records Center: Box # Basic description of contents with DATES. Consecutive box numbers. 1 Financial Records FY 2002-2005 Leave Gray Areas blank, Financial Records FY 2001

  14. Waste transfer leaks technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides technical support for the onsite radiological and toxicological, and offsite toxicological, portions of the waste transfer leak accident presented in the Documented Safety Analysis. It provides the technical basis for frequency and consequence bin selection, and selection of safety SSCs and TSRs.

  15. Transfer Information Sheet for Bergen Community College

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    223 Business Law I BLS 111 3 ART, CIN, DAN. MUS, THR, LIT, WRT 204 or 205 Art, Cinema, DanceEd "H" or GenEd "C" 6 Bio, CHM, ESC or PHY Lab Science GenEd "L" 4 ECO 202 Macroeconomics ECON 162 3 or PHY Science elective Science elective 4 ECO 201 Microeconomics ECON 160 3 Total transfer credits 62

  16. Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012 SRS was set up by Dr Paul Sutton and Prof Linda contributes and benefits Campus Company Profile Mobro.co/trinity TTO The three gentlemen of the TTO U.S./Ireland Legal Symposium in Philadelphia on October 10-12, 2012. Dr. Emily Vereker (Trinity TTO

  17. Convective heat transfer in rotating, circular channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Brenna Elizabeth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nusselt number values for flow in a rotating reference frame are obtained through computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis for Rossby numbers Ro ~1-4 and Reynolds numbers Re ~1,000-2,000. The heat-transfer model is first ...

  18. Target structure independent $^7\\vec{Li}$ elastic scattering at low momentum transfers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Momotyuk; N. Keeley; K. W. Kemper; B. T. Roeder; A. M. Crisp; W. Cluff; B. G. Schmidt; M. Wiedeking; F. Marechal; K. Rusek; S. Yu. Mezhevych; J. Liendo

    2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing powers and cross sections for the elastic scattering of polarized 7Li by targets of 6Li, 7Li and 12C are shown to depend only on the properties of the projectile for momentum transfers of less than 1.0 fm-1. The result of a detailed analysis of the experimental data within the framework of the coupled channels model with ground state reorientation and transitions to the excited states of the projectile and targets included in the coupling schemes are presented. This work suggests that nuclear properties of weakly-bound nuclei can be tested by elastic scattering experiments, independent of the target used, if data are acquired for momentum transfers less than ~1.0 fm-1.

  19. Heat Transfer between Graphene and Amorphous SiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. N. J. Persson; H. Ueba

    2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the heat transfer between graphene and amorphous SiO2. We include both the heat transfer from the area of real contact, and between the surfaces in the non-contact region. We consider the radiative heat transfer associated with the evanescent electromagnetic waves which exist outside of all bodies, and the heat transfer by the gas in the non-contact region. We find that the dominant contribution to the heat transfer result from the area of real contact, and the calculated value of the heat transfer coefficient is in good agreement with the value deduced from experimental data.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearce, T.D.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory and technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearce, T.D.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From its beginning in 1943, Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) has traditionally used science and technology to fine creative, but practical solutions to complex problems. Los Alamos National Laboratory is operated by the University of California, under contact to the Department of Energy. We are a Government Owned-contractor Operated (GOCO) facility, and a Federally-funded research and Development Center (FFRDC). At Los Alamos, our mission is to apply science and engineering capabilities to problems of national security. Recently our mission has been broadened to include technology transfer to ensure the scientific and technical solutions are available to the marketplace. We are, in staff and technical capabilities, one of the worlds largest multidisciplinary, multiprogram laboratories. We conduct extensive research in energy, nuclear safeguards and security, biomedical science, conventional defense technologies, space science, computational science, environmental protection and cleanup, materials science, and other basic sciences. Since 1980, by a series of laws and executive orders, the resources of the federal laboratories have been made increasingly available to private industry via technology transfer efforts. Los Alamos National Laboratory uses a variety of technology transfer methods including laboratory visits, cooperative research, licensing, contract research, user facility access, personnel exchanges, consulting, publications, and workshops, seminars and briefings. We also use unique approaches, such as our negotiating teams, to ensure that transfer of our developed technology takes place in an open and competitive manner. During my presentation, I will discuss the overall process and some of the mechanism that we use at Los Alamos to transfer laboratory developed technology.

  2. PNNL wins Four Technology Transfer Awards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, Julie A.; McMakin, Andrea H.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL wins 4 Technology Transfer Awards Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has received four 2006 Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards from the Federal Laboratory Consortium - a nationwide network of more than 700 major federal laboratories and centers as well as their parent departments and agencies that provides a forum to develop strategies and opportunities for linking technology with the mission and the marketplace. The FLC presents its Awards for Excellence in Technology Transfer to federal laboratory employees who have done outstanding work in transferring U.S. government-sponsored technologies to the public and private sectors. Since 1984, when the awards program was established, Pacific Northwest has earned 62 of these awards, far more than any other national laboratory. This year, PNNL won all four of the nominations that were submitted--the most that any laboratory can submit. PNNL was recognized for transferring technologies that treat and cure cancer, uniquely analyze massive sets of data, increase surgical implant success rates, and neutralize toxic chemicals from the environment. Through collaboration with PNNL researchers and access to facilities at PNNL, IsoRay Medical, Inc. (http://www.isoray.com), expanded its brachytherapy technology for treating prostate and other cancers. The medical isotope ?seed? products are available at more than 17 implant centers nationwide. More than 40 organizations, including Fortune 500 companies, are using the Starlight information visualization software to mine and interpret massive amounts of data. Bacterin International licensed bioactive thin-film coatings which reduce infection rates associated with surgical implants. Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Silica (SAMMS), a process for removing mercury and other toxic chemicals from the environment, was licensed to Steward Advanced Materials for use in coal-fired power plants, municipal incinerators, and other plants.

  3. Transfer reactions using a low-energy {sup 11}Be beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansen, Jacob [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University (Denmark)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments have been performed to investigate neutron rich beryllium isotopes. Scattering as well as one neutron transfer reactions have been studied using a {sup 11}Be beam on deuteron targets. Bound states of {sup 10,11,12}Be have been studied and reaction cross sections have been calculated. The elastic scattering cross section has shown remarkable structure due to the halo structure of {sup 11}Be.

  4. Research on Convective Heat Transfer and Mass Transfer of the Evaporator in Micro/Mini-Channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, J.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the development of science and technology, various heating and cooling equipment have a development trend of micromation. Micro-fabrication processes make it possible to conduct research on condensation heat transfer ...

  5. Research on Convective Heat Transfer and Mass Transfer of the Evaporator in Micro/Mini-Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, J.; Li, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the reviewers on the present household air conditioners, the potential requirements for new heat transfer enhancement used for household air conditioners are discussed. Investigations on condensation and boiling of refrigerants in mini/micro channels have...

  6. Manipulating Quantum States of Molecules Created via Photoassociation of Bose-Einstein Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Ting Zhou; Xiong-Jun Liu; Hui Jing; C. H. Lai; C. H. Oh

    2007-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the quantum state transfer technique in two-color photoassociation (PA) of a Bose-Einstein condensate, where a quantized field is used to couple the free-bound transition from atom state to excited molecular state. Under the weak excitation condition, we find that quantum states of the quantized field can be transferred to the created molecular condensate. The feasibility of this technique is confirmed by considering the atomic and molecular decays discovered in the current PA experiments. The present results allow us to manipulate quantum states of molecules in the photoassociation of a Bose-Einstein condensate.

  7. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    1 NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF POOL BOILING FOR STEADY STATE AND TRANSIENT HEATING Ying He, Masahiro role in nucleate and transition boiling heat transfer at high heat flux. Many experiments have been in the numerical simulation of boiling heat transfer. In this study, based on the macrolayer evaporation model

  8. The Data Transfer Kit: A geometric rendezvous-based tool for multiphysics data transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slattery, S. R.; Wilson, P. P. H. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Pawlowski, R. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Data Transfer Kit (DTK) is a software library designed to provide parallel data transfer services for arbitrary physics components based on the concept of geometric rendezvous. The rendezvous algorithm provides a means to geometrically correlate two geometric domains that may be arbitrarily decomposed in a parallel simulation. By repartitioning both domains such that they have the same geometric domain on each parallel process, efficient and load balanced search operations and data transfer can be performed at a desirable algorithmic time complexity with low communication overhead relative to other types of mapping algorithms. With the increased development efforts in multiphysics simulation and other multiple mesh and geometry problems, generating parallel topology maps for transferring fields and other data between geometric domains is a common operation. The algorithms used to generate parallel topology maps based on the concept of geometric rendezvous as implemented in DTK are described with an example using a conjugate heat transfer calculation and thermal coupling with a neutronics code. In addition, we provide the results of initial scaling studies performed on the Jaguar Cray XK6 system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for a worse-case-scenario problem in terms of algorithmic complexity that shows good scaling on 0(1 x 104) cores for topology map generation and excellent scaling on 0(1 x 105) cores for the data transfer operation with meshes of O(1 x 109) elements. (authors)

  9. J Technol Transfer (2008) 33:560578 DOI 10.1007/s10961-008-9092-0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J Technol Transfer (2008) 33:560­578 DOI 10.1007/s10961-008-9092-0 Globalization of technology+Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract The United States became the dominant technology-based economy after World War, organizational, and marketing assets. However, the world is witnessing the rapid globalization of technology

  10. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 075207 (2012) Optical signature of Mg-doped GaN: Transfer processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 86, 075207 (2012) Optical signature of Mg-doped GaN: Transfer processes G; published 23 August 2012) Mg doping of high quality, metal organic chemical vapor deposition grown GaN films GaN:Mg grown on sapphire substrates and identify two Mg related acceptor states, one additional

  11. CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 15. Technology Commercialization and Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Jay

    CUNY EXPORT CONTROL PROCEDURES 15. Technology Commercialization and Transfer This section addresses the export control requirements associated with CUNY's Technology Commercialization Transfer Agreements trigger export control requirements, CUNY's Technology Commercialization Office (TCO) shall work directly

  12. Policy Transfer of Innovative Sustainability Principles and Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy Transfer of Innovative Sustainability Principles and Practices: The Whistler, British) Report No.: 574 Title of Thesis: Policy transfer of innovative sustainability principles and practices;v Abstract This study examines how innovative policies that seek to embed sustainability principles

  13. Transfers and path choice in urban public transport systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zhan, 1973-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfers are endemic in public transport systems. Empirical evidence shows that a large portion of public transport journeys involve at least one change of vehicles, and that the transfer experience significantly affects ...

  14. Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanolcarbon tetrachloride solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Orientational relaxation and vibrational excitation transfer in methanol­carbon tetrachloride spectroscopy of the hydroxyl stretch of methanol in carbon tetrachloride solutions to study orientational excitation transfer. For concentrated methanol in carbon tetrachloride solu- tions, like those used

  15. Contacts for the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Procurement Subject MatterFunctional Area Lead Backup Technology Transfer John T. Lucas 202-586-2939 Linda Field 202-586-3440 IP...

  16. Scalability of mass transfer in liquid-liquid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woitalka, A.

    We address liquid–liquid mass transfer between immiscible liquids using the system 1-butanol and water, with succinic acid as the mass transfer component. Using this system we evaluate the influence of two-phase flow ...

  17. Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

  18. art heat transfer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfer Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-8-5 Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System...

  19. accident heat transfer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfer Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-8-5 Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System...

  20. accurate heat transfer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfer Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Renewable Energy Resources and a Greener Future Vol.VIII-8-5 Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System...

  1. A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS WITH ATTACHED WALL JETS By WEIXIU KONGQuest Information and Learning Company. #12;II A CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SIMULATION OF ROOMS

  2. July 2008 Mold heat transfer in continuous casting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    with the 1-D heat transfer model, CON1D. To account for the multi- dimensional thermal behavior around speeds and new mold designs. COND Model Description The heat transfer model CON1D1 models sev- eral

  3. OXYGEN TRANSFER IN TRICKLING FILTERS By BruceE. Logan~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OXYGEN TRANSFER IN TRICKLING FILTERS By BruceE. Logan~ ABSTRACT: Insufficientoxygen transfer can result in anaerobic biofilmsand odor generation during biochemicaloxygen demand (BOD) removal plastic media trickling filters occurs by diffusion of oxygen through thin fluid films, previous models

  4. Development of a robust work transfer iomplementation process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Kimberly R

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industry-wide need for a robust method of transferring the manufacturing of a component from one location to another is addressed in this thesis. Work transfer activities can be initiated due to a number of business ...

  5. Hydrodynamics, heat transfer and flow boiling instabilities in microchannels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barber, Jacqueline Claire

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Boiling in microchannels is a very efficient mode of heat transfer with high heat and mass transfer coefficients achieved. Less pumping power is required for two-phase flows than for single-phase liquid flows to achieve ...

  6. High-Throughput Transfer Imprinting for Organic Semiconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choo, Gihoon

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this work, nanoimprint-based transfer imprinting of organic semiconductor is studied. In the same time the suggested technique is simulated with COMSOL multi-physics simulator to understand its mechanism. This transfer printing technique utilize thermal...

  7. Nanofluid heat transfer enhancement for nuclear reactor applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buongiorno, Jacopo

    Colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles are known as `nanofluids'. Such engineered fluids offer the potential for enhancing heat transfer, particularly boiling heat transfer, while avoiding the drawbacks (i.e., erosion, ...

  8. Experimental evaluation of heat transfer characteristics of silica nanofluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zihao, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The laminar convective heat transfer characteristics were investigated for silica nanofluid. An experimental loop was built to obtain heat transfer coefficients for single-phase nanofluids in a circular conduit in laminar ...

  9. Transfer stations and long-haul transport systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, P.; Pferdehirt, W.; O'Leary, P. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Solid and Hazardous Waste Education Center)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfer stations can be an important link between pickup at the curb and ultimate disposal, often allowing significant savings in the total costs to move wastes from the generator to the disposal site. A transfer station is simply a facility where collection trucks bring collected materials for loading into larger vehicles and subsequent shipment, usually to a landfill, waste-to-energy plant, or composting facility. Transferred wastes are typically shipped out in large trailers, but barges and railroad cars are also transport options. Although modern transfer stations usually include some provisions for handling recyclables, solid waste transfer dominates the operation of most facilities. Some communities have begun experimenting with transferring commingled, source-separated recyclables to regional processing centers. Transfer facilities can be as simple as a pavement slab and a front-end loader. Alternatively, transfer stations can cost millions of dollars and move thousands of tons of waste each day.

  10. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  11. Note: The State Clearinghouse will assign identification numbers for all new projects. If a SCH number already exists for a project (e.g. Notice of Preparation or previous draft document) please fill in.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : City: Zip: County: Project Location: County: City/Nearest Community: Cross Streets: Zip Code: Longitude Waste Land Use Drainage/Absorption Population/Housing Balance Toxic/Hazardous Cumulative Effects For LCNG Fueling Facility California Energy Commission Donald Coe 1516 Ninth Street (916) 654

  12. adomet-dependent aminocarboxypropyl transfer: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refrigerator Physics Websites Summary: 445 16 Heat Transfer and Air Flow in a Domestic Refrigerator Onrawee Laguerre UMR Gnie Industriel......

  13. Confinement on the energy transfer between luminescent centers in nanocrystals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, X. Y.; Zhuang, H. Z.; Li, S.; Niedbala, R. S.; Liu, G. K.; Chemistry; OraSure Technologies, Inc.

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminescence dynamics of optical centers in nanocrystals depends critically on the phonon density of states (PDOS), which is quite distinct from that of bulk materials. It is shown that energy transfer (ET) in nanocrystals is confined by discrete PDOS as well as direct size restriction. Temperature-, concentration-, and size-dependence of the fluorescence decay from the {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} state of Er{sup 3+} in Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S nanocrystals have been investigated using laser spectroscopic experiments and computational simulations. A set of microscopic rate equations that govern the evolution of the excitation probability P{sub i}(t) are solved iteratively using a Monte Carlo method. The simulations of ET based on a theoretical model with five parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. It is shown that phonon-assisted ET processes in Er{sup 3+}:Y{sub 2}O{sub 2}S nanocrystals contribute partly to the fluorescence decay at 295 K, and is negligible at 5 K. For applications, the nanoconfinement effects on ET may significantly reduce the efficiency of sensitized or upconversion luminescence due to the lack of low-frequency phonon modes and restricted excitation migration in nanophosphors.

  14. DEVELOPING FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN STRONGLY CURVED DUCTS OF RECTANGULAR CROSS-SECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOpiNG FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN STRONGLY CURVED DUCTS9092 Developing Flow and Heat Transfer in Strongly CurvedForced Convection Heat Transfer in Curved Rectangular

  15. Developing Low-Conductance Window Frames: Capabilities and Limitations of Current Window Heat Transfer Design Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavsen, Arild

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    free convection. In: Heat Transfer and Turbulent Buoyantof convection heat transfer and develop correlations.and radiation heat transfer and develop correlations for

  16. MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fifth semi-annual status report of the MHD Technology Transfer, Integration, and Review Committee (TTIRC) summarizes activities of the TTIRC during the period April 1990 through September 1990. It includes summaries and minutes of committee meetings, progress summaries of ongoing Proof-of-Concept (POC) contracts, discussions pertaining to technical integration issues in the POC program, and planned activities for the next six months.

  17. Low-melting point heat transfer fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel (Oakland, CA); Bradshaw, Robert W. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-melting point, heat transfer fluid made of a mixture of five inorganic salts including about 29.1-33.5 mol % LiNO.sub.3, 0-3.9 mol % NaNO.sub.3, 2.4-8.2 mol % KNO.sub.3, 18.6-19.9 mol % NaNO.sub.2, and 40-45.6 mol % KNO.sub.2. These compositions can have liquidus temperatures below 80.degree. C. for some compositions.

  18. Technology Transfer at VTIP VTIP in 20 Minutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    . · For more information, see http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/plant/ #12;Technology Transfer at VTIPTechnology Transfer at VTIP VTIP in 20 Minutes What You Need to Know Virginia Tech Intellectual Properties, Inc. #12;Technology Transfer at VTIP VTIP Overview Virginia Tech Intellectual Properties, Inc

  19. III. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Gas transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    (Gas Capture)(Gas Capture)( p )( p ) 10-3 - 10-4 torr10 10 torr Oil free, no moving parts Drawback: Oil Diffusion PumpB. High Vacuum: Oil Diffusion Pump (Wet, Gas Transfer)(Wet, Gas TransferIII. Vacuum PumpsIII. Vacuum Pumps Mechanism Gas transfer Gas capture FunctionFunction Roughing

  20. Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basin, David

    Technology Transfer David Basin and Thai Son Hoang Institute of Information Security, ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract. This paper presents our experience of knowledge and technology transfer within the lessons learned and what we would do differently in future technology transfer projects. Keywords

  1. Guide to Dowel LoadTransfer Systems for Jointed Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide to Dowel LoadTransfer Systems for Jointed Concrete Roadway Pavements TECH BRIEF SEPTEMBER 2011 #12;#12;GUIDE TO DOWEL LOAD TRANSFER SYSTEMS FOR JOINTED CONCRETE ROADWAY PAVEMENTS i Technical and Subtitle Guide to Dowel Load Transfer Systems for Jointed Concrete Roadway Pavements 5. Report Date

  2. Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amrhein, Valentin

    Proton Transfer and Hydrogen Bonding in Chemical and Biological Systems: A Force Field Approach and support. i #12;ii #12;Abstract Proton transfer and hydrogen bonds are fundamental for the function be regarded as incipient proton transfer reactions, so theoretically they can be de- scribed in unitary way

  3. Heat transfer of finned tube bundles in crossflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stasiulevicius, J.; Skrinska, A.; Zukauskas, A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume correlates findings on heat transfer and hydraulic drag of bundles of finned tubes in crossflow at Reynolds numbers from 10/sup 4/ to 10/sup 6/. These studies illustrate fin, local, and mean heat transfer coefficients; effects of geometric parameters of the fins; effect of tube location within the bundle on heat transfer and hydraulic drag; and resistance of finned tube bundles.

  4. Model of innovation transfer in small and medium enterprises (SME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model of innovation transfer in small and medium enterprises (SME) Justyna Patalas-Maliszewska1 society, governments and entrepreneurs. In this paper the concept of innovation transfer in SME based of innovation transfer - based on correlations between innovation level in the enterprise sector SME

  5. Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dt2boool2> Nora Heat Transfer Correlations in Nuclear Reactor Safety Calculations VW ÉAiiattÉaii #12;fcflison cufiMiMltt lor yhdyiifci aomicantfgy RIS0-M-25O4 6«.*). HEAT TRANSFER of work 26 3. PRESENT KNOWLEDGE 27 3.1. General considerations 27 3.2. Heat transfer in different flow

  6. Proceeding of the 1st International Forum on Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Proceeding of the 1st International Forum on Heat Transfer November 24-26, 2004, Kyoto, Japan Paper No. HEAT TRANSFER PROBLEMS RELATED WITH CARBON NANOTUBES BY MOLECULAR DYNAMICS-BASED SIMULATIONS Dynamics Simulation, Thermal Conductance ABSTRACT Several heat transfer problems related to single

  7. RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASIMONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI­MONTE CARLO METHODS \\Lambda A. Kersch 1 W. Morokoff 2 A accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer from the heater to the wafer. Figure 1 shows the draft Carlo simulation is often used to solve radiative transfer problems where complex physical phenomena

  8. Proceedings of NHTC'00: 34 th National Heat Transfer Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Proceedings of NHTC'00: 34 th National Heat Transfer Conference Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, August 20 ON SINGLE- AND TWO-PHASE HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS IN A MICROCHANNEL Michael S June Graduate Student study investigates the heat transfer characteristics of single and two-phase flows in a 200 m wide

  9. RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER WITH QUASI-MONTE CARLO METHODS A. Kersch1 W. Moroko2 A. Schuster1 1Siemens of Quasi-Monte Carlo to this problem. 1.1 Radiative Heat Transfer Reactors In the manufacturing of the problems which can be solved by such a simulation is high accuracy modeling of the radiative heat transfer

  10. High flux heat transfer in a target environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    High flux heat transfer in a target environment T. Davenne High Power Targets Group Rutherford Valid for: Consider turbulent heat transfer in a 1.5mm diameter pipe ­ Dittus Boelter correlation Achenbach correlation for heat transfer in a packed bed of spheres Max power density for a sphere

  11. Mechanistic studies of photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer and oxygen atom transfer reactions in model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgkiss, Justin M. (Justin Mark), 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved optical spectroscopy has been employed for mechanistic studies in model systems designed to undergo photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reactions, both of which ...

  12. Spectroscopic investigation of photo-induced proton-coupled electron transfer and Dexter energy transfer in model systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Elizabeth R. (Elizabeth Renee), 1980-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic investigations of systems designed to advance the mechanistic interrogation of photo-induced proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) and proton-coupled (through-bond) energy transfer (PCEnT) are presented. ...

  13. Source storage and transfer cask: Users Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G.W.; Speir, L.G.; Garcia, D.C.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage and shield cask for the dual californium source is designed to shield and transport up to 3.7 mg (2 Ci) of /sup 252/Cf. the cask meets Department of Transportation (DOT) license requirements for Type A materials (DOT-7A). The cask is designed to transfer sources to and from the Flourinel and Fuel Storage (FAST) facility delayed-neutron interrogator. Californium sources placed in the cask must be encapsulated in the SR-CF-100 package and attached to Teleflex cables. The cask contains two source locations. Each location contains a gear box that allows a Teleflex cable to be remotely moved by a hand crank into and out of the cask. This transfer procedure permits sources to be easily removed and inserted into the delayed-neutron interrogator and reduces personnel radiation exposure during transfer. The radiation dose rate with the maximum allowable quantity of californium (3.7 mg) in the cask is 30 mR/h at the surface and less than 2 mR/h 1 m from the cask surface. This manual contains information about the cask, californium sources, describes the method to ship the cask, and how to insert and remove sources from the cask. 28 figs.

  14. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takatoshi Fujita; Joonsuk Huh; Alan Aspuru-Guzik

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on the connection, we propose a novel scheme to correct reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. For this purpose, we introduce a simple relationship that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts - the reorganization shift - to three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to classify the origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.

  15. BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

  16. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

  17. Visible light stimulating dual-wavelength emission and O vacancy involved energy transfer behavior in luminescence for coaxial nanocable arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Lei, E-mail: nanoyang@qq.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Hunan Province Key Laboratory for Spray Deposition Technology and Application, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Dong, Jiazhang; Jiang, Zhongcheng [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Pan, Anlian; Zhuang, Xiujuan [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Physics and Technology of Hunan Province, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a strategy to investigate O vacancy (V{sub O}) involved energy transfer and dual-wavelength yellow emission in coaxial nanocable. By electric field deposition and subsequent sol-gel template approach, ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu coaxial nanocable arrays are synthesized. After visible light excitation, system is promoted to O vacancy charge transfer state of V{sub O}(0/+). In the following cross relaxation, energy transfer from V{sub O} to the excitation energy level of Tb{sup 3+} in ZnO:Tb core area. While in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu shell area, energy transfer to the excitation energy level of Eu{sup 3+}. Subsequently, dual-wavelength emission is observed. By constructing nanocable with dual-wavelength emission, yellow luminescence is obtained. Adjust doping concentration of Eu{sup 3+} or Tb{sup 3+} in the range of 0.01–0.05, chromaticity coordinates of ZnO:Tb/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu nanocable stably stays at yellow region in color space except ZnO:Tb{sub 0.01}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sub 0.01}. As Vo states act as media in energy transfer process in nanocablers, visible light can stimulate dual-wavelength emissions. Yellow luminescent nanocable arrays will have great applications in light-emitting diode luminescence.

  18. Important Resources for Transfer Students Office of Transfer Academic Services--offers academic and procedural assistance to Franklin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Important Resources for Transfer Students Office of Transfer Academic Services--offers academic and procedural assistance to Franklin College transfer students adjusting to a new campus by providing resources, and preparing for exams. You'll find them at http://tutor.uga.edu/ or call 706-542-7575 Disability Resource

  19. Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analysis of roll gap heat transfers in hot steel strip rolling through roll temperature sensors and heat transfer models N. Legrand1,a , N. Labbe1,b D. Weisz-Patrault2,c , A. Ehrlacher2,d , T. Luks3,e heat transfers during pilot hot steel strip rolling. Two types of temperature sensors (drilled and slot

  20. The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittig, T. [Geo-Centers, Inc. (United States); Greenfield, J. [Armaments Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

  1. Resolution of electron and proton transfer events in the electrochromism associated with quinone reduction in bacterial reaction centers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiede, D. M.; Utschig, L.; Gallo, D. M.; Hanson, D. K.; Augustana Coll.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the electrochromic response of the bacteriopheophytin, BPh, and bacteriochlorophyll, BChl, cofactors during the Q{sub A} {sup -}Q{sub B} {yields} Q{sub A}Q{sub B}{sup -} electron transfer in chromatophores of Rhodobacter (Rb.) capsulatus and Rb. sphaeroides. The electrochromic response rises faster in chromatophores and is more clearly biexponential than it is in isolated reaction centers. The chromatophore spectra can be interpreted in terms of a clear kinetic separation between fast electron transfer and slower non-electron transfer events such as proton transfer or protein relaxation. The electrochromic response to electron transfer exhibits rise times of about 4 {micro}s (70%) and 40 {micro}s (30%) in Rb. capsulatus and 4 {micro}s (60%) and 80 {micro}s (40%) in Rb. sphaeroides. The BPh absorption band is shifted to nearly equivalent positions in the Q{sub A}{sup -} and nascent Q{sub B}{sup -} states, indicating that the electrochromic perturbation of BPh absorption from the newly formed Q{sub B}{sup -} state is comparable to that of Q{sub A}{sup -} . Subsequently, partial attenuation of the Q{sub B}{sup -} electrochromism occurs with a time constant on the order of 200 {micro}s. This can be attributed to partial charge compensation by H{sup +} (or other counter ion) movement into the Q{sub B} pocket. Electron transfer events were found to be slower in detergent isolated RCs than in chromatophores, more nearly monoexponential, and overlap H{sup +} transfer, suggesting that a change in rate-limiting step has occurred upon detergent solubilization.

  2. Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

  3. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Hydrogen Services Solar Wind energy AQWON Motors AQWON Motors Speinshart Germany Hydro Hydrogen AQWON Motors has developed the first hydrogen powered stroke engine...

  4. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DC Motors and Battery Management Systems for Electric Vehicles ATG GmbH ATG GmbH Gl tt Germany Vehicles Provider of products and solutions for using diesel or biodiesel at low...

  5. Organization Organization Address Place Zip Notes Website Region

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    th Street Suite Oakland California http www thebreakthrough org Bay Area California Fuel Cell Partnership California Fuel Cell Partnership Industrial Blvd West Sacramento...

  6. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable energy systems design consultation and installation http www rainier energy com Pacific Northwest Area Ram Power Ram Power Ryland Street Suite Reno Nevada Geothermal...

  7. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    up planning to develop produce and market flywheel batteries for stationary power storage RPP Constructions RPP Constructions Tamil Nadu India Focused on infrastructure and...

  8. PHYSICAL SCIENCES Zipping, Entanglement, and the Elastic Modulus of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    for a variety of innovative energy technologies ­ from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems is thermoelectric waste heat recovery systems (2), for which the interfaces between the thermoelectric materials. #12; 2 Abstract: Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge

  9. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Photovoltaics Spain S L REPS Renewable Energies and Photovoltaics Spain S L REPS Spain Solar Spanish solar project developer The firm is a subsidiary of Norwegian energy company...

  10. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Academic Research foundation Centrotherm Photovoltaics AG Centrotherm Photovoltaics AG Blaubeuren Germany Services Provides turnkey manufacturing equipment for...

  11. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    special economic zone Future Heating Future Heating London England United Kingdom Solar Designs and installs solar passive water heating systems FutureCamp GmBH FutureCamp...

  12. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    solar water heating fuel cells and radiant floor heating applications American Photovoltaics American Photovoltaics Houston Texas Solar Will manufacture thin film solar...

  13. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    resources for its members American Photovoltaics American Photovoltaics Houston Texas Solar Will manufacture thin film solar modules http apv us com Texas Area American...

  14. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boston Area Green Fuel Technologies Corporation Green Fuel Technologies Corporation Smith Place Cambridge Massachusetts Biofuels Recycles CO2 from flue gases to produce...

  15. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    significantly better heating efficiency than conventional coiled wire elements A O Smith A O Smith Wisconsin Efficiency Solar Wisconsin based based company that makes both...

  16. Name Name Address Place Zip Category Sector Telephone number...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Marine and Hydrokinetic http acep uaf edu facilities tanana river hydrokinetic test site aspx Alden Research Laboratory Inc Alden Research Laboratory Inc Shrewsbury Street...

  17. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    headed up by China Huaneng Group which focusses on coal gasification hydrogen production CO2 capture and power plant construction H2 Energy LLC H2 Energy LLC Hawaii Hydro Hydrogen...

  18. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    HF ReEnergy has focused its most recent efforts on the desire to create grid quality electricity from landfill waste The company also plans to focus on making existing coal plants...

  19. Company Name Company Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    consultancy and project design relating to emission reductions acquired by CantorCO2e Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Cornwall Vermont Carbon...

  20. Exploring zipping and assembly as a protein folding principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voelz, Vince A; Dill, Ken A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C. Are there pathways for protein folding? Journal de Chimieand the mechanism of protein folding. Ann Rev Biochem 1982;Baldwin RL. How does protein folding get started? TRENDS in