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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract only. The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as part of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single­ shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: DST space utilization, optimization, and closure; Waste Feed Qualification; and, Cementitious Waste Forms. Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be used to meet current challenges and to minimize the impact of future challenges. This paper provides an overview of the exchanges held, but predominately focuses on the team development and actions leading from the workshops.

Ramsey, William Gene

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

INL Site Portion of the April 1995 Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Mamagement Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 1995, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Department of the Navy, as a cooperating agency, issued the Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact Statement (1995 EIS). The 1995 EIS analyzed alternatives for managing The Department's existing and reasonably foreseeable inventories of spent nuclear fuel through the year 2035. It also included a detailed analysis of environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The analysis supported facility-specific decisions regarding new, continued, or planned environmental restoration and waste management operations. The Record of Decision (ROD) was signed in June 1995 and amended in February 1996. It documented a number of projects or activities that would be implemented as a result of decisions regarding INL Site operations. In addition to the decisions that were made, decisions on a number of projects were deferred or projects have been canceled. DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing procedures (found in 10 CFR Part 1 021.330(d)) require that a Supplement Analysis of site-wide EISs be done every five years to determine whether the site-wide EIS remains adequate. While the 1995 EIS was not a true site-wide EIS in that several programs were not included, most notably reactor operations, this method was used to evaluate the adequacy of the 1995 EIS. The decision to perform a Supplement Analysis was supported by the multi-program aspect of the 1995 EIS in conjunction with the spirit of the requirement for periodic review. The purpose of the SA is to determine if there have been changes in the basis upon which an EIS was prepared. This provides input for an evaluation of the continued adequacy of the EIS in light of those changes (i.e., whether there are substantial changes in the proposed action, significant new circumstances, or new information relevant to environmental concerns). This is not to question the previous analysis or decisions based on that analysis, but whether the environmental impact analyses are still adequate in light of programmatic changes. In addition, the information for each of the projects for which decisions were deferred in the ROD needs to be reviewed to determine if decisions can be made or if any additional NEP A analysis needs to be completed. The Supplement Analysis is required to contain sufficient information for DOE to determine whether (1) an existing EIS should be supplemented, (2) a new EIS should be prepared, or (3) no further NEP A documentation is required.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Argonne National Laboratory's Solar Energy Development Programmatic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Development Programmatic EIS Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Argonne National Laboratory's Solar Energy...

4

Programmatic Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Risk assessment for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes for the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the risk assessment performed for the on-site transportation of radioactive wastes in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Risks for the routine shipment of wastes and the impacts from potential accidental releases are analyzed for operations at the Hanford Site (Hanford) near Richland, Washington. Like other large DOE sites, hanford conducts waste management operations for all wastes types; consequently, the impacts calculated for Hanford are expected to be greater than those for smaller sites. The risk assessment conducted for on-site transportation is intended to provide an estimate of the magnitude of the potential risk for comparison with off-site transportation risks assessed for the WM PEIS.

Biwer, B.M.; Monette, F.A.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) Uranium Leasing...

7

Draft Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ''Site-wide Environmental Impact Statement for Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Supplemental Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement'' (LLNL SW/SPEIS) describes the purpose and need for agency action for the continued operation of LLNL and analyzes the environmental impacts of these operations. The primary purpose of continuing operation of LLNL is to provide support for the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship missions. LLNL, located about 40 miles east of San Francisco, California, is also needed to support other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs and Federal agencies such as the U.S. Department of Defense, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the newly established U.S. Department of Homeland Security. This LLNL SW/SPEIS analyzes the environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for ongoing and foreseeable future operations, facilities, and activities at LLNL. The reasonable alternatives include the No Action Alternative, Proposed Action, and the Reduced Operation Alternative. The major decision to be made by DOE/NNSA is to select one of the alternatives for the continued operation of the LLNL. As part of the Proposed Action, DOE/NNSA is considering: using additional materials including plutonium on the National Ignition Facility (NIF); increasing the administrative limit for plutonium in the Superblock, which includes the Plutonium Facility, the Tritium Facility, and the Hardened Engineering Test Building; conducting the Integrated Technology Project, using laser isotope separation to provide material for Stockpile Stewardship experiments, in the Plutonium Facility; increasing the material-at-risk limit for the Plutonium Facility; and increasing the Tritium Facility material-at-risk. A discussion of these issues is presented in Section S.5.2, Proposed Action. The ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) establishes environmental policy, sets goals, and provides means for implementing the policy. NEPA contains provisions to ensure that Federal agencies adhere to the letter and spirit of the Act. The key provision requires preparation of an environmental impact statement on ''major Federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment'' (40 ''Code of Federal Regulations'' [CFR] {section}1502.3). NEPA ensures that environmental information is available to public officials and citizens before decisions are made and actions are taken (40 CFR {section}1500.1[b]). DOE has a policy to prepare sitewide environmental impact statements documents for certain large, multiple-facility sites such as LLNL (10 CFR {section}1021.330). In August 1992, DOE released the ''Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report for Continued Operations of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore'' (LLNL EIS/EIR). A Record of Decision (ROD) (58 ''Federal Register'' [FR] 6268) was issued in January 1993. With the passage of more than 10 years since the publication of the 1992 LLNL EIS/EIR (DOE/EIS-0157) and because of proposed modifications to existing projects and new programs, NNSA determined that it was appropriate to prepare a new LLNL SW/SPEIS.

N /A

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

10

NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan FY 2013-2015 June 2012 #12;N I S T 3 - Y e a r P r o g r a m m a t i and Industry Services programs; and · Priorities for NIST FY 2013-2015. (Credit: Christina Kiffney Photography to submit a three-year programmatic plan concurrent with the submission of the President's budget request

11

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Volume 1, Appendix F, Nevada Test Site and Oak Ridge Reservation Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume addresses the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at two US Department of Energy sites, the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). These sites are being considered to provide a reasonable range of alternative settings at which future SNF management activities could be conducted. These locations are not currently involved in management of large quantities of SNF; NTS has none, and ORR has only small quantities. But NTS and ORR do offer experience and infrastructure for the handling, processing and storage of radioactive materials, and they do exemplify a broad spectrum of environmental parameters. This broad spectrum of environmental parameters will provide, a perspective on whether and how such location attributes may relate to potential environmental impacts. Consideration of these two sites will permit a programmatic decision to be based upon an assessment of the feasible options without bias, to the current storage sites. This volume is divided into four parts. Part One is the volume introduction. Part Two contains chapters one through five for the NTS, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Three contains chapters one through five for the ORR, as well as references contained in chapter six. Part Four is summary information including the list of preparers, organizations contacted, acronyms, and abbreviations for both the NTS and the ORR. A Table of Contents, List of Figures, and List of Tables are included in parts Two, Three, and Four. This approach permitted the inclusion of both sites in one volume while maintaining consistent chapter numbering.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Programmatic agreement among the USDOE/RL Operations Office, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the WA State Historic Preservation Office for the maintenance, deactivation, alteration and demolition of the built environment on the Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Programmatic Agreement (PA) addresses the built environment (i.e., buildings and structures) constructed during the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era periods of Hanford`s operational history. As such it encompasses the years 1943 through 1990. The identification, evaluation, and treatment of buildings and historic archeological remains on the Hanford Site predating 1943 will be accomplished through Sections 800.4 through 800.6 of the Council`s regulations. This PA will be in effect from the date of signature until September 30, 2000. Completion of the Sitewide Treatment Plan established under this PA satisfies all Section 106 requirements for identification, evaluation, and treatment necessary for all undertakings, up to and including demolition which may affect Manhattan Project and Cold War Era properties. This PA may be extended if the Sitewide Treatment Plan has not been completed by the end of FY 2000. Identification, evaluation, and treatment of properties constructed on the Hanford Site after 1990 will be handled pursuant to the regulations in effect at the time such properties are eligible for review.

Lloyd, D.W.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sites Pending Transfer to LM | Department of Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » Sites » Sites Pending Transfer to

14

EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S4: Final Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Complex Transformation The National...

15

EIS-0203: Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact Statement EIS-0203: Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental...

16

Draft Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

which analyzed programmatic alternatives for the weapons complex in the absence of nuclear testing. NNSA maintains the safety, security, and reliability of nuclear weapons...

17

Programmatic Framework | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE R&D)REPORTServicesProgramProgrammatic

18

LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the Uranium Leasing Program LM Issues Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on the Uranium Leasing...

19

EIS-0472: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0472: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Leasing...

20

EIS-0481: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: DOE Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0310: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Accomplishing Expanded...

22

Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision for the Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact...

23

EIS-0459: Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Programmatic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0459: Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Programmatic Environmental Impact...

24

EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S1: Draft Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement This Supplemental DEIS evaluates the...

25

EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

81: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High...

26

EIS-0386: EPA Notice of Availability of the Programmatic Final...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EIS-0386: EPA Notice of Availability of the Programmatic Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0386: EPA Notice of Availability of the Programmatic Final Environmental Impact...

27

EIS-0481: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environment...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

1: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

28

EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Engineered High Energy...

29

EIS-0472: DOE Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0472: DOE Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

30

EIS-0481: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

481: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0481: EPA Notice of Availability of Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

31

French 320 (France Today) Course Outcomes and Programmatic Alignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

French 320 (France Today) Course Outcomes and Programmatic Alignment Students will be able to Outcome assessments Programmatic alignment demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of major

Mayfield, John

32

West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision (BLM)Legal Published NA Year Signed or...

33

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Extensions and enhancements to the iLab heat transfer project site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The iLab Heat Transfer Project website started four years ago to enable web access to experiments related to movement of heat through transport processes. This thesis details improvements made to the site which extend and ...

Saylor, David P. (David Patrick)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Accurate estimates of the volumes of contaminated soils or sediments are critical to effective program planning and to successfully designing and implementing remedial actions. Unfortunately, data available to support the pre-remedial design are often sparse and insufficient for accurately estimating contaminated soil volumes, resulting in significant uncertainty associated with these volume estimates. The uncertainty in the soil volume estimates significantly contributes to the uncertainty in the overall project cost estimates, especially since excavation and off-site disposal are the primary cost items in soil remedial action projects. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District's experience has been that historical contaminated soil volume estimates developed under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) often underestimated the actual volume of subsurface contaminated soils requiring excavation during the course of a remedial activity. In response, the Buffalo District has adopted a variety of programmatic methods for addressing contaminated volume uncertainties. These include developing final status survey protocols prior to remedial design, explicitly estimating the uncertainty associated with volume estimates, investing in pre-design data collection to reduce volume uncertainties, and incorporating dynamic work strategies and real-time analytics in pre-design characterization and remediation activities. This paper describes some of these experiences in greater detail, drawing from the knowledge gained at Ashland 1, Ashland 2, Linde, and Rattlesnake Creek. In the case of Rattlesnake Creek, these approaches provided the Buffalo District with an accurate pre-design contaminated volume estimate and resulted in one of the first successful FUSRAP fixed-price remediation contracts for the Buffalo District. (authors)

Rieman, C.R.; Spector, H.L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States); Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Div., IL (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of transuranic waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of transuranic waste (TRUW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but is necessary to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) contact- and remote-handed (CH and RH) TRUW. Included are definitions of the TRUW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of CH and RH TRUW, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM TRUW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sites Pending Transfer to LM | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe House Committee on Energy andDepartment of EnergyAprilAShaleSites Pending

40

Preoperational test report, cross-site transfer water flush system (POTP-001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the testing performed per POTP-001, for the Cross-Site Transfer Water Flush System. (HNF-1552, Rev. 0) The Flush System consists of a 47,000 gallon tank (302C), a 20 hp pump, two 498kW heaters, a caustic addition pump, various valves, instruments, and piping. The purpose of this system is to provide flush water at 140 F, 140gpm, and pH 11-12 for the Cross-Site Transfer System operation.

Parsons, G.L.

1998-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Programmatic Framework | Department of Energy  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -Miami -NewPlantSteel Co -Sites »

42

Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non Destructive Testing of Concrete: Transfer from Laboratory to On-site Measurement Vincent Vincent.garnier@univ-amu.fr ABSTRACT The evaluation of mechanical and chemical properties of concrete laws from the laboratory between non-destructive measurements and characteristics of the concrete

Boyer, Edmond

43

EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

44

Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private Ownership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office (DOE?GJO) in Grand Junction, Colorado, has played an integral role within the DOE complex for many years. GJO has a reputation for outstanding quality in the performance of complex environmental restoration projects, utilizing state-of-the-art technology. Many of the GJO missions have been completed in recent years. In 1998, DOE Headquarters directed GJO to reduce its mortgage costs by transferring ownership of the site and to lease space at a reasonable rate for its ongoing work. A local community group and GJO have entered into a sales contract; signing of the Quitclaim Deed is planned for February 16, 2001. Site transfer tasks were organized as a project with a critical-path schedule to track activities and a Site Transition Decision Plan was prepared that included a decision process flow chart, key tasks, and responsibilities. Specifically, GJO identified the end state with affected parties early on, successfully dealt with site contamination issues, and negotiated a lease-back arrangement, resulting in an estimated savings of more than 60 percent of facility maintenance costs annually. Lessons learned regarding these transition activities could be beneficial to many other sites.

none,

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Waste minimization plan construction and operation of the replacement cross-site transfer system, project W-058  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses the research and development of a waste minimization plan for the construction and operation of Project W-058, Replacement of the Cross-Site Transfer System, on the Hanford Site. The plan is based on Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-307, Plans. The waste minimization plan identifies areas where pollution prevention/waste minimization principles can be incorporated into the construction and operation of the cross-site transfer system.

Boucher, T.D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

USFS West Wide Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: USFS West Wide...

47

BLM - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: BLM - Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Geothermal Leasing in the Western United StatesLegal...

48

EIS-0269: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EIS-0269: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride,...

49

EIS-0403: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States Notice of Availability, Draft Environmental...

50

EIS-0403: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0403: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States The Agencies have determined that a...

51

EIS-0403-S1: Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIS-0403-S1: Supplement to the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Solar Energy Development in Six Southwestern States The full document number is DOE...

52

EIS-0472: EPA Notice of Availability of Final Programmatic Environment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Impact Statement Uranium Leasing Program, Mesa, Montrose, and San Miguel Counties, Colorado EPA announces the availability of the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact...

53

EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EA-1919: Notice of Availability of a Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment Recycling of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas DOE announces the availability...

54

PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

and Conservation Block Grant Program, the State Energy Plan, and the Weatherization Assistance Program. PROTOTYPE PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF...

55

EIS-0366: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation of the Carbon Sequestration Program The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to...

56

EIS-0366: Notice of Cancellation of a Programmatic Environmental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Cancellation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation of the Carbon Sequestration Program The Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to cancel the...

57

Public Scoping for Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Public Scoping for Preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Deepwater........................................................................................................................................1 III. Natural Resources Damage Assessment..........................................................................................................................7 VIII. Environmental Consequences of Restoration Types

58

EIS-0236-S4: DOE Notice of Availability of the Supplemental Programmat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

EIS-0236-S4: DOE Notice of Availability of the Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236-S4: DOE Notice of Availability of the Supplemental Programmatic...

59

EIS-0236: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplement to the Programmatic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0236: Notice of Intent to Prepare a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental...

60

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria with in which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan establishes the programmatic framework and criteria within which the Hanford Site ensures that contract-handled TRU wastes can be certified as compliant with the WIPP WAC and TRUPACT-II SARP.

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

62

Technology Innovation Program Programmatic Plan: FY 2011 FY 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Innovation Program Programmatic Plan: FY 2011 ­ FY 2014 Critical National Need Area & intelligent automation (#3) Technologies to enable a smart grid (#4) Technologies for water availability (#6) Sustainability Technologies for personalized medicine (#5) Complex networks Manufacturing Advanced sensing

Magee, Joseph W.

63

EIS-0146: Programmatic for Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This programmatic environmental impact statement assesses the environmental impacts of continuing the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program involving the selection, for cost-shared federal funding, of one or more clean coal projects proposed by the private sector.

64

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

Sands, M. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

Authors, Various

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Remote administration and user experience evaluation of the iLab Heat Transfer Project site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The iLab Heat Transfer Project provides a means for students to remotely execute, via a web interface, experiments related to the topic of heat transfer. The website associated with this project provides instructors with ...

Graham, Rodney K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Isotopic identification of surface site transfer on Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotope labeling with temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) for CO hydrogenation was used to separate two distinct CO adsorption sites on a Ni/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts. One site is Ni metal and has the higher activity for CO hydrogenation. The less-reactive CO is on the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ support. Only the Ni metal is occupied at 300 K, and transfer for CO between the two sites occurs at higher temperatures. In the presence of adsorbed H/sub 2/, CO that was adsorbed on the Ni metal moved to the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ support. This is an activated process, and the only pathway to occupy the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ sites is by adsorption on the Ni. The reverse transfer from Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to Ni occurs if some of the H/sub 2/ is desorbed; surface hydrogen inhibits this reverse process. These results show that during a typical TPR experiment, transfer between sites competes with reaction.

Gugla, P.G.; Bailey, K.M.; Falconer, J.L.

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

GER 320 (Germany Today) Course Outcomes and Programmatic Alignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GER 320 (Germany Today) Course Outcomes and Programmatic Alignment Students will be able, conduct presentations, and produce texts relevant to contemporary issues in Germany and the German-speaking countries Individual and small group presentations Final project on important issues in Germany 1a

Mayfield, John

71

Transition and Closeout of the Former DOE Mound Plant Site: Lessons Learned  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) manages the Miamisburg Closure Project (MCP) by cleaning up the Mound site, located in Miamisburg, Ohio, to specific environmental standards, conveying all excess land parcels to the Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation, and transferring all continuing DOE post-closure responsibilities to the Office of Legacy Management (LM). Presently, the EM cleanup contract of the Mound site with CH2M Hill Mound Inc. is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2006. LM manages the Mound transition efforts and also post-closure responsibilities at other DOE sites via a contract with the S.M. Stoller Corporation. The programmatic transfer from EM to LM is scheduled to take place on October 1, 2006. The transition of the Mound site has required substantial integration and coordination between the EM and LM. Several project management principles have been implemented to help facilitate the transfer of programmatic responsibility. As a result, several lessons learned have been identified to help streamline and improve integration and coordination of the transfer process. Lessons learned from the Mound site transition project are considered a work in progress and have been summarized according to a work breakdown structure for specific functional areas in the transition schedule. The functional areas include program management, environmental, records management, information technology, property management, stakeholder and regulatory relations, procurement, worker pension and benefits, and project closeout. Specific improvements or best practices have been recognized and documented by the Mound transition team. The Mound site is one of three major cleanup sites within the EM organization scheduled for completion in 2006. EM, EM cleanup contractor, LM, and LM post-closure contractor have identified lessons learned during the transition and closure of the Mound site. The transition effort from environmental cleanup to post-closure operations is complex and requires creative and innovative solutions. Future environmental cleanups can benefit from the lessons learned gained by DOE and contractor organizations. (authors)

Carpenter, C. P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Research Ridge 4, MS-K09, 3600 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507 (United States); Marks, M. L.; Smiley, S.L. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, Chiquita Building, 250 E. 5 th Street, Cincinnati, OH 45202 (United States); Gallaher, D. M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, 955 Mound Road, Miamisburg, OH 45342 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

USING A RISK-BASED METHODOLOGY FOR THE TRANSFER OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL WITHIN THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BOUNDARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipment of radioactive materials (RAM) is discussed in the Code of Federal Regulations in parts of both 49 CFR and 10 CFR. The regulations provide the requirements and rules necessary for the safe shipment of RAM across public highways, railways, waterways, and through the air. These shipments are sometimes referred to as in-commerce shipments. Shipments of RAM entirely within the boundaries of Department of Energy sites, such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), can be made using methodology allowing provisions to maintain equivalent safety while deviating from the regulations for in-commerce shipments. These onsite shipments are known as transfers at the SRS. These transfers must follow the requirements approved in a site-specific Transportation Safety Document (TSD). The TSD defines how the site will transfer materials so that they have equivalence to the regulations. These equivalences are documented in an Onsite Safety Assessment (OSA). The OSA can show how a particular packaging used onsite is equivalent to that which would be used for an in-commerce shipment. This is known as a deterministic approach. However, when a deterministic approach is not viable, the TSD allows for a risk-based OSA to be written. These risk-based assessments show that if a packaging does not provide the necessary safety to ensure that materials are not released (during normal or accident conditions) then the worst-case release of materials does not result in a dose consequence worse than that defined for the SRS. This paper will discuss recent challenges and successes using this methodology at the SRS.

Loftin, B.; Watkins, R.; Loibl, M.

2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

73

Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Reading contamination : an environmental education center at the Wells G&H Superfund Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes and architectural and programmatic methodology which makes legible the processes and consequences of site contamination. This methodology is chiefly demonstrated through a plan for the site which emerges ...

Berry, Rebecca Lynn, 1973-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

First Amendment to the Texas Programmatic Agreement | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecordFederal Registry CommentsOverview »FINDING OFthe Texas Programmatic

77

EA-1919: Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final EnvironmentalFinding ofFinding NoticeDraft Programmatic

78

Cost and Performance Report Accelerated Site Technology Deployment Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) Industrial Sites Project Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) source group has limited budget and is constantly searching for new technologies to reduce programmatic costs. Partnering with the DOE Office of Science and Technology Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) reduces NNSA/NV programmatic risk and encourages accelerated deployment of potentially beneficial technologies to the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

P. S. Morris

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Department of Energy`s National Environmental Policy Act implementing procedures in Volume 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1021,312, the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Implementation Plan has two primary purposes: to provide guidance for the preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and to record the issues resulting from the scoping and the extended public participation process. The Implementation Plan identifies and discusses the following: background of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities, the purpose of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, and the relationship of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement to other Departmental initiatives (Chapter 1); need and purposes for action (Chapter 2); scoping process and results of the public participation program in defining the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, including a summary of the comments received and their disposition (Chapter 3); planned scope and content of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 4); consultations with other agencies and the role of cooperating agencies (Chapter 5); planned schedule of major Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement milestones (Chapter 6); and responsibilities for preparation of the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Chapter 7).

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Draft 2012 Programmatic Review report to PPAN (October 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Draft 2012 Programmatic Review report to PPAN (October 2012) Astronomy Advisory Panel: Richard Bower (Durham University), Michael Brown (University of Manchester), Anthony Challinor (University of Cambridge), Chris Evans (STFC United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre

Crowther, Paul

83

Transportation risk assessment for the US Department of Energy Environmental Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future management of radioactive and hazardous waste at the facilities of the DOE complex. The alternatives involve facilities to be used for treatment, storage, and disposal of various wastes generated from DOE`s environmental restoration activities and waste management operation. Included in the evaluation are six types of waste (five types of radioactive waste plus hazardous waste), 49 sites, and numerous cases associated with each different alternative for waste management. In general, the alternatives are evaluated independently for each type of waste and reflect decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches. Transportation of waste materials is an integral component of the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The estimated impact on human health that is associated with various waste transportation activities is an important element leading to a complete appraisal of the alternatives. The transportation risk assessment performed for the EM PEIS is designed to ensure -- through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions -- that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful and consistent.

Chen, S.Y.; Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Lazaro, M.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Site Observational Work Plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Shiprock, New Mexico. Revision  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is one of the first documents for developing an approach for achieving ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies Shiprock site information to a regulatory compliance framework, which identifies strategies for meeting ground water compliance at the site. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA ground water programmatic environmental impact statement.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Accelerator Production of Tritium Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Input Submittal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Tritium Supply and Recycling considers several methods for the production of tritium. One of these methods is the Accelerator Production of Tritium. This report summarizes the design characteristics of APT including the accelerator, target/blanket, tritium extraction facility, and the balance of plant. Two spallation targets are considered: (1) a tungsten neutron-source target and (2) a lead neutron-source target. In the tungsten target concept, the neutrons are captured by the circulating He-3, thus producing tritium; in the lead target concept, the tritium is produced by neutron capture by Li-6 in a surrounding lithium-aluminum blanket. This report also provides information to support the PEIS including construction and operational resource needs, waste generation, and potential routine and accidental releases of radioactive material. The focus of the report is on the impacts of a facility that will produce 3/8th of the baseline goal of tritium. However, some information is provided on the impacts of APT facilities that would produce smaller quantities.

Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Greene, G.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Boyack, B.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Controlled Speed Accessory Drive Program: Programmatic environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a programmatic environmental assessment of the Department of Energy's Controlled Speed Accessory Drive (CSAD) program and alternatives. Its purpose is to evaluate CSAD alternatives to assure that environmental priorities are considered at the earliest meaningful point in the decision-making process, and to facilitate the choice of preferable options. This document accords with both the letter and the spirit of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requirements as interpreted and standardized by the Council on Environmental Quality. The major conclusions reached in this assessment are as follows: (1) controlled speed accessory drive bolted onto existing automobile designs may not provide adequate engine cooling when operated at high ambient temperatures or under heavy loading; (2) when the CSAD is adopted for production, the emissions effect of controlled speed accessory drive will not be a problem. Auto emissions are already controlled by existing regulations, and automobiles with a CSAD must meet the same emission standards as non-CSAD vehicles; (3) the nature of the impact is such that significant expansion of the market will not affect it. The one adverse environmental concern, the engine cooling problem, will probably be remedied by proper optimization of automobiles for controlled speed accessory drive, or, until the problem can be alleviated, it will delay commercialization of the drive. No safety hazard will be introduced to the American roadways. In addition, no adverse environmental concerns directly related to the Controlled Speed Accessory Drive demonstration program are anticipated. Therefore, it is recommended that a finding of no significant impact be prepared.

Not Available

1980-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

EA-1123: Transfer of Normal and Low-Enriched Uranium Billets to the United Kingdom, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to transfer approximately 710,000 kilograms (1,562,000 pounds) of unneeded normal and low-enriched uranium to the United Kingdom; thus,...

88

Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspects of siting OTEC plants offshore the United States ongas. phosgene Offshore ammonia plant-ships will presentan facility offshore may expose the plant to power outages

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

EIS-0203F; DOE Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

as requiring no further action. Sources of contamination include spills, abandoned tanks, septic systems, percolation ponds, landfills, and injection wells. Contaminated sites...

91

EIS-0236-S4: Final Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Complex Transformation Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (SPEIS) analyzes the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives to continue transformation of the nuclear weapons complex to be smaller, and more responsive, efficient, and secure in order to meet national security requirements.

92

EIS-0189: Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), Richland, WA (Programmatic)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental impact statement evaluates the Department of Energy (DOE)'s, in cooperation with the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), decisions on how to properly manage and dispose of Hanford Site tank waste and encapsulated cesium and strontium to reduce existing and potential future risk to the public, Site workers, and the environment. The waste includes radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste currently stored in 177 underground storage tanks, approximately 60 other smaller active and inactive miscellaneous underground storage tanks (MUSTs), and additional Site waste likely to be added to the tank waste, which is part of the tank farm system. In addition, DOE proposes to manage and dispose of approximately 1,930 cesium and strontium capsules that are by-products of tank waste. The tank waste and capsules are located in the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington.

93

Controlled Assembly of Heterobinuclear Sites on Mesoporous Silica: Visible Light Charge-Transfer Units with Selectable Redox Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mild synthetic methods are demonstrated for the selective assembly of oxo-bridged heterobinuclear units of the type TiOCrIII, TiOCoII, and TiOCeIII on mesoporous silica support MCM-41. One method takes advantage of the higher acidity and, hence, higher reactivity of titanol compared to silanol OH groups towards CeIII or CoII precursor. The procedure avoids the customary use of strong base. The controlled assembly of the TiOCr system exploits the selective redox reactivity of one metal towards another (TiIII precursor reacting with anchored CrVI centers). The observed selectivity for linking a metal precursor to an already anchored partner versus formation of isolated centers ranges from a factor of six (TiOCe) to complete (TiOCr, TiOCo). Evidence for oxo bridges and determination of the coordination environment of each metal centers is based on K-edge EXAFS (TiOCr), L-edge absorption spectroscopy (Ce), and XANES measurements (Co, Cr). EPR, optical, FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy furnish additional details on oxidation state and coordination environment of donor and acceptor metal centers. In the case of TiOCr, the integrity of the anchored group upon calcination (350 oC) and cycling of the Cr oxidation state is demonstrated. The binuclear units possess metal-to-metal charge-transfer transitions that absorb deep in the visible region. The flexible synthetic method for assembling the units opens up the use of visible light charge transfer pumps featuring donor or acceptor metals with selectable redox potential.

Frei, Heinz; Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

94

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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95

Idaho State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S. Department-2023 Idaho National2 DOEIdaho Site Idaho

96

Environmental Assessment for the Transfer of 1100 AREA, Southern Rail Connection and Rolling Stock, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess potential environmental impacts associated with the U.S. Department of Energy's proposed action: the transfer of the 1100 Area, southern rail connection and rolling stock to a non-federal entity. Impact information contained herein will be used by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Manager, to determine if the proposed action is a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment. If the proposed action is determined to be major and significant, an environmental impact statement will be prepared. If the proposed action is determined not to be major and significant, a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) will be issued and the action can proceed. Criteria used to evaluate significance can be found in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1508.27. This EA was prepared in compliance with the ''National Environmental Policy Act'' (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the U.S. Department of Energy Implementing Procedures for NEPA (10 CFR 1021). The following is a description of each section of the EA. (1) Purpose and Need for Action. This provides a brief statement concerning the problem or opportunity the U.S. Department of Energy is addressing with the proposed action. As necessary, background information is provided. (2) Description of the Proposed Action. A description with sufficient detail to identify potential environmental impacts is provided. (3) Alternatives to the Proposed Action. Reasonable alternative actions, which would address the Purpose and Need, are described. A no action alternative, as required by 10 CFR 1021, also is described. (4) Affected Environment. This provides a brief description of the locale in which the proposed action takes place, and which may be environmentally impacted. (5) Environmental Impacts. The range of environmental impacts, beneficial and adverse, are described for the proposed action. Impacts of alternatives briefly are discussed. (6) Permits and Regulatory Requirements. A brief description of permits and regulatory requirements for the proposed action is provided. (7) Organizations Consulted. Any outside agencies, groups, or individuals contacted as part of environmental assessment documentation preparation are listed. (8) References. Documents used to provide information or data are listed. The appendices contain additional information necessary to support an understanding of the proposed action, alternatives, and potential impacts is provided. Comments resulting from review of the environmental assessment by states and tribes or other stakeholders and the response to those comments will be included in the appendices.

N /A

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Supplemental results of the human health risk analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy draft waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is intended as an information supplement to the human health risk analysis performed for the US Department of Energy`s Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, hereinafter called the PEIS. This report provides the installation-by-installation human health risk analysis results from which the risk estimate summaries for the PEIS were drawn. Readers should bear in mind that the risk estimates presented here are the result of a program-wide (as opposed to site-specific) study. They are based on best available data; systematically applied assumptions; and professional judgment about DOE waste inventories, waste volumes generated annually, currently available treatment and disposal technologies, technical limitations of treatment, and facility capacities across the numerous installations in the DOE complex.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

On-site profiling and speciation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at manufactured gas plant sites by a high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe coupled to a photoionization detector and gas chromatography/mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new high temperature transfer line, membrane inlet probe (HTTL-MIP) coupled to a photoionization detector (PID) and gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) was used to rapidly profile and speciate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the subsurface. PID signals were in agreement with GC/MS results. Correlation coefficients of 0.92 and 0.99 were obtained for discrete and composite samples collected from the same exact location. Continuous probe advancement with PID detection found coal tar, a dense nonaqueous phase liquid, in soil channels and saturated media. When samples were collected conventionally, split, solvent extracted, and analyzed in the field and confirmation laboratory, GC/MS measurement precision and accuracy were indistinguishable; despite the fact the field laboratory produced data five times faster than the laboratory using standard EPA methods. No false positive/negatives were found. Based on these findings, increased confidence in site conceptual models should be obtained, since PID response indicated total PAH presence/absence in 'real-time', while GC/MS provided information as to which PAH was present and at what concentration. Incorporation of this tool into a dynamic workplan will provide more data at less cost enabling environmental scientists, engineers, and regulators to better understand coal tar migration and its impact on human health and the environment. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Thomas Considine; Albert Robbat Jr. [Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States). Chemistry Department, Center for Field Analytical Studies and Technology

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Technology Solutions and Programmatic Approaches: Driving Innovation in Residential Energy Efficiency Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"Technology Solutions and Programmatic Approaches: Driving Innovation in Residential Energy Efficiency Strategies," by Kat A. Donnelly, July 11, 2012. Describes how the program relies on technology to enhance the program including a new, industry specific platform customized in collaboration with program partners. The programs including homeowners/customers, trade allies, staff, and program administrators. The tools are technology platform provides tools for the various partners involved in specifically designed to increase uptake of energy efficiency programs, as well as provide real-time tracking of impacts and other key metrics.

100

EIS-0408: DOE Notice of Availability of a Programmatic Draft Environmental  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

Assessment of transportation risk for the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In its Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering a broad range of alternatives for the future management of radioactive and hazardous waste at the facilities of the DOE complex. The alternatives involve facilities to be used for treatment, storage, and disposal of various wastes generated from DOE environmental restoration activities and waste management operations. The evaluation includes five types of waste (four types of radioactive waste plus hazardous waste), 49 sites, and numerous cases associated with each alternative for waste management. In general, the alternatives are evaluated independently for each type of waste and reflect decentralized, regionalized, and centralized approaches. Transportation of waste materials is an integral component of the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The estimated impact on human health that is associated with various waste transportation activities is an important component of a complete appraisal of the alternatives. The transportation risk assessment performed for the EM PEIS is designed to ensure through uniform and judicious selection of models, data, and assumptions that relative comparisons of risk among the various alternatives are meaningful and consistent. Among other tasks, Argonne National Laboratory is providing technical assistance to the EM PEIS on transportation risk assessment. The objective is to perform a human health risk assessment for each type of waste relative to the EM PEIS alternatives for waste management. The transportation risk assessed is part of the overall impacts being analyzed for the EM PEIS to determine the safest, most environmentally and economically sound manner in which to satisfy requirements for waste management in the coming decades.

Chen, S.Y.; Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; Lazaro, M.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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103

Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

104

EIS-0236-S2: Supplemental Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Stockpile Stewardship and Management for a Modern Pit Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE's NNSA is responsible for the safety and reliability of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile, including production readiness required to maintain that stockpile. Pursuant to National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, NNSA has prepared a Supplement to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement on: (1) whether to proceed with a Modern Pit Facility (MPF); and (2) if so, where to locate a MPF.

105

Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in e-waste: Level and transfer in a typical e-waste recycling site in Shanghai, Eastern China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste. • PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. • The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS. • The inappropriate recycling and disposal of e-waste is an important source of PBDEs. - Abstract: Very few data for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were available in the electronic waste (e-waste) as one of the most PBDEs emission source. This study reported concentrations of PBDEs in e-waste including printer, rice cooker, computer monitor, TV, electric iron and water dispenser, as well as dust from e-waste, e-waste dismantling workshop and surface soil from inside and outside of an e-waste recycling plant in Shanghai, Eastern China. The results showed that PBDEs were detected in the majority of e-waste, and the concentrations of ?PBDEs ranged from not detected to 175 g/kg, with a mean value of 10.8 g/kg. PBDEs were found in TVs made in China after 1990. The mean concentrations of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Korea, Japan, Singapore and China were 1.84 g/kg, 20.5 g/kg, 0.91 g/kg, 4.48 g/kg, respectively. The levels of ?PBDEs in e-waste made in Japan far exceed the threshold limit of RoHS (1.00 g/kg). BDE-209 dominated in e-waste, accounting for over 93%. The compositional patterns of PBDEs congeners resembled the profile of Saytex 102E, indicating the source of deca-BDE. Among the samples of dust and surface soil from a typical e-waste recycling site, the highest concentrations of ?{sub 18}PBDEs and BDE-209 were found in dust in e-waste, ranging from 1960 to 340,710 ng/g and from 910 to 320,400 ng/g, which were 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than other samples. It suggested that PBDEs released from e-waste via dust, and then transferred to surrounding environment.

Li, Yue; Duan, Yan-Ping, E-mail: duanyanping@tongji.edu.cn; Huang, Fan; Yang, Jing; Xiang, Nan; Meng, Xiang-Zhou; Chen, Ling

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A compendium of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system and recent programmatic changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, usually plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with 10 CFR 71 (1994). To meet these regulatory requirements, US DOE commissioned Westinghouse Hanford Co. in 1988 to develop a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) that would fully comply while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal transport conditions (eg, mainly shock and heat). RTGTS is scheduled for completion Dec. 1996 and will be available to support NASA`s Cassini mission to Saturn in Oct. 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS project, discusses the hardware being produced, and summarizes various programmatic and management innovations required by recent changes at DOE.

Becker, D.L.; McCoy, J.C.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EIS-0481: Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Draft PEIS: Public Comment Period Ends 03/17/15This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHEC). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

108

EIS-0481: Test Engineered High Energy Crop Programs Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, Southeastern United States  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Programmatic EIS (PEIS) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of implementing one or more programs to catalyze the deployment of engineered high energy crops (EHECs). A main component of the proposed EHEC programs would be providing financial assistance to funding recipients, such as research institutions, independent contract growers, or commercial entities, for field trials to evaluate the performance of EHECs. Confined field trials may range in size and could include development-scale (up to 5 acres), pilot-scale (up to 250 acres), or demonstration-scale (up to 15,000 acres). This PEIS will assess the potential environmental impacts of such confined field trials in the southeastern United States. DOE’s proposed action under this PEIS will be limited to the states of Alabama, Florida (excluding the Everglades/Southern Florida coastal plain ecoregion), Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia.

109

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) was prepared for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). This PElS provides an analysis of the potential impacts of the alternatives and ground water compliance strategies as well as potential cumulative impacts. On November 8, 1978, Congress enacted the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, Public Law, codified at 42 USC §7901 et seq. Congress found that uranium mill tailings " ... may pose a potential and significant radiation health hazard to the public, and that every reasonable effort should be made to provide for stabilization, disposal, and control in a safe, and environmentally sound manner of such tailings in order to prevent or minimize other environmental hazards from such tailings." Congress authorized the Secretary of Energy to designate inactive uranium processing sites for remedial action by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Congress also directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set the standards to be followed by the DOE for this process of stabilization, disposal, and control. On January 5, 1983, EPA published standards (40 CFR Part 192) for the disposal and cleanup of residual radioactive materials. On September 3, 1985, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit set aside and remanded to EPA the ground water provisions of the standards. The EPA proposed new standards to replace remanded sections and changed other sections of 40 CFR Part 192. These proposed standards were published in the Federal Register on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 36000). Section 108 of the UMTRCA requires that DOE comply with EPA's proposed standards in the absence of final standards. The Ground Water Project was planned under the proposed standards. On January 11, 1995, EPA published the final rule, with which the DOE must now comply. The PElS and the Ground Water Project are in accordance with the final standards. The EPA reserves the right to modify the ground water standards, if necessary, based on changes in EPA drinking water standards. Appendix A contains a copy of the 1983 EPA ground water compliance standards, the 1987 proposed changes to the standards, and the 1995 final rule. Under UMTRA, DOE is responsible for bringing the designated processing sites into compliance with the EPA ground water standards and complying with all other applicable standards and requirements. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) must concur with DOE's actions. States are full participants in the process. The DOE also must consult with any affected Indian tribes and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Uranium processing activities at most of the inactive mill sites resulted in the contamination of ground water beneath and, in some cases, downgradient of the sites. This contaminated ground water often has elevated levels of constituents such as but not limited to uranium and nitrates. The purpose of the UMTRA Ground Water Project is to eliminate or reduce to acceptable levels the potential health and environmental consequences of milling activities by meeting the EPA ground water standards.

None

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

FROM PROPERTY LEASE TO PROPERTY TRANSFER - TAKING THE STEPS TO FACILITATE SITE CLOSURE USING THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY'S 10 CFR 770 PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While implementing a successful leasing program for land and facilities at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Operations Office in Oak Ridge, TN, the Department is now transitioning from a leasing program to one of title transfer. The program, called ''Reindustrialization'', is the result of a visionary idea to enable the use of excess resources to meet a community's needs in the wake of continued DOE downsizing. An established process included within the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, tailored to meet DOE-ORO's objectives, was used to lease. Title transfer, using DOE's new 10 CFR 770 process, is being undertaken to meet a DOE-HQs directive to close the ORO facility where Reindustrialization is taking place. Title transfer is a key component of the closure effort. However, the process for title transfer is new, it is a DOE process, and it has not yet been completed for any facilities in the DOE complex. Making the transition from a known to an unknown has created opportunities in program design, as well as implementation, coordination and acceptance challenges in a variety of areas, and a host of lessons learned and learning.

Cusick, Lesley T.; Hart, Patricia W.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Environmental settings for selected US Department of Energy installations - support information for the programmatic environmental impact statement and the baseline environmental management report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the environmental setting information developed for 25 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) installations in support of the DOE`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Study (PEIS) and the Baseline Environmental Management Report (BEMR). The common objective of the PEIS and the BEMR is to provide the public with information about the environmental contamination problems associated with major DOE facilities across the country, and to assess the relative risks that radiological and hazardous contaminants pose to the public, onsite workers, and the environment. Environmental setting information consists of the site-specific data required to model (using the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System) the atmospheric, groundwater, and surface water transport of contaminants within and near the boundaries of the installations. The environmental settings data describes the climate, atmospheric dispersion, hydrogeology, and surface water characteristics of the installations. The number of discrete environmental settings established for each installation was governed by two competing requirements: (1) the risks posed by contaminants released from numerous waste sites were to be modeled as accurately as possible, and (2) the modeling required for numerous release sites and a large number of contaminants had to be completed within the limits imposed by the PEIS and BEMR schedule. The final product is the result of attempts to balance these competing concerns in a way that minimizes the number of settings per installation in order to meet the project schedule while at the same, time providing adequate, if sometimes highly simplified, representations of the different areas within an installation. Environmental settings were developed in conjunction with installation experts in the fields of meteorology, geology, hydrology, and geochemistry.

Holdren, G.R.; Glantz, C.S.; Berg, L.K.; Delinger, K.; Fosmire, C.J.; Goodwin, S.M.; Rustad, J.R.; Schalla, R.; Schramke, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Office of Enterprise Assessments Review of the Hanford Site Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis, Revision 00 - April 2015  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment of Energy(National1 -OSSGasofOfficeKathleen Hanford Site

115

Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Riverton, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Riverton, Wyoming, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the first document for the UMTRA Ground Water Project to address site-specific activities to meet compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed ground water standards (52 FR 36000 (1987)). In support of the activities the regulatory framework and drivers are presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. A combination of the two compliance strategies that will be recommended for this site are no remediation with the application of alternate concentration levels (ACL) and natural flushing in conjunction with institutional controls. ACLs are to be applied to constituents that occur at concentrations above background levels but which are essential nutrients and occur within nutritional ranges and/or have very low toxicity and high dietary intake rates compared to the levels detected in the ground water. The essential premise of natural flushing is that ground water movement and natural attenuation processes will reduce the detected contamination to background levels within 1 00 years. These two recommended compliance strategies were evaluated by applying Riverton site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement. There are three aquifers beneath the site: a surficial unconfined aquifer, a middle semiconfined aquifer, and a deeper confined aquifer. The milling-related contamination at the site has affected both the surficial and semiconfined aquifers, although the leaky shale aquifers separating these units limits the downward migration of contamination into the semiconfined aquifer. A shale aquitard separates the semiconfined aquifer from the underlying confined aquifer which has not been contaminated by milling-related constituents.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CPP-603 Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) has been constructed to describe the activities required for the relocation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from the CPP-603 facility. These activities are the only Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) actions identified in the Implementation Plan developed to meet the requirements of the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 to the Secretary of Energy regarding an improved schedule for remediation in the Defense Nuclear Facilities Complex. As described in the DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Implementation Plan, issued February 28, 1995, an INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan is currently under development to direct the placement of SNF currently in existing INEL facilities into interim storage, and to address the coordination of intrasite SNF movements with new receipts and intersite transfers that were identified in the DOE SNF Programmatic and INEL Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Record, of Decision. This SISMP will be a subset of the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and the activities described are being coordinated with other INEL SNF management activities. The CPP-603 relocation activities have been assigned a high priority so that established milestones will be meet, but there will be some cases where other activities will take precedence in utilization of available resources. The Draft INEL Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP), INEL-94/0279, Draft Rev. 2, dated March 10, 1995, is being superseded by the INEL Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Plan and this CPP-603 specific SISMP.

Denney, R.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Shiprock, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Shiprock, New Mexico, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Site is the initial document for developing site-specific activities to achieve regulatory compliance in the UMTRA Ground Water Project. The regulatory framework used to select the proposed ground water compliance strategies is presented along with a discussion of the relationship of this SOWP to other UMTRA Ground Water Project programmatic documents. The Shiprock site consists of two, interconnected hydrogeologic systems: the terrace system and the floodplain system. Separate compliance strategies are proposed for these two systems. The compliance strategy for the terrace aquifer is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards based on classification of the terrace aquifer as having Class III (limited-use) ground water. The compliance strategy for the floodplain aquifer is active remediation using a subsurface biological barrier. These strategies were selected by applying site-specific data to the compliance framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) (DOE, 1994a). The site conceptual model indicates that milling-related contamination has impacted the ground water in the terrace and floodplain aquifers. Ground water occurs in both aquifers in alluvium and in fractures in the underlying Cretaceous age Mancos Shale. A mound of ground water related to fluids from the milling operations is thought to exist in the terrace aquifer below the area where settling ponds were in use during the mill operations. Most of the water occurring in the floodplain aquifer is from recharge from the San Juan River.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

have spotted. Drug addiction can be treated and abstinence achieved, and with a programmatic approach to maintaining abstinence, the illness is ar-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

have spotted. Drug addiction can be treated and abstinence achieved, and with a programmatic to treat a specific problem. This knowledge can assist the employee in making an informed choice from a list of ap- proved providers. If a managed care referral is made to a therapist to treat a problem

Kim, Duck O.

120

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project Site at Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this initial site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site in Grand Junction, Colorado. This SOWP is one of the first UMTRA Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards (40 CFR Part 192, as amended by 60 FR 2854) for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS). This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The DOE goal is to use the observational method to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation based on the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA project site at Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This site observational work plan (SOWP) is one of the first Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project documents developed to select a compliance strategy that meets the UMTRA ground water standards for the Grand Junction site. This SOWP applies information about the Grand Junction site to the compliance strategy selection framework developed in the UMTRA Ground Water Project draft programmatic environmental impact statement. This risk-based, decision-making framework identifies the decision logic for selecting compliance strategies that could be used to meet the ground water standards. The US Department of Energy (DOE) goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. Based on an evaluation of the site characterization and risk assessment data available for the preparation of this SOWP, DOE proposes that the most likely compliance strategy for the Grand Junction site is no remediation with the application of supplemental standards. This proposed strategy is based on a conceptual site model that indicates site-related contamination is confined to a limited-use aquifer as defined in the ground water standards. The conceptual model demonstrates that the uranium processing-related contamination at the site has affected the unconfined alluvial aquifer, but not the deeper confined aquifer.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

File:Amending LUPs with Programmatic EISs 2.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublicIDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf Jump to:TXATransmissionSiting.pdfCappFS.pdfsource History View New Pages

123

Waste Feed Delivery Transfer System Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a documented basis for the required design pressure rating and pump pressure capacity of the Hanford Site waste-transfer system in support of the waste feed delivery to the privatization contractor for vitrification. The scope of the analysis includes the 200 East Area double-shell tank waste transfer pipeline system and the associated transfer system pumps for a11 Phase 1B and Phase 2 waste transfers from AN, AP, AW, AY, and A2 Tank Farms.

JULYK, L.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

124

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action(UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1996). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will be evaluated in the site-specific environmental assessment to determine potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholders a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee's activities to date have focused primarily on the technology transfer'' aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Final Uranium Leasing Program Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement: Volume 1, DOE/EIS-0472, March 2014  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES ANDIndustrialEnergyFinal FY 2009 NEUP RDFinal Site-Widefor(PEIS)

127

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Spook, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spook, Wyoming, site observational work plan proposes site-specific activities to achieve compliance with Subpart B of 40 CFR Part 192 (1994) of the final US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water protection standards 60 FR 2854 (1995) at this Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. This draft SOWP presents a comprehensive summary of existing site characterization data, a conceptual site model of the nature and extent of ground water contamination, exposure pathways, and potential impact to human health and the environment. Section 2.0 describes the requirements for meeting ground water standards at UMTRA Project sites. Section 3.0 defines past and current conditions, describes potential environmental and human health risks, and provides site-specific data that supports the selection of a proposed ground water compliance strategy. Section 4.0 provides the justification for selecting the proposed ground water compliance strategy based on the framework defined in the ground water programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS).

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Site observational work plan for the UMTRA Project site at Monument Valley, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site observational work plan (SOWP) for the Monument Valley, Arizona, US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site is one of the first site-specific documents developed to achieve ground water compliance at the site. This SOWP applies information about the Monument Valley site to a regulatory compliance framework that identifies strategies that could be used to meet ground water compliance. The compliance framework was developed in the UMTRA Ground Water programmatic environmental impact statement (DOE, 1995). The DOE`s goal is to implement a cost-effective site strategy that complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ground water standards and protects human health and the environment. The compliance strategy that emerges in the final version of the SOWP will assess potential environmental impacts and provide stakeholder a forum for review and comment. When the compliance strategy is acceptable, it will be detailed in a remedial action plan that will be subject to review by the state and/or tribe and concurrence by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Information available for the preparation of this SOWP indicates active remediation is the most likely compliance strategy for the Monument Valley site. Additional data are needed to determine the most effective remediation technology.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Final programmatic environmental impact statement for the uranium mill tailings remedial action ground water project. Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the programmatic environmental impact statement (PElS) is a comment and response document; it is the collection of the comments received on the draft PElS. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) response to each comment is provided after each comment. If the comment resulted in a change to the PElS, the affected section number of the PElS is provided in the response. Comments 1 through 259 were received at public hearings. The name of the hearing at which the comment was received is listed after each comment. Comments were recorded on flip charts and by notetakers. DOE representatives were present to hear the comments and respond to them. The DOE's written response is provided after each comment. Comments 260 through 576 were received in writing at the hearings, and from various federal, tribal, and state agencies and from individuals during the public comment period. Copies of the written comments follow the comments and responses.

none,

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Financial services FY 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.10.4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the signed Financial Service fiscal year 1995 Site Support Program Plan, Work Breakdown Structure 6.10.4, for the Hanford site. This plan is intended to enable the contractor to accomplish the following: ensure financial integrity in all Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) operation while supporting the programmatic activities of WHC, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, and other Hanford contractors; provide efficient and effective financial services, and value added audits and review that enable management to enhance future operational results.

Vodney, E.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Site Feeds - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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132

Site Screening, Site Selection,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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133

Washington Wildlife Mitigation Projects : Final Programmatic Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the portion of the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement (Agreement) pertaining to wildlife habitat mitigation projects to be undertaken in a cooperative effort with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW). This Agreement serves to establish a monetary budget funded by BPA for projects proposed by Washington Wildlife Coalition members and approved by BPA to protect, mitigate, and improve wildlife and/or wildlife habitat within the State of Washington that has been affected by the construction of Federal dams along the Columbia River. This Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and/or improving wildlife habitat within five different project areas. These project areas are located throughout Grant County and in parts of Okanogan, Douglas, Adams, Franklin, Kittias, Yakima, and Benton Counties. The multiple projects would involve varying combinations of five proposed site-specific activities (habitat improvement, operation and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, access and recreation management, and cultural resource management). All required Federal, State, and tribal coordination, permits and/or approvals would be obtained prior to ground-disturbing activities.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

135

Notice of Inquiry: Technology Transfer Practices at Department...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST AND EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT - ACADEMIC AFFAIRS OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER 1111 Franklin Street, 5 th Floor Oakland, California 94607-5200 Web Site:...

136

Data Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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137

Transferring Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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138

Transferring Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer

139

TRACKING SITE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

140

Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer (PCET) describes reactions in which there is a change in both electron and proton content between reactants and products. It originates from the influence of changes in electron content on acid?base properties and provides a molecular-level basis for energy transduction between proton transfer and electron transfer. Coupled electron?proton transfer or EPT is defined as an elementary step in which electrons and protons transfer from different orbitals on the donor to different orbitals on the acceptor. There is (usually) a clear distinction between EPT and H-atom transfer (HAT) or hydride transfer, in which the transferring electrons and proton come from the same bond. Hybrid mechanisms exist in which the elementary steps are different for the reaction partners. EPT pathways such as PhO•/PhOH exchange have much in common with HAT pathways in that electronic coupling is significant, comparable to the reorganization energy with H{sub DA} ~ ?. Multiple-Site Electron?Proton Transfer (MS-EPT) is an elementary step in which an electron?proton donor transfers electrons and protons to different acceptors, or an electron?proton acceptor accepts electrons and protons from different donors. It exploits the long-range nature of electron transfer while providing for the short-range nature of proton transfer. A variety of EPT pathways exist, creating a taxonomy based on what is transferred, e.g., 1e{sup -}/2H{sup +} MS-EPT. PCET achieves “redox potential leveling” between sequential couples and the buildup of multiple redox equivalents, which is of importance in multielectron catalysis. There are many examples of PCET and pH-dependent redox behavior in metal complexes, in organic and biological molecules, in excited states, and on surfaces. Changes in pH can be used to induce electron transfer through films and over long distances in molecules. Changes in pH, induced by local electron transfer, create pH gradients and a driving force for long-range proton transfer in Photosysem II and through other biological membranes. In EPT, simultaneous transfer of electrons and protons occurs on time scales short compared to the periods of coupled vibrations and solvent modes. A theory for EPT has been developed which rationalizes rate constants and activation barriers, includes temperature- and driving force (?G)-dependences implicitly, and explains kinetic isotope effects. The distance-dependence of EPT is dominated by the short-range nature of proton transfer, with electron transfer being far less demanding.Changes in external pH do not affect an EPT elementary step. Solvent molecules or buffer components can act as proton donor acceptors, but individual H2O molecules are neither good bases (pK{sub a}(H{sub 3}O{sup +}) = ?1.74) nor good acids (pK{sub a}(H{sub 2}O) = 15.7). There are many examples of mechanisms in chemistry, in biology, on surfaces, and in the gas phase which utilize EPT. PCET and EPT play critical roles in the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of Photosystem II and other biological reactions by decreasing driving force and avoiding high-energy intermediates.

Weinberg, Dave; Gagliardi, Christopher J.; Hull, Jonathan F; Murphy, Christine Fecenko; Kent, Caleb A.; Westlake, Brittany C.; Paul, Amit; Ess, Daniel H; McCafferty, Dewey Granville; Meyer, Thomas J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Programmatic Biological Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1990. A field guide to western birds. Third edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, Massachusetts. 432 pp. Phillips, A.R. 1948. Geographic variation in Empidonax traillii....

142

Programmatic Biological Assessment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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143

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT AMONG  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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144

for Achieving Programmatic Savings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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145

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 2, Sections 1-6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains the analysis of programmatic alternatives, project alternatives, affected environment of alternative sites, environmental consequences, and environmental regulations and permit requirements.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for managing treatment, storage, and disposal of radioactive and hazardous waste. Volume 3, Appendix A: Public response to revised NOI, Appendix B: Environmental restoration, Appendix C, Environmental impact analysis methods, Appendix D, Risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume three contains appendices for the following: Public comments do DOE`s proposed revisions to the scope of the waste management programmatic environmental impact statement; Environmental restoration sensitivity analysis; Environmental impacts analysis methods; and Waste management facility human health risk estimates.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites. Final [report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC`s acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Accident analysis for the low-level mixed waste ``No-Flame`` option in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper outlines the various steps pursued in performing a generic safety assessment of the various technologies considered for the low-level mixed waste (LLMW) ``No-Flame`` option in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The treatment technologies for the ``No-Flame`` option differ from previous LLMW technologies analyzed in the WM PEIS in that the incineration and thermal desorption technologies are replaced by sludge washing, soil washing, debris washing, and organic destruction. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios were selected for analysis by means of a screening process. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Kohout, E.; Mueller, C.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Wilkins, B. [Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States); Mishima, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2008 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2008 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress transfer authorities established by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

Perkins, Richard A.

150

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department's future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An overview of treatment and characterization technologies for environmental remediation at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has the responsibility to remediate waste sites and groundwater to standards as determined by Federal and State Authorities. This mission requires that certain programmatic interfaces within the ERD, Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC, formerly Savannah River Laboratory (SRL)), the Department of Energy Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Office of Technology Development (OTD), and outside commercial contractors be utilized to ensure cost-effective remediation technologies are utilized. This paper provides a synopsis of a select cross-section of the treatment and characterization technologies currently being pursued by ERD. Environmental Restoration Technology (ERT) Department`s future role in providing the necessary technologies for waste sites and groundwater remediation is also discussed.

Holt, D.L.; Butcher, B.T.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lessons learned -- a comparison of the proposed on-site waste management facilities at the various Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Sites (DOE) are faced with the challenge of managing several categories of waste generated from past or future cleanup activities, such as 11(e)2 byproduct material, low-level radioactive (LL), low-level radioactive mixed (LLM), transuranic (TRU), high level radioactive (HL), and hazardous waste (HW). DOE must ensure safe and efficient management of these wastes while complying with all applicable federal and state laws. Proposed waste management strategies for the EM-40 Environmental Restoration (ER) program at these sites indicate that on-site disposal is becoming a viable option. For purposes of this paper, on-site disposal cells managed by the EM-40 program at Hanford, Weldon Spring, Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) and Rocky Flats were compared. Programmatic aspects and design features were evaluated to determine what comparisons can be made, and to identify benefits lessons learned that may be applicable to other sites. Based on comparative analysis, it can be concluded that the DOE EM-40 disposal cells are very unique. Stakeholders played a major role in the decision to locate the various DOE on-site disposal facilities. The disposal cells will be used to manage 11(e)2 by-product materials, LL, LLM, and/or HLW. The analysis further suggests that the design criteria are comparable. Lessons learned relative to the public involvement activities at Weldon Spring, and the design approach at Hanford should be considered when planning future on-site disposal facilities at DOE sites. Further, a detailed analysis of progress made at Hanford should be evaluated for application at sites such as Rocky Flats that are currently planning on-site disposal facilities.

Ciocco, J. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Singh, D. [Booz Allen and Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States); Survochak, S. [DOE RFETS, Golden, CO (United States); Elo, M. [Burns and Roe, Germantown, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring - Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure - 13060  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs. (authors)

Wilborn, Bill; Knapp, Kathryn [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Intera (United States)] [Navarro-Intera (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Wilborn, Bill [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States); Farnham, Irene [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Marutzky, Sam [Navarro-Interra LLC, Las Vegas (United States); Knapp, Kathryn [NNSA/NFO, Nevada Site Office (United States)

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

155

Geothermal: Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011Programmatic ReportsContactRelated

156

Idaho National Laboratory Site Pollution Prevention Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is the policy of the Department of Energy (DOE) that pollution prevention and sustainable environmental stewardship will be integrated into DOE operations as a good business practice to reduce environmental hazards, protect environmental resources, avoid pollution control costs, and improve operational efficiency and mission sustainability. In furtherance of this policy, DOE established five strategic, performance-based Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sustainable Environmental Stewardship goals and included them as an attachment to DOE O 450.1, Environmental Protection Program. These goals and accompanying strategies are to be implemented by DOE sites through the integration of Pollution Prevention into each site's Environmental Management System (EMS). This document presents a P2 and Sustainability Program and corresponding plan pursuant to DOE Order 450.1 and DOE O 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. This plan is also required by the state of Idaho, pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) partial permit. The objective of this document is to describe the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site P2 and Sustainability Program. The purpose of the program is to decrease the environmental footprint of the INL Site while providing enhanced support of its mission. The success of the program is dependent on financial and management support. The signatures on the previous page indicate INL, ICP, and AMWTP Contractor management support and dedication to the program. P2 requirements have been integrated into working procedures to ensure an effective EMS as part of an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS). This plan focuses on programmatic functions which include environmentally preferable procurement, sustainable design, P2 and Sustainability awareness, waste generation and reduction, source reduction and recycling, energy management, and pollution prevention opportunity assessments. The INL Site P2 and Sustainability Program is administratively managed by the INL Site P2 Coordinator. Development and maintenance of this overall INL Site plan is ultimately the responsibility of DOE-ID. This plan is applicable to all INL Site contractors except those at the Naval Reactors Facility.

E. D. Sellers

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public Tours Hanford Site

158

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. The U-235 atoms are ionized when precisely tuned laser light -- of appropriate power, spectral, and temporal characteristics -- illuminates the uranium vapor and selectively photoionizes the U-235 isotope. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE site to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. 65 refs., 15 tabs.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Yuen, C.R.; Cleland, J.H. (ed.)

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Untitled Page -- Considered Sites Summary  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou are here Home » Sites » Sites Pending Transfer

160

HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

Lenert, Andrej

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

INL Technology Transfer  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Through collaboration with industry partners, INL's Technology Deployment office makes available to American agencies and international organizations unique...

162

Heat Transfer Guest Editorial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer Guest Editorial We are indeed delighted in bringing out this special issue was showcased in diverse areas such as traditional heat and mass transfer, lab-on-chip, sensors, biomedical applica- tions, micromixers, fuel cells, and microdevices. Selected papers in the field of heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

163

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2007 Prepared by: National Institute to present to the President and the Congress this Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Report summarizing the achievements of Federal technology transfer and partnering programs of the Federal research and development

Perkins, Richard A.

164

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Fiscal Year 2009 Prepared by: National Institute to submit this fiscal year 2009 Technology Transfer Summary Report to the President and the Congress in accordance with 15 USC Sec 3710(g)(2) for an annual summary on the implementation of technology transfer

Perkins, Richard A.

165

ENHANCING THE TRANSFER STUDENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efforts #12;Who Are Ohio State Transfer Students? #12;TRANSFER PROFILE DatafromSU12,AU12,SP13 3 as NFYS: 576 Average Transfer Hours of Enrolled Student: 52.2 Living on Campus: 470 Total # Sending Expectations (time management skills, balancing a more rigorous course load, study skills) 13.24% Majors (how

166

Heat transfer in proteinwater interfaces Anders Lervik,ab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer in protein­water interfaces Anders Lervik,ab Fernando Bresme,*ac Signe Kjelstrup of the heat diffusion equation we compute the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of the proteins by about 4 nm.4 It is expected that the energy transfer between these sites may involve the concerted

Kjelstrup, Signe

167

The second iteration of the Systems Prioritization Method: A systems prioritization and decision-aiding tool for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Volume 3, Analysis for final programmatic recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Systems Prioritization Method (SPM) is a decision-aiding tool developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the US DOE Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO). This tool provides an analytical basis for programmatic decision making for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). SPM integrates decision-analysis techniques, performance,a nd risk-assessment tools, and advanced information technology. Potential outcomes of proposed activities and combination of activities are used to calculate a probability of demonstrating compliance (PDC) with selected regulations. The results are presented in a decision matrix showing cost, duration, and maximum PDC for all activities in a given cost and duration category. This is the third and final volume in the series which presents the analysis for final programmatic recommendations.

Prindle, N.H.; Boak, D.M.; Weiner, R.F. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

McGuire, Joseph C. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Heat transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

Not Available

1980-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Integrated Stabilization Management Plan (SISMP) was developed in support of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 94-1 Integrated Program Plan (IPP). Volume 1 of the SISMP identifies the technical scope and costs associated with Hanford Site plans to resolve concerns identified in DNFSB Recommendation 94-1. Volume 2 of the SISMP provides the Resource Loaded Integrated Schedules for Spent Nuclear Fuel Project and Plutonium Finishing Plant activities identified in Volume 1 of the SISMP. Appendix A provides the schedules and progress curves related to spent nuclear fuel management. Appendix B provides the schedules and progress curves related to plutonium-bearing material management. Appendix C provides programmatic logic diagrams that were referenced in Volume 1 of the SISMP.

Gerber, E.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

B. Gorpani

2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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173

Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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174

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery:Act-funded KPER TV14 WhiteShimkus CongressmanSite

175

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywoodroadship Shipping Mixed,sites 212R

176

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpgcommunity200 Wlocalplywoodroadship Shipping Mixed,sites

177

Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's | HTML |

178

Sacandaga Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga Site Certification tp2ket

179

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visit EdBoard3

180

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite visitARRA

182

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSite

183

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTF PRCGrip Get aSiteSubcontract for

184

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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185

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTFIrrigationBasin Waste Site

186

Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Bigfront.jpg Gallery: VPPDR ReactorFFTFIrrigationBasin Waste SiteReactor

187

MOX Lead Assembly Fabrication at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced its intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on the disposition of the nations weapon-usable surplus plutonium.This EIS is tiered from the Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Material Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement issued in December 1996,and the associated Record of Decision issued on January, 1997. The EIS will examine reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition. The three types of facilities are: a pit disassembly and conversion facility, a facility to immobilize surplus plutonium in a glass or ceramic form for disposition, and a facility to fabricate plutonium oxide into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.As an integral part of the surplus plutonium program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition(MD) as the technical lead to organize and evaluate existing facilities in the DOE complex which may meet MD`s need for a domestic MOX fuel fabrication demonstration facility. The Lead Assembly (LA) facility is to produce 1 MT of usable test fuel per year for three years. The Savannah River Site (SRS) as the only operating plutonium processing site in the DOE complex, proposes two options to carry out the fabrication of MOX fuel lead test assemblies: an all Category I facility option and a combined Category I and non-Category I facilities option.

Geddes, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Spiker, D.L.; Poon, A.P.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Wil Lewis, editor

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Environmental Assessment for the new sanitary sludge land application sites at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Action is necessary to allow the Savannah River Site (SRS) to provide for efficient disposal of sanitary sludge for SRS as forecast by the latest site projections (WSRC, 1991) and modified by the latest US Department of Energy (DOE) planning guidance for SRS (Stello, 1993). From 1986 to 1992, sanitary wastewater sludge was applied on SRS lands in accordance with a South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) permit as part of the reclamation of SRS`s F- and H-Area borrow pits (disturbed land). This reclamation is essentially complete and, if land disposal of sludge is to continue, new land application sites on SRS must be selected as the extended permit for applying sludge to the borrow pits expired in 1992. Currently, sludge is being trucked offsite for disposal by a subcontractor to a Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW) near Augusta, Georgia (WSRC, 1992a). This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared by DOE to assess the potential environmental impacts of onsite land disposal of treated sanitary sewage sludge from SRS. The proposed action is to replace the present offsite disposal of the treated sanitary sludge from existing SRS wastewater treatment plants with onsite reuse through land application. The proposed action is independent of SRS production operations and is necessary for more efficient disposal of SRS sanitary sludge at lower costs. The proposed land application at SRS is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) ``No Action`` alternative (DOE, 1991). The sludge from SRS sanitary wastewater treatment plants is nonhazardous. Onsite disposal of this sludge allows SRS to comply with current DOE policies to keep any DOE wastes onsite where possible and to eliminate any potential accidents due to continuing offsite transportation of sanitary wastes (DOE, 1990a).

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fuel transfer system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

HIGEE Mass Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGEE MASS TRANSFER R.J. Mohr and R. Fowler GLITSCH, INC. Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Distillation, absorption, and gas stripping have traditionally been performed in tall columns utilizing trays or packing. Columns perform satisfactorily... transfer system which utilizes a rotating bed of packing to achieve high efficiency separations, and consequent reduction in size and weight. INTRODUCTION HIGEE is probably one of the most interesting developments in mass transfer equipment made...

Mohr, R. J.; Fowler, R.

193

Drart environmental impact statement siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 4, Appendices D-R  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains 15 appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium enrichment in the United States has utilized a diffusion process to preferentially enrich the U-235 isotope in the uranium product. In the 1970s, the US Department of Energy (DOE) began investigating more efficient and cost-effective enrichment technologies. In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. Initial facility operation is anticipated for 1999. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate a U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts. The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. The final evaluation, which included sensitivity studies, identified the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP) site, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) site, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) site as having significant advantages over the other sites considered. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the PORTS site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). This report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during site visits. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use. Socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3.

Marmer, G.J.; Dunn, C.P.; Filley, T.H.; Moeller, K.L.; Pfingston, J.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Cleland, J.H.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

196

Bus transfer analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses bus transfer schemes and the methodology used in modeling and analysis. Due to the unavailability of generic acceptance criteria, simulations were performed to analyze the actual fast bus transfer operations at four operating nuclear power generating stations. Sample simulation results illustrating the transient variations in motors currents and torques are included. The analyses were performed to ensure that motors and other rotating parts are not subjected to excessive or accumulated stresses caused by bus transfer operations. A summary of the experience gained in the process of performing this work and suggested bus transfer acceptance criteria are also presented.

Weronick, R.; Hassan, I.D. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Lyndhurst, NJ (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Technology Transfer Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer Initiatives USEFUL LINKS Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM) Federal Laboratory...

198

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

199

Fernald vacuum transfer system for uranium materials repackaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) is the site of a former Department of Energy (DOE) uranium processing plant. When production was halted, many materials were left in an intermediate state. Some of this product material included enriched uranium compounds that had to be repackaged for shipment of off-site storage. This paper provides an overview, technical description, and status of a new application of existing technology, a vacuum transfer system, to repackage the uranium bearing compounds for shipment. The vacuum transfer system provides a method of transferring compounds from their current storage configuration into packages that meet the Department of Transportation (DOT) shipping requirements for fissile materials. This is a necessary activity, supporting removal of nuclear materials prior to site decontamination and decommissioning, key to the Fernald site's closure process.

Kaushiva, Shirley; Weekley, Clint; Molecke, Martin; Polansky, Gary

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

200

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Savannah River Site Achieves Waste Transfer First | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 Page 1 of 1Sandra L. BurrellSarai

202

Lessons Learned: The Grand Junction Office Site Transfer to Private  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORT TOJaredKansas1 - Energy Basics LessonOwnership |

203

Environmental site description for a Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) production plant at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In January 1990, the Secretary of Energy approved a plan for the demonstration and deployment of the Uranium Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) technology, with the near-term goal to provide the necessary information to make a deployment decision by November 1992. The U-AVLIS process is based on electrostatic extraction of photoionized U-235 atoms from an atomic vapor stream created by electron-beam vaporization of uranium metal alloy. A programmatic document for use in screening DOE sites to locate the U-AVLIS production plant was developed and implemented in two parts (Wolsko et al. 1991). The first part consisted of a series of screening analyses, based on exclusionary and other criteria, that identified a reasonable number of candidate sites. These sites were then subjected to a more rigorous and detailed comparative analysis for the purpose of developing a short list of reasonable alternative sites for later environmental examination. This environmental site description (ESD) provides a detailed description of the ORGDP site and vicinity suitable for use in an environmental impact statement (EIS). The report is based on existing literature, data collected at the site, and information collected by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) staff during a site visit. The organization of the ESD is as follows. Topics addressed in Sec. 2 include a general site description and the disciplines of geology, water resources, biotic resources, air resources, noise, cultural resources, land use, socioeconomics, and waste management. Identification of any additional data that would be required for an EIS is presented in Sec. 3. Following the site description and additional data requirements, Sec. 4 provides a short, qualitative assessment of potential environmental issues. 37 refs., 20 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Site Analysis Shadow Analysis Site Objectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On ­ Site Rainwater Collection o Composting Toilets o Green Roof o Indigenous Landscape - Wetlands Building

Kyte, Michael

205

Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide Complexes in the Energetics and Dynamics of Electron Transfer and Proton Transfer in Dissociation of Metal III (salen)-Peptide...

206

Effective Transfer of Industrial Energy Conservation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Various avenues exist for transferring energy conservation technologies to industry. Briefing documents, presentations at trade meetings and con ferences, or simple diffusion by word-of-mouth are a few methods. However, when left to chance, tech... of 444 ESL-IE-83-04-68 Proceedings from the Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference Volume II, Houston, TX, April 17-20, 1983 TABLE 1. Current Energy Impacts of Foam Processing of Textiles BROADWOVENS AND KNITS User Site (a) Average Production...

Clement, M.; Vallario, R. W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The transfer from nuclear development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s task of cleaning up the extensive nuclear weapons complex is of such enormous proportions that there can be no definitive solution that can be adjusted to a predictable cost. The cleanup and disposition of hazardous wastes in many cases will take thirty or more years. In the near term, the economic impact affecting the communities and large number of displaced workers is a significant concern to the Department and the nation. However, before a useful transfer of DOE land, facilities, and sites to the public for economic development can be realized, a consistent and comprehensive process of compliance with regulatory requirements needs to be established. The simultaneous pursuit of these goals creates an unprecedented challenge to the Department of Energy and the US.

Smith, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technology transfer 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Savannah River Site, Spent Nuclear Fuel Management, Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed DOE action described in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets assigned to the Savannah River Site (SRS), including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel (20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some programmatic material stored at SRS for repackaging and dry storage pending shipment offsite).

N /A

1998-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Technology Transfer Office November 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer Office November 2009 INVENTION AGREEMENT In consideration of my employment in writing to Dartmouth through the Technology Transfer Office any such discovery or invention and identify

Myers, Lawrence C.

212

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

Covey, Debra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM LIST Name Organization Fairbanks, Mary H. AU Garnett-Harris, Deborah A. AU James, Debra A. AU Johnston, Robyne AU May, Melanie P. AU Pickens,...

216

Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings of Heat Transfer 2003: ASME Summer Heat Transfer Conference Las Vegas, Nevada, USA July 21-23, 2003 HT2003-47449 HEAT TRANSFER FROM A MOVING AND EVAPORATING MENISCUS ON A HEATED SURFACE meniscus with complete evaporation of water without any meniscus break-up. The experimental heat transfer

Kandlikar, Satish

218

Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources, framing, and transfer p. 1 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer Departments. #12;Resources, framing, and transfer p. 2 Resources, framing, and transfer David Hammer, Andrew Elby of activating resources, a language with an explicitly manifold view of cognitive structure. In this chapter, we

Hammer, David

219

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

Annual report on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource studies that were undertaken in support of the DOE`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project in the state of Colorado for the period of October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report fulfills the DOE`s obligation to provide an annual report to the state of Colorado on the status and results of cultural resource studies conducted during the above period of record. This requirement is stated in a programmatic memorandum of agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Previous reports were based on a calendar year reporting period. However, in order to be more consistent with the programmatic memorandum of agreement, the period of record for this and subsequent annual reports has been changed to the Federal fiscal year. The current status and summaries of 1992 cultural resource surveys are provided for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. The sites are Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock.

Not Available

1993-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NIST 3-Year Programmatic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas critical to the nation's economy.The America COMPETES Act outlines major roles for NIST-year period.NIST will continue to refine this plan as it works with the Administration to address national

222

Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13/12/2012 Technology transfer @ VUB Hugo Loosvelt #12;VUB in Brussels www.vub.ac.be including or conclude licensing contracts #12;Technology transfer TTI assists academics to realise knowledge transfer by needed for R&D collaboration, licensing and spin-out company formation Technology transfer is the process

Steels, Luc

223

POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff to CSU including (but not limited to) helping transfer students explore study skills, time management

224

Richard Bland College Transfer Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology-IDT Interdisciplinary Studies-IDS International Business-INBU International Studies-IS ItalianRichard Bland College Transfer Guide #12;Using the Transfer Guide Thank you for your interest in Old Dominion University!!! The ODU Transfer Guide is designed to assist students transferring to ODU

225

MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee. Second semiannual status report, July 1988--March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the MHD Integrated Topping Cycle (ITC) project, TRW was given the responsibility to organize, charter and co-chair, with the Department of Energy (DOE), an MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee (TTIRC). The Charter of the TTIRC, which was approved by the DOE in June 1988 and distributed to the committee members, is included as part of this Summary. As stated in the Charter, the purpose of this committee is to: (1) review all Proof-of-Concept (POC) projects and schedules in the national MHD program; to assess their compatibility with each other and the first commercial MHD retrofit plant; (2) establish and implement technology transfer formats for users of this technology; (3) identify interfaces, issues, and funding structures directly impacting the success of the commercial retrofit; (4) investigate and identify the manner in which, and by whom, the above should be resolved; and (5) investigate and assess other participation (foreign and domestic) in the US MHD Program. The DOE fiscal year 1989 MHD Program Plan Schedule is included at the end of this Summary. The MHD Technology Transfer, Integration and Review Committee`s activities to date have focused primarily on the ``technology transfer`` aspects of its charter. It has provided a forum for the dissemination of technical and programmatic information among workers in the field of MHD and to the potential end users, the utilities, by holding semi-annual meetings. The committee publishes this semi-annual report, which presents in Sections 2 through 11 capsule summaries of technical progress for all DOE Proof-of-Concept MHD contracts and major test facilities.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Draft environmental impact statement for the siting, construction, and operation of New Production Reactor capacity. Volume 3, Sections 7-12, Appendices A-C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation`s nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century. A capacity equivalent to that of about a 3,000-megawatt (thermal) heavy-water reactor was assumed as a reference basis for analysis in this EIS; this is the approximate capacity of the existing production reactors at DOE`s Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The EIS programmatic alternatives address Departmental decisions to be made on whether to build new production facilities, whether to build one or more complexes, what size production capacity to provide, and when to provide this capacity. Project-specific impacts for siting, constructing, and operating new production reactor capacity are assessed for three alternative sites: the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; and the Savannah River Site. For each site, the impacts of three reactor technologies (and supporting facilities) are assessed: a heavy-water reactor, a light-water reactor, and a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Impacts of the no-action alternative also are assessed. The EIS evaluates impacts related to air quality; noise levels; surface water, groundwater, and wetlands; land use; recreation; visual environment; biotic resources; historical, archaeological, and cultural resources; socioeconomics; transportation; waste management; and human health and safety. The EIS describes in detail the potential radioactive releases from new production reactors and support facilities and assesses the potential doses to workers and the general public. This volume contains references; a list of preparers and recipients; acronyms, abbreviations, and units of measure; a glossary; an index and three appendices.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

SUBCONTRACTOR SITE ACCESS GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 5 5. Projects with Off-site Parking Arrangements.................................................................................6 5.1 Initial Screening and Off-site Parking Process................................................................. 9 7.2 Substitute Contractors with Off-site Parking

Eisen, Michael

228

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Calibrating the MKAR array using transfer functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing regional discriminants (RDs) at any given seismic station requires a ground-truth database of waveforms from both earthquakes and explosions. Recently installed stations used for seismic monitoring have no single charge explosions on which to base discriminants. We have developed a procedure to map information from surrogate stations, having a long recording history, to newly installed operational stations. We investigated a method to compute transfer functions using known effective 13Ds for a database of earthquakes and explosions located near the Lop Nor nuclear test site and recorded at the KNET array in Kyrgyzstan. For specific source-station paths, transfer functions work well. However, preliminary analysis of India and Pakistan nuclear tests indicate strong azimuthal dependence in the construction of reliable transfer functions. The success of the preliminary work suggests we can apply the same technique to calibrate the recently installed MKAR array using the Global Seismic Network station MAKZ as a surrogate. Both MKAR, an 11-element array operational since 2000, and MAKZ (including its earlier counterpart MAK), operating very broadband instruments since 1994, are located in Eastern Kazakhstan and separated by 25 km. To perform the calibration requires additional considerations not taken into account during the initial investigation: (1) utilizing amplitude spectra, rather than using RDs, to calculate transfer functions; (2) computing transfer functions for a range of azimuths, as we believe the transfer function are azimuthally dependent; and (3) determining whether working with each array element separately or developing a single-input/multiple-output model will provide more stable results and better error estimates.

Renwald, M. D. (Marie D.); Taylor, S. R. (Steven R.); Wallace, Terry C.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

Day-Lewis, Frederick David [U.S. Geological Survey; Singha, Kamini [Colorado School of Mines; Johnson, Timothy C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Haggerty, Roy [Oregon State; Binley, Andrew [Lancaster University; Lane, John W. [US Geological Survey

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

Site transition framework for long-term surveillance and maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a framework for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites where DOE may have anticipated long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTSM) responsibilities. It is a tool to help facilitate a smooth transition from remediation to LTSM, providing a systematic process for affected parties to utilize in analyzing the baseline to understand and manage the actions from EM mission completion through a site’s transition into LTSM. The framework is not meant to provide an exhaustive list of the specific requirement and information that are needed. Sites will have unique considerations that may not be adequately addressed by this tool, and it is anticipated that a team comprised of the transferring and receiving organization will use judgment in utilizing this augmenting with other DOE guidance. However the framework should be followed to the extent possible at each site; and adapted to accommodate unique site-specific requirements, needs, and documents. Since the objective of the tool is facilitate better understanding of the conditions of the site and the actions required for transfer, the transition team utilizing the checklist is expected to consult with management of both the receiving and transferring organization to verify that major concerns are addressed. Ideally, this framework should be used as early in the remediation process as possible. Subsequent applications of the Site Transition Framework (STF) to the site should be conducted periodically and used to verify that all appropriate steps have been or will be taken to close-out the site and that actions by both organization are identified to transfer the site to LTSM. The requirements are provided herein.

none,

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Development of site-specific soil cleanup criteria: New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential human exposure which results from the residual soil radioactivity at a decommissioned site is a prime concern during D and D projects. To estimate this exposure, a pathway analysis approach is often used to arrive at the residual soil radioactivity criteria. The development of such a criteria for the decommissioning of the New Brunswick Laboratory, New Jersey site is discussed. Contamination on this site was spotty and located in small soil pockets spread throughout the site area. Less than 1% of the relevant site area was contaminated. The major contaminants encountered at the site were /sup 239/Pu, /sup 241/Am, normal and natural uranium, and natural thorium. During the development of the pathway analysis to determine the site cleanup criteria, corrections for the inhomogeneity of the contamination were made. These correction factors and their effect upon the relevant pathway parameters are presented. Major pathways by which radioactive material may reach an individual are identified and patterns of use are specified (scenario). Each pathway is modeled to estimate the transfer parameters along the given pathway, such as soil to air to man, etc. The transfer parameters are then combined with dose rate conversion factors (ICRP 30 methodology) to obtain soil concentration to dose rate conversion factors (pCi/g/mrem/yr). For an appropriate choice of annual dose equivalent rate, one can then arrive at a value for the residual soil concentration. Pathway modeling, transfer parameters, and dose rate factors for the three major pathways; inhalation, ingestion and external exposure, which are important for the NBL site, are discussed.

Veluri, V.R.; Moe, H.J.; Robinet, M.J.; Wynveen, R.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

PHP SCILAB | .. | 1 (Web Site) Web Site ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHP SCILAB | .. | 1 Chapter 1 , (Web Site) Web Site , (World Wide Web) : http://school.obec.go.th/borkruwitt/inter/internet01.gif HTML PHP,JavaScript,ASP PHP SCILAB AppServ PHP http://www.appservnetwork.com #12; PHP SCILAB | .. | 2 1. 2. Next 3. I

Kovintavewat, Piya

236

Urban Sewage Delivery Heat Transfer System (2): Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thimble delivery heat-transfer (TDHT) system is one of the primary modes to utilize the energy of urban sewage. Using the efficiency-number of transfer units method ( ), the heat-transfer efficiencies of the parallel-flow and reverse-flow TDTH...

Zhang, C.; Wu, R.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Zhuang, Z.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

A Theoretical Investigation Into Energy Transfer In Photosynthetic Open Quantum Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis looks at the electronic energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex, in which evidence of long-lived coherence has been observed in 2-dimensional infrared experiments. I use three techniques: the numerically exact Hierarchical Equations of Motion, and the perturbative Redfield and Foerster theories, the latter of which ignores quantum coherence in the transfer. Both of the approximate methods perform very well - and while oscillations in site populations (a hallmark of coherence) are present in the exact transfer dynamics and absent in the dynamics of Foerster theory, the latter gives a reasonable prediction of transfer rates and steady-state populations, despite being incoherent - suggesting that coherence is not vital for the dynamics of transfer. Since Foerster theory is very inexpensive to run and performs so well, I then apply it to calculate the effects of static disorder in bacteriochlorophyll site energies and of a more structured spectral density. Ultimately, the energy transfer i...

Wilkins, David M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

239

Plastic container bagless transfer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

240

Descriptions of representative contaminated sites and facilities within the DOE complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated efforts to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) that will analyze the existing environmental restoration and waste management program and evaluate alternatives for an integrated program. The alternatives being evaluated include (1) a {open_quotes}No Action{close_quotes} alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) an Applicable, Relevant, and Appropriate Requirements (ARAR)-driven alternative, (3) a land-use-driven alternative, (4) a health-risk-driven alternative, and (5) a combination land-use and health-risk-driven alternative. The analytical approach being taken to evaluate each of these alternatives is to perform a remedial engineering analysis and human health and ecosystem effects analyses on every contaminated site and facility in the DOE complex. One of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) roles in this approach has been to compile the source term and environmental setting data needed to drive each of these analyses. To date, over 10,000 individual contaminated sites and facilities located throughout the DOE complex of installations have been identified and at least some minimal data compiled on each. The PEIS analyses have been appreciably simplified by categorizing all of these contaminated sites and facilities into six broad categories: (1) contaminated buildings, (2) contaminated soils, (3) solid waste sites (e.g., burial grounds), (4) liquid containment structures (e.g., tanks), (5) surface water sites, and (6) contaminated groundwater sites. A report containing a complete description of each of these thousands of contaminated sites and facilities would be tremendously large and unwildy, as would separate reports describing the application of the analytical methodologies to each.

Short, S.M.; Buck, J.W.; Clark, L.L.; Fletcher, J.F.; Glantz, C.S.; Holdren, G.R.; Huesties, L.R.; Williams, M.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Oates, L. [ICF, Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1/120 5. Heat transfer Ron Zevenhoven �bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering / Värme Three heat transfer mechanisms Conduction Convection Radiation 2/120 Pic: B�88 �bo Akademi University | Thermal and Flow Engineering | 20500 Turku | Finland #12;3/120 5.1 Conductive heat transfer �bo Akademi

Zevenhoven, Ron

242

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November...

243

Dynamics of Charge Transfer in Ordered and Chaotic Nucleotide Sequences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charge transfer is considered in systems composed of a donor, an acceptor and bridge sites of (AT) nucleotide pairs. For a bridge consisting of 180 (AT) pairs, three cases are dealt with: a uniform case, when all the nucleotides in each strand are identical; an ordered case, when nucleotides in each DNA strand are arranged in an orderly fashion; a chaotic case, when (AT) and (TA) pairs are arranged randomly. It is shown that in all the cases a charge transfer from a donor to an acceptor can take place. All other factors being equal, the transfer is the most efficient in the uniform case, the ordered and chaotic cases are less and the least efficient, accordingly. The results obtained are in agreement with experimental data on long-range charge transfer in DNA.

Fialko, N S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Environmental Assessment for the new Whole Body Counter facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy proposes to construct and operate a new in-vivo counting facility at the Savannah River Site for the monitoring of employees for internal radionuclides. The proposed facility, titled the new Whole Body Counter (WBC) facility, would house both the existing and additional new invivo counting equipment and facility support operations. The proposed facility would be sited and located in an area of the SRS in which background radiation levels are sufficiently low to assure accurate in-vivo counts and a location that would assure ease of access for occupational workers. This Environmental Assessment has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations for Implementing NEPA (40 CPR Parts 1500-1508). NEPA requires the assessment of environmental consequences of Federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. The proposed action has independent utility to the Savannah River operations and will be necessary to support plant activities regardless of the makeup of the future mission at the site. As such, the proposed new WBC facility is treated as part of the preliminary Reconfiguration Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement ``No Action`` alternative.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Wireless Power Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

None

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wireless Power Transfer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

None

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Data Transfer Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is aID Service First DOIData Transfer»

249

Transfers | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyThe Sun andDepartment ofFanTransactive1/08Transfers

250

Transfer reactions at ATLAS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer Service

251

NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and ResourcesOther FederalNicheTechnology Transfer Ombuds

252

Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Nevada National Security Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSSWAC). The NNSSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) will accept low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level waste for disposal. The NNSSWAC includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NNSS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex for disposal. The NNSA/NSO and support contractors are available to assist you in understanding or interpreting this document. For assistance, please call the NNSA/NSO Waste Management Project at (702) 295-7063 or fax to (702) 295-1153.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Managing contaminated sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book summarizes the generic principles of contaminated site management. The book walks the reader through contaminated site identification, risk assessment and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. The book is divided into two major sections, problem diagnosis and development of site restoration. In problem diagnosis, the general principles of site investigation are discussed, including the objectives and differences between tier 1,2, and 3 investigations. The principles of data collection and analysis are presented. A small quantitative discussion of statistical analysis is presented but in keeping with the objectives of the text is not sufficient comprehensive or detailed to provide much of a guide for the practitioner. Chapters on contaminant fate and transport processes and risk assessment help the reader understand the role of these issues in site investigation and remedial planning. A chapter is also included on elements of a site characterization activity, which summarizes some of the key considerations in conducting a site investigation.

Asante-Duah, D.K.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s Cultural Resource Activities at Colorado UMTRA Project Sites for October 1993 through September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The UMTRA Project is a cooperative (state and federal) program mandated by the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, Public Law 95-604 (42 USC {section}7901 et seq.). This law requires the timely cleanup of 24 inactive uranium mill tailings sites throughout the United States. Nine of these inactive uranium mill tailings sites are in Colorado at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of agreement (PMOA) (DOE, 1984). This PMOA specifies requirements for the DOE`s fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report fulfills the requirement for the DOE to provide the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all of the UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. This report is organized by UMTRA Project site. For each site, the general remedial action activities and cultural resource activities performed during the period of record are summarized. When known, the DOE`s plans for future cultural resource activities at the site are summarized.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Site Transition Process Upon Cleanup Completion. Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After environmental remediation is completed at a site and there is no continuing mission, responsibility for the site and the associated records are transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management for post-closure management. Where residual hazards (e.g., disposal cells, ground water contamination) remain, active long-term surveillance and maintenance will be required to ensure protection of human health and the environment.

none,

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

SWAMI II technology transfer plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heat transfer probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

Technology transfer 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

1999 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

NONE

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Nevada National Security Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

HISTORYIn 1950, President Truman established what is now known as the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) to perform nuclear weapons testing activities.  In support of national defense initiatives...

262

2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Network analysis of proton transfer in liquid water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proton transfer in macromolecular systems is a fascinating yet elusive process. In the last ten years, molecular simulations have shown to be a useful tool to unveil the atomistic mechanism. Notwithstanding, the large number of degrees of freedom involved make the accurate description of the process very hard even for the case of proton diffusion in bulk water. Here, multi-state empirical valence bond molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with complex network analysis are applied to study proton transfer in liquid water. Making use of a transition network formalism, this approach takes into account the time evolution of several coordinates simultaneously. Our results provide evidence for a strong dependence of proton transfer on the length of the hydrogen bond solvating the Zundel complex, with proton transfer enhancement as shorter bonds are formed at the acceptor site. We identify six major states (nodes) on the network leading from the “special pair” to a more symmetric Zundel complex required for transferring the proton. Moreover, the second solvation shell specifically rearranges to promote the transfer, reiterating the idea that solvation beyond the first shell of the Zundel complex plays a crucial role in the process.

Shevchuk, Roman; Rao, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.rao@frias.uni-freiburg.de [Freiburg Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Soft Matter Research, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Agmon, Noam [Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem (Israel)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

264

Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

265

Conceptual design analyses for Hanford Site deployable remote spectroscopy systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies potential remote, NIR spectroscopic waste surface moisture monitoring system design alternatives to be operated inside one of the Hanford Site, high level, nuclear waste storage tanks. Potential tank waste moisture data impacts from the remote NIR signal transfer through high humidity vapor space is evaluated.

Philipp, B.L.; Reich, F.R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Protein active sites, interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for active site identification ! Manual MSA and structure analysis ! Catalytic Site Atlas (homology-based) ! Evolutionary Trace (MSA subfamily- and family-wide conservation; phylogenetic tree and structure analysis) ! 3D", Bartlett et al. J Mol Biol. 2002 Nov 15;324(1):105-21. · "An evolutionary trace method defines binding

Sjölander, Kimmen

268

Technology Transfer Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPF developed the concept of a mobile, on-site NORM remediation and disposal process in late 1993. Working with Conoco and receiving encouragement born the Department of Energy, Metarie Office, and the Texas Railroad Commission the corporation conducted extensive feasibility studies on an on-site disposal concept. In May 1994, the Department of Energy issued a solicitation for cooperative agreement proposal for, "Development and Testing of a Method for Treatment and Underground Disposal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM)". BPF submitted a proposal to the solicitation in July 1994, and was awarded a cooperative agreement in September 1995. BPF proposed and believed that proven equipment and technology could be incorporated in to a mobile system. The system would allow BPF to demonstrate an environmentally sound and commercially affordable method for treatment and underground disposal of NORM. The key stop in the BPF process incorporates injection of the dissolved radioactive materials into a water injection or disposal well. Disposal costs in the BPF proposal of July 1995 were projected to range from $1000 to $5000 per cubic yard. The process included four separate steps. (1) De-oiling (2) Volume Reduction (3) Chemical Dissolution of the Radium (4) Injection

None

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Site decommissioning management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Transfer and transport of solid waste with case studies of facilities in northern New Jersey and New York City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transfer stations are used to consolidate the waste from collection vehicles for its transport to a disposal site that can be a waste-to-energy facility and/or a landfill. Separation of materials for recycling and/or composting may also be done at a transfer station. Transfer stations are developed and used primarily when the travel time to a disposal site is too far for a collection truck to transport waste in an economic manner. Travel time includes the actual transport time and the unloading time at a disposal site. Local factors such as the capacity of collection trucks, wage rates, and the size of collection crews will affect the economics of direct haul versus transfer haul. The various types of approaches used to transfer and transport wastes are reviewed in this paper.

Peterson, C.; Towne, C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

THE UNLV FOUNDATION MONETARY TRANSFER FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNLV FOUNDATION MONETARY TRANSFER FORM (Use one form for each account) Date Department Amount Transfer from Foundation Account Name UNLV Foundation Foundation Account Number Transfer to University contributions to this fund were accepted. Multiple Transfer A monetary transfer from the UNLV Foundation

Hemmers, Oliver

274

Hanford Site radioactive hazardous materials packaging directory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Radioactive Hazardous Materials Packaging Directory (RHMPD) provides information concerning packagings owned or routinely leased by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for offsite shipments or onsite transfers of hazardous materials. Specific information is provided for selected packagings including the following: general description; approval documents/specifications (Certificates of Compliance and Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging); technical information (drawing numbers and dimensions); approved contents; areas of operation; and general information. Packaging Operations & Development (PO&D) maintains the RHMPD and may be contacted for additional information or assistance in obtaining referenced documentation or assistance concerning packaging selection, availability, and usage.

McCarthy, T.L.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

EIS-0144: Siting, Construction, and Operation of New Production Reactor Capacity; Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, and Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy developed this statement to assess the potential environmental impacts, both on a broad programmatic level and on a project-specific level, concerning a proposed action to provide new tritium production capacity to meet the nation's nuclear defense requirements well into the 21st century.

276

Risk management study for the retired Hanford Site facilities. Volume 2, Risk evaluation work procedure for the retired Hanford Site facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Risk from retired surplus facilities has always been assumed to be low at the Hanford Site as the facilities are inactive and have few potentials for causing an offsite hazardous material release. However,the fatal accident that occurred in the spring of 1992 in which an employee fell through a deteriorated roof at the 105-F Reactor Building has raised the possibility that retired facilities represent a greater risk than was originally assumed. Therefore, Westinghouse Hanford Company and the US Department of Energy management have determined that facility risk management strategies and programmatic plans should be reevaluated to assure risks are identified and appropriate corrective action plans are developed. To evaluate risk management strategies, accurate risk information about the current and projected condition of the facilities must be developed. This work procedure has been created to address the development of accurate and timely risk information. By using the evaluation results in this procedure, it will be possible to create a prioritized baseline for managing facility risk until all retired surplus facilities are demolished.

Coles, G.A.; Shultz, M.V.; Taylor, W.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE`s obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

TECH TRANSFER TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECH TRANSFER TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM · INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES · UNIVERSITY THURSDAY SATURDAYFRIDAYWEDNESDAYTUESDAY TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM · INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES's to another year of working safer and smarter. Laura Melendy Director, Technology Transfer Program #12;AUGUST

California at Berkeley, University of

279

Colorado, Processing Sites  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofofOxford SiteToledo SiteTonawanda North SiteD&D

280

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

HAQ MA

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

282

Investigation of boiling heat transfer at a surface with a system of cylindrical cavities under conditions of free motion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a mathematical model for the intensification of boiling heat transfer and the subsequent increase in thermal efficiency of the cylindrical heat transfer surfaces in an evaporative cooling system. The boiling curves for water, ethanol, and freon 113 are calculated for a surface with artificial nucleation sites. The model incorporates such coolant properties as surface tension, specific heat, and vaporization heat.

Danilova, G.N.; Reznikov, V.I.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public ToursOfficial

284

Hanford Site Safety Standards - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite Public

285

Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2M HILL Secretary MonizSite PublicAbout Us >Program

286

Site Manager Y-12 Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Reviewwill help prepare local students forStorm2 |Y-12 Site

287

VPP Hanford Site Champions Committee - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field EmissionFunctionalPortalV1 - March8,Hanford Site

288

Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s)Excel workbook (version 5.2) is aAUGUST 2014Site

289

Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer Agency Approaches; FY 2001 Activity Metrics and Outcomes 2002 Report to the President and the Congress under the Technology Transfer: FEDERAL LAB TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES

Perkins, Richard A.

290

Potential Release Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy, but some are located within the Los Alamos town boundaries, on private property, Los Alamos County property, or U.S. Forest Service land. Number of sites...

291

Site Energy Surveys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified, screening is conducted to develop their economic attractiveness. This presentation reviews factors leading to the need for Site Energy Surveys, the objectives for conducting surveys, the approach utilized, considerations given to values...

Lockett, W., Jr.; Guide, J. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

ParaSITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paraSITE proposes the appropriation of exterior ventilation systems on existing architecture to inflate pneumatic shelters that are designed for homeless people. This project involves the production of a series of inflatable ...

Rakowitz, Michael

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Plant Site Refrigeration Upgrade  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayer Corporation operates a multi-division manufacturing facility in Bushy Park, South Carolina. Low temperature refrigeration (-4°F) is required by many of the chemical manufacturing areas and is provided by a Plant Site Refrigeration System...

Zdrojewski, R.; Healy, M.; Ramsey, J.

294

Annual report on the U.S. Department of Energy`s cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites for October 1995--September 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of cultural resource activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado for the period of October 1, 1995 through September 30, 1996. The inactive uranium mill tailings sites in Colorado are at Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. On December 6, 1984, the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer (SHPO) entered into a programmatic memorandum of understanding (PMOU). This PMOU requires the DOE to fulfillment of its obligations under various state and federal regulations for the protection and preservation of cultural resources. This report provides the state of Colorado with an annual report on the cultural resource activities performed for all UMTRA Project sites in Colorado. Due to the completion of surface activities at the UMTRA Project sites, this will be the last annual report to the state of Colorado. Cultural resources activities subsequent to this report will be reported to the state through site-specific correspondence.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

Lahey, Richard T.

296

Transferring Data from Batch Jobs at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Examples Once you are set up for automatic authentication (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch...

297

USDOE Technology Transfer, Working with DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deployment SBIRSTTR - Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Oil & Gas Technology Transfer...

298

Technology Transfer Overview | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Transfer Overview Technology Transfer Overview Through strategic investments in science and technology, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) helps power and secure...

299

Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project Technology Transfer for Brownfields Redevelopment Project The U.S. Department of Energy has provided six computers to...

300

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division to them in California. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM MAY 2011, VOL. 3, NO. 1 California's Transition

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Preparing for Transfer Biological Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Engineering Game Design Industrial Systems & Information Technology Information Science MaterialsPreparing for Transfer Majors: Biological Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil Engineering Computer Science Electrical & Computer Engineering Engineering Physics Environmental Engineering

Walter, M.Todd

302

Electrohydrodynamically enhanced condensation heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a condenser the thickness of the liquid condensate film covering the cooled surface constitutes a resistance to the heat transfer. By establishing a non uniform electric field in the vicinity of the condensation surface the extraction of liquid...

Wawzyniak, Markus

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

303

Knowledge Capture and Transfer Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Learning and Workforce Development is working with Heads of Departmental Elements, DOE senior leaders and subject-matter-experts to capture and transfer the knowledge and experiences...

304

Hanford site transuranic waste certification plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A, ''Radioactive Waste Management, and the Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant' (DOE 1996d) (WIPP WAC). The WIPP WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WIPP WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their management of TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WIPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter41 (TRUPACT-11). The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-I1 requirements in the ''Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package'' (NRC 1997) (TRUPACT-I1 SARP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

Brownfield site development -- The Ontario context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The provincial government of Ontario recently promulgated new guidelines to deal with contamination on sites. One of the purposes of the guideline was to bolster development of contaminated sites by clarifying the regulatory process for redeveloping a contaminated site and to provide several clean-up options based on newer scientific information. These clean-up options include stratified clean-ups and site specific risk based criteria. The applications of the previous guideline were at times cumbersome for industries and land developers which may have impeded development of the Brownfield. This paper compares the changes between the old and the new regulatory clean-up guidelines and presents the differences in approach. This paper also presents the results from interviews with several industries and property developers and assesses their view on the regulatory change as well as their desire to develop Brownfields in Ontario. This information determines if the change in regulatory process has really encouraged development. Results from the interviews with proponents indicated that the new guidelines are a much better approach but still contain barriers such as liability issues. Furthermore, the regulatory approval process has been transferred from the provincial government to the local governments. As a result the local governments are applying the guidelines differently across the province.

Phillips, D.B. [Proctor and Redfern Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

Virginia Tech

307

Siting study for a consolidated waste capability at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decision analysis was used to rank alternative sites for a new Consolidated Waste Capability (CWC) to replace current hazardous solid waste operations (hazardous/chemical, mixed lowlevel, transuranic, and low-level waste) at Los Alamos National Laboratory's TA-54 Area G. An original list of 21 site alternatives was pre-screened to ten sites that were assessed using the analytical hierarchy process with five top-level criteria and fifteen sub-criteria. Three passes of the analysis were required to assess different site scenarios: 1) a fully consolidated CWC with both transfer/storage and LL W disposal in one location (45 acre minimum), 2) CWC transfer/storage only (12 acre minimum), and 3) LLW disposal only (33 acre minimum). The top site choice for all three options is TA-63/52/46; the second choice is TA-18/36. TA-54 East, Zone 4 also deserves consideration as a LLW disposal site.

Booth, Steven Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

A 3D radiative transfer framework: II. line transfer problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Higher resolution telescopes as well as 3D numerical simulations will require the development of detailed 3D radiative transfer calculations. Building upon our previous work we extend our method to include both continuum and line transfer. We present a general method to calculate radiative transfer including scattering in the continuum as well as in lines in 3D static atmospheres. The scattering problem for line transfer is solved via means of an operator splitting (OS) technique. The formal solution is based on a long-characteristics method. The approximate $\\Lambda$ operator is constructed considering nearest neighbors {\\em exactly}. The code is parallelized over both wavelength and solid angle using the MPI library. We present the results of several test cases with different values of the thermalization parameter and two choices for the temperature structure. The results are directly compared to 1D spherical tests. With our current grid setup the interior resolution is much lower in 3D than in 1D, nevertheless the 3D results agree very well with the well-tested 1D calculations. We show that with relatively simple parallelization that the code scales to very large number of processors which is mandatory for practical applications. Advances in modern computers will make realistic 3D radiative transfer calculations possible in the near future. Our current code scales to very large numbers of processors, but requires larger memory per processor at high spatial resolution.

E. Baron; Peter H. Hauschildt

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

310

YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE DESCRIPTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' summarizes, in a single document, the current state of knowledge and understanding of the natural system at Yucca Mountain. It describes the geology; geochemistry; past, present, and projected future climate; regional hydrologic system; and flow and transport within the unsaturated and saturated zones at the site. In addition, it discusses factors affecting radionuclide transport, the effect of thermal loading on the natural system, and tectonic hazards. The ''Yucca Mountain Site Description'' is broad in nature. It summarizes investigations carried out as part of the Yucca Mountain Project since 1988, but it also includes work done at the site in earlier years, as well as studies performed by others. The document has been prepared under the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management quality assurance program for the Yucca Mountain Project. Yucca Mountain is located in Nye County in southern Nevada. The site lies in the north-central part of the Basin and Range physiographic province, within the northernmost subprovince commonly referred to as the Great Basin. The basin and range physiography reflects the extensional tectonic regime that has affected the region during the middle and late Cenozoic Era. Yucca Mountain was initially selected for characterization, in part, because of its thick unsaturated zone, its arid to semiarid climate, and the existence of a rock type that would support excavation of stable openings. In 1987, the United States Congress directed that Yucca Mountain be the only site characterized to evaluate its suitability for development of a geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel.

A.M. Simmons

2004-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Will Lewis, Compiler

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Site Map - Cyclotron Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success Stories ContactSite MapSite

313

Site map | Jefferson Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success StoriesSite Map Site

314

Sandia National Laboratories: Siting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErikGroundbreaking WorkTransformationSiting Siting At the residential and

315

Site Map | DOEpatents  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |Site Map

316

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlightsSeminarsSiliconSite Map TUNL pdf's | FAS pdf's |SiteMaps

317

Hanford Private Tours - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Private Tours Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tour Restrictions Hanford Site Tours Hanford Tours for Governmental Officials Hanford Tours for Tribal Affairs Hanford Private Tours Media...

318

Technology Transfer Office FY2011 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer Office FY2011 Annual Report #12;TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER ADVISORY COMMITTEES The UC San Diego Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) is responsible for general oversight of the universityĂ? s technology transfer program. This standing committee is appointed by the chancellor

Hasty, Jeff

319

Technology Transfer office 2008 Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer office 2008 Annual Report #12;The UC San Diego Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) is responsible for general oversight of the university's technology transfer program. It meets periodically to assess UC San Diego's technology transfer practices and guides the overall

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

320

Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Services B I E N N I A L R E P O R T 03­04 #12;University of California, San Diego Technology Transfer Advisory Committee The UCSD Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) is responsible for general oversight of the UCSD Technology Transfer Program

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Nanoscale heat transfer - from computation to experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer can differ distinctly at the nanoscale from that at the macroscale. Recent advancement in

Luo, Tengfei

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

322

The Evolution of LTS at DOE's Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hanford's Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program has evolved from a small, informal process, with minimal support, to a robust program that provides comprehensive transitions from cleanup contractors to long-term stewardship for post-cleanup requirements specified in the associated cleanup decision documents. The LTS Program has the responsibility for almost 100,000 acres of land, along with over 200 waste sites and will soon have six cocooned reactors. Close to 2,600 documents have been identified and tagged for storage in the LTS document library. The program has successfully completed six consecutive transitions over the last two years in support of the U.S. DOE Richland Operations Office's (DOE-RL) near-term cleanup objectives of significantly reducing the footprint of active cleanup operations for the River Corridor. The program has evolved from one that was initially responsible for defining and measuring Institutional Controls for the Hanford Site, to a comprehensive, post remediation surveillance and maintenance program that begins early in the transition process. In 2013, the first reactor area -- the cocooned 105-F Reactor and its surrounding 1,100 acres, called the F Area was transitioned. In another first, the program is expected to transition the five remaining cocooned reactors into the program through using a Transition and Turnover Package (TTP). As Hanford's LTS Program moves into the next few years, it will continue to build on a collaborative approach. The program has built strong relationships between contractors, regulators, tribes and stakeholders and with the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM). The LTS Program has been working with LM since its inception. The transition process utilized LM's Site Transition Framework as one of the initial requirement documents and the Hanford Program continues to collaborate with LM today. One example of this collaboration is the development of the LTS Program's records management system in which, LM has been instrumental. The development of a rigorous data collection and records management systems has been influenced and built off of LMs success, which also ensures compatibility between what Hanford's LTS Program develops and LM. In another example, we are exploring a pilot project to ship records from the Hanford Site directly to LM for long-term storage. This pilot would gain program efficiencies so that records would be handled only once. Rather than storage on-site, then shipment to an interim Federal Records Center in Seattle, records would be shipped directly to LM. The Hanford LTS Program is working to best align programmatic processes, find efficiencies, and to benchmark site transition requirements. Involving the Hanford LTS Program early in the transition process with an integrated contractor and DOE team is helping to ensure that there is time to work through details on the completed remediation of transitioning areas. It also will allow for record documentation and storage for the future, and is an opportunity for the program to mature through the experiences that will be gained by implementing LTS Program activities over time.

Moren, Richard J. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States); Grindstaff, Keith D. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

323

CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

B. Gorpani

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

324

Polarisation Transfer in Proton Compton Scattering at High Momentum Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Jefferson Lab Hall A experiment E99-114 comprised a series of measurements to explore proton Compton scattering at high momentum transfer. For the first time, the polarisation transfer observables in the p (~ 0 ~ p) reaction were measured in the GeV energy range, where it is believed that quark-gluon degrees of freedom begin to dominate. The experiment utilised a circularly polarised photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target, with the scattered photon and recoil proton detected in a lead-glass calorimeter and a magnetic spectrometer, respectively.

David Hamilton

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization Site Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization Site Design No frames No Flash intro o with links are OK Image maps are not OK ­ search engine crawlers will not follow the links Implement a site. Proprietary 1 March 2007 #12;Site Design Considerations for Search Engine Optimization There should

Goldman, Steven A.

326

Site characterization progress report: Yucca Mountain, Nevada, October 1, 1994--March 31, 1995, Number 12. Nuclear Waste Policy Act (Section 113)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first half of fiscal year 1995, most activities at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project were directed at implementing the Program Plan developed by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The Plan is designed to enable the Office to make measurable and significant progress toward key objectives over the next five years within the financial resources that can be realistically expected. Activities this period focused on the immediate goal of determining by 1998 whether Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is technically suitable as a possible site for a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Work on the Project advanced in several critical areas, including programmatic activities such as issuing the Program Plan, completing the first technical basis report to support the assessment of three 10 CFR 960 guidelines, developing the Notice of Intent for the Environmental Impact Statement, submitting the License Application Annotated Outline, and beginning a rebaselining effort to conform with the goals of the Program Plan. Scientific investigation and analysis of the site and design and construction activities to support the evaluation of the technical suitability of the site also advanced. Specific details relating to all Project activities and reports generated are presented in this report.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Pulling History from the Waste Stream: Identification and Collection of Manhattan Project and Cold War Era Artifacts on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One man's trash is another man's treasure. Not everything called "waste" is meant for the refuse pile. The mission of the Curation Program is at direct odds with the remediation objectives of the Hanford Site. While others are busily tearing down and burying the Site's physical structures and their associated contents, the Curation Program seeks to preserve the tangible elements of the Site's history from these structures for future generations before they flow into the waste stream. Under the provisions of a Programmatic Agreement, Cultural Resources staff initiated a project to identify and collect artifacts and archives that have historic or interpretive value in documenting the role of the Hanford Site throughout the Manhattan Project and Cold War Era. The genesis of Hanford's modern day Curation Program, its evolution over nearly two decades, issues encountered, and lessons learned along the way -- particularly the importance of upper management advocacy, when and how identification efforts should be accomplished, the challenges of working within a radiological setting, and the importance of first hand information -- are presented.

Marceau, Thomas E. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States); Watson, Thomas L. [Mission Support Alliance, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

Solar Site Survey Toolkit  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After a couple outings, a principal technologist at Sandia National Laboratories saw a need for a travel kit that would have the necessary tools to make the task of site surveys more manageable and safer. They have had great success using the kit in the field already.

329

Proposed Drill Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Proposed Drill Sites  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Proposed drill sites for intermediate depth temperature gradient holes and/or deep resource confirmation wells. Temperature gradient contours based on shallow TG program and faults interpreted from seismic reflection survey are shown, as are two faults interpreted by seismic contractor Optim but not by Oski Energy, LLC.

Lane, Michael

331

Savannah River Site Robotics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Sandmantis and Frankie, two advanced robotic devices that are key to cleanup at Savannah River Site. Sandmantis cleans hard, residual waste off huge underground storage tanks. Frankie is equipped with unique satellite capabilities and sensing abilties that can determine what chemicals still reside in the tanks in a cost effective manner.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Efficient Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting Systems, II: Quantum-Classical Comparison, Flux Network, and Robustness Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following the calculation of optimal energy transfer in thermal environment in our first paper (Wu et al., New J. Phys., 2010, 12, 105012), full quantum dynamics and leading-order `classical' hopping kinetics are compared in the seven-site Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) protein complex. The difference between these two dynamic descriptions is due to higher-order quantum corrections. Two thermal bath models, classical white noise (the Haken-Strobl-Reineker model) and quantum Debye model, are considered. In the seven-site FMO model, we observe that higher-order corrections lead to negligible changes in the trapping time or in energy transfer efficiency around the optimal and physiological conditions (2% in the HSR model and 0.1% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). However, using the concept of integrated flux, we can identify significant differences in branching probabilities of the energy transfer network between hopping kinetics and quantum dynamics (26% in the HSR model and 32% in the quantum Debye model for the initial site at BChl 1). This observation indicates that the quantum coherence can significantly change the distribution of energy transfer pathways in the flux network with the efficiency nearly the same. The quantum-classical comparison of the average trapping time with the removal of the bottleneck site, BChl 4, demonstrates the robustness of the efficient energy transfer by the mechanism of multi-site quantum coherence. To reconcile with the latest eight-site FMO model, the quantum-classical comparison with the flux network analysis is summarized in the appendix. The eight-site FMO model yields similar trapping time and network structure as the seven-site FMO model but leads to a more disperse distribution of energy transfer pathways.

Jianlan Wu; Fan Liu; Jian Ma; Robert J. Silbey; Jianshu Cao

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Mass Transfer by Stellar Wind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the process of mass transfer in a binary system through a stellar wind, with an emphasis on systems containing a red giant. I show how wind accretion in a binary system is different from the usually assumed Bondi-Hoyle approximation, first as far as the flow's structure is concerned, but most importantly, also for the mass accretion and specific angular momentum loss. This has important implications on the evolution of the orbital parameters. I also discuss the impact of wind accretion, on the chemical pollution and change in spin of the accreting star. The last section deals with observations and covers systems that most likely went through wind mass transfer: barium and related stars, symbiotic stars and central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN). The most recent observations of cool CSPN progenitors of barium stars, as well as of carbon-rich post-common envelope systems, are providing unique constraints on the mass transfer processes.

Boffin, Henri M J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery Department of Mechanical 8. Aerospace Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Heat Transfer1999 JHT Heat Transfer Gallery S. M. You Department of Mechanical 8 Transfer Visualization Committee organized two photo gallery sessions in 1998. The International Heat Transfer Photo Gallery was held at the l la' International Heat Transfer Conference (IHTC) in Kyongju

Kihm, IconKenneth David

335

Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6 1 4 3 48 23 30 10 Technology Transfer award funding data* Figure 1. Current Technology Transfer awards Numbers represent active grants as at 1 October 2013 Figure 2. Technology Transfer award Transfer funding division. In the 2012/13 financial year Technology Transfer approved awards worth a total

Rambaut, Andrew

336

CHARACTERIZATION THROUGH DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES AND CERTIFICATION OF REMOTE-HANDLED TRANSURANIC WASTE GENERATOR/STORAGE SITES FOR SHIPMENT TO THE WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is operating to receive and dispose of contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) waste. The Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) is seeking approval from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the remote-handled (RH) TRU characterization plan to allow disposal of RH TRU waste in the WIPP repository. In addition, the DOE-CBFO has received approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to use two shipping casks for transporting RH TRU waste. Each regulatory agency (i.e., EPA, NMED, and NRC) has different requirements that will have to be met through the use of information collected by characterizing the RH TRU waste. Therefore, the DOE-CBFO has developed a proposed characterization program for obtaining the RH TRU waste information necessary to demonstrate that the waste meets the applicable regulatory requirements. This process involved the development of a comprehensive set of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) comprising the various regulatory requirements. The DOE-CBFO has identified seven DQOs for use in the RH TRU waste characterization program. These DQOs are defense waste determination, TRU waste determination, RH TRU determination, activity determination, RCRA physical and chemical properties, prohibited item determination, and EPA physical and chemical properties. The selection of the DQOs were based on technical, legal and regulatory drivers that assure the health and safety of the workers, the public, to protect the environment, and to comply with the requirements of the regulatory agencies. The DOE-CBFO also has the responsibility for the certification of generator/storage sites to ship RH TRU mixed waste to the WIPP for disposal. Currently, thirteen sites across the DOE complex are generators of RH TRU waste or store the waste at their location for other generators. Generator/storage site certification involves review and approval of site-specific programmatic documents that demonstrate compliance with the WIPP waste characterization and transportation requirements. Additionally, procedures must be developed to implement programmatic requirements and adequacy of those procedures determined. Finally, on-site audits evaluate the technical and administrative implementation and effectiveness of the operating procedures.

Spangler, L.R.; Most, Wm.A.; Kehrman, R.F.; Gist, C.S.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

337

WASTE CONDITIONING FOR TANK HEEL TRANSFER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research carried out at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) for the fiscal year 1998 (FY98) under the Tank Focus Area (TFA) project ''Waste Conditioning for Tank Slurry Transfer.'' The objective of this project is to determine the effect of chemical and physical properties on the waste conditioning process and transfer. The focus of this research consisted in building a waste conditioning experimental facility to test different slurry simulants under different conditions, and analyzing their chemical and physical properties. This investigation would provide experimental data and analysis results that can make the tank waste conditioning process more efficient, improve the transfer system, and influence future modifications to the waste conditioning and transfer system. A waste conditioning experimental facility was built in order to test slurry simulants. The facility consists of a slurry vessel with several accessories for parameter control and sampling. The vessel also has a lid system with a shaft-mounted propeller connected to an air motor. In addition, a circulation system is connected to the slurry vessel for simulant cooling and heating. Experimental data collection and analysis of the chemical and physical properties of the tank slurry simulants has been emphasized. For this, one waste slurry simulant (Fernald) was developed, and another two simulants (SRS and Hanford) obtained from DOE sites were used. These simulants, composed of water, soluble metal salts, and insoluble solid particles, were used to represent the actual radioactive waste slurries from different DOE sites. The simulants' chemical and physical properties analyzed include density, viscosity, pH, settling rate, and volubility. These analyses were done to samples obtained from different experiments performed at room temperature but different mixing time and strength. The experimental results indicate that the viscosity of the slurries follow the Bingham plastic model, especially when the solids concentration is increased. At low concentrations slurries may behave as Newtonian fluids. The three simulants follow a similar settling rate behavior. This behavior can be explained as a combination of one or more decreasing exponential curves. This means that the particle settling rate of the simulants decreases exponentially as time increases. The pH range for the three simulants was from 8 to 13 at all concentrations. The SRS simulant showed the highest pH, around 12; the other two simulants, Hanford and Fernald, had about the same pH range, from 3 to 9. When comparing volubility of the three simulants at the same concentration, SRS simulant showed higher volubility, followed by the Hanford simulant and the Fernald simulant, in that order. Further work is scheduled for next year (FY99) in this project, when other parameters like simulants particle size distribution, particle shape, and crystallization behavior will be studied. The same tests performed this period also will be performed at different temperatures for data comparison.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

339

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NFO for closure of CAU 104 · The transfer of CAU 104 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

none,

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

340

ONSITE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORIZATION CHALLENGES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to 2008, transfers of radioactive material within the Savannah River Site (SRS) boundary, referred to as onsite transfers, were authorized by Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents that only required approval by the SRS contractor. This practice was in accordance with the existing SRS Transportation Safety Document (TSD). In 2008 the Department of Energy Savannah River Field Office (DOE-SR) requested that the SRS TSD be revised to require DOE-SR approval of all Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents. As a result, the primary SRS contractor embarked on a multi-year campaign to consolidate old or generate new TSB documents and obtain DOE-SR approval for each. This paper focuses on the challenges incurred during the rewriting or writing of and obtaining DOE-SR approval of all Savannah River Site Onsite Transportation Safety Basis documents.

Watkins, R.; Loftin, B.; Hoang, D.; Maxted, M.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA, JUNE 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site (NTS) will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and mixed waste (MW) for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the NTS Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) for storage or disposal.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Electron transfer reactions in microporous solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied electron transfer quenching of the excited state of Ru(bpy){sub 3}{sup 2+} in aqueous suspensions of zeolites Y, L, and mordenite. The internal pore network of the zeolite is ion-exchanged with methylviologen cations, which quench the excited state of the surface-bound sensitizer. A detailed study of the quenching and charge recombination kinetics, using time-resolved luminescence quenching and transient diffuse reflectance spectroscopies, shows to remarkable effects: first, the excited state quenching is entirely dynamic is large-pore zeolites (L and Y), even when they are prepared as apparently dry'' powders (which still contain significant amounts of internally sited water). Second, a lower limit for the diffusion coefficient of the MV{sup 2+} ion in these zeolites, determined by this technique, is 10{sup {minus}7} cm{sup 2}sec, i.e., only about one order of magnitude slower than a typical ion in liquid water, and 2--3 orders of magnitude faster than charge transfer diffusion of cations in polyelectrolyte films or membranes such as Nafion. Surface sensitization of internally platinized layered oxide semiconductors such as K{sub 4-x}H{sub x}Nb{sub 6}O{sub 17}{center dot}nH{sub 2}O (x {approx} 2.5) yields photocatalysts for the production of H{sub 2} and I{sub 3{minus}} in aqueous iodide solutions. Layered alkali niobates and titanates form a class of zeolitic wide-bandap semiconductors, and are the first examples of photocatalysts that evolve hydrogen from an electrochemically reversible (i.e., non-sacrificial) electron donor with visible light excitation.

Mallouk, T.E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Submersible canned motor transfer pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

Guardiani, Richard F. (Ohio Township, Allegheny County, PA); Pollick, Richard D. (Sarver, PA); Nyilas, Charles P. (Monroeville, PA); Denmeade, Timothy J. (Lower Burrell, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spring 2014 1 Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a cylindrical nuclear fuel rod of length L and diameter df and the tube at a rate m , and the outer surface of the tube is well insulated. Heat generation occurs within. The specific heat of water pc , and the thermal conductivity of the fuel rod fk are constants. The system

Virginia Tech

346

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Entrepreneurial separation to transfer technology (ESTT) program is that entrepreneurs terminate their employment with Sandia. The term of the separation is two years with the option to request a third year. Entrepreneurs are guaranteed reinstatement by Sandia if they return before ESTT expiration. Participants may start up or helpe expand technology businesses.

Fairbanks, Richard R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Mass Transfer from Giant Donors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stability of mass transfer in binaries with convective giant donors remains an open question in modern astrophysics. There is a significant discrepancy between what the existing methods predict for a response to mass loss of the giant itself, as well as for the mass transfer rate during the Roche lobe overflow. Here we show that the recombination energy in the superadiabatic layer plays an important and hitherto unaccounted-for role in he donor's response to mass loss, in particular on its luminosity and effective temperature. Our improved optically thick nozzle method to calculate the mass transfer rate via $L_1$ allows us to evolve binary systems for a substantial Roche lobe overflow. We propose a new, strengthened criterion for the mass transfer instability, basing it on whether the donor experiences overflow through its outer Lagrangian point. We find that with the new criterion, if the donor has a well-developed outer convective envelope, the critical initial mass ratio for which a binary would evolv...

Pavlovskii, K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transfer Guide: Philosophy: General Philosophy Concentration Revised: 1 December 2009 TRANSFER GUIDE AND PLANNING WORKSHEET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transfer Guide: Philosophy: General Philosophy Concentration Revised: 1 December 2009 TRANSFER Degree ­ Philosophy general philosophy concentration This planning worksheet represents a guide for community college students transferring to Colorado State University and majoring in Philosophy: general

349

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Base closure: Environmental concerns for transfer of a ``GOCO`` facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Faced with funding restrictions, cutbacks and fiscal restraints, the United States Department of Defense (DOD), over the next few years will be required to downsize its military personnel and equipment and divest or transfer some of its facilities. A program of procedures used to assess the environmental conditions of a government facility for transfer to non-federal ownership is required. An environmental site assessment or an Environmental Baseline Survey (EBS) is a program that can be used to evaluate the environmental conditions at a facility and whether it is in compliance with existing environmental regulations. An EBS will be required at both the large military bases and the smaller Government Owned Contractor Operated (GOCO) facilities. This presentation focuses on a case study of an EBS conducted at a GOCO facility in the upper midwest. The unique challenge offered at this site, as opposed to other military bases, is that the property consisted primarily of manufacturing areas. The use of hazardous substances and petroleum products by several defense contractors over the years resulted in environmental concerns that may have affected soil and ground water. Since this site is one of the first divestitures of a GOCO facility, the data collection process, environmental findings, recommendations and unique problems associated with a GOCO facility can serve as a model for future GOCO divestitures.

Henderson, M.R.; Dent, M.J.; McLaurin, E.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geo energy research and development: technology transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

Traeger, R.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Annual report to the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer on the US Department of Energy's cultural resource activities at Colorado UMTRA Project sites, January--December 1991. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) cultural resource investigations for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites in Colorado. This report is intended to fulfill the DOE's obligation for an annual report as stated in the Programmatic Memorandum of Agreement executed between the DOE, the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, and the Colorado State Historic Preservation Officer in December 1984. Summaries of the cultural resource surveys and identified resources are provided for the UMTRA Project sites in the vicinities of Durango, Grand Junction, Gunnison, Maybell, Naturita, Rifle, and Slick Rock. This report covers all UMTRA Project cultural resource activities in Colorado from January through December 1991.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative Endpoints and Approaches for the Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater at Complex Sites - 13426  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOE)'s environmental remediation programs is to restore groundwater to beneficial use, similar to many other Federal and state environmental cleanup programs. Based on past experience, groundwater remediation to pre-contamination conditions (i.e., drinking water standards or non-detectable concentrations) can be successfully achieved at many sites. At a subset of the most complex sites, however, complete restoration is not likely achievable within the next 50 to 100 years using today's technology. This presentation describes several approaches used at complex sites in the face of these technical challenges. Many complex sites adopted a long-term management approach, whereby contamination was contained within a specified area using active or passive remediation techniques. Consistent with the requirements of their respective environmental cleanup programs, several complex sites selected land use restrictions and used risk management approaches to accordingly adopt alternative cleanup goals (alternative endpoints). Several sites used long-term management designations and approaches in conjunction with the alternative endpoints. Examples include various state designations for groundwater management zones, technical impracticability (TI) waivers or greater risk waivers at Superfund sites, and the use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) or other passive long-term management approaches over long time frames. This presentation will focus on findings, statistics, and case studies from a recently-completed report for the Department of Defense's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) (Project ER-0832) on alternative endpoints and approaches for groundwater remediation at complex sites under a variety of Federal and state cleanup programs. The primary objective of the project was to provide environmental managers and regulators with tools, metrics, and information needed to evaluate alternative endpoints for groundwater remediation at complex sites. A statistical analysis of Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites receiving TI waivers will be presented as well as case studies of other types of alternative endpoints and alternative remedial strategies that illustrate the variety of approaches used at complex sites and the technical analyses used to predict and document cost, time frame, and potential remedial effectiveness. This presentation is intended to inform DOE program managers, state regulators, practitioners and other stakeholders who are evaluating technical cleanup challenges within their own programs, and establishing programmatic approaches to evaluating and implementing long-term management approaches. Case studies provide examples of long-term management designations and strategies to manage and remediate groundwater at complex sites. At least 13 states consider some designation for groundwater containment in their corrective action policies, such as groundwater management zones, containment zones, and groundwater classification exemption areas. Long-term management designations are not a way to 'do nothing' or walk away from a site. Instead, soil and groundwater within the zone is managed to be protective of human health and the environment. Understanding when and how to adopt a long-term management approach can lead to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across DOE and at numerous other industrial and military sites across the U.S. This presentation provides context for assessing the use and appropriate role of alternative endpoints and supporting long-term management designations in final remedies. (authors)

Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elisabeth L. [ARCADIS, U.S., 2000 Powell St., 7th Floor, Emeryville, California 94608 (United States)] [ARCADIS, U.S., 2000 Powell St., 7th Floor, Emeryville, California 94608 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) .................................................8 3.1.3 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA#12;Annual Site EnvironmentalAnnual Site Environmental ReportReport for Calendar Year1997 ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT Table of Contents Page 1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

355

Competitive Dynamics of Web Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a dynamical model of web site growth in order to explore the effects of competition among web sites and to determine how they affect the nature of markets. We show that under general conditions, as the competition between sites increases, the model exhibits a sudden transition from a regime in which many sites thrive simultaneously, to a "winner take all market" in which a few sites grab almost all the users, while most other sites go nearly extinct. This prediction is in agreement with recent measurements on the nature of electronic markets.

Sebastian M. Maurer; Bernardo A. Huberman

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

356

Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

Wyatt, D.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

357

St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet NORTH ST. LOUIS SITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Lambert-St. Louis International Airport, which is now referred to as the St. Louis Airport Site (SLAPS

US Army Corps of Engineers

358

Oak Ridge Site Specific  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge, TennesseeSite Specific

359

ARM - Site Instruments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD) by Microtops AtmosphericApplication andAnthe Infrared LandSystem W-BandGangesPointgovSitesNorth

360

ARM - Site Index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch Highlights Media Contact Hanna GossgovScienceResearchgovSite

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

RMOTC RMOTC -Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProductionSite

362

Site Map - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearchScheduled System Highlights Success Stories ContactSite

363

PNNL: Site index  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 TheSteven Ashby Dr. Steven Ashby Photo Dr.1999alt=SearchSite Index

364

Disposal Information - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates The Office ofDispelling aHanford Site

365

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r. awC' 1kires/L

366

ColumbusSites.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou areDowntown Site -MiamiYVE r.x-L* d! CTColumbus,

367

Princeton Site Ofice  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil'sof EnergyReserve |DiscussesMonth,Princeton Site Ofice

368

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$ EGcG ENERGYELIkNATIONHEALXH:LTS-S IDCSTE 1 h2p'SITE

369

Getting Started - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky LearningGet Assistance Get AssistanceGetting InsideHanford Site

370

ORISE: Site Map  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Regionat CornellInternships, Scholarships and FellowshipsInterestedSite

371

Annual Reports - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4 Early813412

372

Annual Site Environmental Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4 Early813412Annual

373

Site Transition Guidance  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy Agency |AwardJohnson, Steve5,ShiprockPaducahSite

374

Small Site Closures  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational Energy AgencyImpact of Teaming Arrangements onModular ReactorSite

375

Salmon, Mississippi, Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545 OCT 28Sacandaga Site CertificationSalmon,

376

TWP Manus Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities and

377

TWP Nauru Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities

378

Tank Farms - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManus Site-Inactive TWPCarbonTake aTalentTammyProjects

379

Magnesium Ions Enhance the Transfer of Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein from Non-specific to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnesium Ions Enhance the Transfer of Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein from Non reactions which contain an excess of non-speci®c DNA, magnesium ions enhance the binding of E2 to its speci®c sites. In contrast, in the absence of non-speci®c DNA, magnesium ions have no effect on the binding of E

Gaston, Kevin

380

Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 2.4 Transport equations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 The equation for radiative transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 3Modelling of Radiative Transfer in Light Sources PROEFSCHRIFT ter verkrijging van de graad van

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt - Notepad  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Attn Technology Transfer Questions.txt From: eschaput esandc@prodigy.net Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 10:31 PM To: GC-62 Subject: Attn: Technology Transfer Questions We have...

382

Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transfer plus technology application. A&C Enercom has learned from experience that technology deployment will not occur unless utilities achieve both technology transfer (e.g, the dissemination of information) and technology application (e.g., the direct...

Kuhel, G. J.

383

Power transfer through strongly coupled resonances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using self-resonant coils in a strongly coupled regime, we experimentally demonstrate efficient non-radiative power transfer over distances of up to eight times the radius of the coils. We use this system to transfer 60W ...

Kurs, André

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate ...

Araujo, P. T.

385

Microsoft PowerPoint - File Transfer-Turner  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping Richland Operations Office SiteOuachita River SystemTransfer Best

386

State Transfer and Spin Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a Hamiltonian that can be used for amplifying the signal from a quantum state, enabling the measurement of a macroscopic observable to determine the state of a single spin. We prove a general mapping between this Hamiltonian and an exchange Hamiltonian for arbitrary coupling strengths and local magnetic fields. This facilitates the use of existing schemes for perfect state transfer to give perfect amplification. We further prove a link between the evolution of this fixed Hamiltonian and classical Cellular Automata, thereby unifying previous approaches to this amplification task. Finally, we show how to use the new Hamiltonian for perfect state transfer in the, to date, unique scenario where total spin is not conserved during the evolution, and demonstrate that this yields a significantly different response in the presence of decoherence.

A. Kay

2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Idaho Administrator's Memorandum on Transfer Processing Policies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Administrator's Memorandum on Transfer Processing Policies and Procedures Author Idaho Water Management Division Administrator Recipient Water Management Division Published...

388

Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

Choi, Stephen U. S. (Lisle, IL); Eastman, Jeffrey A. (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Submersible canned motor transfer pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

1997-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

390

Successfully transfer HPI proprietary technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intellectual property such as petrochemical/refining licensed technologies are revenue generators for many operating and E/C companies. Successful transfers of available technologies involve many critical elements beyond the basic design engineering stages. Buyers and sellers both have obligations to the licensing agreements. These obligations will vary widely as to the clients` needs and strengths, especially for facilities to be constructed in developing areas. Using the author`s guidelines can streamline new technology evaluations and acquisitions.

Hassan, N. [BE and K, Newark, DE (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Title I Disposal Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Office of Legacy Management and the Navajo Nation have been discussing an item specified in the Long Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Mexican Hat site for some time now, and we have come to a resolution on the matter. The LTSP specifies seep sampling at the site to confirm that the disposal cell is operating as designed. Typically, this is to be done for a specific time and then reevaluated, but, in this LTSP there is no time frame given. After 8 years of experience in sampling and observing these six seeps, it has been found that most are not flowing at all, and those that have any water running are so limited in flow that it is difficult to obtain a sample. In addition, several risk assessments have been performed over the years to evaluate the possible ecological risks associated with exposure to this seep water. The analysis indicates there would be no eco-risk based on the historic data to any wildlife or livestock. This information and a full analysis of the situation was submitted to the Navajo Nation for their consideration, and, in further discussions, they have agreed to limit the sampling to only making observations during the annual cell inspection, and if water is observed to be increased compared to historic observations, then sampling will resume. Their agreement to this change is noted in the enclosed copy of their letter to DOE dated July 25, 2006. I have enclosed a copy of this report,

Mr. Bill; Von Till

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

1996 Site environmental report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FEMP is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the FEMP in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the FEMP. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1996 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the FEMP progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Certification Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a generator of transuranic (TRU) and TRU mixed waste destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the Hanford Site must ensure that its TRU waste meets the requirements of US. Department of Energy (DOE) 0 435.1, ''Radioactive Waste Management,'' and the Contact-Handled (CH) Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP-WAC). WIPP-WAC requirements are derived from the WIPP Technical Safety Requirements, WIPP Safety Analysis Report, TRUPACT-II SARP, WIPP Land Withdrawal Act, WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 191/194 Compliance Certification Decision. The WIPP-WAC establishes the specific physical, chemical, radiological, and packaging criteria for acceptance of defense TRU waste shipments at WIPP. The WPP-WAC also requires that participating DOE TRU waste generator/treatment/storage sites produce site-specific documents, including a certification plan, that describe their program for managing TRU waste and TRU waste shipments before transferring waste to WIPP. Waste characterization activities provide much of the data upon which certification decisions are based. Waste characterization requirements for TRU waste and TRU mixed waste that contains constituents regulated under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) are established in the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Waste Analysis Plan (WAP). The Hanford Site Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) (HNF-2599) implements the applicable requirements in the WAP and includes the qualitative and quantitative criteria for making hazardous waste determinations. The Hanford Site must also ensure that its TRU waste destined for disposal at WPP meets requirements for transport in the Transuranic Package Transporter-11 (TRUPACT-11). The US. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) establishes the TRUPACT-11 requirements in the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package (TRUPACT-11 SARP). In addition, a TRU waste is eligible for disposal at WIPP only if it has been generated in whole or in part by one or more of the activities listed in Section 10101(3) of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. DOE sites must determine that each waste stream to be disposed of at WIPP is ''defense'' TRU waste. (See also the definition of ''defense'' TRU waste.). Only CH TRU wastes meeting the requirements of the QAPjP, WIPP-WAP, WPP-WAC, and other requirements documents described above will be accepted for transportation and disposal at WIPP.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ME 519: THEORY OF HEAT TRANSFER Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ME 519: THEORY OF HEAT TRANSFER Fall 2014 Instructor: Class time: Classroom: Office Hours: Prof Tuesday 4­5pm or by appointment Class description This course will cover the fundamentals of heat transfer. An introductory course in heat transfer (ME 419 or equivalent) is pre-requisite. Grading 20% Homework 25% Exam 1

Lin, Xi

397

THE UNLV FOUNDATION MONETARY TRANSFER FORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNLV FOUNDATION MONETARY TRANSFER FORM (Use one form for each account) Date Department Amount Transfer from Foundation Account Name UNLV Foundation Foundation Account Number Transfer to University contributions to this fund were accepted. If Foundation account number does not equal BOR account number

Walker, Lawrence R.

398

Spin-out Company Portfolio Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spin-out Company Portfolio 2012 Technology Transfer The Sir Colin Campbell Building The University `Entrepreneurial University of the Year' in 2008. The Technology Transfer Office (TTO) has close links detail. Dr Susan Huxtable Director, Technology Transfer Tel: +44 (0)115 84 66388 Email: susan

Aickelin, Uwe

399

Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Services 2005 A n n u a l R e p o r t #12;The UCSD Technology Transfer Advisory Committee (TTAC) is responsible for general oversight of the UCSD Technology chancellor of Research. It meets periodically to assess UCSD technology transfer policy and guide

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

400

Frequently Asked Questions 1. Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frequently Asked Questions 1. Technology Transfer 2. Patent 3. Requirements for obtaining a patent is not addressed, please contact Colleen Michael at 631-344 -4919. #12;What is Technology Transfer? Technology Transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Bidirectional Technology Transfer: Sabbaticals in Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bidirectional Technology Transfer: Sabbaticals in Industry Mark D. Hill University of Wisconsin---not just technology transfer---through a ten­month sabbatical in an industrial product group. I advocate product group. The next sections discuss technology transfer, my recent sabbatical, and conclude

Hill, Mark D.

402

Requirements Engineering Technology Transfer: An Experience Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Requirements Engineering Technology Transfer: An Experience Report Francisco A. C. Pinheiro1 Julio of software engineering technology transfer was identified by Pfleeger (1999). She came to the con- clusion Journal of Technology Transfer, 28, 159­165, 2003 ©2003 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured

Leite, Julio Cesar Sampaio do Prado

403

Technology Transfer at Penn State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer at Penn State University An Inventor's Guide to #12;Our mission is to protect on the University of Michigan's "Inventor's Guide to Technology Transfer," with adaptation for Penn State, and the staff of the UM Office of Technology Transfer for their kind permission to use their excellent material

Lee, Dongwon

404

Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Report on Federal Laboratory Technology Transfer FY 2003 Activity Metrics and Outcomes 2004 Report to the President and the Congress under the Technology Transfer and Commercialization Act Office Chapter 2. Trends in Federal Lab Technology Transfer 2.1 Cooperative Research and Development

Perkins, Richard A.

405

An Inventor's Guide to Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Inventor's Guide to Technology Transfer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on the University of Michigan's "Inventor's Guide to Technology Transfer," with adaptations for MIT and the MIT of Technology Transfer for their kind permission to use their excellent material and to the University

Reuter, Martin

406

Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology Transfer from the University of Oxford www.isis-innovation.com #12;Isis Innovation Ltd Oxford Technology Transfer IP, Patents, Licences, Spin-outs, Material Sales, Seed Funds, Isis Angels Network Oxford Expertise Consulting, Services Isis Consulting Business Technology Transfer and Innovation

Paxton, Anthony T.

407

Research and Technology Transfer Faculty Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research and Technology Transfer Faculty Conference August 18th 2014 Bruce D. Honeyman Office of the VPRTT #12;Role of the Office of the Vice President for Research and Technology Transfer · `The role Poate. · Support Mines' Strategic Plan Office of the Vice President of Research and Technology Transfer

408

WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WHICH MODEL OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER FOR NANOTECHNOLOGY? A Comparison with Biotech, where technology transfer and knowledge-bridging will play a pivotal role in the industrial dynamics of the microelectronics sector. Keywords. Nanotechnology ­ biotechnology ­ microelectronics ­ technology transfer

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012 SRS was set up by Dr Paul Sutton and Prof Linda licensing fees. Dr. Margaret Woods | Technology Transfer Manager mjwoods@tcd.ie Ms. Audrey Crosbie;Trinity Technology Transfer News December 2012 Trinity Campus Company Funding Round EmpowerTheUser (www

O'Mahony, Donal E.

410

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division of asphalt pavements. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM JULY 2010, VOL. 2, NO. 1 Warm Mix Asphalt Hits the Road, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer Program, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley

California at Berkeley, University of

411

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY UPDATE This Technology Transfer Program publication is funded by the Division solve the very serious problem of waste tire disposal. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM SEPTEMBER 2009, VOL, University of California Pavement Research Center, and California LTAP Field Engineer, Technology Transfer

California at Berkeley, University of

412

Transferring to The University of New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2007 ­ 2009 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

New Mexico, University of

413

Transferring to The University of New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transferring to The University of New Mexico From Central New Mexico College A Transfer Articulation Guide based on Central New Mexico Community College Catalog Year 2009 ­ 2011 Apply to UNM on-line at www.unm.edu #12;Transferring to The University of New Mexico from Central New Mexico Community College

New Mexico, University of

414

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kaviany and B.P. Singh, “Radiative heat transfer in porousmedia”, Advances in Heat Transfer, vol. 23, no. 23, pp. 133–Thermal radiation heat transfer, Hemisphere Publishing Co. ,

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Climate Change: A Challenge to the Means of Technology Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TO THE MEANS OF TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER Gordon J. MacDonaldthe importance of technology transfer in dealing withthe discussion of technology transfer has centered on

MacDonald, Gordon J. F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Intellectual Property Protection and Technology Transfer: Evidence From US Multinationals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Technology Transfer? Empirical Evidence FromProtection and Technology Transfer: Evidence from USProperty Protection and Technology Transfer Evidence from US

Kanwar, Sunil

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9. Main Stem Reservoirs Cultural Resources Management Plans ........................................ 7 10. Five-Year Cultural Resources Implementation Plan ........................................................................................ 11 15. Cultural Resource Education Program

US Army Corps of Engineers

419

South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

heating heat recovery systems, and other energy recovery equipment k. Repair or replace electric motors and motor controls like variable speed drives 1. Incorporate other...

420

Alabama State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

heating heat recovery systems, and other energy recovery equipment k. Repair or replace electric motors and motor controls like valiable speed drives I. Incorporate other...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

or inside the building. g. Wood pellet storage silos or other containers used for bulk delivery of wood pellet fuel are considered temporary structures, and will not...

422

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

unprecedented numbers of requests for historic preservation review of un delia kings funded by all Federal Agencies, including undeliakings funded by the Programs;...

424

Utah State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

106 revielV. n. The Recipient and SHPO will make bcst efforts to expedite reviews throlgh a finding of "No Adverse Effect with conditions" wilen the Recipient and tho SHPO...

425

Iowa State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

k. Adding variable speed drive motors I. Insulation of water heater tanks and pipes m. Furnace or hot water tank replacement that does not require a visible new supply or...

426

Kansas State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

k. Adding variable speed drive motors 1. Insulation of water heater tanks and pipes m. Furnace or hot water tank replacement that does not require a visible new supply or...

427

Hawaii State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

i. Adding variable speed drive motors j. Insulation of water heater tanks and pipes k. Furnace or hot water tank replacement that does not require a visible new supply or...

428

South Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

k. Adding variable speed drive motors I. Insulation of water heater tanks and pipes m. Furnace or hot water tank replacement that does not require a visible new supply or...

429

North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

k. Adding variable speed drive motors l. Insulation of water heater tanks and pipes m. Furnace or hot water tank replacement that does not require a visible new supply or...

430

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

DOE Prepares Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Agency or only require updates as the PEIS progresses. A meeting was held with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on November 9, 2011, and DOE initiated the informal consultation...

432

Florida State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfFletcher E.Florida Recovery Act

433

Connecticut State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth Codestheatfor Optimized91 *09 FY 2009

434

Historic Preservation - Executed Programmatic Agreements | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many| DepartmentAndreaHilton

435

Massachusetts State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment Accident TolerantDepartment of Energy Massachusetts

436

Pennsylvania State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652Grow Your EnergyTechnology toPaulStorageDepartment

437

Wisconsin State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf TheViolations | Department ofEnergyWireless Sensors Improveof

438

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving STATEMENT OF MELANIESUBSIDYSUNSHOT1 0-SA-02

439

Programmatic Records Schedules | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (PSE

440

Tennessee State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice -Template for aof Energy Tennessee

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE NUCLEAR INFRASTRUCTURE PROGRAMMATIC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA1 0-SA-02 September 2013 SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS

442

Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001Long-Term Storage of Cesium1940sof Energy

443

Delaware State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix

444

Louisiana State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 |KSRS25RV*)BoydLoretta Robinson LorettaEnergia y Clima

445

ACHP - Nationwide Programmatic Agreements | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights,Information Of TheFixed UtilitiesHandbook |Nationwide

446

South Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study |4Solid-StateDepartmentSystems

447

South Dakota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScoping Study

448

Programmatic Agreement for Colorado | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d FNEPA/309Department ofDepartment ofProgram Update and50 CHAPTER

449

California State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 20154: CategoricalDepartmentFuel CellDepartmentDepartmentof

450

Washington State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of| Department of EnergyDepartmentDepartment of EnergyWasWashingtonof

451

New Mexico State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,FermiJoshuaAugust1 |Department ofDepartment of EnergyaEnergyof

452

Minnesota State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOE TribaltheMy nameMid-LevelMidwestSept.Minnesota E85of

453

New Hampshire State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutiveRateEnergyDepartment

454

North Carolina State Historic Preservation Programmatic Agreement |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership ProgramDepartment ofCatalystsCarolina

455

NIST Three Year Programmatic Plan 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, standards, and technology in a range of strategic areas critical to the nation's economy. The America will continue to refine this plan as it works with the Administration to address national priorities. This Plan is a lead agency in DOC's efforts towards its innovation goal to Foster a more innovative U.S. economy ­ one

456

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report DOE/ORO/2445 2012 #12;Cover Image Jeff Riggs Logistical Services Design Creative Media Communications Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2012 #12;DOE/ORO/2445 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental

Pennycook, Steve

457

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report DOE/ORO-2473 2013 #12;Cover Image & Design Creative Media Communications Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report 2013 #12;DOE/ORO/2473 Oak Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report for 2013 on the World

Pennycook, Steve

458

Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AU TH O R PR O O F Heat Transfer Research, 2010, Vol. 41, No. 6 Turbine Aero-Heat Transfer Studies in Rotating Research Facilities CENGIZ CAMCI Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory, Department The present paper deals with the experimental aero-heat transfer studies performed in rotating turbine

Camci, Cengiz

459

Guidance for Preparing Annual Agency Technology Transfer Reports Under the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance for Preparing Annual Agency Technology Transfer Reports Under the Technology Transfer U.S. Department of Commerce in conjunction with The Interagency Working Group on Technology Transfer May 2013 #12;2 Introduction Under the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000 (P.L. 106

460

Technology needs for remediation: Hanford and other DOE sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies are being developed under the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program to facilitate remediation of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) buried and stored low-level radioactive, transuranic (TRU), and mixed radioactive and hazardous buried wastes. The BWID program is being coordinated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, a DOE site that has large volumes of buried radioactive wastes. The program is currently focusing its efforts on the problems at INEL's Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). As specific technologies are successfully demonstrated, they will be available for transfer to applications at other DOE buried waste sites. The purpose of this study is to present buried waste technology needs that have been identified for DOE sites other than INEL.

Stapp, D.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

462

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Operations of the LR56 radioactive liquid cask transport system at U.S. Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LR56 cask system is licensed for use in France under Certificate of Compliance F/309/B(U)F for transport of 4,000-liter volumes of radioactive liquids. Three LR56 cask systems (with modifications for use at Department of Energy (DOE) sites) have been purchased for delivery at the Hanford Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The LR56 cask systems will be used for on-site transfers of Type B quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The ORNL unit will also be used as a Type A packaging for transfers of radioactive liquids between DOE sites. This paper discusses LR56 operating features and the use of the cask system at the three DOE sites.

Davidson, J.S. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hornstra, D.J. [Performance Development Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Sazawal, V.K. [NUMATEC, Inc., Bethesda, MD (United States); Clement, G. [SGN, St. Quentin en Yvelines (France)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Release Data Package for Hanford Site Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support a Hanford assessment. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 through 2005 to support the Release Module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) for the updated composite analysis. This work was completed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, part of the Remediation and Closure Science Project, the Hanford Assessments Project, and the Characterization of Systems Project managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Related characterization activities and data packages for the vadose zone and groundwater are being developed under the remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The Release Module applies release models to waste inventory data from the Inventory Module and accounts for site remediation activities as a function of time. The resulting releases to the vadose zone, expressed as time profiles of annual rates, become source terms for the Vadose Zone Module. Radioactive decay is accounted for in all inputs and outputs of the Release Module. The Release Module is implemented as the VADER (Vadose zone Environmental Release) computer code. Key components of the Release Module are numerical models (i.e., liquid, soil-debris, cement, saltcake, and reactor block) that simulate contaminant release from the different waste source types found at the Hanford Site. The Release Module also handles remediation transfers to onsite and offsite repositories.

Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Engel, David W.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Available transfer capability and first order sensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of calculating Available Transfer Capability and the exploration of the first order effects of certain power system network variables are described. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has ordered that bulk electrical control areas must provide to market participants a ``commercially viable`` network transfer capability for the import, export, and through-put of energy. A practical method for deriving this transfer capability utilizing both linear and non-linear power flow analysis methods is developed that acknowledges both thermal and voltage system limitations. The Available Transfer Capability is the incremental transfer capability derived by the method reduced by margins. A procedure for quantifying the first order effect of network uncertainties such as load forecast error and simultaneous transfers on the calculated transfer capability of a power system snapshot are explored. The quantification of these network uncertainties can provide information necessary for system operation, planning, and energy market participation.

Gravener, M.H. [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States)] [PJM Interconnection, L.L.C., Valley Forge, PA (United States); Nwankpa, C. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Site Management Guide (Blue Book)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

None

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nuclear reactor safety heat transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reviewed is a book which has 5 parts: Overview, Fundamental Concepts, Design Basis Accident-Light Water Reactors (LWRs), Design Basis Accident-Liquid-Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs), and Special Topics. It combines a historical overview, textbook material, handbook information, and the editor's personal philosophy on safety of nuclear power plants. Topics include thermal-hydraulic considerations; transient response of LWRs and LMFBRs following initiating events; various accident scenarios; single- and two-phase flow; single- and two-phase heat transfer; nuclear systems safety modeling; startup and shutdown; transient response during normal and upset conditions; vapor explosions, natural convection cooling; blockages in LMFBR subassemblies; sodium boiling; and Three Mile Island.

Jones, O.C.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional VariationCluster) |About Us /Transfers

472

Transfer Service (contracts/rd)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2Topo II: AnTraining andfor a CleanTransfer Service --

473

Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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474

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Montgomery, James M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

2007 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

Ratel,K.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM; (MANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORS)

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nevada National Security Site Industrial Sites Project Closeout - 12498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is responsible for environmental restoration (ER) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This includes remediation at Industrial Sites where past nuclear testing activities and activities that supported nuclear testing may have or are known to have resulted in the release of contaminants into the environment. Industrial Sites at the NNSS have included nuclear facilities that supported the nuclear rocket/missile development programs, gas stations, landfills, spill sites, ordnance sites, and numerous other waste disposal and release sites. The NNSS Industrial Sites activities neared completion at the end of fiscal year 2011 while other activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and part of the same NNSS ER Project are forecasted to extend to 2027 or beyond. With the majority of Industrial Sites corrective action units (CAUs) completed (more than 250 CAUs and over 1,800 corrective action sites), it was determined that an activity closeout process should be implemented to ensure that the work completed over the past 15 years is well documented in a comprehensive and concise summary. While the process used to close each individual CAU is described in approved documents, no single document describes in summary fashion the work completed to close the many individual Industrial Sites. The activity closeout process will be used to develop an Industrial Sites closeout document that describes these years of work. This document will summarize the number of Industrial Sites closed under the FFACO and provide general descriptions of projects, contaminants removed, and sites closed in place with corresponding Use Restrictions. Other pertinent information related to Industrial Sites work such as the project history, closure decisions, historical declarations, remediation strategies, and final CAU status will be included in the closeout document, along with a table listing each CAU and corresponding corrective action sites within each CAU. Using this process of conducting the activity closeout and developing a closeout document may prove useful for other ER projects within the DOE complex in describing how a long period of ER can be summarized in a single document. The NNSS Industrial Sites activities were completed over the span of 15 years and involved the investigation, cleanup or Use Restriction, and closure of more than 260 CAUs and over 1,800 sites. These activities will conclude in FY 2012 (with the exception of one CAU). In order to capture the work completed over this length of time and document decisions made during the activities, a closeout effort was initiated. The closeout will review the work conducted during the Industrial Sites activities and produce a single document that summarizes Industrial Sites activities. This closeout is being conducted at an interim stage in the overall NNSA/NSO ER Project since the Soils and UGTA activities will continue for a number of years, but the completion of the Industrial Sites project warrants conducting a closeout now while personnel are available and information is still current. The process followed by NNSA/NSO in conducing project closeout for the Industrial Sites portion of the ER program may prove useful within the DOE complex in demonstrating how a large ER project can be summarized. (authors)

Cabble, Kevin [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Krauss, Mark [S.M. Stoller for Navarro-Intera, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89193 (United States); Matthews, Pat [Navarro-Intera, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 8919 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The EMDEX Project: Technology transfer and occupational measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the EPRI EMDEX Project -- is a multifaceted project entailing technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. The specific objectives of the project in order of priority were: to transfer the EMDEX technology to utilities; to develop measurement protocols and data management capabilities for large exposure data sets; and to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. Transfer of the EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure system (EMDEX) technology to the participating utilities was accomplished through training and through extensive involvement in the exposure data collection effort. Field exposure data measured by an EMDEX system were collected by volunteer utility employees at 59 sites in the US and three other countries between October 1988 and September 1989. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field and 23,000 hours of electric field exposure records taken at 10-second intervals were obtained, of which 70% were from Work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments have been analyzed by Primary Work Environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification. Generally, the measured fields and exposures in the Generation, Transmission, Distribution and Substation environments were higher than in other occupational environments in utilities. The Nonwork fields and exposures for workers associated with various categories were comparable. Evaluation of the project by participants indicated general satisfaction with the EMDEX system and with this approach to technology transfer. This document, Volume 3 contains appendices with a complete set of project protocols, project materials, and extensive data tables.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electrocatalysis of anodic and cathodic oxygen-transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrocatalysis of oxygen-transfer reactions is discussed in two parts. In Part I, the reduction of iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}) is examined as an example of cathodic oxygen transfer. On oxide-covered Pt electrodes (PtO), a large cathodic current is observed in the presence of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to coincide with the reduction of PtO. The total cathodic charge exceeds the amount required for reduction of PtO and IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to produce an adsorbed product. An electrocatalytic link between reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and reduction of PtO is indicated. In addition, on oxide-free Pt electrodes, the reduction of IO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} is determined to be sensitive to surface treatment. The electrocatalytic oxidation of CN{sup {minus}} is presented as an example of anodic oxygen transfer in Part II. The voltametric response of CN{sup {minus}} is virtually nonexistent at PbO{sub 2} electrodes. The response is significantly improved by doping PbO{sub 2} with Cu. Cyanide is also oxidized effectively at CuO-film electrodes. Copper is concluded to serve as an adsorption site for CN{sup {minus}}. It is proposed that an oxygen tunneling mechanism comparable to electron tunneling does not occur at the electrode-solution interface. The adsorption of CN{sup {minus}} is therefore considered to be a necessary prerequisite for oxygen transfer. 201 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

Wels, B.R.

1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transfer sites programmatic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

482

Early Site Permit Demonstration Program: Siting Guide, Site selection and evaluation criteria for an early site permit application. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In August 1991, the Joint Contractors came to agreement with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Department of Energy (DOE) on a workscope for the cost-shared Early Site Permit Demonstration Program. One task within the scope was the development of a guide for site selection criteria and procedures. A generic Siting Guide his been prepared that is a roadmap and tool for applicants to use developing detailed siting plans for their specific region of the country. The guide presents three fundamental principles that, if used, ensure a high degree of success for an ESP applicant. First, the site selection process should take into consideration environmentally diverse site locations within a given region of interest. Second, the process should contain appropriate opportunities for input from the public. Third, the process should be applied so that it is clearly reasonable to an impartial observer, based on appropriately selected criteria, including criteria which demonstrate that the site can host an advanced light water reactor (ALWR). The Siting Guide provides for a systematic, comprehensive site selection process in which three basic types of criteria (exclusionary, avoidance, and suitability) are presented via a four-step procedure. It provides a check list of the criteria for each one of these steps. Criteria are applied qualitatively, as well as presented numerically, within the guide. The applicant should use the generic guide as an exhaustive checklist, customizing the guide to his individual situation.

Not Available

1993-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

483

Site environmental report - CY 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental compliance activities are described for the NPR-3 site from January 1997 through December 1997. Hazardous waste storage activities and storage tank testing are included.

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Chernobyl’s waste site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the prospects for using the Chernobyl exclusion zone for development of a spent fuel store, waste disposal site and other nuclear facilities.

Schmieman, Eric A.; Paskevych, Sergiy; Sizov, Andrey; Batiy, Valeriy

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Hazardous Sites Cleanup Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act tasks the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection with regulating hazardous waste. The department is charged with siting, review, permitting and development of hazardous waste...

486

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT x 2003 Site Environmental Report Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT x 2003 Site Environmental Report Team The SER Team realizes. The Environmental and Waste Management Services Division Field SamplingTeam (photo, center right) (From left to right) Robert Metz, Carlee Ogeka, Richard Lagattolla, and Lawrence Lettieri The Environmental

Homes, Christopher C.

487

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

CSMRI Site Proposed Plan Proposed Plan for CSMRI Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

also includes summaries of other alternatives that were evaluated for use at the Site. This document participation responsibilities under the Section 300.430(f)(2) of the National Oil and Hazardous Substances on the Site that were removed in the mid-1990s. A settling pond, located between the building complex

490

The role of historical operations information for supporting remedial investigation work at the former Harshaw Chemical Site - 8279.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early stages of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste (HTRW) site investigations, basic record searches are performed to help direct the agencies investigating contaminated sites to areas of concern and to identify contaminants of interest (COI). Plans developed on the basis of this preliminary research alone are often incomplete and result in unexpected discoveries either while in the field investigating the site or after the reports have been written. Many of the sites investigated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action program (FUSRAP) have complex histories that are slowly uncovered over the life of the project. Because of programmatic constraints, nuances of these sites are often discovered late in their programs and result in increased expenditures in order to fully characterize the site, perform a robust feasibility study, and recommend appropriate alternatives for remediation. By identifying resources for public records, classified records, historic aerial photographs, and other sources of site-specific historical information, a process can be established to optimize the collection of information and to develop efficient and complete project plans. In many cases, interviews with past site employees are very useful tools. In combining what is found in the records, observed on historic aerial photographs, and heard from former employees and family members, teams investigating these sites can begin to compile sound and more complete conceptual site models (CSMs). The former Harshaw Chemical Site (HCS) illustrates this discovery process. HCS is part of FUSRAP. Preliminary investigations by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in the 1970s provided an initial CSM of activities that had taken place that may have resulted in contamination. The remedial investigation (RI) conducted by the US Army Corps of Engi