National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for transfer models operated

  1. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER MODEL FOR SRS WASTE TANK OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-27

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation. The analysis model took a parametric approach. A series of the modeling analyses was performed to examine how submersible mixer pumps affect tank temperature during waste removal operation in the Type-I tank. The model domain included radioactive decay heat load, two SMP's, and one Submersible Transfer Pump (STP) as heat source terms. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%. Transient modeling calculations for two potential scenarios of sludge mixing and removal operations have been made to estimate transient waste temperatures within a Type-I waste tank. When two 200-HP submersible mixers and 12 active cooling coils are continuously operated in 100-in tank level and 40 C initial temperature for 40 days since the initiation of mixing operation, waste temperature rises about 9 C in 48 hours at a maximum. Sensitivity studies for the key operating variables were performed. The sensitivity results showed that the chromate cooling coil system provided the primary cooling mechanism to remove process heat from the tank during operation.

  2. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a UCLA-led solar project to investigate high operating temperature liquid metal heat transfer fluids, funded by the SunShot initiative. The project team is using a combination of modeling along with a variety of property measurement and validation studies to demonstrate that the metal alloys identified can meet all the needs of a concentrating solar power plant. A successful candidate fluid would allow for the reduction of the levelized cost of energy by increasing the operating temperature for the CSP plant power cycle, which would increase thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency.

  3. Operation Periods: Single Column Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    climate model. Researchers first use the SCM to efficiently improve submodels of clouds, solar radiation transfer, and atmosphere-surface interactions, then implement the results...

  4. Project Profile: High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), along with partners at the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University, under the 2012 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids funding opportunity, is investigating the use of metal alloys as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems operating at temperatures in excess of 800°C. By allowing higher temperature operation, CSP systems can achieve greater efficiencies and thereby reduce the overall cost of electricity production.

  5. An early warning indicator for atmospheric blocking events using transfer operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tantet, Alexis Burgt, Fiona R. van der; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2015-03-15

    The existence of persistent midlatitude atmospheric flow regimes with time-scales larger than 5–10 days and indications of preferred transitions between them motivates to develop early warning indicators for such regime transitions. In this paper, we use a hemispheric barotropic model together with estimates of transfer operators on a reduced phase space to develop an early warning indicator of the zonal to blocked flow transition in this model. It is shown that the spectrum of the transfer operators can be used to study the slow dynamics of the flow as well as the non-Markovian character of the reduction. The slowest motions are thereby found to have time scales of three to six weeks and to be associated with meta-stable regimes (and their transitions) which can be detected as almost-invariant sets of the transfer operator. From the energy budget of the model, we are able to explain the meta-stability of the regimes and the existence of preferred transition paths. Even though the model is highly simplified, the skill of the early warning indicator is promising, suggesting that the transfer operator approach can be used in parallel to an operational deterministic model for stochastic prediction or to assess forecast uncertainty.

  6. Project Design Concept for Transfer Piping For Project W-314 Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    1999-09-28

    This Project Design Concept represents operational requirements for design of transfer piping system for Phase I of Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation Upgrades.

  7. TRANSIENT HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR SRS RADIOACTIVE TANK OPERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2013-06-27

    The primary objective of the present work is to perform a heat balance study for type-I waste tank to assess the impact of using submersible mixer pumps during waste removal. The temperature results calculated by the model will be used to evaluate the temperatures of the slurry waste under various tank operating conditions. A parametric approach was taken to develop a transient model for the heat balance study for type-I waste tanks such as Tank 11, during waste removal by SMP. The tank domain used in the present model consists of two SMP?s for sludge mixing, one STP for the waste removal, cooling coil system with 36 coils, and purge gas system. The sludge waste contained in Tank 11 also has a decay heat load of about 43 W/m{sup 3} mainly due to the emission of radioactive gamma rays. All governing equations were established by an overall energy balance for the tank domain, and they were numerically solved. A transient heat balance model used single waste temperature model, which represents one temperature for the entire waste liquid domain contained in the tank at each transient time.

  8. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding (Book) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding In fusion welding, parts...

  9. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A successful candidate fluid would allow for the reduction of the levelized cost of energy by increasing the operating temperature for the CSP plant power cycle, which would ...

  10. Self-pacing direct memory access data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A

    2015-02-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for self-pacing DMA data transfer operations for nodes in a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin DMA on an origin node, a RTS message to a target node, the RTS message specifying an message on the origin node for transfer to the target node; receiving, in an origin injection FIFO for the origin DMA from a target DMA on the target node in response to transferring the RTS message, a target RGET descriptor followed by a DMA transfer operation descriptor, the DMA descriptor for transmitting a message portion to the target node, the target RGET descriptor specifying an origin RGET descriptor on the origin node that specifies an additional DMA descriptor for transmitting an additional message portion to the target node; processing, by the origin DMA, the target RGET descriptor; and processing, by the origin DMA, the DMA transfer operation descriptor.

  11. Chaining direct memory access data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2010-09-28

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for chaining DMA data transfer operations for compute nodes in a parallel computer that include: receiving, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO buffer for the origin DMA engine, a RGET data descriptor specifying a DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node and a second RGET data descriptor on the origin node, the second RGET data descriptor specifying a target RGET data descriptor on the target node, the target RGET data descriptor specifying an additional DMA transfer operation data descriptor on the origin node; creating, by the origin DMA engine, an RGET packet in dependence upon the RGET data descriptor, the RGET packet containing the DMA transfer operation data descriptor and the second RGET data descriptor; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine to a target DMA engine on the target node, the RGET packet.

  12. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-12-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles, the University of California, Berkeley, and Yale University is one of the 2012 SunShot CSP R&D awardees for their Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI): High Operating Temperature (HOT) Fluids. This fact sheet explains the motivation, description, and impact of the project.

  13. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Takatoshi E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Aln E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts the reorganization shift to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to understand the physical origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard; Perez, Danielle

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  15. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435 Citation Details ...

  16. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers to Compare Alternatives for High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Citation Details ...

  17. A mathematical framework for multiscale science and engineering : the variational multiscale method and interscale transfer operators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Gregory John; Collis, Samuel Scott; Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Lehoucq, Richard B.; Parks, Michael L.; Jones, Reese E.; Silling, Stewart Andrew; Scovazzi, Guglielmo; Bochev, Pavel B.

    2007-10-01

    This report is a collection of documents written as part of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project A Mathematical Framework for Multiscale Science and Engineering: The Variational Multiscale Method and Interscale Transfer Operators. We present developments in two categories of multiscale mathematics and analysis. The first, continuum-to-continuum (CtC) multiscale, includes problems that allow application of the same continuum model at all scales with the primary barrier to simulation being computing resources. The second, atomistic-to-continuum (AtC) multiscale, represents applications where detailed physics at the atomistic or molecular level must be simulated to resolve the small scales, but the effect on and coupling to the continuum level is frequently unclear.

  18. Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling The multiphysics capabilities of COMSOL provide the necessary tools to simulate the turbulent thermal-fluid aspects of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Version 4.1, and later, of COMSOL provides three different turbulence models: the standard k-{var_epsilon}

  19. MODELING HEAT TRANSFER IN SPENT FUEL TRANSFER CASK NEUTRON SHIELDS A CHALLENGING PROBLEM IN NATURAL CONVECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Cuta, Judith M.; Bajwa, C.; Baglietto, E.

    2010-07-18

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 10-15 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper proposes that there may be reliable CFD approaches to the transfer cask problem, specifically coupled steady-state solvers or unsteady simulations; however, both of these solutions take significant computational effort. Segregated (uncoupled) steady state solvers that were tested did not accurately capture the flow field and heat transfer distribution in this application. Mesh resolution, turbulence modeling, and the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions are addressed. Because of the critical nature of this application, the need for new experiments at representative scales is clearly demonstrated.

  20. Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improvements to the SHDOM Radiative Transfer Modeling Package K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado W. J. Wiscombe National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction The spherical harmonic discrete ordinate method (SHDOM) is an algorithm and FORTRAN computer code for three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric radiative transfer modeling (Evans 1998). The optical properties (extinction, single scattering albedo, and phase function)

  1. New model of calculating the energy transfer efficiency for the spherical theta-pinch device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, G.; Hock, C.; Loisch, G.; Jacoby, J.; Xiao, G.; Zhao, Y.; Weyrich, K.; Li, Y.

    2015-05-15

    Ion-beam-plasma-interaction plays an important role in the field of warm dense matter and inertial confinement fusion. A spherical theta pinch is proposed to act as a plasma target in various applications including a plasma stripper cell. One key parameter for such applications is the free electron density. A linear dependency of this density to the amount of energy transferred into the plasma from an energy storage was found by Teske. Since the amount of stored energy is known, the energy transfer efficiency is a reliable parameter for the design of a spherical theta pinch device. As the main assumption of a constant reflected plasma resistance is contradictory by the measured data, the traditional two models of energy transfer efficiency will lead to wrong results. From measurements, the parasitic resistance is derived as constant. Based on this key parameter, a new model is proposed. Due to no assumption, the new model is considered as exact. Further, a comparison of these three different models is given at a fixed operation voltage for the full range of working gas pressures. Due to the inappropriate assumptions included in the traditional models, one owns a tendency to overestimate the energy transfer efficiency whereas the other leads to an underestimation. Applying our new model to a wide spread set of operation voltages and gas pressures, an overall picture of the energy transfer efficiency results.

  2. Pacing a data transfer operation between compute nodes on a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-09-13

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for pacing a data transfer between compute nodes on a parallel computer that include: transferring, by an origin compute node, a chunk of an application message to a target compute node; sending, by the origin compute node, a pacing request to a target direct memory access (`DMA`) engine on the target compute node using a remote get DMA operation; determining, by the origin compute node, whether a pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine; and transferring, by the origin compute node, a next chunk of the application message if the pacing response to the pacing request has been received from the target DMA engine.

  3. Off-resonance frequency operation for power transfer in a loosely coupled air core transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scudiere, Matthew B

    2012-11-13

    A power transmission system includes a loosely coupled air core transformer having a resonance frequency determined by a product of inductance and capacitance of a primary circuit including a primary coil. A secondary circuit is configured to have a substantially same product of inductance and capacitance. A back EMF generating device (e.g., a battery), which generates a back EMF with power transfer, is attached to the secondary circuit. Once the load power of the back EMF generating device exceeds a certain threshold level, which depends on the system parameters, the power transfer can be achieved at higher transfer efficiency if performed at an operating frequency less than the resonance frequency, which can be from 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency.

  4. OPERATIONAL CHALLENGES IN MIXING AND TRANSFER OF HIGH YIELD STRESS SLUDGE WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, T.; Bhatt, P.

    2009-12-07

    The ability to mobilize and transport non-Newtonian waste is essential to advance the closure of highly radioactive storage tanks. Recent waste removal operations from Tank 12H at the Savannah River Site (SRS) encountered sludge mixtures with a yield stress too high to pump. The waste removal equipment for Tank 12H was designed to mobilize and transport a diluted slurry mixture through an underground 550m long (1800 ft) 0.075m diameter (3 inch) pipeline. The transfer pump was positioned in a well casing submerged in the sludge slurry. The design allowed for mobilized sludge to enter the pump suction while keeping out larger tank debris. Data from a similar tank with known rheological properties were used to size the equipment. However, after installation and startup, field data from Tank 12H confirmed the yield stress of the slurry to exceed 40 Pa, whereas the system is designed for 10 Pa. A revision to the removal strategy was required, which involved metered dilution, blending, and mixing to ensure effective and safe transfer performance. The strategy resulted in the removal of over 255,000 kgs of insoluble solids with four discrete transfer evolutions for a total transfer volume of 2400 m{sup 3} (634,000 gallons) of sludge slurry.

  5. Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation Docket No. EO-05-01: Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation, part of Supplement Number 3 to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC PDF icon Exhibit A: ENSR Modeling in Support of Individual Unit Operation More Documents & Publications Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume Limited Operation

  6. Implementation of conduct of operations at Paducah uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) sampling and transfer facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penrod, S.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the initial planning and actual field activities associated with the implementation of {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes}, Conduct of Operations is an operating philosophy that was developed through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Conduct of Operations covers many operating practices and is intended to provide formality and discipline to all aspects of plant operation. The implementation of these operating principles at the UF{sub 6} Sampling and Transfer Facility resulted in significant improvements in facility operations.

  7. Implementation of conduct of operations at Paducah uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) sampling and transfer facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penrod, S.R.

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the initial planning and actual field activities associated with the implementation of {open_quotes}Conduct of Operations{close_quotes}. Conduct of Operations is an operating philosophy that was developed through the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). Conduct of Operations covers many operating practices and is intended to provide formality and discipline to all aspects of plant operation. The implementation of these operating principles at the UF{sub 6} Sampling and Transfer Facility resulted in significant improvements in facility operations.

  8. Modeling Power System Operation with Intermittent Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinovici, Maria C.; Kirkham, Harold; Glass, Kevin A.; Carlsen, Leif C.

    2013-02-27

    Electricity generating companies and power system operators face the need to minimize total fuel cost or maximize total profit over a given time period. These issues become optimization problems subject to a large number of constraints that must be satisfied simultaneously. The grid updates due to smart-grid technologies plus the penetration of intermittent re- sources in electrical grid introduce additional complexity to the optimization problem. The Renewable Integration Model (RIM) is a computer model of interconnected power system. It is intended to provide insight and advice on complex power systems management, as well as answers to integration of renewable energy questions. This paper describes RIM basic design concept, solution method, and the initial suite of modules that it supports.

  9. RELAP5 Model of the Vacuum Vessel Primary Heat Transfer System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, Juan J; Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Kim, Seokho H

    2010-07-01

    This report describes the RELAP5 models that have been developed for the Vacuum Vessel (VV) Primary Heat Transfer System (PHTS). The models are intended to be used to examine the transient performance of the VV PHTS, and evaluate control schemes necessary to maintain parameters within acceptable limits during transients. Some preliminary results are presented to show the maturity of the models and to examine general VV PHTS transient behavior. The models can be used as a starting point to develop transient modeling capability in several directions including control system modeling, safety evaluations, etc, and are not intended to represent the final VV PHTS design. Preliminary calculations using the models indicate that during normal pulsed operation, heat exchanger control may not be necessary, and that temperatures within the vacuum vessel during decay heat operation remain low.

  10. EIS-0302: Transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Assembly and Test Operations From the Mound Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's proposed transfer of the Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) operations at the Mound Site near Miamisburg, Ohio, to an alternative DOE site.

  11. 3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Barker; Jason Cole

    2012-05-17

    Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

  12. Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and

  13. Transfers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transfer means a change of an employee, from one Federal government branch (executive, legislative, judicial) to another or from one agency to another without a break in service of 1 full work day. 

  14. A meshless method for modeling convective heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrington, David B

    2010-01-01

    A meshless method is used in a projection-based approach to solve the primitive equations for fluid flow with heat transfer. The method is easy to implement in a MATLAB format. Radial basis functions are used to solve two benchmark test cases: natural convection in a square enclosure and flow with forced convection over a backward facing step. The results are compared with two popular and widely used commercial codes: COMSOL, a finite element model, and FLUENT, a finite volume-based model.

  15. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

  16. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  17. Technology Transfer Webinar on November 12: High-Performance Hybrid Simulation/Measurement-Based Tools for Proactive Operator Decision-Support

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE/OE and EPRI will host a technology transfer webinar on Wednesday, November 12, 2014 from noon to 2 p.m. (ET). The purpose of this open webinar is to disseminate results and outcomes of the recently completed project “High-Performance Hybrid Simulation/Measurement-Based Tools for Proactive Operator Decision-Support,” which is one of the awarded projects of the DOE Advanced Modeling Grid Research Program.

  18. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2015-02-28

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning, we reformulate the method in a computationally efficient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9 − ((1 − naphthyl) − methyl) − anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH{sub 2} − naphthyl groups as subsystems and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using configuration interaction singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst the excited electronic states.

  19. Modeling the transfer function for the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Rykoff, E.; Becker, M. R.; Bruderer, C.; Gamper, L.; Leistedt, B.; Peiris, H.; Abbott, T.; Abdalla, F. B.; Balbinot, E.; Banerji, M.; Bernstein, R. A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero, A.; Desai, S.; da Costa, L. N.; Cunha, C. E.; Eifler, T.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gruen, D.; James, D.; Kuehn, K.; Maia, M. A. G.; Makler, M.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Schubnell, M.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Zuntz, J.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modelling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function a mapping from cosmological and astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator, Berge et al. 2013) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we simulate the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in 5 bands for the DES Science Verification (SV) data. The simulation output is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples, star/galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection, are then used to demonstrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modelling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. As a result, it provides a powerful tool for systematics studies which is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.

  20. Modeling the Transfer Function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modeling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function—a mapping from cosmological/astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we demonstrate the framework by simulating the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in five bands for the DES Science Verification data. The simulation output is compared with themore » corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples—star-galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection—are then used to illustrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modeling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. It provides a powerful tool for systematics studies that is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.« less

  1. Modeling the transfer function for the Dark Energy Survey

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chang, C.; Busha, M. T.; Wechsler, R. H.; Refregier, A.; Amara, A.; Rykoff, E.; Becker, M. R.; Bruderer, C.; Gamper, L.; Leistedt, B.; et al

    2015-03-04

    We present a forward-modelling simulation framework designed to model the data products from the Dark Energy Survey (DES). This forward-model process can be thought of as a transfer function a mapping from cosmological and astronomical signals to the final data products used by the scientists. Using output from the cosmological simulations (the Blind Cosmology Challenge), we generate simulated images (the Ultra Fast Image Simulator, Berge et al. 2013) and catalogs representative of the DES data. In this work we simulate the 244 deg2 coadd images and catalogs in 5 bands for the DES Science Verification (SV) data. The simulationmoreoutput is compared with the corresponding data to show that major characteristics of the images and catalogs can be captured. We also point out several directions of future improvements. Two practical examples, star/galaxy classification and proximity effects on object detection, are then used to demonstrate how one can use the simulations to address systematics issues in data analysis. With clear understanding of the simplifications in our model, we show that one can use the simulations side-by-side with data products to interpret the measurements. This forward modelling approach is generally applicable for other upcoming and future surveys. As a result, it provides a powerful tool for systematics studies which is sufficiently realistic and highly controllable.less

  2. Exhibit A: Modeling in Support of Two Unit Operating Configurations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Docket No. EO-05-01: Tables showing modeling of emissions from units of the Mirant Potomac Power Plant. PDF icon Exhibit A: Modeling in Support of Two Unit Operating Configurations ...

  3. Modeling Momentum Transfer from Kinetic Impacts: Implications for Redirecting Asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickle, A. M.; Atchison, J. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cheng, A. F.; Crawford, D. A.; Ernst, C. M.; Fletcher, Z.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-05-19

    Kinetic impactors are one way to deflect a potentially hazardous object headed for Earth. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is designed to test the effectiveness of this approach and is a joint effort between NASA and ESA. The NASA-led portion is the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) and is composed of a ~300-kg spacecraft designed to impact the moon of the binary system 65803 Didymos. The deflection of the moon will be measured by the ESA-led Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) (which will characterize the moon) and from ground-based observations. Because the material properties and internal structure of the target are poorly constrained, however, analytical models and numerical simulations must be used to understand the range of potential outcomes. Here, we describe a modeling effort combining analytical models and CTH simulations to determine possible outcomes of the DART impact. We examine a wide parameter space and provide predictions for crater size, ejecta mass, and momentum transfer following the impact into the moon of the Didymos system. For impacts into “realistic” asteroid types, these models produce craters with diameters on the order of 10 m, an imparted Δv of 0.5–2 mm/s and a momentum enhancement of 1.07 to 5 for a highly porous aggregate to a fully dense rock.

  4. Modeling Momentum Transfer from Kinetic Impacts: Implications for Redirecting Asteroids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stickle, A. M.; Atchison, J. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cheng, A. F.; Crawford, D. A.; Ernst, C. M.; Fletcher, Z.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-05-19

    Kinetic impactors are one way to deflect a potentially hazardous object headed for Earth. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is designed to test the effectiveness of this approach and is a joint effort between NASA and ESA. The NASA-led portion is the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) and is composed of a ~300-kg spacecraft designed to impact the moon of the binary system 65803 Didymos. The deflection of the moon will be measured by the ESA-led Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) (which will characterize the moon) and from ground-based observations. Because the material properties and internal structure ofmore » the target are poorly constrained, however, analytical models and numerical simulations must be used to understand the range of potential outcomes. Here, we describe a modeling effort combining analytical models and CTH simulations to determine possible outcomes of the DART impact. We examine a wide parameter space and provide predictions for crater size, ejecta mass, and momentum transfer following the impact into the moon of the Didymos system. For impacts into “realistic” asteroid types, these models produce craters with diameters on the order of 10 m, an imparted Δv of 0.5–2 mm/s and a momentum enhancement of 1.07 to 5 for a highly porous aggregate to a fully dense rock.« less

  5. Boiler heat transfer modeling using CEMS data with application to fouling analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zibas, S.J.; Idem, S.A.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical boiler heat transfer simulation for coal-fired plants is described. Required model input includes boiler geometry, fuel composition, and limited CEMS data that are typically available. Radiation heat transfer in the furnace is calculated using curve-fits to the Hottel charts. The model employs empirical heat transfer coefficient correlations to evaluate convection heat transfer to various boiler component surfaces. Fouling/slagging can be accounted for by including fouling resistance in the calculation of the overall heat transfer coefficient of each component. Model performance predictions are compared to cases available in the literature. Results from parametric studies are presented.

  6. Improving computer simulations of heat transfer for projecting fenestration products: Using radiation view-factor models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, B.; Tuerler, D.; Arasteh, D.K.; Curcija, D.

    1998-10-01

    The window well formed by the concave surface on the warm side of skylights and garden windows can cause surface heat-flow rates to be different for these projecting types of fenestration products than for normal planar windows. Current methods of simulating fenestration thermal conductance (U-factor) use constant boundary condition values for overall surface heat transfer. Simulations that account for local variations in surface heat transfer rates (radiation and convection) may be more accurate for rating and labeling window products whose surfaces project outside a building envelope. This paper, which presents simulation and experimental results for one projecting geometry, is the first step in documenting the importance of these local effects. A generic specimen, called the foam garden window, was used in simulations and experiments to investigate heat transfer of projecting surfaces. Experiments focused on a vertical cross section (measurement plane) located at the middle of the window well on the warm side of the specimen. The specimen was placed between laboratory thermal chambers that were operated at American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) winter heating design conditions. Infrared thermography was used to map surface temperatures. Air temperature and velocity were mapped throughout the measurement plane using a mechanical traversing system. Finite-element computer simulations that directly modeled element-to-element radiation were better able to match experimental data than simulations that used fixed coefficients for total surface heat transfer. Air conditions observed in the window well suggest that localized convective effects were the reason for the difference between actual and modeled surface temperatures. U-value simulation results were 5% to 10% lower when radiation was modeled directly.

  7. A simplified model for heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates for thermoacoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Herman, C.

    1999-07-01

    A simplified model of heat transfer in heat exchangers and stack plates of thermoacoustic devices was developed. The model took advantage of previous results regarding the thermal behavior of the thermoacoustic core for investigations of the performance of heat exchangers attached to the core. Geometrical and operational parameters as well as thermophysical properties of the heat exchangers, the plate, and the working medium were organized into dimensionless groups that allowed to account for their impact on the performance of the heat exchangers. Numerical simulations with the model were carried out. Nonlinear temperature distributions and heat fluxes near the edge of the stack plate were observed. Effects of different parameters on the thermal performance of the heat exchangers were investigated.

  8. Use of look-ahead modeling in pipeline operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wray, B.; O`Leary, C.

    1995-12-31

    Amoco Canada Petroleum Company, Ltd. operates the Cochin pipeline system. Cochin pumps batched liquid ethane, propane, ethylene, butane, and NGL. Operating and scheduling this pipeline is very complex. There are safety considerations, especially for ethylene, which cannot be allowed to drop below vapor pressure. Amoco Canada needs to know where batches are in the line, what pressure profiles will look like into the future, and when batches arrive at various locations along the line. In addition to traditional instrumentation and SCADA, Amoco Canada uses modeling software to help monitor and operate the Cochin pipeline. Two important components of the modeling system are the Estimated Time of Arrival (ETA) and Predictive Model (PM) modules. These modules perform look ahead modeling to assist in operating the Cochin pipeline. The modeling software was first installed for the Cochin system in February of 1994, and was commissioned on August 1, 1994. This paper will discuss how the look ahead modules are used for the Cochin pipeline.

  9. A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

    2011-01-14

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

  10. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  11. THE HANFORD WASTE FEED DELIVERY OPERATIONS RESEARCH MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERRY J; GALLAHER BN

    2011-01-13

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), the Hanford tank farm contractor, is tasked with the long term planning of the cleanup mission. Cleanup plans do not explicitly reflect the mission effects associated with tank farm operating equipment failures. EnergySolutions, a subcontractor to WRPS has developed, in conjunction with WRPS tank farms staff, an Operations Research (OR) model to assess and identify areas to improve the performance of the Waste Feed Delivery Systems. This paper provides an example of how OR modeling can be used to help identify and mitigate operational risks at the Hanford tank farms.

  12. Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model Beta Version 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-31

    The Building Restoration Operations Optimization Model (BROOM), developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is a software product designed to aid in the restoration of large facilities contaminated by a biological material. BROOM’s integrated data collection, data management, and visualization software improves the efficiency of cleanup operations, minimizes facility downtime, and provides a transparent basis for reopening the facility. Secure remote access to building floor plans Floor plan drawings and knowledge of the HVAC system are criticalmore » to the design and implementation of effective sampling plans. In large facilities, access to these data may be complicated by the sheer abundance and disorganized state they are often stored in. BROOM avoids potentially costly delays by providing a means of organizing and storing mechanical and floor plan drawings in a secure remote database that is easily accessed. Sampling design tools BROOM provides an array of tools to answer the question of where to sample and how many samples to take. In addition to simple judgmental and random sampling plans, the software includes two sophisticated methods of adaptively developing a sampling strategy. Both tools strive to choose sampling locations that best satisfy a specified objective (i.e. minimizing kriging variance) but use numerically different strategies to do so. Surface samples are collected early in the restoration process to characterize the extent of contamination and then again later to verify that the facility is safe to reenter. BROOM supports sample collection using a ruggedized PDA equipped with a barcode scanner and laser range finder. The PDA displays building floor drawings, sampling plans, and electronic forms for data entry. Barcodes are placed on sample containers for the purpose of tracking the specimen and linking acquisition data (i.e. location, surface type, texture) to laboratory results. Sample location is determined by activating the integrated laser range finder which uses the PDA drawings to accurately measure position relative to nearby walls or other interior structures. The PDA and desktop application exchange information over a secure wireless network, Through this network, the progress of sampling activities may be monitored in real-time. PDA-acquired data is ultimately transferred over the network to the desktop where it is stored permanently in the project database. Once in the database, the data may be viewed, analyzed, or reported from the desktop. Mapping A picture is worth a thousand words. BROOM includes both inverse distance and kriging interpolation algorithms which are used to generate continuous contamination maps and display underlying confidence. Such maps greatly assist in interpreting discrete sample data and communicating results to others. Data Management The BROOM database provides a streamlined means of storing. retrieving, viewing, and analyzing the various data associated with recovery operations. Critical floor plan drawings and other pertinent images may be organized and stored in the database before an event occurs. History indicates that thousands of samples will need to be collected and analyzed by contractors, laboratories, government agencies. and other stakeholders. The BROOM database provides a secure, easy to use plafform, where these data may be centrally stored and shared among all concerned parties.« less

  13. Development of a UF{sub 6} cylinder transient heat transfer/stress analysis model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    A heat transfer/stress analysis model is being developed to simulate the heating to a point of rupture of a cylinder containing UF{sub 6} when it is exposed to a fire. The assumptions underlying the heat transfer portion of the model, which has been the focus of work to date, will be discussed. A key aspect of this model is a lumped parameter approach to modeling heat transfer. Preliminary results and future efforts to develop an integrated thermal/stress model will be outlined.

  14. Glass Furnace Model (GFM) development and technology transfer program final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lottes, S. A.; Petrick, M.; Energy Systems

    2007-12-04

    A Glass Furnace Model (GFM) was developed under a cost-shared R&D program by the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory in close collaboration with a consortium of five glass industry members: Techneglas, Inc., Owens-Corning, Libbey, Inc., Osram Sylvania, Inc., and Visteon, Inc. Purdue University and Mississippi State University's DIAL Laboratory were also collaborators in the consortium. The GFM glass furnace simulation model that was developed is a tool industry can use to help define and evaluate furnace design changes and operating strategies to: (1) reduce energy use per unit of production; (2) solve problems related to production and glass quality by defining optimal operating windows to reduce cullet generation due to rejects and maximize throughput; and (3) make changes in furnace design and/or operation to reduce critical emissions, such as NO{sub x} and particulates. A two-part program was pursued to develop and validate the furnace model. The focus of the Part I program was to develop a fully coupled furnace model which had the requisite basic capabilities for furnace simulation. The principal outcome from the Phase I program was a furnace simulation model, GFM 2.0, which was copyrighted. The basic capabilities of GFM 2.0 were: (1) built-in burner models that can be included in the combustion space simulation; (2) a participating media spectral radiation model that maintains local and global energy balances throughout the furnace volume; and (3) a multiphase (liquid, solid) melt model that calculates (does not impose) the batch-melting rate and the batch length. The key objectives of the Part II program, which overlapped the Part I program were: (1) to incorporate a full multiphase flow analytical capability with reduced glass chemistry models in the glass melt model and thus be able to compute and track key solid, gas, and liquid species through the melt and the combustion space above; and (2) to incorporate glass quality indices into the simulation to facilitate optimization studies with regard to productivity, energy use and emissions. Midway through the Part II program, however, at the urging of the industrial consortium members, the decision was made to refocus limited resources on transfer of the existing GFM 2.0 software to the industry to speed up commercialization of the technology. This decision, in turn, necessitated a de-emphasis of the development of the planned final version of the GFM software that had full multiphase capability, GFM 3.0. As a result, version 3.0 was not completed; considerable progress, however, was made before the effort was terminated. The objectives of the Technology Transfer program were to transfer the Glass Furnace Model (GFM) to the glass industry and to promote its widespread use by providing the requisite technical support to allow effective use of the software. GFM Version 2.0 was offered at no cost on a trial, six-month basis to expedite its introduction to and use by the industry. The trial licenses were issued to generate a much more thorough user beta test of the software than the relatively small amount completed by the consortium members prior to the release of version 2.0.

  15. Maintenance Free Fluidic Transfer and Mixing Devices for Highly Radioactive Applications - Design, Development, Deployment and Operational Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.; Richardson, J. E.; Fallows, P.

    2006-07-01

    Power Fluidics is the generic name for a range of maintenance-free fluid transfer and mixing devices, capable of handling a wide range of highly radioactive fluids, jointly developed by British Nuclear Group, its US-based subsidiary BNG America, and AEA Technology. Power Fluidic devices include Reverse Flow Diverters (RFDs), Vacuum Operated Slug Lifts (VOSLs), and Air Lifts, all of which have an excellent proven record for pumping radioactive liquids and sludges. Variants of the RFD, termed Pulse Jet Mixers (PJMs) are used to agitate and mix tank contents, where maintenance-free equipment is desirable, and where a high degree of homogenization is necessary. The equipment is designed around the common principle of using compressed air to provide the motive force to transfer liquids and sludges. These devices have no moving parts in contact with the radioactive medium and therefore require no maintenance in radioactive areas of processing plants. Once commissioned, Power Fluidic equipment has been demonstrated to operate for the life of the facility. Over 800 fluidic devices continue to operate safely and reliably in British Nuclear Group's nuclear facilities at the Sellafield site in the United Kingdom, and some of these have done so for almost 40 years. More than 400 devices are being supplied by AEA Technology and BNG America for the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State, USA. This paper discusses: - Principles of operation of fluidic pumps and mixers. - Selection criteria and design of fluidic pumps and mixers. - Operational experience of fluidic pumps and mixers in the United Kingdom. - Applications of fluidic pumps and mixers at the U.S. Department of Energy nuclear sites. (authors)

  16. EnergySolution's Clive Disposal Facility Operational Research Model - 13475

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nissley, Paul; Berry, Joanne

    2013-07-01

    EnergySolutions owns and operates a licensed, commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility located in Clive, Utah. The Clive site receives low-level radioactive waste from various locations within the United States via bulk truck, containerised truck, enclosed truck, bulk rail-cars, rail boxcars, and rail inter-modals. Waste packages are unloaded, characterized, processed, and disposed of at the Clive site. Examples of low-level radioactive waste arriving at Clive include, but are not limited to, contaminated soil/debris, spent nuclear power plant components, and medical waste. Generators of low-level radioactive waste typically include nuclear power plants, hospitals, national laboratories, and various United States government operated waste sites. Over the past few years, poor economic conditions have significantly reduced the number of shipments to Clive. With less revenue coming in from processing shipments, Clive needed to keep its expenses down if it was going to maintain past levels of profitability. The Operational Research group of EnergySolutions were asked to develop a simulation model to help identify any improvement opportunities that would increase overall operating efficiency and reduce costs at the Clive Facility. The Clive operations research model simulates the receipt, movement, and processing requirements of shipments arriving at the facility. The model includes shipment schedules, processing times of various waste types, labor requirements, shift schedules, and site equipment availability. The Clive operations research model has been developed using the WITNESS{sup TM} process simulation software, which is developed by the Lanner Group. The major goals of this project were to: - identify processing bottlenecks that could reduce the turnaround time from shipment arrival to disposal; - evaluate the use (or idle time) of labor and equipment; - project future operational requirements under different forecasted scenarios. By identifying processing bottlenecks and unused equipment and/or labor, improvements to operating efficiency could be determined and appropriate cost saving measures implemented. Model runs forecasting various scenarios helped illustrate potential impacts of certain conditions (e.g. 20% decrease in shipments arrived), variables (e.g. 20% decrease in labor), or other possible situations. (authors)

  17. Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During RIA This paper describes a model for the cladding-coolant heat transfer of high burnup fuel during a Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) which is implemented in the fuel performance code FRAPTRAN 1.2. The minimum stable film boiling temperature, affected by the subcooling and the

  18. Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  19. Estimating Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Green Roof Systems: Current Modeling Capabilities and Limitations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tabares Velasco, P. C.

    2011-04-01

    This presentation discusses estimating heat and mass transfer processes in green roof systems: current modeling capabilities and limitations. Green roofs are 'specialized roofing systems that support vegetation growth on rooftops.'

  20. Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Docket No. ...

  1. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  2. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435 (Conference) | SciTech Connect Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers in Potential High-Level Nuclear Waste Repositories - 12435 A combination of transient heat

  3. Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineered Barriers to Compare Alternatives for High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal (Conference) | SciTech Connect Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers to Compare Alternatives for High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Analytical Heat Transfer Models of Multi-layered Natural and Engineered Barriers to Compare Alternatives for High-Level Nuclear Waste Disposal Authors: Greenberg, H R

  4. Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloudy Sky RRTM Shortwave Radiative Transfer and Comparison to the Revised ECMWF Shortwave Model M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Introduction An important step toward improving radiative transfer codes in general circulation models (GCMs) is their thorough evaluation by comparison to measurements directly, or

  5. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  6. Ultrasonic power transfer from a spherical acoustic wave source to a free-free piezoelectric receiver: Modeling and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahab, S.; Gray, M.; Erturk, A.

    2015-03-14

    Contactless powering of small electronic components has lately received growing attention for wireless applications in which battery replacement or tethered charging is undesired or simply impossible, and ambient energy harvesting is not a viable solution. As an alternative to well-studied methods of contactless energy transfer, such as the inductive coupling method, the use of ultrasonic waves transmitted and received by piezoelectric devices enables larger power transmission distances, which is critical especially for deep-implanted electronic devices. Moreover, energy transfer by means of acoustic waves is well suited in situations where no electromagnetic fields are allowed. The limited literature of ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer is mainly centered on proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating the feasibility of this method, lacking experimentally validated modeling efforts for the resulting multiphysics problem that couples the source and receiver dynamics with domain acoustics. In this work, we present fully coupled analytical, numerical, and experimental multiphysics investigations for ultrasonic acoustic energy transfer from a spherical wave source to a piezoelectric receiver bar that operates in the 33-mode of piezoelectricity. The fluid-loaded piezoelectric receiver under free-free mechanical boundary conditions is shunted to an electrical load for quantifying the electrical power output for a given acoustic source strength of the transmitter. The analytical acoustic-piezoelectric structure interaction modeling framework is validated experimentally, and the effects of system parameters are reported along with optimal electrical loading and frequency conditions of the receiver.

  7. Modeling of Heat and Mass Transfer in Fusion Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In fusion welding, parts are joined together by melting and subsequent solidification. Although this principle is simple, complex transport phenomena take place during fusion welding, and they determine the final weld quality and performance. The heat and mass transfer in the weld pool directly affect the size and shape of the pool, the solidification microstructure, the formation of weld defects such as porosity and humping, and the temperature distribution in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone (HAZ). Furthermore, the temperature evolution affects the kinetics and extent of various solid-state phase transformations, which in turn determine the final weld microstructure and mechanical properties. The formation of residual stresses and distortion originates from the thermal expansion and contraction during welding heating and cooling, respectively.

  8. Measurement and modeling of transfer functions for lightning coupling into the Sago mine.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Marvin E.; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2007-04-01

    This report documents measurements and analytical modeling of electromagnetic transfer functions to quantify the ability of cloud-to-ground lightning strokes (including horizontal arc-channel components) to couple electromagnetic energy into the Sago mine located near Buckhannon, WV. Two coupling mechanisms were measured: direct and indirect drive. These transfer functions are then used to predict electric fields within the mine and induced voltages on conductors that were left abandoned in the sealed area of the Sago mine.

  9. A NEW OPERATIONAL MODEL FOR SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES DESCRIPTION...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by solving radiation transfer equations - this requires absolute satellite calibration knowledge and precise information on the composition of the atmosphere. At the other end...

  10. Model operating permits for natural gas processing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arend, C.

    1995-12-31

    Major sources as defined in Title V of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 that are required to submit an operating permit application will need to: Evaluate their compliance status; Determine a strategic method of presenting the general and specific conditions of their Model Operating Permit (MOP); Maintain compliance with air quality regulations. A MOP is prepared to assist permitting agencies and affected facilities in the development of operating permits for a specific source category. This paper includes a brief discussion of example permit conditions that may be applicable to various types of Title V sources. A MOP for a generic natural gas processing plant is provided as an example. The MOP should include a general description of the production process and identify emission sources. The two primary elements that comprise a MOP are: Provisions of all existing state and/or local air permits; Identification of general and specific conditions for the Title V permit. The general provisions will include overall compliance with all Clean Air Act Titles. The specific provisions include monitoring, record keeping, and reporting. Although Title V MOPs are prepared on a case-by-case basis, this paper will provide a general guideline of the requirements for preparation of a MOP. Regulatory agencies have indicated that a MOP included in the Title V application will assist in preparation of the final permit provisions, minimize delays in securing a permit, and provide support during the public notification process.

  11. A mass transfer model of ammonia volatilisation from anaerobic digestate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whelan, M.J.; Everitt, T.; Villa, R.

    2010-10-15

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is becoming increasingly popular for treating organic waste. The methane produced can be burned to generate electricity and the digestate, which is high in mineral nitrogen, can be used as a fertiliser. In this paper we evaluate potential losses of ammonia via volatilisation from food waste anaerobic digestate using a closed chamber system equipped with a sulphuric acid trap. Ammonia losses represent a pollution source and, over long periods could reduce the agronomic value of the digestate. Observed ammonia losses from the experimental system were linear with time. A simple non-steady-state partitioning model was developed to represent the process. After calibration, the model was able to describe the behaviour of ammonia in the digestate and in the trap very well. The average rate of volatilisation was approximately 5.2 g N m{sup -2} week{sup -1}. The model was used to extrapolate the findings of the laboratory study to a number of AD storage scenarios. The simulations highlight that open storage of digestate could result in significant losses of ammonia to the atmosphere. Losses are predicted to be relatively minor from covered facilities, particularly if depth to surface area ratio is high.

  12. A hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer in absorbing and scattering media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger, M.; Caliot, C.; Crouseilles, N.; Coelho, P.J.

    2014-10-15

    A new multi-scale hybrid transport-diffusion model for radiative transfer is proposed in order to improve the efficiency of the calculations close to the diffusive regime, in absorbing and strongly scattering media. In this model, the radiative intensity is decomposed into a macroscopic component calculated by the diffusion equation, and a mesoscopic component. The transport equation for the mesoscopic component allows to correct the estimation of the diffusion equation, and then to obtain the solution of the linear radiative transfer equation. In this work, results are presented for stationary and transient radiative transfer cases, in examples which concern solar concentrated and optical tomography applications. The Monte Carlo and the discrete-ordinate methods are used to solve the mesoscopic equation. It is shown that the multi-scale model allows to improve the efficiency of the calculations when the medium is close to the diffusive regime. The proposed model is a good alternative for radiative transfer at the intermediate regime where the macroscopic diffusion equation is not accurate enough and the radiative transfer equation requires too much computational effort.

  13. Model-based planning for laser cutting operations under unsteady-state conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Pietro, P.; Yao, Y.L.

    1996-12-31

    Boundary encroachment or cutting right up to pre-cut sections are examples of unsteady-state operations of the laser cutting process. Cornering and generating small diameter holes also fall into this category. Heat transfer is often frustrated here, resulting in bulk heating of the workpiece. This in turn leads to a degradation of the cut quality. Currently, trial-and-error based experimentation is needed in order to assure quality in these regions. Thus model-based process planning has the benefit of reducing this step whilst leading to an optimal solution. Numerical investigation of the laser-workpiece interaction zone quantifies significant effects of such transiency on cutting front mobility and beam coupling behavior. Non-linear power adaptation profiles are generated via the optimization strategy in order to stabilize cutting front temperatures. Experimental results demonstrate such process planning can produce quality improvements.

  14. 3D CFD Electrochemical and Heat Transfer Model of an Integrated-Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James E. O'Brien

    2008-10-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in a new novel integrated planar porous-tube supported solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model is of several integrated planar cells attached to a ceramic support tube. This design is being evaluated with modeling at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  15. The local heat transfer mathematical model between vibrated fluidized beds and horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xuejun; Ye, Shichao; Pan, Xiaoheng

    2008-05-15

    A dimensionless mathematical model is proposed to predict the local heat transfer coefficients between vibrated fluidized beds and immersed horizontal tubes, and the effects of the thickness of gas film and the contact time of particle packets are well considered. Experiments using the glass beads (the average diameter bar d{sub p}=1.83mm) were conducted in a two-dimensional vibrated fluidized bed (240 mm x 80 mm). The local heat transfer law between vibrated fluidized bed and horizontal tube surface has been investigated. The results show that the values of theoretical prediction are in good agreement with experimental data, so the model is able to predict the local heat transfer coefficients between vibrated fluidized beds and immersed horizontal tubes reasonably well, and the error is in range of {+-}15%. The results can provide references for future designing and researching on the vibrated fluidized beds with immersed horizontal tubes. (author)

  16. Ownership transfer for non-federate object and time management in developing an hla compliant logistics model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.

    1998-01-12

    A seaport simulation model, PORTSIM, has been developed for the Department of Defense (DOD) at Argonne National Laboratory. PORTSIM simulates the detailed processes of cargo loading and unloading in a seaport and provides throughput capability, resource utilization, and other important information on the bottlenecks in a seaport operation, which are crucial data in determining troop and equipment deployment capability. There are two key problems to solve in developing the HLA-compliant PORTSIM model. The first is the cargo object ownership transfer problem. In PORTSIM, cargo items, e.g. vehicles, containers, and pallets, are objects having asset attributes. Cargo comes to a seaport for loading or unloading. The ownership of a cargo object transfers from its carrier to the port and then from the port to a new carrier. Each owner of the cargo object is responsible for publishing and updating the attributes of the cargo object when it has the ownership. This creates a unique situation in developing the PORTSIM federate object model, that is, the ownership of the object instead of the attributes needs to be changed in handling the cargo object in the PORTSIM federate. The ownership management service provided by the current RTI does not directly address this issue. The second is the time management issue. PORTSIM is an event-driven simulation that models seaport operations over time. To make PORTSIM HLA compliant, time management must be addressed to allow for synchronization with other simulation models. This paper attempts to address these two issues and methodologies developed for solving these two problems.

  17. Effective-medium model of wire metamaterials in the problems of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirmoosa, M. S. Nefedov, I. S. Simovski, C. R.; Rüting, F.

    2014-06-21

    In the present work, we check the applicability of the effective medium model (EMM) to the problems of radiative heat transfer (RHT) through so-called wire metamaterials (WMMs)—composites comprising parallel arrays of metal nanowires. It is explained why this problem is so important for the development of prospective thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems. Previous studies of the applicability of EMM for WMMs were targeted by the imaging applications of WMMs. The analogous study referring to the transfer of radiative heat is a separate problem that deserves extended investigations. We show that WMMs with practically realizable design parameters transmit the radiative heat as effectively homogeneous media. Existing EMM is an adequate tool for qualitative prediction of the magnitude of transferred radiative heat and of its effective frequency band.

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of heat transfer from slab floors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahnfleth, W.P.

    1989-07-01

    Earth-coupled heat-transfer processes have been recognized in recent years as a potential source of significant energy savings in both conventional and earth-sheltered designs, Because of the complexity of the building/soil/atmosphere interaction, however, important aspects of earth-coupled heat transfer are not well understood. There is a particular lack of three-dimensional foundation heat-loss data. In this study, a detailed three-dimensional finite-difference model of a slab floor was used to generate 93 annual simulations in parametric groups focusing on effects of size and shape, soil properties, boundary conditions, climate, insulation, and building shadow. These results indicate that soil thermal conductivity, ground surface conditions, foundation design, and floor shape/size are essential elements of a general change in heat-transfer rate.

  19. Software design and operational model for the WCEDS prototype

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beiriger, J.I.; Moore, S.G.; Young, C.J.; Trujillo, J.R.

    1997-08-01

    To explore the potential of waveform correlation for CTBT, the Waveform Correlation Event Detection System (WCEDS) prototype was developed. The WCEDS software design followed the Object Modeling Technique process of analysis, system design, and detailed design and implementation. Several related executable programs are managed through a Graphical User Interface (GUI). The WCEDS prototype operates in an IDC/NDC-compatible environment. It employs a CSS 3.0 database as its primary input/output interface, reading in raw waveforms at the start, and storing origins, events, arrivals, and associations at the finish. Additional output includes correlation results and data for specified testcase origins, and correlation timelines for specified locations. During the software design process, the more general seismic monitoring functionality was extracted from WCEDS-specific requirements and developed into C++ object-oriented libraries. These include the master image, grid, basic seismic, and extended seismic libraries. Existing NDC and commercial libraries were incorporated into the prototype where appropriate, to focus development activities on new capability. The WCEDS-specific application code was built in a separate layer on top of the general seismic libraries. The general seismic libraries developed for the WCEDS prototype can provide a base for other algorithm development projects.

  20. Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Configurations | Department of Energy Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations Docket No. EO-05-01: Attachment to the Operating Plan of Mirant Potomac River, LLC PDF icon Attachment A: Modeling in Support of Additional Two-Unit Operating Configurations More Documents & Publications Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME Mirant

  1. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  2. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  3. ANALYTICAL MODELS OF EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES. II. RADIATIVE TRANSFER VIA THE TWO-STREAM APPROXIMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, Kevin; Mendonça, João M.; Lee, Jae-Min E-mail: joao.mendonca@csh.unibe.ch

    2014-11-01

    We present a comprehensive analytical study of radiative transfer using the method of moments and include the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the coherent limit. Within this unified formalism, we derive the governing equations and solutions describing two-stream radiative transfer (which approximates the passage of radiation as a pair of outgoing and incoming fluxes), flux-limited diffusion (which describes radiative transfer in the deep interior), and solutions for the temperature-pressure profiles. Generally, the problem is mathematically underdetermined unless a set of closures (Eddington coefficients) is specified. We demonstrate that the hemispheric (or hemi-isotropic) closure naturally derives from the radiative transfer equation if energy conservation is obeyed, while the Eddington closure produces spurious enhancements of both reflected light and thermal emission. We concoct recipes for implementing two-stream radiative transfer in stand-alone numerical calculations and general circulation models. We use our two-stream solutions to construct toy models of the runaway greenhouse effect. We present a new solution for temperature-pressure profiles with a non-constant optical opacity and elucidate the effects of non-isotropic scattering in the optical and infrared. We derive generalized expressions for the spherical and Bond albedos and the photon deposition depth. We demonstrate that the value of the optical depth corresponding to the photosphere is not always 2/3 (Milne's solution) and depends on a combination of stellar irradiation, internal heat, and the properties of scattering in both the optical and infrared. Finally, we derive generalized expressions for the total, net, outgoing, and incoming fluxes in the convective regime.

  4. Literature Review and Assessment of Plant and Animal Transfer Factors Used in Performance Assessment Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, David E.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Napier, Bruce A.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Sasser, Lyle B.

    2003-07-20

    A literature review and assessment was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to update information on plant and animal radionuclide transfer factors used in performance-assessment modeling. A group of 15 radionuclides was included in this review and assessment. The review is composed of four main sections, not including the Introduction. Section 2.0 provides a review of the critically important issue of physicochemical speciation and geochemistry of the radionuclides in natural soil-water systems as it relates to the bioavailability of the radionuclides. Section 3.0 provides an updated review of the parameters of importance in the uptake of radionuclides by plants, including root uptake via the soil-groundwater system and foliar uptake due to overhead irrigation. Section 3.0 also provides a compilation of concentration ratios (CRs) for soil-to-plant uptake for the 15 selected radionuclides. Section 4.0 provides an updated review on radionuclide uptake data for animal products related to absorption, homeostatic control, approach to equilibration, chemical and physical form, diet, and age. Compiled transfer coefficients are provided for cows milk, sheeps milk, goats milk, beef, goat meat, pork, poultry, and eggs. Section 5.0 discusses the use of transfer coefficients in soil, plant, and animal modeling using regulatory models for evaluating radioactive waste disposal or decommissioned sites. Each section makes specific suggestions for future research in its area.

  5. Collective operations in a file system based execution model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shinde, Pravin; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2013-02-12

    A mechanism is provided for group communications using a MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system. A master application creates a multi-pipe synthetic file in the MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system, the master application indicating a multi-pipe operation to be performed. The master application then writes a header-control block of the multi-pipe synthetic file specifying at least one of a multi-pipe synthetic file system name, a message type, a message size, a specific destination, or a specification of the multi-pipe operation. Any other application participating in the group communications then opens the same multi-pipe synthetic file. A MULTI-PIPE file system module then implements the multi-pipe operation as identified by the master application. The master application and the other applications then either read or write operation messages to the multi-pipe synthetic file and the MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system module performs appropriate actions.

  6. Collective operations in a file system based execution model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shinde, Pravin; Van Hensbergen, Eric

    2013-02-19

    A mechanism is provided for group communications using a MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system. A master application creates a multi-pipe synthetic file in the MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system, the master application indicating a multi-pipe operation to be performed. The master application then writes a header-control block of the multi-pipe synthetic file specifying at least one of a multi-pipe synthetic file system name, a message type, a message size, a specific destination, or a specification of the multi-pipe operation. Any other application participating in the group communications then opens the same multi-pipe synthetic file. A MULTI-PIPE file system module then implements the multi-pipe operation as identified by the master application. The master application and the other applications then either read or write operation messages to the multi-pipe synthetic file and the MULTI-PIPE synthetic file system module performs appropriate actions.

  7. A knowledge based model of electric utility operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1993-08-11

    This report consists of an appendix to provide a documentation and help capability for an analyst using the developed expert system of electric utility operations running in CLIPS. This capability is provided through a separate package running under the WINDOWS Operating System and keyed to provide displays of text, graphics and mixed text and graphics that explain and elaborate on the specific decisions being made within the knowledge based expert system.

  8. Constraint-Based Modeling of Carbon Fixation and the Energetics of Electron Transfer in Geobacter metallireducens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feist, AM; Nagarajan, H; Rotaru, AE; Tremblay, PL; Zhang, T; Nevin, KP; Lovley, DR; Zengler, K

    2014-04-24

    Geobacter species are of great interest for environmental and biotechnology applications as they can carry out direct electron transfer to insoluble metals or other microorganisms and have the ability to assimilate inorganic carbon. Here, we report on the capability and key enabling metabolic machinery of Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 to carry out CO2 fixation and direct electron transfer to iron. An updated metabolic reconstruction was generated, growth screens on targeted conditions of interest were performed, and constraint-based analysis was utilized to characterize and evaluate critical pathways and reactions in G. metallireducens. The novel capability of G. metallireducens to grow autotrophically with formate and Fe(III) was predicted and subsequently validated in vivo. Additionally, the energetic cost of transferring electrons to an external electron acceptor was determined through analysis of growth experiments carried out using three different electron acceptors (Fe(III), nitrate, and fumarate) by systematically isolating and examining different parts of the electron transport chain. The updated reconstruction will serve as a knowledgebase for understanding and engineering Geobacter and similar species. Author Summary The ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons directly with their environment has large implications for our knowledge of industrial and environmental processes. For decades, it has been known that microbes can use electrodes as electron acceptors in microbial fuel cell settings. Geobacter metallireducens has been one of the model organisms for characterizing microbe-electrode interactions as well as environmental processes such as bioremediation. Here, we significantly expand the knowledge of metabolism and energetics of this model organism by employing constraint-based metabolic modeling. Through this analysis, we build the metabolic pathways necessary for carbon fixation, a desirable property for industrial chemical production. We further discover a novel growth condition which enables the characterization of autotrophic (i.e., carbon-fixing) metabolism in Geobacter. Importantly, our systems-level modeling approach helped elucidate the key metabolic pathways and the energetic cost associated with extracellular electron transfer. This model can be applied to characterize and engineer the metabolism and electron transfer capabilities of Geobacter for biotechnological applications.

  9. Improved Scheme for Modeling Mass Transfer between Fracture and Matrix Continua with Particle Tracking Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Pan; Y. Seol; G. Bodvarsson

    2004-04-29

    The dual-continuum random-walk particle tracking approach is an attractive simulation method for simulating transport in a fractured porous medium. In order to be truly successful for such a model, however, the key issue is to properly simulate the mass transfer between the fracture and matrix continua. In a recent paper, Pan and Bodvarsson (2002) proposed an improved scheme for simulating fracture-matrix mass transfer, by introducing the concept of activity range into the calculation of fracture-matrix particle-transfer probability. By comparing with analytical solutions, they showed that their scheme successfully captured the transient diffusion depth into the matrix without any additional subgrid (matrix) cells. This technical note presents an expansion of their scheme to cases in which significant water flow through the fracture-matrix interface exists. The dual-continuum particle tracker with this new scheme was found to be as accurate as a numerical model using a more detailed grid. The improved scheme can be readily incorporated into the existing particle-tracking code, while still maintaining the advantage of needing no additional matrix cells to capture transient features of particle penetration into the matrix.

  10. CKow -- A More Transparent and Reliable Model for Chemical Transfer to Meat and Milk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; McKone, Thomas E.; Jolliet, Olivier

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study is to increase the understanding and transparency of chemical biotransfer modeling into meat and milk and explicitly confront the uncertainties in exposure assessments of chemicals that require such estimates. In cumulative exposure assessments that include food pathways, much of the overall uncertainty is attributable to the estimation of transfer into biota and through food webs. Currently, the most commonly used meat and milk-biotransfer models date back two decades and, in spite of their widespread use in multimedia exposure models few attempts have been made to advance or improve the outdated and highly uncertain Kow regressions used in these models. Furthermore, in the range of Kow where meat and milk become the dominant human exposure pathways, these models often provide unrealistic rates and do not reflect properly the transfer dynamics. To address these issues, we developed a dynamic three-compartment cow model (called CKow), distinguishing lactating and non-lactating cows. For chemicals without available overall removal rates in the cow, a correlation is derived from measured values reported in the literature to predict this parameter from Kow. Results on carry over rates (COR) and biotransfer factors (BTF) demonstrate that a steady-state ratio between animal intake and meat concentrations is almost never reached. For meat, empirical data collected on short term experiments need to be adjusted to provide estimates of average longer term behaviors. The performance of the new model in matching measurements is improved relative to existing models--thus reducing uncertainty. The CKow model is straight forward to apply at steady state for milk and dynamically for realistic exposure durations for meat COR.

  11. NEW MODEL AND MEASUREMENT PRINCIPLE OF FLOWING AND HEAT TRANSFER CHARACTERISTICS OF REGENERATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Luo, E. C.; Dai, W.

    2008-03-16

    Regenerators play key role in oscillating-flow cryocoolers or thermoacoustic heat engine systems. However, their flowing and heat transfer mechanism is still not well understood. The complexities of the oscillating flow regenerator make traditional method of heat transfer research become difficult or helpless. In this paper, a model for porous media regenerator was given based on the linear thermoacoustic theory. Then the correlations for characteristic parameters were obtained by deducing universal expressions for thermoacoustic viscous function F{sub v} and thermal function F{sub T}. A simple acoustical method and experimental system to get F{sub v} and F{sub T} via measurements of isothermal regenerators were presented. Some measurements of packed stainless screen regenerators were performed, and preliminary experimental results for flow and convective coefficients were derived, which showing flowing friction factor is approximately within 132/Re to 173/Re.

  12. Simple protocols for oblivious transfer and secure identification in the noisy-quantum-storage model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaffner, Christian

    2010-09-15

    We present simple protocols for oblivious transfer and password-based identification which are secure against general attacks in the noisy-quantum-storage model as defined in R. Koenig, S. Wehner, and J. Wullschleger [e-print arXiv:0906.1030]. We argue that a technical tool from Koenig et al. suffices to prove security of the known protocols. Whereas the more involved protocol for oblivious transfer from Koenig et al. requires less noise in storage to achieve security, our ''canonical'' protocols have the advantage of being simpler to implement and the security error is easier control. Therefore, our protocols yield higher OT rates for many realistic noise parameters. Furthermore, a proof of security of a direct protocol for password-based identification against general noisy-quantum-storage attacks is given.

  13. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  14. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-07-01

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  15. Mathematical modeling of mass transfer during centrifugal filtration of polydisperse suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.F. Pozhidaev; Y.B. Rubinshtein; G.Y. Golberg; S.A. Osadchii

    2009-07-15

    A mass-transfer equation, the solution of which for given boundary conditions makes it possible to derive in analytical form a relationship between the extraction of the solid phase of a suspension into the centrifuge effluent and the fineness of the particles, is suggested on the basis of a model; this is of particular importance in connection with the development of a new trend in the utilization of filtering centrifuges - concentration of coal slurries by extraction into the centrifuge effluent of the finest particles, the ash content of which is substantially higher than that of particles of the coarser classes. Results are presented for production studies under conditions at an active establishment (the Neryungrinskaya Enrichment Factory); these results confirmed the adequacy of the mathematical model proposed: convergence of computed and experimental data was within the limits of the experimental error (no more than 3%). The model in question can be used to predict results of suspension separation by centrifugal filtration.

  16. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  17. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS (TBACT) DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEM SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY SE; HAASS CC; KOVACH JL; TURNER DA

    2010-06-03

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste throught the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP).

  18. EVALUATION OF BEST AVAILABLE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY FOR TOXICS -TBACT- DOUBLE SHELL TANK FARMS PRIMARY VENTILATION SYSTEMS SUPPORTING WASTE TRANSFER OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAAS CC; KOVACH JL; KELLY SE; TURNER DA

    2010-06-24

    This report is an evaluation of Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (tBACT) for installation and operation of the Hanford double shell (DST) tank primary ventilation systems. The DST primary ventilation systems are being modified to support Hanford's waste retrieval, mixing, and delivery of single shell tank (SST) and DST waste through the DST storage system to the Waste Treatment and Immobilizaiton Plant (WTP).

  19. Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conditions (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development and Testing of CTF to Support Modeling of BWR Operating Conditions This milestone supports developing and assessing COBRA-TF (CTF) for the modeling of boiling water reactors (BWRs). This is achieved in three stages. First, a new preprocessor utility that is capable of handling BWR-specic design

  20. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore » heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  1. Systematic Assessment of Neutron and Gamma Backgrounds Relevant to Operational Modeling and Detection Technology Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Daniel E.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Nicholson, Andrew D.; Patton, Bruce W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a two year effort to systematically assess neutron and gamma backgrounds relevant to operational modeling and detection technology implementation. The first year effort focused on reviewing the origins of background sources and their impact on measured rates in operational scenarios of interest. The second year has focused on the assessment of detector and algorithm performance as they pertain to operational requirements against the various background sources and background levels.

  2. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully coupled STOMP simulator to guide barrier design will result in optimized designs with reduced construction costs; reduced environmental impacts at borrow sites; and minimized post-closure care and monitoring needs, while meeting regulatory requirements.

  3. Development of COBRA-TF for Modeling Full-Core Reactor Operating...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Development of COBRA-TF for Modeling Full-Core Reactor Operating Cycles Authors: Salko, Robert K 1 ; Lange, Travis L 1 ; Kucukboyaci, Vefa 2 ; Sung, Yixing 2 ; ...

  4. Development of COBRA-TF for Modeling Full-Core Reactor Operating Cycles

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development of COBRA-TF for Modeling Full-Core Reactor Operating Cycles Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of COBRA-TF for Modeling Full-Core Reactor Operating Cycles Authors: Salko, Robert K [1] ; Lange, Travis L [1] ; Kucukboyaci, Vefa [2] ; Sung, Yixing [2] ; Palmtag, Scott [3] ; Gehin, Jess C [1] ; Avramova, Maria [4] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township Core Physics, Inc. Pennsylvania State

  5. Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E.

    2012-07-16

    Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

  6. Transfer matrix computation of critical polynomials for two-dimensional Potts models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Scullard, Christian R.

    2013-02-04

    We showed, In our previous work, that critical manifolds of the q-state Potts model can be studied by means of a graph polynomial PB(q, v), henceforth referred to as the critical polynomial. This polynomial may be defined on any periodic two-dimensional lattice. It depends on a finite subgraph B, called the basis, and the manner in which B is tiled to construct the lattice. The real roots v = eK — 1 of PB(q, v) either give the exact critical points for the lattice, or provide approximations that, in principle, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the size ofmore » B in an appropriate way. In earlier work, PB(q, v) was defined by a contraction-deletion identity, similar to that satisfied by the Tutte polynomial. Here, we give a probabilistic definition of PB(q, v), which facilitates its computation, using the transfer matrix, on much larger B than was previously possible.We present results for the critical polynomial on the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices for bases of up to respectively 96, 162, and 243 edges, compared to the limit of 36 edges with contraction-deletion. We discuss in detail the role of the symmetries and the embedding of B. The critical temperatures vc obtained for ferromagnetic (v > 0) Potts models are at least as precise as the best available results from Monte Carlo simulations or series expansions. For instance, with q = 3 we obtain vc(4, 82) = 3.742 489 (4), vc(kagome) = 1.876 459 7 (2), and vc(3, 122) = 5.033 078 49 (4), the precision being comparable or superior to the best simulation results. More generally, we trace the critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane and discuss the intricate structure of the phase diagram in the antiferromagnetic (v < 0) region.« less

  7. Heat transfer modelling of the saltstone pouring and curing process. Task Number: 93-016-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shadday, M.A. Jr.

    1993-11-01

    A byproduct of the in tank precipitation, ITP, process will be 25 million gallons of low-level salt solution. This salt solution will be mixed with cement and a flyash/slag mixture and solidified in surface vaults in the Z-area Saltstone Facility. The curing process of saltstone involves exothermic reactions, and there is a maximum temperature limit of 90{degree}C for the curing saltstone. If this temperature limit is exceeded, the physical properties of the saltstone can be degraded. A heat transfer model of the saltstone pouring and curing process has been developed that predicts transient temperature distributions in the curing saltstone. The purpose of this model is to predict peak temperatures as functions of the several independent variables in this process: pour temperature, the pour schedule, and seasonal variations in the ambient temperature. The peak temperature of the saltstone is very sensitive to the internal heat generation that accompanies the curing process. Most of the energy is released over a short period of several hours, and the balance is released slowly over a period of time that can be in excess of a month. This long term low level internal heat generation is difficult to measure in laboratory calorimetry tests, and it can significantly influence the peak temperature in the saltstone. Due to the low thermal conductivity of the saltstone, the central region of the poured saltstone will essentially heat up adiabatically. The time dependence of the internal heat generation rate was determined from an analysis of the 1991 pilot pour test. With a pour schedule of eight hours a day and five days a week in the summer, the model predicts that the saltstone will have a peak temperature of 98 C with a pour temperature of 45 C, and a peak temperature of 88 C with a pour temperature of 30 C. With a pour schedule of three days a week, the peak temperature will be 88{degree}C with a pour temperature of 45 C, and 80 C with a pour temperature of 30 C.

  8. Incorporation of a Helical Tube Heat Transfer Model in the MARS Thermal Hydraulic Systems Analysis Code for the T/H Analyses of the SMART Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young Jin Lee; Bub Dong Chung; Jong Chull Jo; Hho Jung Kim; Un Chul Lee

    2004-07-01

    SMART is a medium sized integral type advanced pressurized water reactor currently under development at KAERI. The steam generators of SMART are designed with helically coiled tubes and these are designed to produce superheated steam. The helical shape of the tubes can induce strong centrifugal effect on the secondary coolant as it flows inside the tubes. The presence of centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the formation of cross-sectional circulation flows within the tubes that will increase the overall heat transfer. Furthermore, the centrifugal effect is expected to enhance the moisture separation and thus make it easier to produce superheated steam. MARS is a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic systems analysis code with multi-phase, multi-dimensional analysis capability. The MARS code was produced by restructuring and merging the RELAP5 and the COBRA-TF codes. However, MARS as well as most other best-estimate systems analysis codes in current use lack the detailed models needed to describe the thermal hydraulics of helically coiled tubes. In this study, the heat transfer characteristics and relevant correlations for both the tube and shell sides of helical tubes have been investigated, and the appropriate models have been incorporated into the MARS code. The newly incorporated helical tube heat transfer package is available to the MARS users via selection of the appropriate option in the input. A performance analysis on the steam generator of SMART under full power operation was carried out using the modified MARS code. The results of the analysis indicate that there is a significant improvement in the code predictability. (authors)

  9. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  10. Corrections to the Neutrinoless Double-Beta-Decay Operator in the Shell Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Jonathan [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Hagen, Gaute [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    We use diagrammatic perturbation theory to construct an effective shell-model operator for the neutrinoless double beta decay of ^{82}Se. The starting point is the same Bonn-C nucleon-nucleon interaction that is used to generate the Hamiltonian in state-of-the-art shell-model calculations. After first summing high-energy ladder diagrams that account for short-range correlations and then adding diagrams of low order in the G matrix to account for longer-range correlations, we fold the two-body matrix elements of the resulting effective operator with transition densities from an existing shell-model calculation to obtain the overall nuclear matrix element that governs the decay. Although the high-energy ladder diagrams suppress this matrix element at very short distances as expected, they enhance it at distances between one and two fermis, so that their overall effect is small. The corrections due to longer-range physics are large, but cancel one another so that the fully corrected matrix element is comparable to that produced by the bare operator. This cancellation between large and physically distinct low-order terms indicates the importance of a reliable nonperturbative calculation.

  11. Corrections to the neutrinoless double-{beta}-decay operator in the shell model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engel, Jonathan; Hagen, Gaute [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516-3255 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    We use diagrammatic perturbation theory to construct an effective shell-model operator for the neutrinoless double-{beta} decay of {sup 82}Se. The starting point is the same Bonn-C nucleon-nucleon interaction that is used to generate the Hamiltonian for recent shell-model calculations of double-{beta} decay. After first summing high-energy ladder diagrams that account for short-range correlations and then adding diagrams of low order in the G matrix to account for longer-range correlations, we fold the two-body matrix elements of the resulting effective operator with transition densities from the recent shell-model calculation to obtain the overall nuclear matrix element that governs the decay. Although the high-energy ladder diagrams suppress this matrix element at very short distances as expected, they enhance it at distances between one and two fermis, so that their overall effect is small. The corrections due to longer-range physics are large, but cancel one another so that the fully corrected matrix element is comparable to that produced by the bare operator. This cancellation between large and physically distinct low-order terms indicates the importance of a reliable nonperturbative calculation.

  12. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Not Available

    1980-03-07

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor is described. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  13. Heat transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, Joseph C.

    1982-01-01

    A heat transfer system for a nuclear reactor. Heat transfer is accomplished within a sealed vapor chamber which is substantially evacuated prior to use. A heat transfer medium, which is liquid at the design operating temperatures, transfers heat from tubes interposed in the reactor primary loop to spaced tubes connected to a steam line for power generation purposes. Heat transfer is accomplished by a two-phase liquid-vapor-liquid process as used in heat pipes. Condensible gases are removed from the vapor chamber through a vertical extension in open communication with the chamber interior.

  14. Modeling and Simulation of HVAC Faulty Operations and Performance Degradation due to Maintenance Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Liping; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-01-01

    Almost half of the total energy used in the U.S. buildings is consumed by heating, ventilation and air conditionings (HVAC) according to EIA statistics. Among various driving factors to energy performance of building, operations and maintenance play a significant role. Many researches have been done to look at design efficiencies and operational controls for improving energy performance of buildings, but very few study the impacts of HVAC systems maintenance. Different practices of HVAC system maintenance can result in substantial differences in building energy use. If a piece of HVAC equipment is not well maintained, its performance will degrade. If sensors used for control purpose are not calibrated, not only building energy usage could be dramatically increased, but also mechanical systems may not be able to satisfy indoor thermal comfort. Properly maintained HVAC systems can operate efficiently, improve occupant comfort, and prolong equipment service life. In the paper, maintenance practices for HVAC systems are presented based on literature reviews and discussions with HVAC engineers, building operators, facility managers, and commissioning agents. We categorize the maintenance practices into three levels depending on the maintenance effort and coverage: 1) proactive, performance-monitored maintenance; 2) preventive, scheduled maintenance; and 3) reactive, unplanned or no maintenance. A sampled list of maintenance issues, including cooling tower fouling, boiler/chiller fouling, refrigerant over or under charge, temperature sensor offset, outdoor air damper leakage, outdoor air screen blockage, outdoor air damper stuck at fully open position, and dirty filters are investigated in this study using field survey data and detailed simulation models. The energy impacts of both individual maintenance issue and combined scenarios for an office building with central VAV systems and central plant were evaluated by EnergyPlus simulations using three approaches: 1) direct modeling with EnergyPlus, 2) using the energy management system feature of EnergyPlus, and 3) modifying EnergyPlus source code. The results demonstrated the importance of maintenance for HVAC systems on energy performance of buildings. The research is intended to provide a guideline to help practitioners and building operators to gain the knowledge of maintaining HVAC systems in efficient operations, and prioritize HVAC maintenance work plan. The paper also discusses challenges of modeling building maintenance issues using energy simulation programs.

  15. A WSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat Transfer Model of Above and Underground Insulated Piping

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    WSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat Transfer Model of Above and Underground Insulated Piping Systems by K. C. Kwon Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 A document prepared for ASME CONFERENCE - HEAT EXCHANGER COMMITTEE MEETING 8 , INTERNATIONAL JOINT POWER GENERATION CONFERENCE 1998 at Baltimore, MA, USA from 8/23/98 - 8/26/98. DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 This paper was prepared in connection with work done under the above contract number with the U. S.

  16. Technology Transfer - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PAZ0004_v2.jpg Technology Transfer Who We Are JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers Governance & Advisory Boards Operations & Administration Who we are Overview JCAP Mission JCAP At A Glance Fact Sheets Organizational Chart Our Achievements Recent Science Technology Transfer Awards & Honors Our People Senior Management Scientific Leadership Researchers

  17. GRIZZLY Model of Multi-Reactive Species Diffusion, Moisture/Heat Transfer and Alkali-Silica Reaction for Simulating Concrete Aging and Degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Spencer, Benjamin W.; Cai, Guowei

    2015-09-01

    Concrete is widely used in the construction of nuclear facilities because of its structural strength and its ability to shield radiation. The use of concrete in nuclear power plants for containment and shielding of radiation and radioactive materials has made its performance crucial for the safe operation of the facility. As such, when life extension is considered for nuclear power plants, it is critical to have accurate and reliable predictive tools to address concerns related to various aging processes of concrete structures and the capacity of structures subjected to age-related degradation. The goal of this report is to document the progress of the development and implementation of a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model in GRIZZLY code with the ultimate goal to reliably simulate and predict long-term performance and response of aged NPP concrete structures subjected to a number of aging mechanisms including external chemical attacks and volume-changing chemical reactions within concrete structures induced by alkali-silica reactions and long-term exposure to irradiation. Based on a number of survey reports of concrete aging mechanisms relevant to nuclear power plants and recommendations from researchers in concrete community, we’ve implemented three modules during FY15 in GRIZZLY code, (1) multi-species reactive diffusion model within cement materials; (2) coupled moisture and heat transfer model in concrete; and (3) anisotropic, stress-dependent, alkali-silica reaction induced swelling model. The multi-species reactive diffusion model was implemented with the objective to model aging of concrete structures subjected to aggressive external chemical attacks (e.g., chloride attack, sulfate attack, etc.). It considers multiple processes relevant to external chemical attacks such as diffusion of ions in aqueous phase within pore spaces, equilibrium chemical speciation reactions and kinetic mineral dissolution/precipitation. The moisture/heat transfer module was implemented to simulate long-term spatial and temporal evolutions of the moisture and temperature fields within concrete structures at both room and elevated temperatures. The ASR swelling model implemented in GRIZZLY code can simulate anisotropic expansions of ASR gel under either uniaxial, biaxial and triaxial stress states, and can be run simultaneously with the moisture/heat transfer model and coupled with various elastic/inelastic solid mechanics models that were implemented in GRIZZLY code previously. This report provides detailed descriptions of the governing equations, constitutive equations and numerical algorithms of the three modules implemented in GRIZZLY during FY15, simulation results of example problems and model validation results by comparing simulations with available experimental data reported in the literature. The close match between the experiments and simulations clearly demonstrate the potential of GRIZZLY code for reliable evaluation and prediction of long-term performance and response of aged concrete structures in nuclear power plants.

  18. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine decreases the developed turbine torque; the RCIC speed then slows, and thus the pump flow rate to the RPV decreases. Subsequently, RPV water level decreases due to continued boiling and the liquid fraction flowing to the RCIC decreases, thereby accelerating the RCIC and refilling the RPV. The feedback cycle then repeats itself and/or reaches a quasi-steady equilibrium condition. In other words, the water carry-over is limited by cyclic RCIC performance degradation, and hence the system becomes self-regulating. The indications achieved to date with the system model are more qualitative than quantitative. The avenues being pursued to increase the fidelity of the model are expected to add quantitative realism. The end product will be generic in the sense that the RCIC model will be incorporable within the larger reactor coolant system model of any nuclear power plant or experimental configuration.

  19. Fluid flow modeling of resin transfer molding for composite material wind turbine blade structures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, Douglas S. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Rossel, Scott M. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

    2004-06-01

    Resin transfer molding (RTM) is a closed mold process for making composite materials. It has the potential to produce parts more cost effectively than hand lay-up or other methods. However, fluid flow tends to be unpredictable and parts the size of a wind turbine blade are difficult to engineer without some predictive method for resin flow. There were five goals of this study. The first was to determine permeabilities for three fabrics commonly used for RTM over a useful range of fiber volume fractions. Next, relations to estimate permeabilities in mixed fabric lay-ups were evaluated. Flow in blade substructures was analyzed and compared to predictions. Flow in a full-scale blade was predicted and substructure results were used to validate the accuracy of a full-scale blade prediction.

  20. Operational forecasting based on a modified Weather Research and Forecasting model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J; Glascoe, L; Obrecht, J

    2010-03-18

    Accurate short-term forecasts of wind resources are required for efficient wind farm operation and ultimately for the integration of large amounts of wind-generated power into electrical grids. Siemens Energy Inc. and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the University of Colorado at Boulder, are collaborating on the design of an operational forecasting system for large wind farms. The basis of the system is the numerical weather prediction tool, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model; large-eddy simulations and data assimilation approaches are used to refine and tailor the forecasting system. Representation of the atmospheric boundary layer is modified, based on high-resolution large-eddy simulations of the atmospheric boundary. These large-eddy simulations incorporate wake effects from upwind turbines on downwind turbines as well as represent complex atmospheric variability due to complex terrain and surface features as well as atmospheric stability. Real-time hub-height wind speed and other meteorological data streams from existing wind farms are incorporated into the modeling system to enable uncertainty quantification through probabilistic forecasts. A companion investigation has identified optimal boundary-layer physics options for low-level forecasts in complex terrain, toward employing decadal WRF simulations to anticipate large-scale changes in wind resource availability due to global climate change.

  1. Transferring Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transferring Data to and from NERSC Yushu Yao 1 Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Overview 2 * Structure of NERSC Systems and Disks * Data Transfer Nodes * Transfer Data from/to NERSC - scp/sftp - bbcp - GridFTP * Sharing Data Within NERSC Tuesday, March 8, 2011 Systems and Disks 3 System Hopper Franklin Carver Euclid Data Transfer Node PDSF Global Home ($HOME) Global Scratch ($GSCRATCH) Project Directory Local Non-shared Scratch Data transfer nodes can access most of the disks, suggested for transferring

  2. MODELING COUPLED PROCESSES OF MULTIPHASE FLOW AND HEAT TRANSFER IN UNSATURATED FRACTURED ROCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wu; S. Mukhopadhyay; K. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2006-02-28

    A mountain-scale, thermal-hydrologic (TH) numerical model is developed for investigating unsaturated flow behavior in response to decay heat from the radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. The TH model, consisting of three-dimensional (3-D) representations of the unsaturated zone, is based on the current repository design, drift layout, and thermal loading scenario under estimated current and future climate conditions. More specifically, the TH model implements the current geological framework and hydrogeological conceptual models, and incorporates the most updated, best-estimated input parameters. This mountain-scale TH model simulates the coupled TH processes related to mountain-scale multiphase fluid flow, and evaluates the impact of radioactive waste heat on the hydrogeological system, including thermally perturbed liquid saturation, gas- and liquid-phase fluxes, and water and rock temperature elevations, as well as the changes in water flux driven by evaporation/condensation processes and drainage between drifts. For a better description of the ambient geothermal condition of the unsaturated zone system, the TH model is first calibrated against measured borehole temperature data. The ambient temperature calibration provides the necessary surface and water table boundary as well as initial conditions. Then, the TH model is used to obtain scientific understanding of TH processes in the Yucca Mountain unsaturated zone under the designed schedule of repository thermal load.

  3. Modeling Cladding-Coolant Heat Transfer of High-Burnup Fuel During...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the fuel performance code FRAPTRAN 1.2. The minimum stable film boiling temperature, affected by the subcooling and the clad oxidation, is modeled by a modified Henry correlation. ...

  4. Overview of heat transfer and fluid flow problem areas encountered in stirling engine modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, R.C. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has been managing Stirling engine development programs for over a decade. In addition to contractual programs, this work has included in-house engine testing and development of engine computer models. Attempts to validate Stirling engine computer models with test data have demonstrated that engine thermodynamic losses need better characterization. Various Stirling engine thermodynamic losses and efforts that are underway to characterize these losses are discussed.

  5. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.

  6. Modeling polychlorinated biphenyl mass transfer after amendment of contaminated sediment with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Werner; Upal Ghosh; Richard G. Luthy

    2006-07-01

    The sorption kinetics and concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in historically polluted sediment is modeled to assess a remediation strategy based on in situ PCB sequestration by mixing with activated carbon (AC). The authors extend their evaluation of a model based on intraparticle diffusion by including a biomimetic semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and a first-order degradation rate for the aqueous phase. The model predictions are compared with the previously reported experimental PCB concentrations in the bulk water phase and in SPMDs. The simulated scenarios comprise a marine and a freshwater sediment, four PCB congeners, two AC grain sizes, four doses of AC, and comparison with laboratory experiments. The modeling approach distinguishes between two different sediment particles types: a light-density fraction representing carbonaceous particles such as charcoal, coal, coke, cenospheres, or wood, and a heavy-density fraction representing the mineral phase with coatings of organic matter. A third particle type in the numerical model is AC. The model qualitatively reproduces the observed shifts in the PCB distribution during repartitioning after AC amendment but overestimates the overall effect of the treatment in reducing aqueous and SPMD concentrations of PCBs by a factor of 2-6. For the AC application in sediment, competitive sorption of the various solutes apparently requires a reduction by a factor of 16 of the literature values for the AC-water partitioning coefficient measured in pure aqueous systems. With this correction, model results and measurements agree within a factor of 3. After AC amendment is homogeneously mixed into the sediment and then left undisturbed, aqueous PCB concentrations tend toward the same reduction after 5 years. 19 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Development of a Thermodynamic Model for the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator - 12193

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Robert; Seniow, Kendra

    2012-07-01

    The Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) is the current tool used by the Hanford Tank Operations Contractor for system planning and assessment of different operational strategies. Activities such as waste retrievals in the Hanford tank farms and washing and leaching of waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) are currently modeled in HTWOS. To predict phase compositions during these activities, HTWOS currently uses simple wash and leach factors that were developed many years ago. To improve these predictions, a rigorous thermodynamic framework has been developed based on the multi-component Pitzer ion interaction model for use with several important chemical species in Hanford tank waste. These chemical species are those with the greatest impact on high-level waste glass production in the WTP and whose solubility depends on the processing conditions. Starting with Pitzer parameter coefficients and species chemical potential coefficients collated from open literature sources, reconciliation with published experimental data led to a self-consistent set of coefficients known as the HTWOS Pitzer database. Using Gibbs energy minimization with the Pitzer ion interaction equations in Microsoft Excel,1 a number of successful predictions were made for the solubility of simple mixtures of the chosen species. Currently, this thermodynamic framework is being programmed into HTWOS as the mechanism for determining the solid-liquid phase distributions for the chosen species, replacing their simple wash and leach factors. Starting from a variety of open literature sources, a collection of Pitzer parameters and species chemical potentials, as functions of temperature, was tested for consistency and accuracy by comparison with available experimental thermodynamic data (e.g., osmotic coefficients and solubility). Reconciliation of the initial set of parameter coefficients with the experimental data led to the development of the self-consistent set known as the HTWOS Pitzer database. Using Microsoft Excel to formulate the Gibbs energy minimization method and the multi-component Pitzer ion interaction equations, several predictions of the solubility of solute mixtures at various temperatures were made using the HTWOS Pitzer database coefficients. Examples of these predictions are shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4. A listing of the entire HTWOS Pitzer database can be found in RPP-RPT-50703. Currently, work is underway to install the Pitzer ion interaction model in HTWOS as the mechanism for determining the solid-liquid phase distributions of select waste constituents during tank retrievals and subsequent washing and leaching of the waste. Validation of the Pitzer ion interaction model in HTWOS will be performed with analytical laboratory data of actual tank waste. This change in HTWOS is expected to elicit shifts in mission criteria, such as mission end date and quantity of high-level waste glass produced by WTP, as predicted by HTWOS. These improvements to the speciation calculations in HTWOS, however, will establish a better planning basis and facilitate more effective and efficient future operations of the WTP. (authors)

  8. Data Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfer Data Transfer This section contains advice for the best ways to get your data into and out of NERSC. Globus Globus is a service for fast reliable managed data transfers. Read More » GridFTP GridFTP is a high-performance, secure, reliable data transfer protocol optimized for high-bandwidth wide-area networks. The GridFTP protocol is based on FTP, the highly-popular Internet file transfer protocol. Read More » Data Transfer Nodes The data transfer nodes are optimized for moving data

  9. Data Transfer Software-SAS MetaData Server & Phoenix Integration Model Center

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-04-15

    This software is a plug-in that interfaces between the Phoenix Integration's Model Center and the Base SAS 9.2 applications. The end use of the plug-in is to link input and output data that resides in SAS tables or MS SQL to and from "legacy" software programs without recoding. The potential end users are users who need to run legacy code and want data stored in a SQL database.

  10. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W.-L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H.-H.

    2015-05-19

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada, using the global CCSM4 (Community Climate System Model version 4; Community Atmosphere Model/Community Land Model – CAM4/CLM4) with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation (3-D–PP (plane-parallel)) adjustment to ensure that the energy balance atmore » the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization. We show that deviations in the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher-elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while it decreases for higher elevations, with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases at higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  11. RCIC operation in Fukushima accidents as modeled by MELCOR and proposed testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.

    2014-10-07

    This report discusses some of the findings from a Fukushima analysis that relays deep insight into critical operating systems such as the RCIC cooling system.

  12. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  13. A global model simulation for 3-D radiative transfer impact on surface hydrology over Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, W. -L.; Gu, Y.; Liou, K. N.; Leung, L. R.; Hsu, H. -H.

    2014-12-15

    We investigate 3-D mountain effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the Western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada using CCSM4 (CAM4/CLM4) global model with a 0.23° × 0.31° resolution for simulations over 6 years. In 3-D radiative transfer parameterization, we have updated surface topography data from a resolution of 1 km to 90 m to improve parameterization accuracy. In addition, we have also modified the upward-flux deviation [3-D - PP (plane-parallel)] adjustment to ensure that energy balance at the surface is conserved in global climate simulations based on 3-D radiation parameterization.more » We show that deviations of the net surface fluxes are not only affected by 3-D mountains, but also influenced by feedbacks of cloud and snow in association with the long-term simulations. Deviations in sensible heat and surface temperature generally follow the patterns of net surface solar flux. The monthly snow water equivalent (SWE) deviations show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, leading to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, negative SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Simulated precipitation increases for lower elevations, while decreases for higher elevations with a minimum in April. Liquid runoff significantly decreases in higher elevations after April due to reduced SWE and precipitation.« less

  14. Transient Inverse Calibration of Hanford Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts - 1943 to 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Thorne, Paul D.; Orr, Samuel; Mckinley, Mathew I.

    2001-05-31

    This report describes a new initiative to strengthen the technical defensibility of predictions made with the Hanford site-wide groundwater flow and transport model. The focus is on characterizing major uncertainties in the current model. PNNL will develop and implement a calibration approach and methodology that can be used to evaluate alternative conceptual models of the Hanford aquifer system. The calibration process will involve a three-dimensional transient inverse calibration of each numerical model to historical observations of hydraulic and water quality impacts to the unconfined aquifer system from Hanford operations since the mid-1940s.

  15. Operation Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operation Schedule Daily Hours of Operation

  16. A two-dimensional model for the heat transfer on the external circuit of a Stirling engine for a dish/Stirling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhkamov, K.K.; Ingham, D.B.

    1998-07-01

    In this paper the {kappa}-{var{underscore}epsilon} turbulent model for the incompressible fluid flow has been used to describe the heat transfer and gas dynamical processes on the external circuit of a Stirling Engine as used on a Solar Dish/Stirling System. The problem considered, in this work for a cavity-type heat receiver of the Stirling Engine, is that of the heat transfer in the body of the shell of the heat exchangers of the engine due to the thermal conductivity, the convective heat transfer between the working fluid and the walls of the engine internal gas circuit and the heat transfer due to the forced convection of the air in the cavity and in the attached air domain. The boundary conditions employed on the engines internal circuit were obtained using the developed one-dimensional second level mathematical model of the engine working cycle. Physical models for the distribution of the solar insolation on the bottom and side walls of the heat receiver have been taken into account and the temperature fields for the heat receiver and the air velocity have been obtained for the case when the heat receiver is affected by wind. The numerical results show that it is in the region of the boundary of the input window of the heat receiver where there is the largest reduction in the temperature in the shell of the heat exchangers and this is due to the convection of the air.

  17. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  18. Transferring Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transferring Data Advice and Overview NERSC provides many facilities for storing data and performing analysis. However, transferring data - whether over the wide area network or with NERSC - can be expensive and time consuming. This page explains the mechanisms NERSC provides to move your data from one place to another. A good strategy, once your data is resident at NERSC, is to perform your analysis in situ, rather than transferring the data elsewhere for analysis. The NERSC consultant can

  19. HYDRODYNAMIC AND RADIATIVE MODELING OF TEMPORAL H{alpha} EMISSION V/R VARIATIONS CAUSED BY DISCONTINUOUS MASS TRANSFER IN BINARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadima, Pavel; Harmanec, Petr; Wolf, Marek; Firt, Roman; Ruzdjak, Domagoj; Bozic, Hrvoje; Koubsky, Pavel

    2011-07-15

    H{alpha} emission V/R variations caused by discontinuous mass transfer in interacting binaries with a rapidly rotating accreting star are modeled qualitatively for the first time. The program ZEUS-MP was used to create a non-linear three-dimensional hydrodynamical model of a development of a blob of gaseous material injected into an orbit around a star. It resulted in the formation of an elongated disk with a slow prograde revolution. The LTE radiative transfer program SHELLSPEC was used to calculate the H{alpha} profiles originating in the disk for several phases of its revolution. The profiles have the form of a double emission and exhibit V/R and radial velocity variations. However, these variations should be a temporal phenomenon since imposing a viscosity in the given model would lead to a circularization of the disk and fading-out of the given variations.

  20. Operations Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Research Analysts The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) within the Department of Energy has forged a world-class information program that stresses quality, teamwork, and employee growth. In support of our program, we offer a variety of profes- sional positions, including the Operations Research Analyst, whose work is associated with the development and main- tenance of energy modeling systems. Responsibilities: Operations Research Analysts perform or participate in one or

  1. Technology Transfer Webinar on November 12: High-Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Webinar on November 12: High-Performance Hybrid SimulationMeasurement-Based Tools for Proactive Operator Decision-Support Technology Transfer Webinar on...

  2. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover; DOE responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements; records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor for use during Phase 1B.

  3. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  4. Business Operations | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Contact Us Business Operations Procurement Division Travel and Conference Services Careers Human...

  5. Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Since 1974, the Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer has recognized scientists and engineers at federal government and research centers for their "uncommon creativity and initiative in conveying innovations from their facilities to industry and local government." Scientists and engineers from more than 650 federal government laboratories and research centers compete for the 30 awards presented each year. Because the number

  6. Understanding Building Infrastructure and Building Operation through DOE Asset Score Model: Lessons Learned from a Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Na; Goel, Supriya; Gorrissen, Willy J.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

    2013-06-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is developing a national voluntary energy asset score system to help building owners to evaluate the as-built physical characteristics (including building envelope, the mechanical and electrical systems) and overall building energy efficiency, independent of occupancy and operational choices. The energy asset score breaks down building energy use information by simulating building performance under typical operating and occupancy conditions for a given use type. A web-based modeling tool, the energy asset score tool facilitates the implementation of the asset score system. The tool consists of a simplified user interface built on a centralized simulation engine (EnergyPlus). It is intended to reduce both the implementation cost for the users and increase modeling standardization compared with an approach that requires users to build their own energy models. A pilot project with forty-two buildings (consisting mostly offices and schools) was conducted in 2012. This paper reports the findings. Participants were asked to collect a minimum set of building data and enter it into the asset score tool. Participants also provided their utility bills, existing ENERGY STAR scores, and previous energy audit/modeling results if available. The results from the asset score tool were compared with the building energy use data provided by the pilot participants. Three comparisons were performed. First, the actual building energy use, either from the utility bills or via ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, was compared with the modeled energy use. It was intended to examine how well the energy asset score represents a buildings system efficiencies, and how well it is correlated to a buildings actual energy consumption. Second, calibrated building energy models (where they exist) were used to examine any discrepancies between the asset score model and the pilot participant buildings [known] energy use pattern. This comparison examined the end use breakdowns and more detailed time series data. Third, ASHRAE 90.1 prototype buildings were also used as an industry standard modeling approach to test the accuracy level of the asset score tool. Our analysis showed that the asset score tool, which uses simplified building simulation, could provide results comparable to a more detailed energy model. The buildings as-built efficiency can be reflected in the energy asset score. An analysis between the modeled energy use through the asset score tool and the actual energy use from the utility bills can further inform building owners about the effectiveness of their buildings operation and maintenance.

  7. Transient Inverse Calibration of Site-Wide Groundwater Model to Hanford Operational Impacts from 1943 to 1996--Alternative Conceptual Model Considering Interaction with Uppermost Basalt Confined Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Cole, Charles R.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Thorne, Paul D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

    2001-08-29

    The baseline three-dimensional transient inverse model for the estimation of site-wide scale flow parameters, including their uncertainties, using data on the transient behavior of the unconfined aquifer system over the entire historical period of Hanford operations, has been modified to account for the effects of basalt intercommunication between the Hanford unconfined aquifer and the underlying upper basalt confined aquifer. Both the baseline and alternative conceptual models (ACM-1) considered only the groundwater flow component and corresponding observational data in the 3-Dl transient inverse calibration efforts. Subsequent efforts will examine both groundwater flow and transport. Comparisons of goodness of fit measures and parameter estimation results for the ACM-1 transient inverse calibrated model with those from previous site-wide groundwater modeling efforts illustrate that the new 3-D transient inverse model approach will strengthen the technical defensibility of the final model(s) and provide the ability to incorporate uncertainty in predictions related to both conceptual model and parameter uncertainty. These results, however, indicate that additional improvements are required to the conceptual model framework. An investigation was initiated at the end of this basalt inverse modeling effort to determine whether facies-based zonation would improve specific yield parameter estimation results (ACM-2). A description of the justification and methodology to develop this zonation is discussed.

  8. Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-15

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

  9. Working with SRNL - Technology Transfer - Ombudsman

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GO Tech Briefs Contacts Ombudsman Tech Home SRNL Home Working with SRNL - Technology Transfer Ombudsman SRS Entry Sign The Department of Energy and its management and operating...

  10. Modeling the performance of small capacity lithium bromide-water absorption chiller operated by solar energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saman, N.F.; Sa`id, W.A.D.K.

    1996-12-31

    An analysis of the performance of a solar operated small capacity (two-ton) Lithium Bromide-Water (LiBr-H{sub 2}O) absorption system is conducted. The analysis is based on the first law of thermodynamics with lithium bromide as the absorbent and water as the refrigerant. The effect of various parameters affecting the machine coefficient of performance under various operating conditions is reported. Coefficient of performance of up to 0.8 can be obtained using flat plate solar collectors with generator temperatures in the range of 80--95 C (176--203 F). Liquid heat exchangers with effectiveness based on an NTU of the order of one would be a good design choice. The chiller can save approximately 3,456 kWh/yr per a two-ton unit, and it will reduce emissions by 19 lb of NO{sub x}, 5,870 lb of CO{sub 2}, and 16 lb of SO{sub x} per year per machine.

  11. Proof-of-Concept Demonstrations for Computation-Based Human Reliability Analysis. Modeling Operator Performance During Flooding Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe, Jeffrey Clark; Boring, Ronald Laurids; Herberger, Sarah Elizabeth Marie; Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis Lee

    2015-09-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program has the overall objective to help sustain the existing commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs). To accomplish this program objective, there are multiple LWRS “pathways,” or research and development (R&D) focus areas. One LWRS focus area is called the Risk-Informed Safety Margin and Characterization (RISMC) pathway. Initial efforts under this pathway to combine probabilistic and plant multi-physics models to quantify safety margins and support business decisions also included HRA, but in a somewhat simplified manner. HRA experts at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) have been collaborating with other experts to develop a computational HRA approach, called the Human Unimodel for Nuclear Technology to Enhance Reliability (HUNTER), for inclusion into the RISMC framework. The basic premise of this research is to leverage applicable computational techniques, namely simulation and modeling, to develop and then, using RAVEN as a controller, seamlessly integrate virtual operator models (HUNTER) with 1) the dynamic computational MOOSE runtime environment that includes a full-scope plant model, and 2) the RISMC framework PRA models already in use. The HUNTER computational HRA approach is a hybrid approach that leverages past work from cognitive psychology, human performance modeling, and HRA, but it is also a significant departure from existing static and even dynamic HRA methods. This report is divided into five chapters that cover the development of an external flooding event test case and associated statistical modeling considerations.

  12. Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

  13. Circuit model optimization of a nano split ring resonator dimer antenna operating in infrared spectral range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gneiding, N.; Zhuromskyy, O.; Peschel, U.; Shamonina, E.

    2014-10-28

    Metamaterials are comprised of metallic structures with a strong response to incident electromagnetic radiation, like, for example, split ring resonators. The interaction of resonator ensembles with electromagnetic waves can be simulated with finite difference or finite elements algorithms, however, above a certain ensemble size simulations become inadmissibly time or memory consuming. Alternatively a circuit description of metamaterials, a well developed modelling tool at radio and microwave frequencies, allows to significantly increase the simulated ensemble size. This approach can be extended to the IR spectral range with an appropriate set of circuit element parameters accounting for physical effects such as electron inertia and finite conductivity. The model is verified by comparing the coupling coefficients with the ones obtained from the full wave numerical simulations, and used to optimize the nano-antenna design with improved radiation characteristics.

  14. Feed tank transfer requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman-Pollard, J.R.

    1998-09-16

    This document presents a definition of tank turnover. Also, DOE and PC responsibilities; TWRS DST permitting requirements; TWRS Authorization Basis (AB) requirements; TWRS AP Tank Farm operational requirements; unreviewed safety question (USQ) requirements are presented for two cases (i.e., tank modifications occurring before tank turnover and tank modification occurring after tank turnover). Finally, records and reporting requirements, and documentation which will require revision in support of transferring a DST in AP Tank Farm to a privatization contractor are presented.

  15. 2009 Technology Transfer Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Technology Transfer Awards Los Alamos National Laboratory, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer, is operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC, for the National Nuclear Security Administration of the U.S.Department of Energy under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the Los

  16. Literature survey of heat transfer enhancement techniques in refrigeration applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M.K.; Shome, B.

    1994-05-01

    A survey has been performed of the technical and patent literature on enhanced heat transfer of refrigerants in pool boiling, forced convection evaporation, and condensation. Extensive bibliographies of the technical literature and patents are given. Many passive and active techniques were examined for pure refrigerants, refrigerant-oil mixtures, and refrigerant mixtures. The citations were categorized according to enhancement technique, heat transfer mode, and tube or shell side focus. The effects of the enhancement techniques relative to smooth and/or pure refrigerants were illustrated through the discussion of selected papers. Patented enhancement techniques also are discussed. Enhanced heat transfer has demonstrated significant improvements in performance in many refrigerant applications. However, refrigerant mixtures and refrigerant-oil mixtures have not been studied extensively; no research has been performed with enhanced refrigerant mixtures with oil. Most studies have been of the parametric type; there has been inadequate examination of the fundamental processes governing enhanced refrigerant heat transfer, but some modeling is being done and correlations developed. It is clear that an enhancement technique must be optimized for the refrigerant and operating condition. Fundamental processes governing the heat transfer must be examined if models for enhancement techniques are to be developed; these models could provide the method to optimize a surface. Refrigerant mixtures, with and without oil present, must be studied with enhancement devices; there is too little known to be able to estimate the effects of mixtures (particularly NARMs) with enhanced heat transfer. Other conclusions and recommendations are offered.

  17. Estimation of time to rupture in a fire using 6FIRE, a lumped parameter UF{sub 6} cylinder transient heat transfer/stress analysis model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.R.; Anderson, J.C.

    1995-12-31

    The transportation of UF{sup 6} is subject to regulations requiring the evaluation of packaging under a sequence of hypothetical accident conditions including exposure to a 30-min 800{degree}C (1475{degree}F) fire [10 CFR 71.73(c)(3)]. An issue of continuing interest is whether bare cylinders can withstand such a fire without rupturing. To address this issue, a lumped parameter heat transfer/stress analysis model (6FIRE) has been developed to simulate heating to the point of rupture of a cylinder containing UF{sup 6} when it is exposed to a fire. The model is described, then estimates of time to rupture are presented for various cylinder types, fire temperatures, and fill conditions. An assessment of the quantity of UF{sup 6} released from containment after rupture is also presented. Further documentation of the model is referenced.

  18. A high-fidelity multiphysics model for the new solid oxide iron-air redox battery part I: Bridging mass transport and charge transfer with redox cycle kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, XF; Zhao, X; Huang, K

    2015-04-15

    A high-fidelity two-dimensional axial symmetrical multi-physics model is described in this paper as an effort to simulate the cycle performance of a recently discovered solid oxide metal-air redox battery (SOMARB). The model collectively considers mass transport, charge transfer and chemical redox cycle kinetics occurring across the components of the battery, and is validated by experimental data obtained from independent research. In particular, the redox kinetics at the energy storage unit is well represented by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JIVIAK) and Shrinking Core models. The results explicitly show that the reduction of Fe3O4 during the charging cycle limits the overall performance. Distributions of electrode potential, overpotential, Nernst potential, and H-2/H2O-concentration across various components of the battery are also systematically investigated. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Steric Effect for Proton, Hydrogen-Atom, andHydride Transfer Reactions with Geometric Isomers of NADH-Model Ruthenium Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita E.; Cohen, B.W.; Polyansky, D.E.; Achord, P.; Cabelli, D.; Muckerman, J.T.; Tanaka, K.; Thummel, R.P.; Zong, R.

    2012-01-01

    Two isomers, [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} (Ru = Ru(bpy){sub 2}, bpy = 2,2{prime}-bipyridine, 1 = 2-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-1-azaacridine) and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} (2 = 3-(pyrid-2{prime}-yl)-4-azaacridine), are bio-inspired model compounds containing the nicotinamide functionality and can serve as precursors for the photogeneration of C-H hydrides for studying reactions pertinent to the photochemical reduction of metal-C{sub 1} complexes and/or carbon dioxide. While it has been shown that the structural differences between the azaacridine ligands of [Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2)]{sup 2+} have a significant effect on the mechanism of formation of the hydride donors, [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} and [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+}, in aqueous solution, we describe the steric implications for proton, net-hydrogen-atom and net-hydride transfer reactions in this work. Protonation of [Ru(2{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +} in aprotic and even protic media is slow compared to that of [Ru(1{sup {sm_bullet}-})]{sup +}. The net hydrogen-atom transfer between *[Ru(1)]{sup 2+} and hydroquinone (H{sub 2}Q) proceeds by one-step EPT, rather than stepwise electron-proton transfer. Such a reaction was not observed for *[Ru(2)]{sup 2+} because the non-coordinated N atom is not easily available for an interaction with H{sub 2}Q. Finally, the rate of the net hydride ion transfer from [Ru(1HH)]{sup 2+} to [Ph{sub 3}C]{sup +} is significantly slower than that of [Ru(2HH)]{sup 2+} owing to steric congestion at the donor site.

  20. Electron Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Pierre Kennepohl1,2 and Edward Solomon1* 1Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 Electron transfer, or the act of moving an electron from one place to another, is amongst the simplest of chemical processes, yet certainly one of the most critical. The process of efficiently and controllably moving electrons around is one of the primary regulation mechanisms in biology. Without stringent control of electrons in living organisms, life could simply not exist. For example,

  1. NREL Commercialization & Technology Transfer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NREL Commercialization & Technology Transfer State Energy Advisory Board June 8, 2010 Bill Farris, V.P. Commercialization and Technology Transfer NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future NREL Mission It is NREL's mission to ... commercialization activities that enable widespread adoption of renewable

  2. System-Level Heat Transfer Analysis, Thermal- Mechanical Cyclic Stress Analysis, and Environmental Fatigue Modeling of a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor. A Preliminary Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Subhasish; Soppet, William; Majumdar, Saurin; Natesan, Ken

    2015-01-03

    This report provides an update on an assessment of environmentally assisted fatigue for light water reactor components under extended service conditions. This report is a deliverable in April 2015 under the work package for environmentally assisted fatigue under DOE's Light Water Reactor Sustainability program. In this report, updates are discussed related to a system level preliminary finite element model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). Based on this model, system-level heat transfer analysis and subsequent thermal-mechanical stress analysis were performed for typical design-basis thermal-mechanical fatigue cycles. The in-air fatigue lives of components, such as the hot and cold legs, were estimated on the basis of stress analysis results, ASME in-air fatigue life estimation criteria, and fatigue design curves. Furthermore, environmental correction factors and associated PWR environment fatigue lives for the hot and cold legs were estimated by using estimated stress and strain histories and the approach described in NUREG-6909. The discussed models and results are very preliminary. Further advancement of the discussed model is required for more accurate life prediction of reactor components. This report only presents the work related to finite element modelling activities. However, in between multiple tensile and fatigue tests were conducted. The related experimental results will be presented in the year-end report.

  3. Application of global weather and climate model output to the design and operation of wind-energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, Judith

    2015-05-21

    This project addressed the challenge of providing weather and climate information to support the operation, management and planning for wind-energy systems. The need for forecast information is extending to longer projection windows with increasing penetration of wind power into the grid and also with diminishing reserve margins to meet peak loads during significant weather events. Maintenance planning and natural gas trading is being influenced increasingly by anticipation of wind generation on timescales of weeks to months. Future scenarios on decadal time scales are needed to support assessment of wind farm siting, government planning, long-term wind purchase agreements and the regulatory environment. The challenge of making wind forecasts on these longer time scales is associated with a wide range of uncertainties in general circulation and regional climate models that make them unsuitable for direct use in the design and planning of wind-energy systems. To address this challenge, CFAN has developed a hybrid statistical/dynamical forecasting scheme for delivering probabilistic forecasts on time scales from one day to seven months using what is arguably the best forecasting system in the world (European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, ECMWF). The project also provided a framework to assess future wind power through developing scenarios of interannual to decadal climate variability and change. The Phase II research has successfully developed an operational wind power forecasting system for the U.S., which is being extended to Europe and possibly Asia.

  4. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    404-NOV. 1, 2000 TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COMMERCIALIZATION ACT OF 2000 VerDate 11-MAY-2000 04:52 Nov 16, 2000 Jkt 089139 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6579 Sfmt 6579 E:\PUBLAW\PUBL404.106 APPS27 PsN: PUBL404 114 STAT. 1742 PUBLIC LAW 106-404-NOV. 1, 2000 Public Law 106-404 106th Congress An Act To improve the ability of Federal agencies to license federally owned inventions. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, SECTION 1. SHORT

  5. SINGLE-SHELL TANK INTEGRITY PROJECT ANALYSIS OF RECORD-PRELIMINARY MODELING PLAN FOR THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAST RS; RINKER MW; BAPANAALLI SK; DEIBLER JE; GUZMAN-LEONG CE; JOHNSON KI; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; SANBORN SE

    2010-10-22

    This document is a Phase I deliverable for the Single-Shell Tank Analysis of Record effort. This document is not the Analysis of Record. The intent of this document is to guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort. Preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. The preliminary analysis document reviews and preliminary modeling analysis results are reported herein. In addition, this report provides recommendations for the next phase of the SST AOR project, SST detailed modeling. Efforts and results discussed in this report do not include seismic modeling as seismic modeling is covered by a separate report. The combined results of both static and seismic models are required to complete this effort. The SST AOR project supports the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) mission for obtaining a better understanding of the structural integrity of Hanford's SSTs. The 149 SSTs, with six different geometries, have experienced a range of operating histories which would require a large number of unique analyses to fully characterize their individual structural integrity. Preliminary modeling evaluations were conducted to determine the number of analyses required for adequate bounding of each of the SST tank types in the Detailed Modeling Phase of the SST AOR Project. The preliminary modeling was conducted in conjunction with the Evaluation Criteria report, Johnson et al. (2010). Reviews of existing documents were conducted at the initial stage of preliminary modeling. These reviews guided the topics that were explored in the SST preliminary modeling. The reviews determined the level of detail necessary to perform the analyses of the SSTs. To guide the Phase II detailed modeling effort, preliminary finite element models for each of the tank types were developed and different case studies were performed on one or more of these tank types. Case studies evaluated include thermal loading, waste level variation, the sensitivity of boundary effects (soil radial extent), excavation slope or run to rise ratio, soil stratigraphic (property and layer thickness) variation at different farm locations, and concrete material property variation and their degradation under thermal loads. Conclusions were derived from case studies on one of the tank types when no additional runs of similar cases on other types of tanks were found necessary to derive those conclusions. The document reviews provided relatively complete temperature histories for Type IV tanks. The temperature history data for Type I, II, and III tanks was almost nonexistent for years prior to 1975. Document reviews indicate that there might be additional useful data in the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) records in Seattle, WA, and these records need to be reviewed to extract data that might have been disregarded during previous reviews. Thermal stress analyses were conducted using different temperature distribution scenarios on Type IV tanks. Such studies could not be carried out for other tank types due to lack of temperature history data. The results from Type IV tank analyses indicate that factors such as temperature distribution in the tank waste and rate of rise in waste temperature have a significant impact on the thermal stresses in the tank structures. Overall, the conclusion that can drawn from the thermal stress analyses is that these studies should be carried out for all tank types during the detailed analysis phase with temperature values that are reasonably close to the typical temperature histories of the respective tank types. If and/or when additional waste temperature data is acquired for tank Type I, II, and III tanks, additional cases need to be considered as tank structural integrity is sensitive to thermal loads. A few case studies were also performed using Type IV-b models to comprehend the effects of excavation boundaries, change in soil stratigraphy (layer thickness and properties), and radial extent of soil in the finite element models. The result from the case studies indicates that the slight variation in soil stratigraphy has little effects on the tank sections force and moment demands under mechanical loads. The case study for excavation slope or backfill transition boundary indicated that inclusion of such boundary yields conservative demands in the wall region while demands at other locations remain unaffected. Hence this excavation slope will be modeled in the detailed analysis of SSTs.

  6. Modeling of coupled heat and mass transfers with phase change in a porous medium: Application to superheated steam drying

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daurelle, J.V.; Topin, F.; Occelli, R. [IUSTI, Marseille (France)

    1998-01-01

    The physical model is based on balance equations at the representative elementary volume. The considered medium has three phases (liquid, solid, and gas). The gas phase includes two components (air and vapor). The authors use the mass balance equations on air and water (liquid and steam) as well as the heat equation in order to describe the phenomena. The system of equations is closed via classical relations in these media, which leads to a three-equation system with coupled nonlinear partial derivatives. The authors have applied this model to superheated steam drying. A solution model of the coupled nonlinear equation system based on the finite element method in a two-dimensional configuration was developed and validated. This approach allows one to determine all the variables of the problem. It is a complementary tool of analysis that opens access to nonmeasurable variables, such as the phase change rate. This computation model was applied to a configuration studied experimentally. The numerical and experimental results agree in nondimensional time. This double approach has enabled them to point out and evaluate new mechanisms typical of this drying method.

  7. Technology Transfer | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Through partnerships and licensing of its intellectual property rights, NREL seeks to reduce private sector risk in early stage technologies, enable investment in the adoption of renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, reduce U.S. reliance on foreign energy sources, reduce carbon emissions, and increase U.S. industrial competitiveness. A photo of three men looking at a colorful, floor-to-ceiling, 3-D visualization of a biomass analysis model. View a summary of

  8. Estimation of placental and lactational transfer and tissue distribution of atrazine and its main metabolites in rodent dams, fetuses, and neonates with physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhoumeng; Fisher, Jeffrey W.; Wang, Ran; Ross, Matthew K.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2013-11-15

    Atrazine (ATR) is a widely used chlorotriazine herbicide, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, and a potential developmental toxicant. To quantitatively evaluate placental/lactational transfer and fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry of ATR and its major metabolites, physiologically based pharmacokinetic models were developed for rat dams, fetuses and neonates. These models were calibrated using pharmacokinetic data from rat dams repeatedly exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR followed by model evaluation against other available rat data. Model simulations corresponded well to the majority of available experimental data and suggest that: (1) the fetus is exposed to both ATR and its major metabolite didealkylatrazine (DACT) at levels similar to maternal plasma levels, (2) the neonate is exposed mostly to DACT at levels two-thirds lower than maternal plasma or fetal levels, while lactational exposure to ATR is minimal, and (3) gestational carryover of DACT greatly affects its neonatal dosimetry up until mid-lactation. To test the model's cross-species extrapolation capability, a pharmacokinetic study was conducted with pregnant C57BL/6 mice exposed (oral gavage; 5 mg/kg) to ATR from gestational day 12 to 18. By using mouse-specific parameters, the model predictions fitted well with the measured data, including placental ATR/DACT levels. However, fetal concentrations of DACT were overestimated by the model (10-fold). This overestimation suggests that only around 10% of the DACT that reaches the fetus is tissue-bound. These rodent models could be used in fetal/neonatal tissue dosimetry predictions to help design/interpret early life toxicity/pharmacokinetic studies with ATR and as a foundation for scaling to humans. - Highlights: We developed PBPK models for atrazine in rat dams, fetuses, and neonates. We conducted pharmacokinetic (PK) study with atrazine in pregnant mice. Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental rat and mouse PK data. The fetus is exposed to atrazine/its main metabolite at levels similar to the dam. The nursing neonate is exposed primarily to atrazine's main metabolite DACT.

  9. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative: High Operating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In August 2012, DOE announced two awards under the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) to develop high-operating temperature heat-transfer fluids for ...

  10. Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project: Preliminary flood hazards estimates for screening Department of Energy sites, Albuquerque Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, M.W. Jr.; Boissonnade, A.C.

    1988-05-01

    As part of an ongoing program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is directing the Natural Phenomena Hazards Modeling Project (NPHMP) on behalf of the Department of Energy (DOE). A major part of this effort is the development of probabilistic definitions of natural phenomena hazards; seismic, wind, and flood. In this report the first phase of the evaluation of flood hazards at DOE sites is described. Unlike seismic and wind events, floods may not present a significant threat to the operations of all DOE sites. For example, at some sites physical circumstances may exist that effectively preclude the occurrence of flooding. As a result, consideration of flood hazards may not be required as part of the site design basis. In this case it is not necessary to perform a detailed flood hazard study at all DOE sites, such as those conducted for other natural phenomena hazards, seismic and wind. The scope of the preliminary flood hazard analysis is restricted to evaluating the flood hazards that may exist in proximity to a site. The analysis does involve an assessment of the potential encroachment of flooding on-site at individual facility locations. However, the preliminary flood hazard assessment does not consider localized flooding at a site due to precipitation (i.e., local run-off, storm sewer capacity, roof drainage). These issues are reserved for consideration by the DOE site manager. 11 refs., 84 figs., 61 tabs.

  11. CANISTER TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-23

    The Canister Transfer System receives transportation casks containing large and small disposable canisters, unloads the canisters from the casks, stores the canisters as required, loads them into disposal containers (DCs), and prepares the empty casks for re-shipment. Cask unloading begins with cask inspection, sampling, and lid bolt removal operations. The cask lids are removed and the canisters are unloaded. Small canisters are loaded directly into a DC, or are stored until enough canisters are available to fill a DC. Large canisters are loaded directly into a DC. Transportation casks and related components are decontaminated as required, and empty casks are prepared for re-shipment. One independent, remotely operated canister transfer line is provided in the Waste Handling Building System. The canister transfer line consists of a Cask Transport System, Cask Preparation System, Canister Handling System, Disposal Container Transport System, an off-normal canister handling cell with a transfer tunnel connecting the two cells, and Control and Tracking System. The Canister Transfer System operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area with the Cask Transport System. The Cask Preparation System prepares the cask for unloading and consists of cask preparation manipulator, cask inspection and sampling equipment, and decontamination equipment. The Canister Handling System unloads the canister(s) and places them into a DC. Handling equipment consists of a bridge crane hoist, DC loading manipulator, lifting fixtures, and small canister staging racks. Once the cask has been unloaded, the Cask Preparation System decontaminates the cask exterior and returns it to the Carrier/Cask Handling System via the Cask Transport System. After the DC is fully loaded, the Disposal Container Transport System moves the DC to the Disposal Container Handling System for welding. To handle off-normal canisters, a separate off-normal canister handling cell is located adjacent to the canister transfer cell and is interconnected to the transfer cell by means of the off-normal canister transfer tunnel. All canister transfer operations are controlled by the Control and Tracking System. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal Waste Handling Building (WHB) support systems.

  12. Simulating operations at Glen Canyon Dam, Colorado River Storage Project, Arizona gcflow version 1.4 (for microcomputers). Model-Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    This product is a modeling tool for examining the amount and pattern of daily water releases from Glen Canyon Dam under various operational constraints. This program is an extension of the geometric model used by Western Area Power Administration and is primarily an educational tool. It is designed to help the user understand hydropower operations at Glen Canyon Dam and to illustrate how the alternatives examined in the Glen Canyon Dam Environmental Impact Statement affect power production. This program demonstrates, in a simplified way, the relationship between monthly release volume, flow constraints, lake elevation, and power production.

  13. Technology Transfer | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Projects Patents Disclosures Contact Information Forms Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Contact Us Business Operations Careers/ Human Resources Directory Environment, Safety & Health Furth Plasma Physics Library Lab Leadership Organization Chart Technology Transfer Current Projects Patents Disclosures Contact Information Forms Strategic Partnership Projects (SPP) Technology Transfer Overview Substantial physics, engineering, and technological efforts have been required to build

  14. Transferring Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    , 2012 David Turner NERSC User Services Group * Secure Shell (ssh) - Protocol version 2 since 2006 - Encrypts all communications * Control - Prevents password "sniffing" * Data - Potential performance penalty usually not a problem Connecting with SSH * Server - sshd daemon * Clients - ssh, scp, sftp * OpenSSH - Linux, Mac * PuTTY - Windows - Other clients layered on top of ssh authentication * Subversion (svn) * bbcp SSH Client/Server Model * password - need

  15. Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:May 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Accelerating the transfer in Technology Transfer Express Licensing fast tracks commercialization. May 1, 2013 Division Leader Dave Pesiri Division Leader Dave Pesiri. Contact Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Express Licensing program To better serve its

  16. Data Transfer Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfer » Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:12

  17. Geochemical Speciation Mass Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1985-12-01

    PHREEQC is designed to model geochemical reactions. Based on an ion association aqueous model, PHREEQC can calculate pH, redox potential, and mass transfer as a function of reaction progress. It can be used to describe geochemical processes for both far-field and near-field performance assessment and to evaluate data acquisition needs and test data. It can also calculate the composition of solutions in equilibrium with multiple phases. The data base, including elements, aqueous species, and mineralmore » phases, is independent of the program and is completely user-definable. PHREEQC requires thermodynamic data for each solid, gaseous, or dissolved chemical species being modeled. The two data bases, PREPHR and DEQPAK7, supplied with PHREEQC are for testing purposes only and should not be applied to real problems without first being carefully examined. The conceptual model embodied in PHREEQC is the ion-association model of Pearson and Noronha. In this model a set of mass action equations are established for each ion pair (and controlling solid phases when making mass transfer calculations) along with a set of mass balance equations for each element considered. These sets of equations are coupled using activity coefficient values for each aqueous species and solved using a continued fraction approach for the mass balances combined with a modified Newton-Raphson technique for all other equations. The activity coefficient expressions in PHREEQC include the extended Debye-Huckel, WATEQ Debye-Huckel, and Davies equations from the original United States Geological Survey version of the program. The auxiliary preprocessor program PHTL, which is derived from EQTL, converts EQ3/6 thermodynamic data to PHREEQC format so that the two programs can be compared. PHREEQC can be used to determine solubility limits on the radionuclides present in the waste form. These solubility constraints may be input to the WAPPA leach model.« less

  18. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  19. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average. Graphs for the last 8 days. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Storage Concurrency Transfer Activity This graph shows the number of transfers to the storage systems...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - Ombuds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Ombuds NREL's Technology Transfer Ombuds offers an informal process to help resolve issues and concerns regarding the laboratory's technology partnership,...

  1. Chinese biogas digester: a potential model for small-scale, rural applications (a manual for construction and operation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, C.H.; Honquilada, Q.L.

    1985-07-01

    This report gives a thorough description of a Philippine biogas project. It provides basic knowledge and guidance for the construction and operation of a small-scale family-size biogas unit. The report includes benefits of installation and a general overview of the construction process: structural features/considerations, planning/preparation, site consideration and operation and maintenance provisions. Contains numerous sketches, design diagrams, appendices and a reference bibliography.

  2. Wireless Power Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-22

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consump

  3. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3??MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50?kW DC power and 3?MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  4. Posters Comparison of Stochastic Radiation Transfer Predictions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models for estimating the effects of broken cloud on radiative transfer in the context of a general circulation model (GCM). These schemes are required to be very fast and...

  5. Model-based statistical estimation of Sandia RF ohmic switch dynamic operation form stroboscopic, x-ray imaging.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diegert, Carl F.

    2006-12-01

    We define a new diagnostic method where computationally-intensive numerical solutions are used as an integral part of making difficult, non-contact, nanometer-scale measurements. The limited scope of this report comprises most of a due diligence investigation into implementing the new diagnostic for measuring dynamic operation of Sandia's RF Ohmic Switch. Our results are all positive, providing insight into how this switch deforms during normal operation. Future work should contribute important measurements on a variety of operating MEMS devices, with insights that are complimentary to those from measurements made using interferometry and laser Doppler methods. More generally, the work opens up a broad front of possibility where exploiting massive high-performance computers enable new measurements.

  6. Hanford Waste Transfer Planning and Control - 13465

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirch, N.W.; Uytioco, E.M.; Jo, J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, Richland, Washington (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Hanford tank waste cleanup requires efficient use of double-shell tank space to support single-shell tank retrievals and future waste feed delivery to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Every waste transfer, including single-shell tank retrievals and evaporator campaign, is evaluated via the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program for compliance with safety basis, environmental compliance, operational limits and controls to enhance future waste treatment. Mixed radioactive and hazardous wastes are stored at the Hanford Site on an interim basis until they can be treated, as necessary, for final disposal. Implementation of the Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program helps to ensure continued safe and prudent storage and handling of these wastes within the Tank Farms Facility. The Tank Farms Waste Transfer Compatibility Program is a Safety Management Program that is a formal process for evaluating waste transfers and chemical additions through the preparation of documented Waste Compatibility Assessments (WCA). The primary purpose of the program is to ensure that sufficient controls are in place to prevent the formation of incompatible mixtures as the result of waste transfer operations. The program defines a consistent means of evaluating compliance with certain administrative controls, safety, operational, regulatory, and programmatic criteria and specifies considerations necessary to assess waste transfers and chemical additions. Current operations are most limited by staying within compliance with the safety basis controls to prevent flammable gas build up in the tank headspace. The depth of solids, the depth of supernatant, the total waste depth and the waste temperature are monitored and controlled to stay within the Compatibility Program rules. Also, transfer planning includes a preliminary evaluation against the Compatibility Program to assure that operating plans will comply with the Waste Transfer Compatibility Program. (authors)

  7. A Roadmap for NEAMS Capability Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernholdt, David E

    2011-11-01

    The vision of the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program is to bring truly predictive modeling and simulation (M&S) capabilities to the nuclear engineering community in order to enable a new approach to the design and analysis of nuclear energy systems. From its inception, the NEAMS program has always envisioned a broad user base for its software and scientific products, including researchers within the DOE complex, nuclear industry technology developers and vendors, and operators. However activities to date have focused almost exclusively on interactions with NEAMS sponsors, who are also near-term users of NEAMS technologies. The task of the NEAMS Capability Transfer (CT) program element for FY2011 is to develop a comprehensive plan to support the program's needs for user outreach and technology transfer. In order to obtain community input to this plan, a 'NEAMS Capability Transfer Roadmapping Workshop' was held 4-5 April 2011 in Chattanooga, TN, and is summarized in this report. The 30 workshop participants represented the NEAMS program, the DOE and industrial user communities, and several outside programs. The workshop included a series of presentations providing an overview of the NEAMS program and presentations on the user outreach and technology transfer experiences of (1) The Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program, (2) The Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) project, and (3) The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), followed by discussion sessions. Based on the workshop and other discussions throughout the year, we make a number of recommendations of key areas for the NEAMS program to develop the user outreach and technology transfer activities: (1) Engage not only DOE, but also industrial users sooner and more often; (2) Engage with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to facilitate their understanding and acceptance of NEAMS approach to predictive M&S; (3) Place requirements gathering from prospective users on a more formal footing, updating requirements on a regular basis and incorporate them into planning and execution of the project in a traceable fashion; (4) Seek out the best available data for validation purposes, and work with experimental programs to design and carry out new experiments that satisfy the need for data suitable for validation of high-fidelity M&S codes; (5) Develop and implement program-wide plans and policies for export control, licensing, and distribution of NEAMS software products; (6) Establish a program of sponsored alpha testing by experienced users in order to obtain feedback on NEAMS codes; (7) Provide technical support for NEAMS software products; (8) Develop and deliver documentation, tutorial materials, and live training classes; and (9) Be prepared to support outside users who wish to contribute to the codes.

  8. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Operations /newsroom/_assets/images/operations-icon.png Laboratory Operations Latest announcements from the Lab on its operations. Community, Events Laboratory Operations Environmental Stewardship Melissa Blueflower-Sanchez and Robert Sanchez, owners of R and M Construction, LLC, of Santa Clara Pueblo. Four regional businesses receive Native American Venture Acceleration Fund grants The grants are designed to help the recipients create jobs, increase their revenue base and help

  9. Data Transfer Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer Nodes Data Transfer Nodes PDSF has dedicated nodes for grid services and data transfers named pdsfdtn1.nersc.gov and pdsfdtn2.nersc.gov. Both nodes have 10 Gb/s network connections to the NERSC network. Please avoid using the interactive nodes for bulk data transfer. Not only can it be disruptive to other users but the network connection is only 1 Gb/s so it will take longer. For transfers using /project and/or HPSS use the NERSC data transfer nodes - see the NERSC data transfer

  10. TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER COORDINATORS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mark Hartney, Director of the Office of Strategic Planning, SLAC, discussed technology transfer at SLAC. Bob Hwang, Director, Transportation Energy Center, Combustion Research Facility, SNL presented on technology transfer at SNL. Elsie Quaite-Randall, Chief Technology Transfer Officer, Innovation and Partnerships Office, LBNL, presented on technology transfer at LBNL. Richard A. Rankin, Director, Industrial Partnerships Office and Economic Development Office (Interim), LLNL, presented on technology transfer at LLNL.

  11. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick David; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy C.; Haggerty, Roy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John W.

    2014-11-25

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  12. Considerations for modeling small-particulate impacts from surface coal-mining operations based on wind-tunnel simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, S.G.; Petersen, W.B.; Thompson, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 provide for a reexamination of the current Environmental Protection Agency`s (USEPA) methods for modeling fugitive particulate (PM10) from open-pit, surface coal mines. The Industrial Source Complex Model (ISCST2) is specifically named as the method that needs further study. Title II, Part B, Section 234 of the Amendments states that {open_quotes}...the Administrator shall analyze the accuracy of such model and emission factors and make revisions as may be necessary to eliminate any significant over-predictions of air quality effect of fugitive particulate emissions from such sources.{close_quotes}

  13. Wireless adiabatic power transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangelov, A.A.; Suchowski, H.; Silberberg, Y.; Vitanov, N.V.

    2011-03-15

    Research Highlights: > Efficient and robust mid-range wireless energy transfer between two coils. > The adiabatic energy transfer is analogous to adiabatic passage in quantum optics. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to any resonant constraints. > Wireless energy transfer is insensitive to noise in the neighborhood of the coils. - Abstract: We propose a technique for efficient mid-range wireless power transfer between two coils, by adapting the process of adiabatic passage for a coherently driven two-state quantum system to the realm of wireless energy transfer. The proposed technique is shown to be robust to noise, resonant constraints, and other interferences that exist in the neighborhood of the coils.

  14. ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Gorpani

    2000-06-26

    The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

  15. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. , Blocksome; Michael A. , Parker; Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  16. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  17. Operational Excellence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operational Excellence /about/_assets/images/icon-70th.jpg Operational Excellence The Lab's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. aeiral shot of los alamos, new mexico What Los Alamos gets done as a premier national security science laboratory depends on how we do it The Laboratory's operations and business

  18. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, Richard F.; Pollick, Richard D.; Nyilas, Charles P.; Denmeade, Timothy J.

    1997-01-01

    A transfer pump used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass therethrough, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank.

  19. SPEAR Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interface 1113 N. Kurita J. Langton Vacuum TSP's 1120 J. Corbett A. Terebilo MATLAB Applications - Basics 1121 F. Rafael Booster Kicker Upgrade, Operation Manual 1121...

  20. operations center

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    servers and other critical Operations Center equipment

  21. Independent air supply system filtered to protect against biological and radiological agents (99.7%).
  22. <...

  1. Wireless Power Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-19

    Wireless Power Transfer is an innovative approach using magnetic resonance coupling of air core transformers designed for today's growing plug-in electric vehicle market. This technology can provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions. Plug-in Electric Vehicles (PEV) are burdened by the need for cable and plug charger, galvanic isolation of the on-board electronics, bulk and cost of this charger and the large energy storage system (ESS) packs needed. With a system where you have to physically plug in there are a number of occasions where the owner could very well forget to charge the vehicle. For stationary applications (like charging of a PHEV at home), ORNL's innovative wireless power transfer technology adds a convenience factor compared to actually plugging in which will mean that the vehicle will have a full charge every morning. Electric vehicle charging must be safe, compact and efficient in order to be convenient for customers. By reconfiguring the transformer and altering the resonance frequency, energy is transferred to the battery with lower energy losses and with fewer demands on the primary circuit by the rest of the transformer system. The ORNL discovery shows that sufficient power for the battery can be transferred from the primary to secondary circuits without significant energy losses if the operating frequency is set at 50% to 95% of the resonance frequency of the circuit. The electrical power is then transmitted to the chargeable battery, which is electrically coupled to the secondary circuit through the air core transformer. Some advantages include: Reduced energy losses during transfer of energy to the battery; A charge potential that is relatively unaffected by up to 25% misalignment of vehicle; and Other receiving components draw less power from the primary circuit. These advantages allow wireless power technology applications to expand at the workplace and beyond as the demand for EV rises. For vehicles that operate over a fixed route such as busses and shuttle vehicles, Wireless Power Transfer (WPT) means that a smaller battery pack can be used. In the traditional system, the battery pack is designed to accommodate the needs of the entire route or shift. With WPT the battery can be downsized because it can be charged when the vehicle stops on its route (a rental car shuttle bus, for example, can charge when it waits in the terminal and again when it waits at the rental car place. Thus the battery only needs enough charge to get to the next stop. This decrease in battery size means significant cost savings to electrify the vehicle. This technology enables efficient "opportunity charging stations" for predefined routes and planned stops reducing down time. Charging can occur in minutes. This improvement also eliminates the harmful emissions that occur in garages while buses are at idle during charging. In larger cities, dynamic charging offers an even greater impact utilizing existing infrastructure. As vehicles travel along busy freeways and interstate systems, wireless charging can occur while the vehicle is in motion. With this technology a vehicle essentially has unlimited electric range while using a relatively small battery pack. In-motion charging stations use vehicle sensors to alert the driver. Traveling at normal speeds, sensors establish in-motion charging. WPT transmit pads sequentially energize to the negotiated power level based on vehicle speed and its requested charging energy. Lower power when vehicle speed is slow and much higher power for faster moving vehicles. Vehicle to Infrastructure communications (V2I) coordinates WPT charging level according to on-board battery pack state-of-charge. V2I activates the roadway transmit pads placing them in standby mode and negotiates charging fee based on prevailing grid rate and vehicle energy demand. Dynamic charging would allow electricity to supply a very large fraction of the energy for the transportation sector and reduce greatly petroleum consumption. Previously worrisome traffic delays now provide longer periods of charge while passing over in-motion chargers. Inclement weather such as rain and snow do not affect the charging capability. At ORNL, we are working to develop the robust nature of wireless power technology to provide a convenient, safe and flexible means to charge electric vehicles under stationary and dynamic conditions.

  2. Custody transfer measurements for LNG/LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.A.

    1984-04-01

    The buying, selling, and transportation of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) requires the use of sophisticated measurement systems for accurate determination of the total quantity and energy content for custody transfer reporting and safe cargo handling of these cryogenic products. These systems must meet strict safety standards for operation in a hazardous environment and, at the same time, provide accurate, reliable information for the storage, transfer, and data reporting required for both operational and financial accounting purposes. A brief discussion of LNG and LPG characteristics and detailed description of these special measurement techniques are given in this presentation.

  3. Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  4. Analytical and numerical solution of one- and two-dimensional steady heat transfer in a coldplate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.F.; Bennett, G.A.; Bultman, D.H.

    1987-01-01

    We develop analytical models for steady-state, one- and two-dimensional heat transfer in a single-material, flat-plate coldplate. Discrete heat sources are mounted on one side of the plate and heat transfer to a flowing fluid occurs on the other. The models are validated numerically using finite differences. We propose a simple procedure for estimating maximum coldplate temperature at the location of each heat source which includes thermal interaction among the sources. Results from one model are compared with data obtained for a composite coldplate operated in the laboratory. We demonstrate the utility of the models as diagnostic tools to be used for predicting the existence and extent of void volumes and delaminations in the composite material that can occur with coldplates of this type. Based on our findings, recommendations for effective coldplate design are given.

  5. NREL: Technology Transfer - Commercialization Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-275-3051. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  6. Operating Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter is focused on capital costs for conventional construction and environmental restoration and waste management projects and examines operating cost estimates to verify that all elements of the project have been considered and properly estimated.

  7. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  8. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  9. Predictive two-dimensional scrape-off layer plasma transport modeling of phase-I operations of tokamak SST-1 using SOLPS5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Himabindu, M.; Tyagi, Anil; Sharma, Devendra; Deshpande, Shishir P. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Bonnin, Xavier [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procds et des Matriaux, CNRS, Universit Paris13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, Villetaneuse 93430 (France)] [Laboratoire des Sciences des Procds et des Matriaux, CNRS, Universit Paris13, Sorbonne Paris Cit, Villetaneuse 93430 (France)

    2014-02-15

    Computational analysis of coupled plasma and neutral transport in the Scrape-Off Layer (SOL) region of the Steady-State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) is done using SOLPS for Phase-I of double-null divertor plasma operations. An optimum set of plasma parameters is explored computationally for the first phase operations with the central objective of achieving an effective control over particle and power exhaust. While the transport of plasma species is treated using a fluid model in the B2.5 code, a full kinetic description is provided by the EIRENE code for the neutral particle transport in a realistic geometry. Cases with and without external gas puffing are analyzed for finding regimes where an effective control of plasma operations can be exercised by controlling the SOL plasma conditions over a range of heating powers. In the desired parameter range, a reasonable neutral penetration across the SOL is observed, capable of causing a variation of up to 15% of the total input power, in the power deposited on the divertors. Our computational characterization of the SOL plasma with input power 1 MW and lower hybrid current drive, for the separatrix density up to 10{sup 19}?m{sup ?3}, indicates that there will be access to high recycling operations producing reduction in the temperature and the peak heat flux at the divertor targets. This indicates that a control of the core plasma density and temperature would be achievable. A power balance analysis done using the kinetic neutral transport code EIRENE indicates about 60%-75% of the total power diverted to the targets, providing quantitative estimates for the relative power loading of the targets and the rest of the plasma facing components.

  10. Technology Transfer at DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer at DOE Karina Edmonds Technology Transfer Coordinator US Department of Energy March 13, 2012 Goals (As presented 11/2010)  Improve contractual vehicles  Update and streamline WFO and CRADA agreements  Create new opportunities to partner with industry  Inreach  Educate tech transfer offices to improve consistency, streamline processes  Improve relationships with inventors to increase IP captured, manage expectations  Outreach  Develop interagency

  11. Material Transfer Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Transfer Agreements Material Transfer Agreements Enables the transfer of tangible consumable research materials between two organizations, when the recipient intends to use the material for research purposes Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Overview The ability to exchange materials freely and without delay is an important part of a healthy scientific laboratory. Los Alamos National

  12. NREL: Technology Transfer - Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    you may have about NREL's technology transfer opportunities. Partnering with NREL Anne Miller, 303-384-7353 Licensing NREL Technologies Eric Payne, 303-275-3166 Printable Version...

  13. NETL: Tech Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the public sector to move federally funded technologies to commercialization. Learn more about NETL Technology Transfer Available Technologies Search NETL available...

  14. Bandwidth and Transfer Activity

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Bandwidth and Transfer Activity Data Rate vs. File Size The graph below shows the bandwidth for individual file transfers for one day. The graph also gives a quick overview of the traffic and maximum bandwidth and file size for a given day. Historical yearly peak days. Daily Rate vs. Size Aggregate Transfer Bandwidth This graph shows the aggregate transfer rate to the storage systems as a function of time of day. The red line is the peak bandwidth observed within each one minute

  15. Facility Survey & Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

  16. Saturn facility oil transfer automation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Nathan R.; Thomas, Rayburn Dean; Lewis, Barbara Ann; Malagon, Hector M.

    2014-02-01

    The Saturn accelerator, owned by Sandia National Laboratories, has been in operation since the early 1980s and still has many of the original systems. A critical legacy system is the oil transfer system which transfers 250,000 gallons of transformer oil from outside storage tanks to the Saturn facility. The oil transfer system was iden- ti ed for upgrade to current technology standards. Using the existing valves, pumps, and relay controls, the system was automated using the National Instruments cRIO FGPA platform. Engineered safety practices, including a failure mode e ects analysis, were used to develop error handling requirements. The uniqueness of the Saturn Oil Automated Transfer System (SOATS) is in the graphical user interface. The SOATS uses an HTML interface to communicate to the cRIO, creating a platform independent control system. The SOATS was commissioned in April 2013.

  17. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-08-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  18. A description of the location and structure of the essential spectrum of a model operator in a subspace of a Fock space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yodgorov, G R; Ismail, F; Muminov, Z I

    2014-12-31

    We consider a certain model operator acting in a subspace of a fermionic Fock space. We obtain an analogue of Faddeev's equation. We describe the location of the essential spectrum of the operator under consideration and show that the essential spectrum consists of the union of at most four segments. Bibliography: 19 titles.

  19. Recent California water transfers: Emerging options in water management. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lund, J.R.; Israel, M.

    1992-12-01

    Report examines the recent use of water transfers in California. Emphasis is on the use of water transfers during the current drought and how planners and operators of federal, state, and local systems can integrate water transfers into the planning and operations of their systems. Through the California experience, the study identifies motivations for incorporating water transfers into water supply systems, reviews a variety of water transfer types, and discusses the integration of water transfers with traditional supply argumentation and water conservation measures. Limitations, constraints, and difficulties for employing water transfers within existing systems are also discussed. The study focuses primarily on the technical, planning, and operational aspects of water transfers, rather than the legal, economic, and social implications. Water transfers, Water management, Water bank, Water supply, Water use, Water institutions, Infrastructure, California state water project, Water rights, Drought, Surface water, Groundwater.

  20. Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate ...

  1. Transfer Activity Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Last 8 Days Transfer Activity Last 8 Days These graphs show the transfer activity statistics for the past eight days with the most recent day shown first. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems) Transfers started/in progress (Both Systems)

  2. Submersible canned motor transfer pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guardiani, R.F.; Pollick, R.D.; Nyilas, C.P.; Denmeade, T.J.

    1997-08-19

    A transfer pump is described which is used in a waste tank for transferring high-level radioactive liquid waste from a waste tank and having a column assembly, a canned electric motor means, and an impeller assembly with an upper impeller and a lower impeller connected to a shaft of a rotor assembly. The column assembly locates a motor housing with the electric motor means adjacent to the impeller assembly which creates an hydraulic head, and which forces the liquid waste, into the motor housing to cool the electric motor means and to cool and/or lubricate the radial and thrust bearing assemblies. Hard-on-hard bearing surfaces of the bearing assemblies and a ring assembly between the upper impeller and electric motor means grind large particles in the liquid waste flow. Slots in the static bearing member of the radial bearing assemblies further grind down the solid waste particles so that only particles smaller than the clearances in the system can pass there through, thereby resisting damage to and the interruption of the operation of the transfer pump. The column assembly is modular so that sections can be easily assembled, disassembled and/or removed. A second embodiment employs a stator jacket which provides an alternate means for cooling the electric motor means and lubricating and/or cooling the bearing assemblies, and a third embodiment employs a variable level suction device which allows liquid waste to be drawn into the transfer pump from varying and discrete levels in the waste tank. 17 figs.

  3. Bulk Data Movement for Climate Dataset: Efficient Data Transfer Management with Dynamic Transfer Adjustment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Alexander; Balman, Mehmet; Williams, Dean N.; Shoshani, Arie; Natarajan, Vijaya

    2010-07-16

    Many scientific applications and experiments, such as high energy and nuclear physics, astrophysics, climate observation and modeling, combustion, nano-scale material sciences, and computational biology, generate extreme volumes of data with a large number of files. These data sources are distributed among national and international data repositories, and are shared by large numbers of geographically distributed scientists. A large portion of data is frequently accessed, and a large volume of data is moved from one place to another for analysis and storage. One challenging issue in such efforts is the limited network capacity for moving large datasets to explore and manage. The Bulk Data Mover (BDM), a data transfer management tool in the Earth System Grid (ESG) community, has been managing the massive dataset transfers efficiently with the pre-configured transfer properties in the environment where the network bandwidth is limited. Dynamic transfer adjustment was studied to enhance the BDM to handle significant end-to-end performance changes in the dynamic network environment as well as to control the data transfers for the desired transfer performance. We describe the results from the BDM transfer management for the climate datasets. We also describe the transfer estimation model and results from the dynamic transfer adjustment.

  4. Technology Transfer | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Transfer Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Management & Operating (M&O) Contracts Technology Transfer Work for Others Contact Information Laboratory Policy U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 More Information » Technology Transfer Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare

  5. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Versus Surgery for Medically Operable Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Markov Model-Based Decision Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, Alexander V.; Rodrigues, George; Palma, David A.; Cao, Jeffrey Q.; Yaremko, Brian P.; Malthaner, Richard; Mocanu, Joseph D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To compare the quality-adjusted life expectancy and overall survival in patients with Stage I non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with either stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) or surgery. Methods and Materials: We constructed a Markov model to describe health states after either SBRT or lobectomy for Stage I NSCLC for a 5-year time frame. We report various treatment strategy survival outcomes stratified by age, sex, and pack-year history of smoking, and compared these with an external outcome prediction tool (Adjuvant{exclamation_point} Online). Results: Overall survival, cancer-specific survival, and other causes of death as predicted by our model correlated closely with those predicted by the external prediction tool. Overall survival at 5 years as predicted by baseline analysis of our model is in favor of surgery, with a benefit ranging from 2.2% to 3.0% for all cohorts. Mean quality-adjusted life expectancy ranged from 3.28 to 3.78 years after surgery and from 3.35 to 3.87 years for SBRT. The utility threshold for preferring SBRT over surgery was 0.90. Outcomes were sensitive to quality of life, the proportion of local and regional recurrences treated with standard vs. palliative treatments, and the surgery- and SBRT-related mortalities. Conclusions: The role of SBRT in the medically operable patient is yet to be defined. Our model indicates that SBRT may offer comparable overall survival and quality-adjusted life expectancy as compared with surgical resection. Well-powered prospective studies comparing surgery vs. SBRT in early-stage lung cancer are warranted to further investigate the relative survival, quality of life, and cost characteristics of both treatment paradigms.

  7. DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. PDF icon cspreviewmeeting042513...

  8. Operating Strategies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operating Strategies and Design Recommendations for Mitigating Local Damage Effects in Offshore Turbine Blades Phillip W. Richards phillip@gatech.edu Graduate Research Assistant Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering Atlanta, Georgia, USA D. Todd Griffith dgriffi@sandia.gov Principal Member of the Technical Staff Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA Dewey H. Hodges dhodges@gatech.edu Professor Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering Atlanta, Georgia, USA

  9. Data Transfer Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » Data Transfer Examples Data Transfer Examples Moving data to Projectb Projectb is where data should be written from jobs running on the cluster or Gpints. There are intermediate files or bad results from a run that didn't work out that don't need to be saved. By running these jobs in the SCRATCH areas, these files will be deleted for you by the puge. If you run in the SANDBOX, you will have to clean up after yourselves. Batch Scheduled Transfers Use any queues to schedule jobs that move data

  10. Successful Oil and Gas Technology Transfer Program Extended to 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Stripper Well Consortium - a program that has successfully provided and transferred technological advances to small, independent oil and gas operators over the past nine years - has been extended to 2015 by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  11. Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moens, L.; Blake, D.

    2005-01-01

    The design of the next generation solar parabolic trough systems for power production will require the development of new thermal energy storage options with improved economics or operational characteristics. Current heat-transfer fluids such as VP-1?, which consists of a eutectic mixture of biphenyl and diphenyl oxide, allow a maximum operating temperature of ca. 300 C, a limit above which the vapor pressure would become too high and would require pressure-rated tanks. The use of VP-1? also suffers from a freezing point around 13 C that requires heating during cold periods. One of the goals for future trough systems is the use of heat-transfer fluids that can act as thermal storage media and that allow operating temperatures around 425 C combined with lower limits around 0 C. This paper presents an outline of our latest approach toward the development of such thermal storage fluids.

  12. TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area TRIDEC Land TRIDEC Land Transfer REQUEST Transfer REQUEST 300 Acres 300 Acres Additional Lands Additional Lands Identified for Identified for EA Analysis EA Analysis 2,772...

  13. NREL: Technology Transfer - Webmaster

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Webmaster To report any problems on or ask a question about the NREL Technology Transfer Web site, you may contact the Webmaster using the online form below. If you have a question...

  14. Data Transfer Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to data transfer of some form or fashion. Examples of intended usage would be running python scripts to download data from a remote source, running client software to load data...

  15. Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-29

    The purpose of this Technical Manual is to establish requirements for operational safety controls for onsite operations. This Technical Manual provides Department of Energy (DOE) technical safety requirements and policy objectives for development of an onsite packaging and transfer program, pursuant to DOE O 461.1; the DOE contractor must document this program in its onsite packaging and transfer manual/procedures. Does not cancel other directives.

  16. Inverse Energy Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inverse Energy Transfer by Near-Resonant Interactions with a Damped-Wave Spectrum P.W. Terry Center for Magnetic Self Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 USA (Received 12 January 2004; published 1 December 2004) The interaction of long-wavelength anisotropic drift waves with the plasma turbulence of electron density advection is shown to produce the inverse energy transfer that condenses onto

  17. Optimizing Data Transfer Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimizing Data Transfer Nodes using Packet Pacing Nathan Hanford University of California Davis, CA 95616 nhanford@ucdavis.edu Brian Tierney Energy Sciences Network Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 bltierney@lbl.gov Dipak Ghosal University of California Davis, CA 95616 dghosal@ucdavis.edu ABSTRACT An important performance problem that we foresee with Data Transfer Nodes (DTNs) in the near future is a fast sending host over-running a slow receiving host, and packets

  18. Data Transfer Nodes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Transfer Nodes HPSS Data Archive I/O Resources for Scientific Applications at NERSC Optimizing I/O performance on the Lustre file system I/O Formats Science Databases Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix Groups at NERSC Unix File Permissions Data & Analytics Connecting to NERSC Queues and Scheduling Job Logs & Statistics Application Performance Training & Tutorials Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing

  19. Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (~ii~,Richland Operations Office ~Z4TESO~Richland, Washington 99352 SEP 2 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Ms. Sarah Washburn Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 5 6 th Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Ms. Washburn: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST (FOI 2009-0067) You requested, pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOJA), the following documents relating to: 1 . "The authorization, decision to use, and actual use of any and all pesticides and herbicides anywhere within the

  20. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  1. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parameters. The current lack of such techniques results in large parameter uncertainty, which in turn translates into enormous prediction uncertainty and cost to DOE. In this project, we considered three hydrogeophysical approaches for providing information about mass-transfer parameters: (1) the combination of electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) and ionic tracer experiments to explore rates of exchange and relative mobile and immobile porosities; (2) complex resistivity (CR) measurements to infer the distribution of diffusive length scales active in a porous medium; and (3) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to estimate mobile and immobile porosity.

  2. Transferring Data from Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Examples Once you are set up for automatic authentication (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch...

  3. Ames Lab 101: Technology Transfer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Covey, Debra

    2012-08-29

    Ames Laboratory Associate Laboratory Director, Sponsored Research Administration, Debra Covey discusses technology transfer. Covey also discusses Ames Laboratory's most successful transfer, lead-free solder.

  4. Ombuds Services for Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds Program Tech Transfer Ombuds Ombuds Services for Technology Transfer Committed to the fair and equitable treatment of all employees, contractors, and persons doing...

  5. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-06-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrium integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi})Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geo-physical and chemical engineering literature.

  6. Gas mass transfer for stratified flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, R.B.; Hughes, E.D.

    1995-07-01

    We analyzed gas absorption and release in water bodies using existing surface renewal theory. We show a new relation between turbulent momentum and mass transfer from gas to water, including the effects of waves and wave roughness, by evaluating the equilibrum integral turbulent dissipation due to energy transfer to the water from the wind. Using Kolmogoroff turbulence arguments the gas transfer velocity, or mass transfer coefficient, is then naturally and straightforwardly obtained as a non-linear function of the wind speed drag coefficient and the square root of the molecular diffusion coefficient. In dimensionless form, the theory predicts the turbulent Sherwood number to be Sh{sub t} = (2/{radical}{pi}) Sc{sup 1/2}, where Sh{sub t} is based on an integral dissipation length scale in the air. The theory confirms the observed nonlinear variation of the mass transfer coefficient as a function of the wind speed; gives the correct transition with turbulence-centered models for smooth surfaces at low speeds; and predicts experimental data from both laboratory and environmental measurements within the data scatter. The differences between the available laboratory and field data measurements are due to the large differences in the drag coefficient between wind tunnels and oceans. The results also imply that the effect of direct aeration due to bubble entrainment at wave breaking is no more than a 20% increase in the mass transfer for the highest speeds. The theory has importance to mass transfer in both the geophysical and chemical engineering literature.

  7. Technology Transfer Reporting Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transfer Reporting Form Technology Transfer Reporting Form PDF icon Technology Transfer Reporting Form More Documents & Publications Technology Partnership Ombudsman - Roles,...

  8. Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-29

    This Technical Manual establishes requirements for operational safety controls for onsite operations and provides Department of Energy (DOE) technical safety requirements and policy objectives for development of an Onsite Packaging and Transfer Program, pursuant to DOE O 461.1A, Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest. The DOE contractor must document this program in its Onsite Packaging and Transfer Manual/Procedures. Admin Chg 1, 7-26-05. Certified 2-2-07. Canceled by DOE O 461.2.

  9. VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VOLUNTARY LEAVE TRANSFER PROGRAM (Eligible employees are listed at the end of this narrative) Under the Voluntary Leave Transfer Program you can apply, based on a medical emergency, to receive annual leave donated by other employees. A medical emergency is generally defined as a medical condition of the employee or family member that is likely to keep you (the employee) away from work and cause a loss of pay of at least 24 hours. You are required to submit an Office of Personnel Management (OPM)

  10. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  11. Effect of translucence of engineering ceramics on heat transfer in diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahiduzzaman, S.; Morel, T. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the experimental portion of a broader study undertaken to assess the effects of translucence of ceramic materials used as thermal barrier coatings in diesel engines. In an earlier analytical work a parametric study was performed, varying several radiative properties over ranges typical of engineering ceramics, thereby identifying the most important radiative properties and their impact on in-cylinder heat transfer. In the current study these properties were experimentally determined for several specific zirconia coatings considered for thermal barrier applications in diesel engines. The methodology of this study involved formulation of a model capable of describing radiative transfer through a semitransparent medium as a function of three independent model parameters, ie, absorption coefficient, scattering coefficient and refractive index. For the zirconia-based ceramics investigated in this study, it was concluded that for usual coating thicknesses (1.5--2.5 mm) these ceramics are optically thick and hence, are effective as radiative heat transfer barriers. These ceramics possess high scattering coefficients and low absorption coefficients causing them to be highly reflective (60-80%) in the spectral region where thermal radiation is important. The performance of the investigated ceramics and the mechanism of heat transfer were found to depend on surface condition, specifically on soot deposition. Thus, to insure the optimum thermal barrier operation for either clean or heavily sooted surfaces, a ceramic material with high scattering coefficient provides the best choice.

  12. Calutron Operations | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Calutron Operations

  13. Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activity Historical Yearly Peak Transfer Activity Historical Yearly Peak The plots below show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for the current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In Progress Transfers Started/In

  14. Energy transfer models in nitrogen plasmas: Analysis of N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}{sub g})–N({sup 4}S{sub u})–e{sup −} interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heritier, K. L.; Panesi, M.; Jaffe, R. L.; Laporta, V.

    2014-11-14

    The relaxation of N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}{sub g}) molecules in a background gas composed of N({sup 4}S{sub u}) atoms and free electrons is studied by using an ideal isochoric and isothermic chemical reactor. A rovibrational state-to-state model is developed to study energy transfer process induced by free electron and atomic collisions. The required cross sections and the corresponding rate coefficients are taken from two well-known kinetic databases: NASA Ames kinetic mechanism for the description of the N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}{sub g})–N({sup 4}S{sub u}) processes and the Phys4Entry database for the electron driven processes, N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}{sub g})–e{sup −}. The evolution of the population densities of each individual rovibrational level is explicitly determined via the numerical solution of the master equation for temperatures ranging from 10000 to 30 000 K. It was found that the distribution of the rovibrational energy levels of N{sub 2}(X{sup 1}Σ{sup +}{sub g}) is strongly influenced by the electron driven collisional processes, which promote the excitation of the low lying vibrational levels. The macroscopic vibrational energy relaxation is governed by the molecule-atom collisions, when free electrons, initially cold are relaxing to the final heat-bath temperature. Thus, the main role of the free electrons is to ensure the equilibration of vibrational and free electron excitation, thus validating the existence of the local equilibrium T{sup V}–T{sup e}. However, if electrons and heavy particles are assumed to be in equilibrium at the heat bath temperature, electron driven processes dominate the vibrational relaxation. Finally, we have assessed the validity of the Landau-Teller model for the description of the inelastic energy transfer between molecules and free electrons. In the case of free-electron temperatures lower than 10 000 K, Landau-Teller relaxation model gives an accurate description of the vibrational relaxation, while at higher temperatures the error in the predictions can be significant and the model should not be used.

  15. Theory of ultrafast heterogeneous electron transfer: Contributions of direct charge transfer excitations to the absorbance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Luxia; Willig, Frank; May, Volkhard

    2007-04-07

    Absorption spectra related to heterogeneous electron transfer are analyzed with the focus on direct charge transfer transition from the surface attached molecule into the semiconductor band states. The computations are based on a model of reduced dimensionality with a single intramolecular vibrational coordinate but a complete account for the continuum of conduction band states. The applicability of this model to perylene on TiO{sub 2} has been demonstrated in a series of earlier papers. Here, based on a time-dependent formulation, the absorbance is calculated with the inclusion of charge transfer excitations. A broad parameter set inspired by the perylene TiO{sub 2} systems is considered. In particular, the description generalizes the Fano effect to heterogeneous electron transfer reactions. Preliminary simulations of measured spectra are presented for perylene-catechol attached to TiO{sub 2}.

  16. Product transfer service chosen over LPG flaring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horn, J.; Powers, M.

    1994-07-01

    Seadrift Pipeline Corp. recently decommissioned its Ella Pipeline, an 108-mile, 8-in. line between the King Ranch and a Union Carbide plant at Seadrift, Texas. The pipeline company opted for the product transfer services of pipeline Dehydrators Inc. to evacuate the ethane-rich LPG mixture from the pipeline instead of flaring the LPG or displacing it with nitrogen at operating pressures into another pipeline. The product transfer system of Pipeline Dehydrators incorporates the use of highly specialized portable compressors, heat exchangers and interconnected piping. The product transfer process of evacuating a pipeline is an economically viable method that safely recovers a very high percentage of the product while maintaining product purity. Using positive-displacement compressors, PLD transferred the LPG from the idled 8-in. Ella line into an adjacent 12-in. ethane pipeline that remained in service at approximately 800 psig. Approximately 4.3 million lb of LPG (97% ethane, 2.7% methane and 0.3% propane) were transferred into the ethane pipeline, lowering the pressure on the Ella Pipeline from 800 psig to 65 psig.

  17. Decal transfer microfabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Childs, William Robert

    2004-10-19

    A method of making a microstructure includes forming a pattern in a surface of a silicon-containing elastomer, oxidizing the pattern, contacting the pattern with a substrate; and bonding the oxidized pattern and the substrate such that the pattern and the substrate are irreversibly attached. The silicon-containing elastomer may be removably attached to a transfer pad.

  18. Final Report: Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haggerty, Roy; Day-Lewis, Fred; Singha, Kamini; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-20

    Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita.

  19. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  20. Passive heat transfer means for nuclear reactors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burelbach, James P.

    1984-01-01

    An improved passive cooling arrangement is disclosed for maintaining adjacent or related components of a nuclear reactor within specified temperature differences. Specifically, heat pipes are operatively interposed between the components, with the vaporizing section of the heat pipe proximate the hot component operable to cool it and the primary condensing section of the heat pipe proximate the other and cooler component operable to heat it. Each heat pipe further has a secondary condensing section that is located outwardly beyond the reactor confinement and in a secondary heat sink, such as air ambient the containment, that is cooler than the other reactor component. Means such as shrouding normally isolated the secondary condensing section from effective heat transfer with the heat sink, but a sensor responds to overheat conditions of the reactor to open the shrouding, which thereby increases the cooling capacity of the heat pipe. By having many such heat pipes, an emergency passive cooling system is defined that is operative without electrical power.

  1. Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W; Li, Tingwen; Nicoletti, Phillip

    2013-01-01

    In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

  2. Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Batch Transfer and Sampling Performance of Simulated HLW - 12307

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Jesse; Townson, Paul; Vanatta, Matt

    2012-07-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste treatment Plant (WTP) has been recognized as a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. At the end of 2009 DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), awarded a contract to EnergySolutions to design, fabricate and operate a demonstration platform called the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) to establish pre-transfer sampling capacity, and batch transfer performance data at two different scales. This data will be used to examine the baseline capacity for a tank mixed via rotational jet mixers to transfer consistent or bounding batches, and provide scale up information to predict full scale operational performance. This information will then in turn be used to define the baseline capacity of such a system to transfer and sample batches sent to WTP. The Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) platform consists of 43'' and 120'' diameter clear acrylic test vessels, each equipped with two scaled jet mixer pump assemblies, and all supporting vessels, controls, services, and simulant make up facilities. All tank internals have been modeled including the air lift circulators (ALCs), the steam heating coil, and the radius between the wall and floor. The test vessels are set up to simulate the transfer of HLW out of a mixed tank, and collect a pre-transfer sample in a manner similar to the proposed baseline configuration. The collected material is submitted to an NQA-1 laboratory for chemical analysis. Previous work has been done to assess tank mixing performance at both scales. This work involved a combination of unique instruments to understand the three dimensional distribution of solids using a combination of Coriolis meter measurements, in situ chord length distribution measurements, and electro-resistive tomography. This current work utilized the same instruments to monitor simulated waste transfers. This paper will discuss some of the scaling compromises when it came to the scaled sampling system design, handling of large quantities of material for sampling, and present data for the discuss of likely behavior of the full scale DST based on scaling correlations using a scale ratio exponent (SRE) from 0.25 to 0.45 and the behavior observed in the SSMD platform. This does not establish a scaling factor for DST mixing using paired jet mixers but is an attempt to envelope the likely performance ranges in terms of certification sampling bias, certification sample root-mean-square-deviation, and bath to batch relative standard deviation. (authors)

  3. CURRENT TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watt, D.A.

    1956-07-01

    A current transfer system is described for transferring current between a rotating member and a co-axial stationary member. The particular area of application for the invention is in connection with homopolar generators where a low voltage and high current are generated. The current tramsfer system of the invention comprises a rotor member and a co-axial stator member wherein one of the members is shaped to provide a circumferential surface concave in section and the other member is shaped to have a peripheral portion in close proximity to the surface, whereby a liquid metal can be stably supported between the two members when they are moving relative to one another to establish an electrical conducting path between the members.

  4. Wireless power transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee; Gilchrist, Aaron

    2016-02-23

    A system includes a first stage of an inductive power transfer system with an LCL load resonant converter with a switching section, an LCL tuning circuit, and a primary receiver pad. The IPT system includes a second stage with a secondary receiver pad, a secondary resonant circuit, a secondary rectification circuit, and a secondary decoupling converter. The secondary receiver pad connects to the secondary resonant circuit. The secondary resonant circuit connects to the secondary rectification circuit. The secondary rectification circuit connects to the secondary decoupling converter. The second stage connects to a load. The load includes an energy storage element. The second stage and load are located on a vehicle and the first stage is located at a fixed location. The primary receiver pad wirelessly transfers power to the secondary receiver pad across a gap when the vehicle positions the secondary receiver pad with respect to the primary receiver pad.

  5. Swipe transfer assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, Robert M.; Mills, William C.

    1992-01-01

    The swipe transfer assembly is a mechanical assembly which is used in conjunction with glove boxes and other sealed containments. It is used to pass small samples into or out of glove boxes without an open breach of the containment, and includes a rotational cylinder inside a fixed cylinder, the inside cylinder being rotatable through an arc of approximately 240.degree. relative to the outer cylinder. An offset of 120.degree. from end to end allows only one port to be opened at a time. The assembly is made of stainless steel or aluminum and clear acrylic plastic to enable visual observation. The assembly allows transfer of swipes and smears from radiological and other specially controlled environments.

  6. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caterpillar, Sandia CRADA Opens Door to Multiple Research Projects Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & ...

  7. Material Balance Assessment for Double-Shell Tank Waste Pipeline Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; White, Mike

    2002-10-30

    PNNL developed a material balance assessment methodology based on conservation of mass for detecting leaks and mis-routings in pipeline transfer of double-shell tank waste at Hanford. The main factors causing uncertainty in these transfers are variable property and tank conditions of density, existence of crust, and surface disturbance due to mixer pump operation during the waste transfer. The methodology was applied to three waste transfers from Tanks AN-105 and AZ-102.

  8. Transfer reactions at ATLAS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Services » Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Relations Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Relations Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Relations Offices of the Deputy General Counsel for Transactions, Technology and Contractor Human Resources Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Procurement and Financial Assistance (GC-61) Office of the Assistant General Counsel for Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property (GC-62) Office of the Assistant

  9. Plastic container bagless transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tibrea, Steven L.; D'Amelio, Joseph A.; Daugherty, Brent A.

    2003-11-18

    A process and apparatus are provided for transferring material from an isolated environment into a storage carrier through a conduit that can be sealed with a plug. The plug and conduit can then be severed to provide a hermetically sealed storage carrier containing the material which may be transported for storage or disposal and to maintain a seal between the isolated environment and the ambient environment.

  10. Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heat Transfer Salts for Nuclear Reactor Systems - Chemistry Control, Corrosion Mitigation, and Modeling The concept of a molten salt reactor has existed for nearly sixty years. Previously all work was done during a large collaborative effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory,

  11. Collaborative Project. 3D Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mountains/Snow for High-Resolution Climate Models. Fast physics and Applications (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Collaborative Project. 3D Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over Mountains/Snow for High-Resolution Climate Models. Fast physics and Applications Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Collaborative Project. 3D Radiative Transfer Parameterization Over Mountains/Snow for High-Resolution Climate Models. Fast physics and Applications Under the support of the aforementioned

  12. Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorn, Thomas; Nelles, Michael; Flamme, Sabine; Jinming, Cai

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

  13. QER- Comment of Energy Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Lee Hanse Executive Vice President Interstate Energy Transfer Mobile - 210 464 2929 Office - 210 403 6455

  14. "Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced Industrial Heat Transfer Fluids"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ganesh Skandan; Dr. Amit Singhal; Mr. Kenneth Eberts; Mr. Damian Sobrevilla; Prof. Jerry Shan; Stephen Tse; Toby Rossmann

    2008-06-12

    ABSTRACT Nanotechnology Enabled Advanced industrial Heat Transfer Fluids Improving the efficiency of Industrial Heat Exchangers offers a great opportunity to improve overall process efficiencies in diverse industries such as pharmaceutical, materials manufacturing and food processing. The higher efficiencies can come in part from improved heat transfer during both cooling and heating of the material being processed. Additionally, there is great interest in enhancing the performance and reducing the weight of heat exchangers used in automotives in order to increase fuel efficiency. The goal of the Phase I program was to develop nanoparticle containing heat transfer fluids (e.g., antifreeze, water, silicone and hydrocarbon-based oils) that are used in transportation and in the chemical industry for heating, cooling and recovering waste heat. Much work has been done to date at investigating the potential use of nanoparticle-enhanced thermal fluids to improve heat transfer in heat exchangers. In most cases the effect in a commercial heat transfer fluid has been marginal at best. In the Phase I work, we demonstrated that the thermal conductivity, and hence heat transfer, of a fluid containing nanoparticles can be dramatically increased when subjected to an external influence. The increase in thermal conductivity was significantly larger than what is predicted by commonly used thermal models for two-phase materials. Additionally, the surface of the nanoparticles was engineered so as to have a minimal influence on the viscosity of the fluid. As a result, a nanoparticle-laden fluid was successfully developed that can lead to enhanced heat transfer in both industrial and automotive heat exchangers

  15. Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Centrifugal Contactors (Conference) | SciTech Connect Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydraulic Performance and Mass Transfer Efficiency of Engineering Scale Centrifugal Contactors Annular centrifugal contactors (ACCs) are being evaluated for process-scale solvent extraction operations in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) separations goals. Process-scale annular

  16. Intelligent Potroom Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jan Berkow; Larry Banta

    2003-07-29

    The Intelligent Potroom Operation project focuses on maximizing the performance of an aluminum smelter by innovating components for an intelligent manufacturing system. The Intelligent Potroom Advisor (IPA) monitors process data to identify reduction cells exhibiting behaviors that require immediate attention. It then advises operational personnel on those heuristic-based actions to bring the cell back to an optimal operating state in order to reduce the duration and frequency of substandard reduction cell performance referred to as ''Off-Peak Modes'' (OPMs). Techniques developed to identify cells exhibiting OPMs include the use of a finite element model-based cell state estimator for defining the cell's current operating state via advanced cell noise analyses. In addition, rule induction was also employed to identify statistically significant complex behaviors that occur prior to OPMs. The intelligent manufacturing system design, concepts and formalisms developed in this project w ere used as a basis for an intelligent manufacturing system design. Future research will incorporate an adaptive component to automate continuous process improvement, a technology platform with the potential to improve process performance in many of the other Industries of the Future applications as well.

  17. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  18. ARM - AMF2 Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Contacts Management and Operations Operations Overview ARM Links BCR | ECR ECO, EWO Extraview PIF, CAR, DQR & DQPR Operations Status System i.arm.gov AMF2 Deployment...

  19. ENERGY-TRANSFER SYSTEMS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thonemann, P.C.; Cowhig, W.T.; Davenport, P.A.

    1963-04-01

    This patent relates to the transfer of energy in a traveling electromagnetic wave to direct-current electrical energy in a gaseous medium. The traveling wave is generated by means of a radio-frequency oscillator connected across a capacitance-loaded helix wound around a sealed tube enclosing the gaseous medium. The traveling wave causes the electrons within the medium to drift towards one end of the tube. The direct current appearing across electrodes placed at each end of the tube is then used by some electrical means. (AEC)

  20. Technology Transfer Reporting Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This form is to be completed by the TTO for individual inquiry/case activity during the quarter as required by the Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000. Mouse over definitions and descriptions appear over text/check boxes where appropriate. After completing this form, click on the submit button. *If you have no TTO activity for the quarter, please fill in your name, FY and quarter, lab or facility and check the box "No Quarterly Activity". Initial Ombuds Contact:

  1. Manipulator mounted transfer platform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dobbins, James C.; Hoover, Mark A.; May, Kay W.; Ross, Maurice J.

    1990-01-01

    A transfer platform for the conveyance of objects by a manipulator includes a bed frame and saddle clamp secured along an edge of the bed frame and adapted so as to secure the bed frame to a horizontal crosspiece of the manipulator. The platform may thus move with the manipulator in a reciprocal linear path defined by a guide rail. A bed insert may be provided for the support of conveyed objects and a lifting bail may be provided to permit the manipulator arm to install the bed frame upon the crosspiece under remote control.

  2. Material Transfer Agreements (MTA) | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Research Material Transfer Agreements (MTA) Materials Transfer Agreements (MTAs) are used to transfer materials, biological or non-biological, between institutions from...

  3. Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November ...

  4. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative: High Operating Temperature Fluids

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In August 2012, DOE announced two awards under the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) to develop high-operating temperature heat-transfer fluids for concentrating solar power (CSP) applications, managed by the SunShot Initiative.

  5. Polarization transfer NMR imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sillerud, Laurel O.; van Hulsteyn, David B.

    1990-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

  6. Engineering Model for Ash Formation

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-02

    Ash deposition is controlled by the impaction and sticking of individual ash particles to heat transfer surfaces. Prediction of deposition therefore requires that the important factors in this process be predictable from coal and operational parameters. Coal combustion, boiler heat transfer, ash formation, ash particle aerodynamic, and ash particle sticking models are all essential steps in this process. The model described herein addresses the prediction of ash particle size and composition distributions based upon combustionmore » conditions and coal parameters. Key features of the model include a mineral redistribution routine to invert CCSEM mineralogical data, and a mineral interaction routine that simulates the conversion of mineral matter into ash during coal burning and yields ash particle size and composition distributions.« less

  7. Lunar Wireless Power Transfer Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldon Freid, et al.

    2008-06-01

    This study examines the feasibility of a multi-kilowatt wireless radio frequency (RF) power system to transfer power between lunar base facilities. Initial analyses, show that wireless power transfer (WPT) systems can be more efficient and less expensive than traditional wired approaches for certain lunar and terrestrial applications. The study includes evaluations of the fundamental limitations of lunar WPT systems, the interrelationships of possible operational parameters, and a baseline design approach for a notionial system that could be used in the near future to power remote facilities at a lunar base. Our notional system includes state-of-the-art photovoltaics (PVs), high-efficiency microwave transmitters, low-mass large-aperture high-power transmit antennas, high-efficiency large-area rectenna receiving arrays, and reconfigurable DC combining circuitry.

  8. Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS) documentation. Volume II. Appendix D: operator's manual; Appendix E: program maintenance guide. Final report. [COMPUSTAT II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    The Revenue Requirements Modeling System (RRMS) is a utility specific financial modeling System used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to evaluate the impact on electric utilities of changes in the regulatory, economic and tax environments. Included in the RRMS is a power plant life-cycle revenue requirements model designed to assess the comparative economic advantage of alternative generating plant. This report is Volume II of a 2 volume set and provides a programmer's guide which describes new user initialization procedures and data base update procedures. This report also provides a software maintenance guide which contains listings of all computer code for the models. Volume I provides a methodology description and user's guide, a model abstract and technical appendix, and sample input and output for the models.

  9. Operating Experience Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Operating Experience Committee (OEC) charter provides a description of the OEC's purpose, background, membership, functions, and operations.

  10. DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant | Department of Energy Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant DOE Announces Transfer of Depleted Uranium to Advance the U.S. National Security Interests, Extend Operations at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant May 15, 2012 - 4:00pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 386-4940 WASHINGTON - The Department of Energy - in collaboration

  11. Recovering entanglement by local operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D’Arrigo, A.; Lo Franco, R.; Benenti, G.; Paladino, E.; Falci, G.

    2014-11-15

    We investigate the phenomenon of bipartite entanglement revivals under purely local operations in systems subject to local and independent classical noise sources. We explain this apparent paradox in the physical ensemble description of the system state by introducing the concept of “hidden” entanglement, which indicates the amount of entanglement that cannot be exploited due to the lack of classical information on the system. For this reason this part of entanglement can be recovered without the action of non-local operations or back-transfer process. For two noninteracting qubits under a low-frequency stochastic noise, we show that entanglement can be recovered by local pulses only. We also discuss how hidden entanglement may provide new insights about entanglement revivals in non-Markovian dynamics.

  12. Technology Transfer and Commercialization Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle R. Blacker

    2008-12-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to all federal agencies, to state and local governments, and to universities and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and made available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, creating jobs and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In other cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies or to regional small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. In other interactions, INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and other technical staff of our partners to further develop emerging technologies. This report is a catalog of selected INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Office of Technology Transfer & Commercialization. The accomplishments cataloged in the report, however, reflect the achievements and creativity of the highly skilled researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce. Their achievements and recognized capabilities are what make the accomplishments cataloged here possible. Without them, none of these transactions would occur.

  13. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  14. LANL Land Transfers 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Land transfer activities are planned to occur fiscal year 2016 which will require independent verification of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)’s sampling protocol and analyses. The former Sewage Treatment Plant within land tract A-16-D and the southern portion of A-16-E are on track for MARSSIM final status survey. The remainder of TA-21 will require verification once final D&D of structures is complete. The sampling activities for these tracts must undergo soil surveys/sampling and analysis by Los Alamos National Security (LANS) using the MARSSIM-style process as required by DOE-O-458.1 to obtain technically defensible data for determining the disposition of this property.

  15. HEAT TRANSFER METHOD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gambill, W.R.; Greene, N.D.

    1960-08-30

    A method is given for increasing burn-out heat fluxes under nucleate boiling conditions in heat exchanger tubes without incurring an increase in pumping power requirements. This increase is achieved by utilizing a spinning flow having a rotational velocity sufficient to produce a centrifugal acceleration of at least 10,000 g at the tube wall. At this acceleration the heat-transfer rate at burn out is nearly twice the rate which can be achieved in a similar tube utilizing axial flow at the same pumping power. At higher accelerations the improvement over axial flow is greater, and heat fluxes in excess of 50 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr/sq ft can be achieved.

  16. Technology transfer 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    Technology Transfer 1995 is intended to inform the US industrial and academic sectors about the many opportunities they have to form partnerships with the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the mutual advantage of the individual institutions, DOE, and the nation as a whole. It also describes some of the growing number of remarkable achievements resulting from such partnerships. These partnership success stories offer ample evidence that Americans are learning how to work together to secure major benefits for the nation--by combining the technological, scientific, and human resources resident in national laboratories with those in industry and academia. The benefits include more and better jobs for Americans, improved productivity and global competitiveness for technology-based industries, and a more efficient government laboratory system.

  17. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters Final Report to the Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Timothy; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-03-10

    . In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Our study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area.

  18. Numerical study of oscillatory flow and heat transfer in a loaded thermoacoustic stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worlikar, A.S.; Knio, O.M.

    1999-01-01

    A thermoacoustic refrigerator may be idealized as consisting of a straight resonance tube housing a stack of parallel plates and heat exchangers, and an acoustic source. Among the advantages of thermoacoustic refrigerators are the simplicity of their design and the fact that they naturally avoid the need for harmful refrigerants such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). The operation of these devices is based on exploiting the well-known thermoacoustic effect to induce a temperature difference across the stack and to transport heat from one end of the plate to the other. Heat exchangers are then used to transfer energy from the thermoacoustic refrigerator to hot and cold reservoirs. A two-dimensional, low-Mach-number computational model is used to analyze the unsteady flow and temperature fields in the neighborhood of an idealized stack/heat exchanger configuration. The model relies on a vorticity-based formulation of the mass, momentum, and energy equations in the low-Mach-number, short-stack limit. The stack and heat exchangers are assumed to consist of flat plates of equal thickness. The heat exchanger plates are assumed isothermal and in perfect thermal contact with the stack plates. The simulations are used to study the effect of heat exchanger size and operating conditions on the heat transfer and stack performance. Computed results show that optimum stack performance is achieved when the length of the heat exchanger is nearly equal to the peak-to-peak particle displacement. Numerical estimates of the mean enthalpy flux within the channel are in good agreement with the predictions of linear theory. However, the results reveal that a portion of the heat exchangers is ineffective due to reverse heat transfer. Details of the energy flux density around the heat exchangers are visualized, and implications regarding heat exchanger design and model extension are discussed.

  19. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technology Partnership Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  20. NREL: Technology Transfer - Technologies Available for Licensing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ombuds. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Technologies Available for Licensing...

  1. Constraining the physical conditions in the jets of ?-ray flaring blazars using centimeter-band polarimetry and radiative transfer simulations. I. Data and models for 0420014, OJ 287, and 1156+295

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aller, M. F.; Hughes, P. A.; Aller, H. D.; Latimer, G. E.; Hovatta, T.

    2014-08-10

    To investigate parsec-scale jet flow conditions during GeV ?-ray flares detected by the Fermi Large Angle Telescope, we obtained centimeter-band total flux density and linear polarization monitoring observations from 2009.5 through 2012.5 with the 26 m Michigan radio telescope for a sample of core-dominated blazars. We use these data to constrain radiative transfer simulations incorporating propagating shocks oriented at an arbitrary angle to the flow direction in order to set limits on the jet flow and shock parameters during flares temporally associated with ?-ray flares in 0420014, OJ 287, and 1156+295; these active galactic nuclei exhibited the expected signature of shocks in the linear polarization data. Both the number of shocks comprising an individual radio outburst (3 and 4) and the range of the compression ratios of the individual shocks (0.5-0.8) are similar in all three sources; the shocks are found to be forward-moving with respect to the flow. While simulations incorporating transverse shocks provide good fits for 0420014 and 1156+295, oblique shocks are required for modeling the OJ 287 outburst, and an unusually low value of the low-energy cutoff of the radiating particles' energy distribution is also identified. Our derived viewing angles and shock speeds are consistent with independent Very Long Baseline Array results. While a random component dominates the jet magnetic field, as evidenced by the low fractional linear polarization, to reproduce the observed spectral character requires that a significant fraction of the magnetic field energy is in an ordered axial component. Both straight and low pitch angle helical field lines are viable scenarios.

  2. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  3. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  4. Concurrent Transfers Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Last 8 Days Concurrent Transfers Last 8 Days These plots show the concurrent transfers statistics for the past eight days with the most recent day shown first. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Concurrency (Both Systems) Last

  5. Working with SRNL - Technology Transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SRNL GO Tech Briefs Contacts Ombudsman Tech Home SRNL Home Working with SRNL Technology Transfer 2015 SRNL Research and Technology Recognition Reception Click to view the 2015...

  6. Handbook of heat transfer fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohsenow, W.M.; Hartnett, J.P.; Ganic, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    This handbook is on the fundamentals of heat transfer. It provides coverage on conduction, convection, and radiation and on thermophysical properties of materials.

  7. Emergency Operations Training Academy | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Introduction Monitoring Division Mgr Training, Adv NARAC Dispersion Modeling NARAC Web Operations Overview of Consequence Management Overview of the DOENNSA Emergency ...

  8. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Permalink Wind Generator Modeling Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Transmission Grid Integration, Wind Energy Wind Generator Modeling This modular block diagram represents the major components of the generic dynamic wind turbine generator models. Model blocks and parameters are used to represent the different wind

  9. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, L.; Li, F.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H{sub 2}O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Frster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  10. RHIC Polarized proton operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, H.; Ahrens, L.; Alekseev, I.G.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoian, G.; Bai, M.; Bazilevsky, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J.M.; Brown, K.A.; Bruno, D.; Connolly, R.; Dion, A.; D'Ottavio, T.; Drees, K.A.; Fischer, W.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Gu, X.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.L.; Laster, J.; Liu, C.; Luo, Y.; MacKay, W.W.; Makdisi, Y.; Marr, G.J.; Marusic, A.; Meot, F.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R,; Minty, M.; Montag, C.; Morris, J.; Nemesure, S.; Poblaguev, A.; Ptitsyn, V.; Ranjibar, V.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Roser, T.; J.; Severino, F.; Schmidke, B.; Schoefer, V.; Severino, F.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K.; Steski, D.; Svirida, D.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J. Wang, G.; Wilinski, M.; Yip, K.; Zaltsman, A.; Zelenski, A.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

    2011-03-28

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) operation as the polarized proton collider presents unique challenges since both luminosity(L) and spin polarization(P) are important. With longitudinally polarized beams at the experiments, the figure of merit is LP{sup 4}. A lot of upgrades and modifications have been made since last polarized proton operation. A 9 MHz rf system is installed to improve longitudinal match at injection and to increase luminosity. The beam dump was upgraded to increase bunch intensity. A vertical survey of RHIC was performed before the run to get better magnet alignment. The orbit control is also improved this year. Additional efforts are put in to improve source polarization and AGS polarization transfer efficiency. To preserve polarization on the ramp, a new working point is chosen such that the vertical tune is near a third order resonance. The overview of the changes and the operation results are presented in this paper. Siberian snakes are essential tools to preserve polarization when accelerating polarized beams to higher energy. At the same time, the higher order resonances still can cause polarization loss. As seen in RHIC, the betatron tune has to be carefully set and maintained on the ramp and during the store to avoid polarization loss. In addition, the orbit control is also critical to preserve polarization. The higher polarization during this run comes from several improvements over last run. First we have a much better orbit on the ramp. The orbit feedback brings down the vertical rms orbit error to 0.1mm, much better than the 0.5mm last run. With correct BPM offset and vertical realignment, this rms orbit error is indeed small. Second, the jump quads in the AGS improved input polarization for RHIC. Third, the vertical tune was pushed further away from 7/10 snake resonance. The tune feedback maintained the tune at the desired value through the ramp. To calibrate the analyzing power of RHIC polarimeters at any energy above injection, the polarized hydrogen jet target runs for every fill with both beams. Based on the known analyzing power, there is very little polarization loss between injection and 100 GeV. An alternative way is to measure the asymmetry at 100 GeV followed by ramping up to 250 GeV and back down to 100 GeV and then to measure the asymmetry again at 100 GeV. If the asymmetry after the down ramp is similar to the measurement before the up ramp, polarization was also preserved during the ramp to 250 GeV. The analyzing power at storage energy can then be extracted from the asymmetries measured at 100 GeV and 250 GeV. The tune and orbit feedbacks are essential for the down ramp to be possible. The polarized proton operation is still going on. We will push bunch intensity higher until reaching the beam-beam limit. The even higher intensity will have to wait for the electron lenses to compensate the beam-beam effect. To understand the details of spin dynamics in RHIC with two snakes, spin simulation with the real magnet fields have been developed recently. The study will provide guidance for possible polarization loss schemes. Further polarization gain will requires a polarized source upgrade; more careful setup jump quads in the AGS to get full benefit; and control emittance in the whole accelerator chain.

  11. Data Transfer and Archiving

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Feedback Using the Cray XE6 NERSC User Group Training Remote Setup 2010 Training Events Online Tutorials Courses NERSC Training Accounts Request Form Training Links OSF HPC Seminars Software Policies User Surveys NERSC Users Group User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov accounts@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 2 or 510-486-8612

  12. Modeling for System Integration Studies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K. D.

    2012-05-01

    This presentation describes some the data requirements needed for grid integration modeling and provides real-world examples of such data and its format. Renewable energy integration studies evaluate the operational impacts of variable generation. Transmission planning studies investigate where new transmission is needed to transfer energy from generation sources to load centers. Both use time-synchronized wind and solar energy production and load as inputs. Both examine high renewable energy penetration scenarios in the future.

  13. ARM - NSA Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlaskaNSA Operations NSA Related Links Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site...

  14. Crane Operation Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crane Operational Training Crane Operational Safety Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY Crane Training - Information Reduces Risk Crane...

  15. Final report on process modeling of cupola furnaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    This report describes the first phase of the AFS/DOE program on mathematical modeling of cupola behavior, covering the period May 19, 1989 to July 19, 1990. The objective of the program is to develop a comprehensive mathematical model of the cupola furnace for on-line and off-line process control and optimization. The work is being carried out by five organizations: Massachusetts Institute of Technology with responsibility for heat transfer and fluid flow modeling, and incorporation of the chemical models being developed by the University of Michigan team. Modern Equipment Company has the responsibility of compiling information on needed sensors for monitoring operation and providing materials data to be used for cupola input. General Motors, Central Foundry Division, is investigating the potential to augment the mathematical models with artificial intelligence programs. Lastly, General Motors Research laboratories are charged with providing accurate cupola operational data to test the models being developed. To date, a one-dimensional steady state model has been developed which considers heat transfer, fluid flow and important chemical processes: combustion, iron composition development, limestone calcination and iron oxidation. The model is based on established physico-chemical principles and data available in the literature. Model predictions compare favorably with data obtained in a production sale cupola, operating under carefully controlled, but realistic, conditions. At the present time, the chemical sub-models are being incorporated into the master program, and a complete working cupola model is expected by September 1990. 43 refs.

  16. Technology Transfer Annual Report Fiscal Year 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skinner, Wendy Lee

    2015-12-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratory that conducts research and development in all DOE mission areas. Like all other federal laboratories, INL has a statutory, technology transfer mission to make its capabilities and technologies available to federal agencies, state and local governments, universities, and industry. To fulfill this mission, INL encourages its scientific, engineering, and technical staff to disclose new inventions and creations to ensure the resulting intellectual property is captured, protected, and available to others who might benefit from it. As part of the mission, intellectual property is licensed to industrial partners for commercialization, job creation, and delivering the benefits of federally funded technology to consumers. In some cases, unique capabilities are made available to other federal agencies, international organizations, domestic and foreign commercial entities, or small businesses to solve specific technical challenges. INL employees work cooperatively with researchers and technical staff from the university and industrial sectors to further development of emerging technologies. In this multinational global economy, INL is contributing to the development of the next generation of engineers and scientists by licensing software to educational institutions throughout the world. This report is a catalog of select INL technology transfer and commercialization transactions and research agreements that were executed during this past year. The size and diversity of INL technical resources, coupled with the large number of relationships with other organizations, virtually ensures that a report of this nature will fail to capture all interactions. Recognizing this limitation, this report focuses on transactions that are specifically authorized by technology transfer legislation (and corresponding contractual provisions) or involve the transfer of legal rights to technology to other parties. This report was compiled from primary records, which were readily available to the INL’s Technology Deployment and Contracts Management Offices. Accomplishments cataloged in the report reflect the achievements and creativity of the researchers, technicians, support staff, and operators of the INL workforce.

  17. DOE Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored DOE Transfers $5 million to NREL, Jobs to be Restored February 20, 2006 - 12:06pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - At the direction of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman, $5 million was transferred to Midwest Research Institute, the operating contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), over the weekend. DOE has been informed that the NREL lab director will use these funds to immediately restore

  18. Perturbation theory for electric-field amplitude and phase ripple transfer in frequency doubling and tripling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, J.M.; Eimerl, D.; Milam, D.; Milonni, P.W.

    1997-01-01

    A theory is presented for the transfer of a perturbation of the electric field from the input to the output of a frequency converter. The transfer relationship for the field ripple is shown to depend on the plane-wave operating parameters of the converter. Predictions of the theory are shown to be in excellent agreement with full numerical simulations of doubling and tripling and experiments measuring ripple transfer in frequency doubling. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  19. Reaction coordinates for electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran C.; Zhu Jianjun

    2008-12-07

    The polarization fluctuation and energy gap formulations of the reaction coordinate for outer sphere electron transfer are linearly related to the constant energy constraint Lagrangian multiplier m in Marcus' theory of electron transfer. The quadratic dependence of the free energies of the reactant and product intermediates on m and m+1, respectively, leads to similar dependence of the free energies on the reaction coordinates and to the same dependence of the activation energy on the reorganization energy and the standard reaction free energy. Within the approximations of a continuum model of the solvent and linear response of the longitudinal polarization to the electric field in Marcus' theory, both formulations of the reaction coordinate are expected to lead to the same results.

  20. The oil and gas joint operating agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the following topics: introduction to the AAPL model form operating agreement; property provisions of the operating agreement; Article 6---the drilling and development article; duties and obligations revisited---who bear what risk of loss; operator's liens; accounting procedure joint operations; insurance; taking gas in kind absent a balancing agreement; RMMLF Form 5 Gas Balancing Agreement; tax partnerships for nontax professionals; alternative agreement forms.

  1. Operation Warfighter Internship Fair

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attendees: Participants of Operation Warfighter Program Cost: Free Supports: Veteran and Disability Employment Programs

  2. Operating Experience Committee Charter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Operating Experience Committe Charter explains the purpose of the Department of Energy (DOE) Operating Experience Committee (OEC), which is to support line management within DOE and the DOE community in developing and sustaining effective oeprating experience programs so that lessons from inernal and external operating experience lead to improvement in future operational and safety performance.

  3. ARM - SGP Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Operations Routine Operations SGP central facility offices. SGP central facility offices. The overwhelming majority of the measurements

  4. Operation of thoriated tungsten cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polk, J.E. )

    1993-01-20

    The operating temperature of thoriated tungsten cathodes used in electric thrusters depends on the surface coverage of thorium, which is determined by a balance of rate processes which supply and deplete the surface layer. The fundamental processes and rates are first reviewed in detail, then a phenomenological model based on these rate processes is described. The model indicates that the thermionic emission capabilities of thoriated tungsten cathodes decay rapidly because of thorium depletion at temperatures encountered in electric thrusters.

  5. Comparison of Methods for Calculating Radiative Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred; Abbate, M J

    2012-01-19

    Various approximations for calculating radioactive heat transfer between parallel surfaces are evaluated. This is done by applying the approximations based on total emissivities to a special case of known spectral emissivities, for which exact heat transfer calculations are possible. Comparison of results indicates that the best approximation is obtained by basing the emissivity of the receiving surface primarily on the temperature of the emitter. A specific model is shown to give excellent agreement over a very wide range of values.

  6. EA-1236: Preparation for Transfer of Ownership of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Natrona County, WY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Final Sitewide Environmental Assessment (EA) This Sitewide EA evaluates activities that DOE would conduct in anticipation of possible transfer of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) out of Federal operation.

  7. Wireless power transfer test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, Aaron; Wu, Hunter; Sealy, Kylee D.; Israelsen, Paul D.

    2015-09-22

    A testing system for wireless power transfer systems, including a stationary plate, a rotating plate, and a driver to rotate the rotating plate with respect to the stationary plate.

  8. Transfer Service (contracts/rd)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    issues regarding Transfer Service. Questions on this program can be sent to Garry Thompson at grthompson@bpa.gov or Connie Howard at cmhoward@bpa.gov. Comments can be e-mailed...

  9. PERSONAL PROPERTY TRANSFER MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING DE..GM07..04ID11457

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERSONAL PROPERTY TRANSFER MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING DE..GM07..04ID11457 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE AND THE COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION, INC. I. INTRODUCTION This plan establishes conditions under which personal property may be transferred from the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), an agency of the United States Government, to the Community Reuse Organization, Inc. (CRO), an Idaho Corporation. A. Background Section 3] 55 of

  10. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  11. Automatic computation of transfer functions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley; Watson, Luke Dale

    2015-04-14

    Technologies pertaining to the automatic computation of transfer functions for a physical system are described herein. The physical system is one of an electrical system, a mechanical system, an electromechanical system, an electrochemical system, or an electromagnetic system. A netlist in the form of a matrix comprises data that is indicative of elements in the physical system, values for the elements in the physical system, and structure of the physical system. Transfer functions for the physical system are computed based upon the netlist.

  12. Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Aggregate Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to the present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate Bandwidth Daily Aggregate

  13. Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Last 8 Days Aggregate Transfers Last 8 Days These plots show the aggregate bandwidth statistics for the past eight days with the most recent day shown first. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) BW (Both Systems) Last edited: 2011-04-04 10:44:03

  14. Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transfers Historical Yearly Peak Concurrent Transfers Historical Yearly Peak These plots show the yearly peak days from 2000 to present. BE CAREFUL because the graphs are autoscaling - check the scales on each axis before you compare graphs. Note that the graph for current year shows the data for the year-to-date peak. Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage Concurrency Daily Storage

  15. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level descriptions. of subsystems and components, and the Transportation System Requirements Document. Other program and system documents, plans, instructions, and detailed designs will be consistent with and informed by the Transportation System Concept of Operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is a living document, enduring throughout the OCRWM systems engineering lifecycle. It will undergo formal approval and controlled revisions as appropriate while the Transportation System matures. Revisions will take into account new policy decisions, new information available through system modeling, engineering investigations, technical analyses and tests, and the introduction of new technologies that can demonstrably improve system performance.

  16. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVLibMatlab Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Sandia has released version 1.3 of PVLib, its widely used Matlab toolbox for modeling photovoltaic (PV) power systems. The version 1.3 release includes the following added functions: functions to estimate parameters for popular PV module models, including PVsyst and the CEC '5 parameter' model a new model of the effects of solar

  17. Phenylnaphthalene Derivatives as Heat Transfer Fluids for Concentrating Solar Power: Loop Experiments and Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarlane, Joanna; Bell, Jason R; Felde, David K; Joseph III, Robert Anthony; Qualls, A L; Weaver, Samuel P

    2013-02-01

    ORNL and subcontractor Cool Energy completed an investigation of higher-temperature, organic thermal fluids for solar thermal applications. Although static thermal tests showed promising results for 1-phenylnaphthalene, loop testing at temperatures to 450 C showed that the material isomerized at a slow rate. In a loop with a temperature high enough to drive the isomerization, the higher melting point byproducts tended to condense onto cooler surfaces. So, as experienced in loop operation, eventually the internal channels of cooler components such as the waste heat rejection exchanger may become coated or clogged and loop performance will decrease. Thus, pure 1-phenylnaphthalene does not appear to be a fluid that would have a sufficiently long lifetime (years to decades) to be used in a loop at the increased temperatures of interest. Hence a decision was made not to test the ORNL fluid in the loop at Cool Energy Inc. Instead, Cool Energy tested and modeled power conversion from a moderate-temperature solar loop using coupled Stirling engines. Cool Energy analyzed data collected on third and fourth generation SolarHeart Stirling engines operating on a rooftop solar field with a lower temperature (Marlotherm) heat transfer fluid. The operating efficiencies of the Stirling engines were determined at multiple, typical solar conditions, based on data from actual cycle operation. Results highlighted the advantages of inherent thermal energy storage in the power conversion system.

  18. Secretary Bodman Announces DOE Technology Transfer Coordinator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Raymond Orbach, as Technology Transfer Coordinator, in accordance with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Secretary Bodman also established a Technology Transfer Policy Board, ...

  19. Technology Transfer Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Overview Technology Transfer Overview Through strategic investments in science and technology, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) helps power and secure ...

  20. Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steinbeis Technology Transfer Centre for Emissions Trading Place: Augsburg, Bavaria,...

  1. NREL: Technology Transfer - Agreements for Commercializing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-384-7353. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  2. NREL: Technology Transfer - Cooperative Research and Development...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-275-4410. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Agreements for Commercializing Technology CRADAs Work for...

  3. Nanofluids for Heat Transfer - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Find More Like This Return to Search Nanofluids for Heat Transfer Argonne National ... of nanoparticles for use as the heat transfer fluid (HTF) in liquid cooling systems. ...

  4. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles Technology available for licensing: A stable, nonreactive nanofluid that exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties with only a minimal ...

  5. Heat Transfer Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials in solids or fluid forms play an important role in a ... Argonne's Heat Transfer Laboratory enables researchers to: Synthesize and prepare heat ...

  6. recuperative heat transfer within the Brayton cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recuperative heat transfer within the Brayton cycle - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers recuperative heat transfer within the ...

  7. Proton transfer in nucleobases is mediated by water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khistyaev, Kirill; Golan, Amir; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2013-04-29

    Water plays a central role in chemistry and biology by mediating the interactions between molecules, altering energy levels of solvated species, modifying potential energy proles along reaction coordinates, and facilitating ecient proton transport through ion channels and interfaces. This study investigates proton transfer in a model system comprising dry and microhydrated clusters of nucleobases. With mass spectrometry and tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation, we show that water shuts down ionization-induced proton transfer between nucleobases, which is very ecient in dry clusters. Instead, a new pathway opens up in which protonated nucleo bases are generated by proton transfer from the ionized water molecule and elimination of a hydroxyl radical. Electronic structure calculations reveal that the shape of the potential energy prole along the proton transfer coordinate depends strongly on the character of the molecular orbital from which the electron is removed, i.e., the proton transfer from water to nucleobases is barrierless when an ionized state localized on water is accessed. The computed energetics of proton transfer is in excellent agreement with the experimental appearance energies. Possible adiabatic passage on the ground electronic state of the ionized system, while energetically accessible at lower energies, is not ecient. Thus, proton transfer is controlled electronically, by the character of the ionized state, rather than statistically, by simple energy considerations.

  8. Climate Data Operators (CDO)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Climate Data Operators (CDO) Climate Data Operators (CDO) Description and Overview CDO is a large tool set for working on climate data. NetCDF 34, GRIB including SZIP compression, ...

  9. Development of the prototype pneumatic transfer system for ITER neutron activation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheon, M. S.; Seon, C. R.; Pak, S.; Lee, H. G.; Bertalot, L.

    2012-10-15

    The neutron activation system (NAS) measures neutron fluence at the first wall and the total neutron flux from the ITER plasma, providing evaluation of the fusion power for all operational phases. The pneumatic transfer system (PTS) is one of the key components of the NAS for the proper operation of the system, playing a role of transferring encapsulated samples between the capsule loading machine, irradiation stations, counting stations, and disposal bin. For the validation and the optimization of the design, a prototype of the PTS was developed and capsule transfer tests were performed with the developed system.

  10. Paducah Operations Timeline | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operations Timeline Paducah Operations Timeline Paducah Operations Timeline

  11. Calutron Operators | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operators Calutron Operators Young women recruited to operate the calutrons

  12. State diagram of an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Li; Wolf, Georg; Pinna, Daniele; Chaves-O'Flynn, Gabriel D.; Kent, Andrew D.

    2015-05-21

    We present the switching characteristics of a spin-transfer device that incorporates a perpendicularly magnetized spin-polarizing layer with an in-plane magnetized free and fixed magnetic layer, known as an orthogonal spin transfer spin valve device. This device shows clear switching between parallel (P) and antiparallel (AP) resistance states and the reverse transition (AP → P) for both current polarities. Further, hysteretic transitions are shown to occur into a state with a resistance intermediate between that of the P and AP states, again for both current polarities. These unusual spin-transfer switching characteristics can be explained within a simple macrospin model that incorporates thermal fluctuations and considers a spin-polarized current that is tilted with respect to the free layer's plane, due to the presence of the spin-transfer torque from the polarizing layer.

  13. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion/Modeling Modelingadmin2015-10-28T01:54:52+00:00 Modelers at the CRF are developing high-fidelity simulation tools for engine combustion and detailed micro-kinetic, surface chemistry modeling tools for catalyst-based exhaust aftertreatment systems. The engine combustion modeling is focused on developing Large Eddy Simulation (LES). LES is being used with closely coupled key target experiments to reveal new understanding of the fundamental processes involved in engine combustion

  14. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reacting Flow/Modeling Modelingadmin2015-10-28T02:39:13+00:00 Turbulence models typically involve coarse-graining and/or time averaging. Though adequate for modeling mean transport, this approach does not address turbulence-microphysics interactions that are important in combustion processes. Subgrid models are developed to represent these interactions. The CRF has developed a fundamentally different representation of these interactions that does not involve distinct coarse-grained and subgrid

  15. Mass transfer of volatile organic compounds from drinking water to indoor air: The role of residential dishwashers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard-Reed, C.; Corsi, R.L.; Moya, J.

    1999-07-01

    Contaminated tap water may be a source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in residential indoor air. To better understand the extent and impact of chemical emissions from this source, a two-phase mass balance model was developed based on mass transfer kinetics between each phase. Twenty-nine experiments were completed using a residential dishwasher to determine model parameters. During each experiment, inflow water was spiked with a cocktail of chemical tracers with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In each case, the effects of water temperature, detergent, and dish-loading pattern on chemical stripping efficiencies and mass transfer coefficients were determined. Dishwasher headspace ventilation rates were also measured using an isobutylene tracer gas. Chemical stripping efficiencies for a single cycle ranged from 18% to 55% for acetone, from 96% to 98% for toluene, and from 97% to 98% for ethylbenzene and were consistently 100% for cyclohexane. Experimental results indicate that dishwashers have a relatively low but continuous ventilation rate that results in significant chemical storage within the headspace of the dishwasher. In conjunction with relatively high mass transfer coefficients, low ventilation rates generally lead to emissions that are limited by equilibrium conditions after approximately 1--2 min of dishwasher operation.

  16. Technology transfer in the national laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonas, G.

    1991-08-01

    The title of this paper might unfairly provoke readers if it conjures up visions of vast stores of high-tech gadgets in several hundred technology warehouses'' (also known as federal laboratories) around the country, open for browsing by those in search of a bargain. That vision, unfortunately, is a mirage. The term technology transfer'' is not really as accurate as is the term technology team-work,'' a process of sharing ideas and knowledge rather than widgets. In addition, instead of discussing the efforts of more than 700 federal labs in the US, I mean to address only those nine government-owned, contractor-operated multiprogram labs run by the Department of Energy. Nevertheless, the topic of technology team-work opportunities with DOE multiprogram national lab is of significance to those concerned with increasing economic competitiveness and finding technological solutions to a host of national problems. A significant fraction of US R D capabilities rests in the nine DOE multiprogram national laboratories -- and these labs have only just begun to join the other federal laboratories in these efforts due to the passage and recent implementation of the National Competitiveness Technology Transfer Act of 1989.

  17. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Daniel Francis Alan; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D; Jankowski, Todd Andrew

    2014-04-15

    A submersible pumping system for downhole use in extracting fluids containing hydrocarbons from a well. In one embodiment, the pumping system comprises a rotary induction motor, a motor casing, one or more pump stages, and a cooling system. The rotary induction motor rotates a shaft about a longitudinal axis of rotation. The motor casing houses the rotary induction motor such that the rotary induction motor is held in fluid isolation from the fluid being extracted. The pump stages are attached to the shaft outside of the motor casing, and are configured to impart fluid being extracted from the well with an increased pressure. The cooling system is disposed at least partially within the motor casing, and transfers heat generated by operation of the rotary induction motor out of the motor casing.

  18. IMPLEMENTATION AND OPERATION OF THE REPOSITORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus Milling

    2003-10-01

    The NGDRS has facilitated 85% of cores, cuttings, and other data identified available for transfer to the public sector. Over 12 million linear feet of cores and cuttings, in addition to large numbers of paleontological samples and are now available for public use. To date, with industry contributions for program operations and data transfers, the NGDRS project has realized a 6.5 to 1 return on investment to Department of Energy funds. Large-scale transfers of seismic data have been evaluated, but based on the recommendation of the NGDRS steering committee, cores have been given priority because of the vast scale of the seismic data problem relative to the available funding. The rapidly changing industry conditions have required that the primary core and cuttings preservation strategy evolve as well. Additionally, the NGDRS clearinghouse is evaluating the viability of transferring seismic data covering the western shelf of the Florida Gulf Coast. AGI remains actively involved in working to realize the vision of the National Research Council's report of geoscience data preservation. GeoTrek has been ported to Linux and MySQL, ensuring a purely open-source version of the software. This effort is key in ensuring long-term viability of the software so that is can continue basic operation regardless of specific funding levels. Work has been on a major revision of GeoTrek, using the open-source MapServer project and its related MapScript language. This effort will address a number of key technology issues that appear to be rising for 2003, including the discontinuation of the use of Java in future Microsoft operating systems. The recent donation of BPAmoco's Houston core facility to the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology has provided substantial short-term relief of the space constraints for public repository space.

  19. An improved multiscale model for dilute turbulent gas particle...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (1) model for interphase TKE transfer, especially the time scale of interphase TKE transfer, and (2) correct prediction of TKE evolution with variation of particle Stokes number. ...

  20. Classification of US hydropower dams by their modes of operation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Oigbokie, II, Clement O.; Kao, Shih -Chieh; Bevelhimer, Mark S.

    2016-02-19

    A key challenge to understanding ecohydrologic responses to dam regulation is the absence of a universally transferable classification framework for how dams operate. In the present paper, we develop a classification system to organize the modes of operation (MOPs) for U.S. hydropower dams and powerplants. To determine the full diversity of MOPs, we mined federal documents, open-access data repositories, and internet sources. W then used CART classification trees to predict MOPs based on physical characteristics, regulation, and project generation. Finally, we evaluated how much variation MOPs explained in sub-daily discharge patterns for stream gages downstream of hydropower dams. After reviewingmore » information for 721 dams and 597 power plants, we developed a 2-tier hierarchical classification based on 1) the storage and control of flows to powerplants, and 2) the presence of a diversion around the natural stream bed. This resulted in nine tier-1 MOPs representing a continuum of operations from strictly peaking, to reregulating, to run-of-river, and two tier-2 MOPs, representing diversion and integral dam-powerhouse configurations. Although MOPs differed in physical characteristics and energy production, classification trees had low accuracies (<62%), which suggested accurate evaluations of MOPs may require individual attention. MOPs and dam storage explained 20% of the variation in downstream subdaily flow characteristics and showed consistent alterations in subdaily flow patterns from reference streams. Lastly, this standardized classification scheme is important for future research including estimating reservoir operations for large-scale hydrologic models and evaluating project economics, environmental impacts, and mitigation.« less

  1. Check Heat Transfer Surfaces | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Transfer Surfaces Check Heat Transfer Surfaces This tip sheet discusses the importance of checking heat transfer surfaces in process heating systems. PROCESS HEAT TIP SHEET #4 PDF icon Check Heat Transfer Surfaces (September 2005) More Documents & Publications Improving Process Heating System Performance: A Sourcebook for Industry, Second Edition Check Burner Air to Fuel Ratios Process Heating Assessment and Survey Tool (PHAST) Introduction

  2. Apparatus and method for transferring slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, J.R.

    1982-08-13

    Slurry is transferred to a high pressure region by pushing the slurry from the bottom of a transfer vessel with a pressurizing liquid admitted into the top of the vessel. While the pressurizing liquid is being introduced into the transfer vessel, pressurizing liquid which has mixed with slurry is drawn off from the transfer vessel at a point between its upper and lower ends.

  3. SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-05

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current modeling results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.

  4. Transferring Data from Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Examples Once you are set up for automatic authentication (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch scripts. You can add the following lines at the end of your batch script. HSI will accept one-line commands on the HSI command line, e.g., hsi put filename HSI, ftp and pftp read from the standard input (stdin) and a list of commands can be placed in a text file (script) and redirected into the given utility, e.g., htp

  5. Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin compute node to a target compute node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-05-24

    Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin node to a target node includes: sending, by an origin DMA engine, an RTS message, the RTS message specifying an application message for transfer to the target node from the origin node; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, a remote get message containing a data descriptor for the message and a completion notification descriptor, the completion notification descriptor specifying a local direct put transfer operation for transferring data locally on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine in an injection FIFO buffer, the data descriptor followed by the completion notification descriptor; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in dependence upon the completion notification descriptor.

  6. Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin compute node to a target compute node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-02-15

    Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin node to a target node includes: sending, by an origin DMA engine, an RTS message, the RTS message specifying an application message for transfer to the target node from the origin node; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, a remote get message containing a data descriptor for the message and a completion notification descriptor, the completion notification descriptor specifying a local memory FIFO data transfer operation for transferring data locally on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine in an injection FIFO buffer, the data descriptor followed by the completion notification descriptor; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in dependence upon the completion notification descriptor.

  7. Transfer Factors for Contaminant Uptake by Fruit and Nut Trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Fellows, Robert J.; Minc, Leah D.

    2013-11-20

    Transfer of radionuclides from soils into plants is one of the key mechanisms for long-term contamination of the human food chain. Nearly all computer models that address soil-to-plant uptake of radionuclides use empirically-derived transfer factors to address this process. Essentially all available soil-to-plant transfer factors are based on measurements in annual crops. Because very few measurements are available for tree fruits, samples were taken of alfalfa and oats and the stems, leaves, and fruits and nuts of almond, apple, apricot, carob, fig, grape, nectarine, pecan, pistachio (natural and grafted), and pomegranate, along with local surface soil. The samples were dried, ground, weighed, and analyzed for trace constituents through a combination of induction-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and instrumental neutron activation analysis for a wide range of naturally-occurring elements. Analysis results are presented and converted to soil-to-plant transfer factors. These are compared to commonly used and internationally recommended values. Those determined for annual crops are very similar to commonly-used values; those determined for tree fruits show interesting differences. Most macro- and micronutrients are slightly reduced in fruits; non-essential elements are reduced further. These findings may be used in existing computer models and may allow development of tree-fruit-specific transfer models.

  8. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A. ); Irvine, T.F., Jr. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured (0 to 8.5 cm/s), the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  9. Enhanced convective and film boiling heat transfer by surface gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.; Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F., Jr.

    1992-04-01

    Heat transfer measurements were made for stable film boiling of water over a horizontal, flat stainless steel plate from the minimum film boiling point temperature, T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}500K, to T{sub SURFACE} {approximately}950K. The pressure at the plate was approximately 1 atmosphere and the temperature of the water pool was maintained at saturation. The data were compared to the Berenson film-boiling model, which was developed for minimum film-boiling-point conditions. The model accurately represented the data near the minimum film-boiling point and at the highest temperatures measured, as long it was corrected for the heat transferred by radiation. On the average, the experimental data lay within {plus_minus}7% of the model. Measurements of heat transfer were made without film boiling for nitrogen jetting into an overlying pool of water from nine 1-mm- diameter holes, drilled in the heat transfer plate. The heat flux was maintained constant at approximately 26.4 kW/m{sup 2}. For water-pool heights of less than 6cm the heat transfer coefficient deceased linearly with a decrease in heights. Above 6cm the heat transfer coefficient was unaffected. For the entire range of gas velocities measured [0 to 8.5 cm/s], the magnitude of the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient only changed by approximately 20%. The heat transfer data bound the Konsetov model for turbulent pool heat transfer which was developed for vertical heat transfer surfaces. This agreement suggests that surface orientation may not be important when the gas jets do not locally affect the surface heat transfer. Finally, a database was developed for heat transfer from the plate with both film boiling and gas jetting occurring simultaneously, in a pool of water maintained at its saturation temperature. The effect of passing nitrogen through established film boiling is to increase the heat transfer from that surface. 60 refs.

  10. Composite fabrication via resin transfer molding technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Domeier, L.A.

    1996-04-01

    The IMPReS (Integrated Modeling and Processing of Resin-based Structures) Program was funded in FY95 to consolidate, evaluate and enhance Sandia`s capabilities in the design and fabrication of composite structures. A key driver of this and related programs was the need for more agile product development processes and for model based design and fabrication tools across all of Sandia`s material technologies. A team of polymer, composite and modeling personnel was assembled to benchmark Sandia`s existing expertise in this area relative to industrial and academic programs and to initiate the tasks required to meet Sandia`s future needs. RTM (Resin Transfer Molding) was selected as the focus composite fabrication technology due to its versatility and growing use in industry. Modeling efforts focused on the prediction of composite mechanical properties and failure/damage mechanisms and also on the uncured resin flow processes typical of RTM. Appropriate molds and test composites were fabricated and model validation studies begun. This report summarizes and archives the modeling and fabrication studies carried out under IMPReS and evaluates the status of composite technology within Sandia. It should provide a complete and convenient baseline for future composite technology efforts within Sandia.

  11. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WVMinputs-outputs Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) When a single solar photovoltaic (PV) module is in full sunlight, then is shaded by a cloud, and is back in full sunlight in a matter of seconds, a sharp dip then increase in power output will result. However, over an entire PV plant, clouds will often uncover some modules even as they cover others, [...] By Andrea

  12. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A rail tank car of the type used to transport crude oil across North America. Recent incidents have raised concerns about the safety of this practice, which the DOE-DOT-sponsored team is investigating. (photo credit: Harvey Henkelmann) Permalink Gallery Expansion of DOE-DOT Tight Oil Research Work Capabilities, Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Fuel Options, Infrastructure Assurance, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling

  13. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monte Carlo modeling it was found that for noisy signals with a significant background component, accuracy is improved by fitting the total emission data which includes the...

  14. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Wind Energy, Wind News|0 Comments Read More ... Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Sandia Modifies Delft3D Turbine Model ...

  15. technology transfer | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    technology transfer Y-12 honors its inventors with Technology Transfer awards OAK RIDGE, Tennessee - Twenty-nine Y-12 inventors were recognized for their technology and innovative accomplishments during the recent 12th annual Technology Transfer Awards Ceremony. The site has a long history of producing technologies initially used at Y-12 and later transferred to the... Y-12 honors its inventors with Technology Transfer awards , Twenty-nine Y-12 inventors were recognized for their technology and

  16. Cask fleet operations study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 assigned to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Waste Management the responsibility for disposing of high-level waste and spent fuel. A significant part of that responsibility involves transporting nuclear waste materials within the federal waste management system; that is, from the waste generator to the repository. The lead responsibility for transportation operations has been assigned to Oak Ridge Operations, with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing technical support through the Transportation Operations Support Task Group. One of the ORNL support activities involves assessing what facilities, equipment and services are required to assure that an acceptable, cost-effective and safe transportation operations system can be designed, operated and maintained. This study reviews, surveys and assesses the experience of Nuclear Assurance Corporation (NAC) in operating a fleet of spent-fuel shipping casks to aid in developing the spent-fuel transportation system.

  17. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  18. Site Operator Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, J.F.

    1991-12-31

    Collectively, the organizations participating in the Site Operator Program have over forty years of EV experience and have operated electric vehicles (EVs) for over 600,000 miles, providing the most extensive EV operating and knowledge base in the country. The Site Operator Program is intended to provide financial and technical support and organizational resources to organizations active in the advancement of electric vehicles. Support is provided for the demonstration of vehicles and the test and evaluation of vehicles, components, and batteries. Support is also provided for the management and support of the program for the participating organizations. The Program provides a forum for participants to exchange information among the group, as well as with vehicle and equipment manufacturers and suppliers, and the public. A central data base at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory provides a repository for-data on the vehicles being operated by the Program participants. Data collection emphasis is in the areas of operations, maintenance, and life cycle costs.

  19. Operating Experience Summaries

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU) Office of Analysis publishes the Operating Experience Summary to exchange lessons-learned information between DOE facilities.

  20. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    & RESIDUE 0 AECMED INVOLVEME?JT AT SITE ...----------- Control a Health Physics Protection 0 AECfMED managed operations G Little or None 0 AEUMED respansible far C ...

  1. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . .' .,Ec-itkED I' NVULVEFY l- AT SITE '---------... .Control c Health Physics Protection 0 AECMED managed operations G Little or None :kf AECMED responsible for ...

  2. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    operations G AECtlED responsible for acrountability . G I i I : I I 1 Health Physics; Protection ; c Little or, None, .c AECMED responsibility c Contractoi ...

  3. ARM - AAF Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2007 - UAV Campaigns 1993 - 2006, 2015 Other Aircraft Campaigns 1993 - 2010 AAF Contacts Rickey Petty DOE AAF Program Director Beat Schmid Technical Director AAF Operations...

  4. APS User Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schedules APS Schedule Useful Links Beamline Design Library (former Design Exchange) Machine Status Link Bunch Clock Information APS Systems Status Storage Ring Operating Status...

  5. APS Operational Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Downtime Log Yearly Operation Statistics 2016 Statistics 2015 Statistics 2014 Statistics 2013 Statistics 2012 Statistics 2011 Statistics 2010 Statistics 2009 Statistics 2008...

  6. Operator interface for vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bissontz, Jay E

    2015-03-10

    A control interface for drivetrain braking provided by a regenerative brake and a non-regenerative brake is implemented using a combination of switches and graphic interface elements. The control interface comprises a control system for allocating drivetrain braking effort between the regenerative brake and the non-regenerative brake, a first operator actuated control for enabling operation of the drivetrain braking, and a second operator actuated control for selecting a target braking effort for drivetrain braking. A graphic display displays to an operator the selected target braking effort and can be used to further display actual braking effort achieved by drivetrain braking.

  7. Operations Committee Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presented to the Commission to Review Effectiveness of National Energy Laboratories Jeff Smith Deputy for Operations Oak Ridge National Laboratory February 24, 2015 The Importance ...

  8. ARM - Historical Operational Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For a complete description of hours for each site, please refer to the current ARM Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. The tables below provide the...

  9. ARM - AMF Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF Operations Members of the AMF1 installation team prepare the...

  10. Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrdad Massoudi

    2012-01-01

    Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

  11. The effects of charge transfer on the properties of liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Alexis J.; Rick, Steven W.

    2011-05-14

    A method for treating charge transfer interactions in classical potential models is developed and applied to water. In this method, a discrete amount of charge is transferred for each hydrogen bond formed. It is designed to be simple to implement, to be applicable to a variety of potential models, and to satisfy various physical requirements. The method does not transfer charge at large intramolecular distances, it does not result in a conductive liquid, and it can be easily parameterized to give the correct amount of charge transfer. Two charge transfer models are developed for a polarizable and a non-polarizable potential. The models reproduce many of the properties of liquid water, including the structure, the diffusion constant, and thermodynamic properties over a range of temperatures.

  12. Method of measuring heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Zelipsky, Steven A.; Rezmer, Ronald R.; Smelser, Peter

    1981-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring the heat influx of a cryogenic transfer system. A gaseous phase of the cryogen used during normal operation of the system is passed through the system. The gaseous cryogen at the inlet to the system is tempered to duplicate the normal operating temperature of the system inlet. The temperature and mass flow rate of the gaseous cryogen is measured at the outlet of the system, and the heat capacity of the cryogen is determined. The heat influx of the system is then determined from known thermodynamic relationships.

  13. Mathematical modeling of postcombustion in a KOBM converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gou, H.; Irons, G.A.; Lu, W.-K. )

    1993-02-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe gas flow, combustion reactions, and heat transfer in converter-type steelmaking processes. The k-[epsilon] two-equation turbulent model, a finite reaction model, and the DeMarco-Lockwood flux model have been incorporated in this model to deal with the turbulent flow, postcombustion reactions, and radiation heat transfer. Local gaseous flow patterns, temperature, and heat flux distributions were calculated for a 300 tonne Kloeckner Oxygen Blowing Maximillanshuette (KOBM) converter. Comparison between the heat-transfer fluxes calculated based on the model and those measured industrially indicates the validity of the model in this application. The postcombustion has been found to be determined by the decarburization rate (DCR) which is directly related to the hardness of blowing not by the entrainment of surrounding gas to the oxygen jet as previously reported. The model revealed that about 20 pct of what is normally considered to be recovered heat has actually been lost through the vessel wall and to the lance. It is shown that this model is useful in studying the detailed mechanisms of postcombustion to optimize operations in converter-type steelmaking processes.

  14. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems.

  15. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems.

  16. DOE Fundamentals Handbook: Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-06-01

    The Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, and Fluid Flow Fundamentals Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors provide operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the thermal sciences. The handbook includes information on thermodynamics and the properties of fluids; the three modes of heat transfer -- conduction, convection, and radiation; and fluid flow, and the energy relationships in fluid systems. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the basic operation of various types of DOE nuclear facility fluid systems.

  17. NREL: Technology Transfer - Innovative Way to Test Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applications. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  18. The Role of the Engineered Barrier System in Safety Cases for Geological Radioactive Waste Repoitories: An NEA Initiaive in Co-Operations with the EC, Process Issues and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.G. Bennett; A.J. Hooper; S. Voinis; H. Umeki; A.V. Luik; J. Alonso

    2006-02-07

    The Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Radioactive Waste Management Committee in co-operation with the European Commission (EC) is conducting a project to develop a greater understanding of how to achieve the necessary integration for successful design, construction, testing, modeling, and assessment of engineered barrier systems. The project also seeks to clarify the role that the EBS plays in assuring the overall safety of a repository. A framework for the EBS Project is provided by a series of workshops that allow discussion of the wide range of activities necessary for the design, assessment and optimization of the EBS, and the integration of this information into the safety case. The topics of this series of workshops have been planned so that the EBS project will work progressively through the main aspects comprising one cycle of the design and optimization process. This paper seeks to communicate key results from the EBS project to a wider audience. The paper focuses on two topics discussed at the workshops: process issues and the role of modeling.

  19. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Earth at Night Video EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Global, Modeling, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting, Videos NASA Earth at Night Video Have you ever wondered what the ...

  20. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that Stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and were not expected to operate for any lengthy period of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered.

  1. Applied Resiliency for More Trustworthy Grid Operation (ARMORE)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Applied Resiliency for More Trustworthy Grid Operation (ARMORE) Secure communications, inspection, and data analysis platform that enhances the security posture for legacy and modern grid devices Background The electric grid increasingly relies on the secure transfer of real-time data between substations to maintain control of system operations. Traditional cybersecurity practices primarily employ perimeter-level protections, such as firewalls or end-point gateways. Additionally, substation

  2. Risk assessment in international operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stricklin, Daniela L.

    2008-11-15

    During international peace-keeping missions, a diverse number of non-battle hazards may be encountered, which range from heavily polluted areas, endemic disease, toxic industrial materials, local violence, traffic, and even psychological factors. Hence, elevated risk levels from a variety of sources are encountered during deployments. With the emphasis within the Swedish military moving from national defense towards prioritization of international missions in atypical environments, the risk of health consequences, including long term health effects, has received greater consideration. The Swedish military is interested in designing an optimal approach for assessment of health threats during deployments. The Medical Intelligence group at FOI CBRN Security and Defence in Umea has, on request from and in collaboration with the Swedish Armed Forces, reviewed a variety of international health threat and risk assessment models for military operations. Application of risk assessment methods used in different phases of military operations will be reviewed. An overview of different international approaches used in operational risk management (ORM) will be presented as well as a discussion of the specific needs and constraints for health risk assessment in military operations. This work highlights the specific challenges of risk assessment that are unique to the deployment setting such as the assessment of exposures to a variety of diverse hazards concurrently.

  3. Stirling machine operating experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, B.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous Stirling machines have been built and operated, but the operating experience of these machines is not well known. It is important to examine this operating experience in detail, because it largely substantiates the claim that stirling machines are capable of reliable and lengthy operating lives. The amount of data that exists is impressive, considering that many of the machines that have been built are developmental machines intended to show proof of concept, and are not expected to operate for lengthy periods of time. Some Stirling machines (typically free-piston machines) achieve long life through non-contact bearings, while other Stirling machines (typically kinematic) have achieved long operating lives through regular seal and bearing replacements. In addition to engine and system testing, life testing of critical components is also considered. The record in this paper is not complete, due to the reluctance of some organizations to release operational data and because several organizations were not contacted. The authors intend to repeat this assessment in three years, hoping for even greater participation.

  4. Nonlinear Heat Transfer 2d Structure

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1987-09-01

    DOT-BPMD is a general-purpose, finite-element, heat-transfer program used to predict thermal environments. The code considers linear and nonlinear transient or steady-state heat conduction in two-dimensional planar or axisymmetric representations of structures. Capabilities are provided for modeling anisotropic heterogeneous materials with temperature-dependent thermal properties and time-dependent temperature, heat flux, convection and radiation boundary conditions, together with time-dependent internal heat generation. DOT-BPMD may be used in the evaluation of steady-state geothermal gradients as well as in themore » transient heat conduction analysis of repository and waste package subsystems. Strengths of DOT-BPMD include its ability to account for a wide range of possible boundary conditions, nonlinear material properties, and its efficient equation solution algorithm. Limitations include the lack of a three-dimensional analysis capability, no radiative or convective internal heat transfer, and the need to maintain a constant time-step in each program execution.« less

  5. City Code Non-Transferable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City Code Non-Transferable If the sales tax permit at this location becomes invalid then all associated permits will become invalid. If the business changes location or ownership or is discontinued for any reason, this permit must be returned to the Oklahoma Tax Commission for cancellation WITH AN EXPLANATION ON THE REVERSE SIDE. PLEASE POST IN CONSPICUOUS PLACE GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 4211 METRO PKWY FORT MYERS FL 33916-9406 443111 8010 March 6, 2014 2102181888 Effective Expires Business

  6. Enhanced heat transfer using nanofluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choi, Stephen U. S.; Eastman, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    This invention is directed to a method of and apparatus for enhancing heat transfer in fluids such as deionized water. ethylene glycol, or oil by dispersing nanocrystalline particles of substances such as copper, copper oxide, aluminum oxide, or the like in the fluids. Nanocrystalline particles are produced and dispersed in the fluid by heating the substance to be dispersed in a vacuum while passing a thin film of the fluid near the heated substance. The fluid is cooled to control its vapor pressure.

  7. Data Transfer Study HPSS Archiving

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wynne, James; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T; Mitchell, Quinn; White, Stanley R

    2015-01-01

    The movement of the large amounts of data produced by codes run in a High Performance Computing (HPC) environment can be a bottleneck for project workflows. To balance filesystem capacity and performance requirements, HPC centers enforce data management policies to purge old files to make room for new computation and analysis results. Users at Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) and many other HPC user facilities must archive data to avoid data loss during purges, therefore the time associated with data movement for archiving is something that all users must consider. This study observed the difference in transfer speed from the originating location on the Lustre filesystem to the more permanent High Performance Storage System (HPSS). The tests were done with a number of different transfer methods for files that spanned a variety of sizes and compositions that reflect OLCF user data. This data will be used to help users of Titan and other Cray supercomputers plan their workflow and data transfers so that they are most efficient for their project. We will also discuss best practice for maintaining data at shared user facilities.

  8. Operational Management | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operational Management Operational Management Operational Management Leadership Contact Information Office of Resource Management and Planning U.S. Department of Energy, MA-1.1 ...

  9. NERSC Operational Assessment Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Operational Assessment Review Agenda and Logistics Home » Events » HPC Workshops » NERSC Operational Assessment Review NERSC Operational Assessment Review By invitation only. Agenda TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 16 8am - Coffee and Pastries 8:15am: Welcome and logistics - Katie Antypas 8:20am: Welcome and DOE charge - Dave Goodwin 8:30am - 9:15am:Year in Review - Sudip Dosanjh 9:30am - 10:30am: User Results - Katie Antypas 10:45 - 11:am: Break 11:00-11:45: Science and Strategic Results - Richard

  10. Operations & Administration - JCAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat & Cool » Heat Pump Systems » Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Operating and Maintaining Your Heat Pump Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos Changing filters regularly is an important part of maintaining a heat pump system. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos Proper operation of your heat pump will save energy. Do not set back the heat pump's thermostat if it causes the

  11. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in warm dense matter experiments with diffuse interface methods in the ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu ∗ , John Barnard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder † August 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid

  12. Bagless Transfer System Welder Analysis Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-10-01

    The Bagless Transfer System Welder Analysis Software (BTS WAS) was developed by SRTC for use with the Bagless Transfer System. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable informaitoin about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TIG welding process, such as the bagless transfer system in FB-Line, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recorded on the stripmore » chart recorder traces, were reviewed by the supervisor using a procedure and criteria to analyze the weld. This hand checking can be tedious and time consuming. To improve this process, another software package developed by SRTC, the BTS DAS, digitizes the weld data and stores the weld data in a file. The BTS WAS automates the weld analysis process by analyzing the data obtained during the weld process against the same weld criteria that the supervisor currently users. Of course with the automated analysis system the supervisor is still provided the same information in the same chart display format so he can also manually review the data as desired. The BTS WAS reads in a data file that was prevously collected using the BTS DAS software. The software will read the file and parse the data. The user is first prompted to enter the file name. The file is then opened and the operator name and Date/Time of Acquisition are read from the file and displayed on the screen. The binary weld data is then read from the file into an array until the end of the file is reached. The shunt and weld current, voltage, RPM, and position data are displayed on the screen in graphical formats on the front panel. The weld power and resistance are calculated and are also displayed in graphical format on the front panel. Individual tack analysis data is provided for each of the three tacks. The main weld and downslope data is also displayed.« less

  13. Operations to be Performed in the Waste Package Dry Remediation Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman E. Cole; Randy K. Elwood

    2003-10-01

    Describes planned and proposed operations for remediating damaged and/or out-of-compliance waste packages, casks, DPCs, overpacks, and containers at the Yucca Mountain Dry Transfer Facility.

  14. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, 6-25-13

  15. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-14

    This Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE.

  16. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    WASTE G RESIDUE a i-CtlED INVOLVE"ENT-AT SITE -'---... Control ci Health Physics Protection 0 AECtlED managed operations c Little or None G AECMED rea' poneible for ...

  17. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    181 WASTE & RESIDUE q ,r . ,, A&MED I NVOLVEMENI-AT SITE I - . : Control 1 Health Physics Protection ' I, 0 AEWHED managed operations 0 Little or None 13 AEWHED responsible for ...

  18. TYPE OF OPERATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    b RESIDUE q GOUT LECISED CONTReCTOR CONTRCICTOR -EEL ---LEeSED Control Health Physics 0 AEWMED managed operations q Little or No 0 AECMED responsible for AEWMED resp ...

  19. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  20. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Admin Chg 2, dated 12-3-14, supersedes Admin Chg 1.

  1. Operations Security Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-04-30

    To establish policies, responsibilities and authorities for implementing and sustaining the Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Security (OPSEC) Program. Cancels DOE O 5632.3B. Canceled by DOE O 471.2 of 9-28-1995.

  2. Operating plan FY 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This document is the first edition of Argonne`s new Operating Plan. The Operating Plan complements the strategic planning in the Laboratory`s Institutional Plan by focusing on activities that are being pursued in the immediate fiscal year, FY 1998. It reflects planning that has been done to date, and it will serve in the future as a resource and a benchmark for understanding the Laboratory`s performance. The heart of the Institutional Plan is the set of major research initiatives that the Laboratory is proposing to implement in future years. In contrast, this Operating Plan focuses on Argonne`s ongoing R&D programs, along with cost-saving measures and other improvements being implemented in Laboratory support operations.

  3. Continuity of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-14

    The notice defines requirements and responsibilities for continuity of operations planning within the DOE to ensure the capability to continue essential Departmental functions across a wide range of all hazard emergencies. Does not cancel other directives.

  4. Rich land Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rich land Operations Office P.O. Box 550 July 10, 2009 CERTIFIED MAIL Mr. Ryan Jarvis Heart of America Northwest 1314 N.E. 56h" Street Suite 100 Seattle, Washington 98105 Dear Mr....

  5. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  6. Deputy Chief Operating Officer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position will be filled at either Morgantown, WV or Pittsburgh, PA. A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Deputy Chief Operating Officer assigned to the Laboratory...

  7. TANK 21 AND TANK 24 BLEND AND FEED STUDY: BLENDING TIMES, SETTLING TIMES, AND TRANSFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.

    2012-05-31

    The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where salt solutions of up to 1.2 million gallons will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. In particular, Tanks 21 and 24 are planned to be used for blending and transferring to the SDI feed tank. These tanks were evaluated here to determine blending times, to determine a range of settling times for disturbed sludge, and to determine that the SWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria that less than 1200 mg/liter of solids will be entrained in salt solutions during transfers from the Tank 21 and Tank 24 will be met. Overall conclusions for Tank 21 and Tank 24 operations include: (1) Experimental correction factors were applied to CFD (computational fluid dynamics) models to establish blending times between approximately two and five hours. As shown in Phase 2 research, blending times may be as much as ten times greater, or more, if lighter fluids are added to heavier fluids (i.e., water added to salt solution). As the densities of two salt solutions converge this effect may be minimized, but additional confirmatory research was not performed. (2) At the current sludge levels and the presently planned operating heights of the transfer pumps, solids entrainment will be less than 1200 mg/liter, assuming a conservative, slow settling sludge simulant. (3) Based on theoretical calculations, particles in the density range of 2.5 to 5.0 g/mL must be greater than 2-4 {micro}m in diameter to ensure they settle adequately in 30-60 days to meet the SWPF feed criterion (<1200 mg/l). (4) Experimental tests with sludge batch 6 simulant and field turbidity data from a recent Tank 21 mixing evolution suggest the solid particles have higher density and/or larger size than indicated by previous analysis of SRS sludge and sludge simulants. (5) Tank 21 waste characterization, laboratory settling tests, and additional field turbidity measurements during mixing evolutions are recommended to better understand potential risk for extended (> 60 days) settling times in Tank 21.

  8. Operations | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Welcome to the Ames Laboratory and the operations pages of our website. Our website has recently been revised starting with the front page, the science division pages and a few pages needed for public interface. If you find that the pages you need are not available please contact the Manager in charge (i.e., Purchasing, Sponsored Programs, etc.) and we will get you the information you need.

  9. Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /: -. !~t. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office P.O. Box 550 Richland, Washington 99352 Nav 0 4 ?nn~ 05-AMCP-OO46 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin, Suite 135 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE #166 -FUND U PLANT AREA REMEDIATION ACTIVITIES In response to your letter dated September 10, 2004, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), appreciates your recommendations contained in HAB Consensus

  10. Project W-314 sn-634 transfer line a-b to ax-b acceptance for beneficial use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnick, T. L.

    1997-09-29

    Program/Project Title: Project W-314, Tank Farm Restoration and Safe Operation, Phase I Component/System: SN-630 Transfer Line (AZ-02A to AN-B) September 15, 1997.

  11. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.

    1997-01-01

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid therebetween; e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits.

  12. Multiple source/multiple target fluid transfer apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, T.D.

    1997-08-26

    A fluid transfer apparatus includes: (a) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid sources; (b) a plurality of orifices for connection with fluid targets; (c) a set of fluid source conduits and fluid target conduits associated with the orifices; (d) a pump fluidically interposed between the source and target conduits to transfer fluid there between; (e) a purge gas conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass a purge gas under pressure; (f) a solvent conduit in fluid communication with the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump to receive and pass solvent, the solvent conduit including a solvent valve; (g) pump control means for controlling operation of the pump; (h) purge gas valve control means for controlling operation of the purge gas valve to selectively impart flow of purge gas to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; (i) solvent valve control means for controlling operation of the solvent valve to selectively impart flow of solvent to the fluid source conduits, fluid target conduits and pump; and (j) source and target valve control means for controlling operation of the fluid source conduit valves and the fluid target conduit valves to selectively impart passage of fluid between a selected one of the fluid source conduits and a selected one of the fluid target conduits through the pump and to enable passage of solvent or purge gas through selected fluid source conduits and selected fluid target conduits. 6 figs.

  13. Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program Technology Transfer Ombudsman Program The Technology Transfer Commercialization Act of 2000, Public Law 106-404 (PDF) was enacted in November 2000. Pursuant to Section 11, Technology Partnerships Ombudsman, each DOE national laboratory and research facility has appointed a technology partnership ombudsman (ombuds). The role of the ombuds is prevention and early resolution of disputes between the lab and inventors or private companies over technology transfer

  14. tech transfer | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    tech transfer Sandia wins tech transfer award from lab consortium EOD technician using XTK from within his response vehicle during a training exercise. NNSA's Sandia National Laboratories won the Federal Laboratory Consortium's (FLC) 2016 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer for a decontamination product that neutralizes chemical and biological agents and... Y-12 honors its inventors with Technology Transfer awards , Twenty-nine Y-12 inventors were recognized for their technology and

  15. Foam insulated transfer line test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Squier, D.M.

    1994-06-01

    Miles of underground insulated piping will be installed at the Hanford site to transfer liquid waste. Significant cost savings may be realized by using pre-fabricated polyurethane foam insulated piping. Measurements were made on sections of insulated pipe to determine the insulation`s resistance to axial expansion of the pipe, the force required to compress the foam in the leg of an expansion loop and the time required for heat up and cool down of a buried piping loop. These measurements demonstrated that the peak axial force increases with the amount of adhesion between the encasement pipe and the insulation. The compressive strength of the foam is too great to accommodate the thermal growth of long straight pipe sections into the expansion loops. Mathematical models of the piping system`s thermal behavior can be refined by data from the heated piping loop.

  16. 3-D Finite Element Heat Transfer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    TOPAZ3D is a three-dimensional implicit finite element computer code for heat transfer analysis. TOPAZ3D can be used to solve for the steady-state or transient temperature field on three-dimensional geometries. Material properties may be temperature-dependent and either isotropic or orthotropic. A variety of time-dependent and temperature-dependent boundary conditions can be specified including temperature, flux, convection, and radiation. By implementing the user subroutine feature, users can model chemical reaction kinetics and allow for any type of functionalmore » representation of boundary conditions and internal heat generation. TOPAZ3D can solve problems of diffuse and specular band radiation in an enclosure coupled with conduction in the material surrounding the enclosure. Additional features include thermal contact resistance across an interface, bulk fluids, phase change, and energy balances.« less

  17. Advances in refrigeration and heat transfer engineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bansal, Pradeep; Cremaschi, Prof. Lorenzo

    2015-05-13

    This special edition of Science and Technology for the Built Environment (STBE) presents selected high quality papers that were presented at the 15th International Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Conference held at Purdue University during July 14-17 2014. All papers went through the additional review before being finally accepted for publication in this special issue of Science and Technology and the Built Environment. Altogether 20 papers made to this special issue that cover a wide range of topics, including advancements in alternative refrigerants, heat exchangers/heat transfer, nano-fluids, systems design and optimization and modeling approaches. Although CO2 may perhaps have been themore » most researched and popular refrigerant in the past decade, R32 is being seriously considered lately as an alternative and environmentally friendly refrigerant for small systems due to its low Global Warming Potential (GWP).« less

  18. Advances in refrigeration and heat transfer engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bansal, Pradeep; Cremaschi, Prof. Lorenzo

    2015-05-13

    This special edition of Science and Technology for the Built Environment (STBE) presents selected high quality papers that were presented at the 15th International Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Conference held at Purdue University during July 14-17 2014. All papers went through the additional review before being finally accepted for publication in this special issue of Science and Technology and the Built Environment. Altogether 20 papers made to this special issue that cover a wide range of topics, including advancements in alternative refrigerants, heat exchangers/heat transfer, nano-fluids, systems design and optimization and modeling approaches. Although CO2 may perhaps have been the most researched and popular refrigerant in the past decade, R32 is being seriously considered lately as an alternative and environmentally friendly refrigerant for small systems due to its low Global Warming Potential (GWP).

  19. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

  20. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  1. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A; Mamidala, Amith R

    2014-02-11

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  2. Simulation of a Wireless Power Transfer System for Electric Vehicles with Power Factor Correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pickelsimer, Michael C; Tolbert, Leon M; Ozpineci, Burak; Miller, John M

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transfer has been a popular topic of recent research. Most research has been done to address the limitations of coil-to-coil efficiency. However, little has been done to address the problem associated with the low input power factor with which the systems operate. This paper details the steps taken to analyze a wireless power transfer system from the view of the power grid under a variety of loading conditions with and without power factor correction.

  3. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" This Fall event was a follow-up to a Climate and Environment Program Area meeting with the California governor's office in July. There, the California Insurance Commissioner, Dave Jones, recognized the value of Sandia's climate-impact modeling and analysis work, led by Stephen Conrad (manager of Sandia's Resilience and Regulatory Effects Dept.), and wanted to connect that [...] By

  4. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tran, Thanh Nhon

    1999-01-01

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area.

  5. Combined heat and mass transfer device for improving separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tran, T.N.

    1999-08-24

    A two-phase small channel heat exchange matrix simultaneously provides for heat transfer and mass transfer between the liquid and vapor phases of a multi-component mixture at a single, predetermined location within a separation column, significantly improving the thermodynamic efficiency of the separation process. The small channel heat exchange matrix is composed of a series of channels having a hydraulic diameter no greater than 5.0 millimeters for conducting a two-phase coolant. In operation, the matrix provides the liquid-vapor contacting surfaces within the separation column, such that heat and mass are transferred simultaneously between the liquid and vapor phases. The two-phase coolant allows for a uniform heat transfer coefficient to be maintained along the length of the channels and across the surface of the matrix. Preferably, a perforated, concave sheet connects each channel to an adjacent channel to facilitate the flow of the liquid and vapor phases within the column and to increase the liquid-vapor contacting surface area. 12 figs.

  6. Electron transfer statistics and thermal fluctuations in molecular junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goswami, Himangshu Prabal; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-02-28

    We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution function (PDF) for electron transport in a simple model of quantum junction in presence of thermal fluctuations. Our approach is based on the large deviation theory combined with the generating function method. For large number of electrons transferred, the PDF is found to decay exponentially in the tails with different rates due to applied bias. This asymmetry in the PDF is related to the fluctuation theorem. Statistics of fluctuations are analyzed in terms of the Fano factor. Thermal fluctuations play a quantitative role in determining the statistics of electron transfer; they tend to suppress the average current while enhancing the fluctuations in particle transfer. This gives rise to both bunching and antibunching phenomena as determined by the Fano factor. The thermal fluctuations and shot noise compete with each other and determine the net (effective) statistics of particle transfer. Exact analytical expression is obtained for delay time distribution. The optimal values of the delay time between successive electron transfers can be lowered below the corresponding shot noise values by tuning the thermal effects.

  7. Wireless power transfer magnetic couplers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Hunter; Gilchrist, Aaron; Sealy, Kylee

    2016-01-19

    A magnetic coupler is disclosed for wireless power transfer systems. A ferrimagnetic component is capable of guiding a magnetic field. A wire coil is wrapped around at least a portion of the ferrimagnetic component. A screen is capable of blocking leakage magnetic fields. The screen may be positioned to cover at least one side of the ferrimagnetic component and the coil. A distance across the screen may be at least six times an air gap distance between the ferrimagnetic component and a receiving magnetic coupler.

  8. Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

    2012-05-01

    The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

  9. Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf PDF icon PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  10. Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of Uranium Secretarial Determination for the Sale or Transfer of...

  11. Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf PDF icon PolicyStatementonTechnologyTransfer.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  12. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse interface methods in ALE-AMR code with application in modeling NDCX-II experiments Wangyi Liu 1 , John Barnard 2 , Alex Friedman 2 , Nathan Masters 2 , Aaron Fisher 2 , Alice Koniges 2 , David Eder 2 1 LBNL, USA, 2 LLNL, USA This work was part of the Petascale Initiative in Computational Science at NERSC, supported by the Director, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was performed

  13. Chapter 10: FTU Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelini, B.M.; Apicella, M.L.; Buceti, G.; Centioli, C.; Crisanti, F.; Iannone, F.; Mazza, G.; Mazzitelli, G.; Panella, M.; Vitale, V.

    2004-05-15

    Some specific points of the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade (FTU) operation are presented for plasma performance as well as for the machine availability and the development of new tools needed to operate in a complex scenario needed for tokamak research. The different techniques adopted for wall conditioning of the FTU are reviewed. Plasmas with low Z{sub eff} have been achieved including those at low density and high additional heating power. The obtained experimental results are discussed in terms of better operation and plasma performance achieved. As with any other large - and thus long-lasting - experiments, a mixture of old and new technological solutions inserted in an open source framework characterizes the FTU data control and acquisition systems. We give some information on the original architecture and try to detail its current state. The high level of reliability presently achieved is discussed.

  14. Operating Innovative Networks Workshop Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combined, these technologies are proven to support high-performance, big data science applications, including high-volume bulk data transfer, remote experiment control, and data ...

  15. Targeted Technology Transfer to US Independents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Lance Cole

    2009-09-30

    The Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) was established by domestic crude oil and natural gas producers, working in conjunction with the Independent Petroleum Association of America (IPAA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and selected universities, in 1994 as a national not-for-profit organization. Its goal is to transfer Exploration and Production (E&P) technology to the domestic upstream petroleum industry, in particular to the small independent operators. PTTC connects producers, technology providers and innovators, academia, and university/industry/government research and development (R&D) groups. From inception PTTC has received federal funding through DOE's oil and natural gas program managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). With higher funding available in its early years, PTTC was able to deliver well more than 100 workshops per year, drawing 6,000 or more attendees per year. Facing the reality of little or no federal funding in the 2006-2007 time frame, PTTC and the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) worked together for PTTC to become a subsidiary organization of AAPG. This change brings additional organizational and financial resources to bear for PTTC's benefit. PTTC has now been 'powered by AAPG' for two full fiscal years. There is a clear sense that PTTC has stabilized and is strengthening its regional workshop and national technology transfer programs and is becoming more entrepreneurial in exploring technology transfer opportunities beyond its primary DOE contract. Quantitative accomplishments: PTTC has maintained its unique structure of a national organization working through Regional Lead Organizations (RLOs) to deliver local, affordable workshops. During the contract period PTTC consolidated from 10 to six regions efficiency and alignment with AAPG sections. The number of workshops delivered by its RLOs during the contract period is shown below. Combined attendance over the period was approximately 32,000, 70% of whom were repeat attendees. Participant feedback established that 40% of them said they had applied a technology they learned of through PTTC. Central/Eastern Gulf Univ. of Alabama, LSU Center for Energy Studies 77 Eastern West Virginia University, Illinois Geological Survey, W. Michigan Univ. 99 Midcontinent University of Kansas, University of Tulsa, Okla. Geological Survey (past) 123 Rocky Mountains Colorado School of Mines 147 Texas/SE New Mexico Bureau of Economic Geology, U. of Texas at Austin 85 West Coast Conservation Committee of California O&G Producers, Univ. So. Cal. (past) 54 At the national level HQ went from an office in Houston to a virtual office in the Tulsa, Okla. area with AAPG providing any physical assets required. There are no employees, rather several full time and several part time contractors. Since inception, PTTC has produced quarterly and mailed the 16-page Network News newsletter. It highlights new advances in technology and has a circulation of 19,000. It also produces the Tech Connections Column in The American Oil & Gas Reporter, with a circulation of 13,000. On an approximate three-week frequency, the electronic Email Tech Alert goes out to 9,000 readers. The national staff also maintains a central website with information of national interest and individual sections for each of the six regions. The national organization also provides legal and accounting services, coordinates the RLO activities, exhibits at at least major national and other meetings, supports the volunteer Board as it provides strategic direction, and is working to restore the Producer Advisory Groups to bolster the regional presence. Qualitative Value: Three qualitative factors confirm PTTC's value to the domestic O&G producing industry. First, AAPG was willing to step in and rescue PTTC, believing it was of significant interest to its domestic membership and of potential value internationally. Second, through a period of turmoil and now with participant fees dramatically increased, industry participants 'keep coming back' to wo

  16. Bagless Transfer System Welder Data Acquisition Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-09-30

    The Bagless Transfer System Welder Data Acquisition Software (BTS DAS) was developed by SRTC to replace a strip chart recorder that has been in place since the design of the BTS. During the welding process, critical weld parameters such as weld current and voltage, can give valuable information about the weld. In the past, weld data from the TID welding process, has been monitored using strip chart recorders. The data from the weld process, recordedmore » on the strip chart recorder traces, are reviewed to analyze the weld. The BTS DAS improves this technology by digitizing the weld data which allows for automation of the analysis process. Also, the data files are now stored digitally as well as a hard copy printout, so they can be reanalyzed if needed. The BTS DAS performs the necessary functions to perform the data acquisition functions during the BTS Welding Process. It is important to monitor the critical weld parameters, current and voltage, during a weld as they can be used to set acceptance criteria for weld acceptance. The software monitors and records the weld current, voltage, and RPM data. The welder DAS is a passive device and does not control the welder. The BTS control system interfaces directly with the welder and the BTS DAS. Digital handshaking is used between the BTS DAS and the BTS control system to ensure that the DAS is ready to weld prior to allowing the operator to initiate the welding process.« less

  17. Correlation of heat transfer in a cylinder containing uranium hexafluoride engulfed in a fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    Transient heat transfer/stress analysis models are currently being developed to evaluate the response of cylinders containing uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) to fire accident scenarios. In order to accurately predict temperatures within the cylinder, and ultimately elapsed time to failure, the heat transfer to and within the cylinder must be well characterized. This report contains a complete set of heat transfer correlations required for such a model. Correlations are presented for predicting heat transfer rates over the cylinder exterior (radiative exchange and natural convection), from the cylinder interior to the various phases of UF{sub 6} (solid, liquid, and vapor) in the cylinder, between UF{sub 6} phases in the cylinder, and during UF{sub 6} liquid boiling. The heat transfer coefficients predicted by these correlations were chosen based on best engineering judgement and have not yet been compared to data from actual cylinder fire tests.

  18. Heat transfer between stratified immiscible liquid layers driven by gas bubbling across the interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.; Irvine, T.F. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The modeling of molten core debris in the CORCON and VANESA computer codes as overlying, immiscible liquid layers is discussed as it relates to the transfer of heat and mass between the layers. This initial structure is identified and possible configurations are discussed. The stratified, gas-sparged configuration that is presently employed in CORCON and VANESA is examined and the existing literature for interlayer heat transfer is assessed. An experiment which was designed to measure interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is described. The results are presented and compared to previously existing models. A dimensionless correlation for stratified, interlayer heat transfer with gas sparging is developed. This relationship is recommended for inclusion in CORCON-MOD2 for heat transfer between stratified, molten liquid layers. 12 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Conduct of Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2010-06-29

    This Order defines the requirements for establishing and implementing Conduct of Operations Programs at Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), facilities and projects. Cancels DOE O 5480.19. Admin Chg 1, dated 6-25-13, cancels DOE O 422.1. Certified 12-3-14.

  20. Electromagnetically Operated Counter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, H.D.; Goldberg, M.I.

    1951-12-18

    An electromagnetically operated counter wherein signals to be counted are applied to cause stepwise rotation of a rotatable element which is connected to a suitable register. The mechanism involved consists of a rotatable armature having three spaced cores of magnetic material and a pair of diametrically opposed electromagnets with a suitable pulsing circuit to actuate the magnets.

  1. LCLS Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LCLS Operating Schedule August - December 2009 Ver: 2 103009 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 S Su M T W Th F S Su M T W Th F S...

  2. Concept of Operations: Essence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutton, William J.

    2014-04-01

    This concept of operations is designed to give the reader a brief overview of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s Essence project and a description of the Essence device design. The data collected by the device, how the data are used, and how the data are protected are also discussed in this document.

  3. Protection Program Operations

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2016-03-23

    The Order establishes requirements for the management and operation of the DOE Federal Protective Forces (FPF), Contractor Protective Forces (CPF), and the Physical Security of property and personnel under the cognizance of DOE. Supersedes DOE O 473.3. NOTE: Safeguards and Security Alarm Management and Control Systems, of DOE O 473.3, is retained as Attachment 3, Annex 1.

  4. Office of Business Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Business Operations manages financial and acquisition management programs throughout the Associate Under Secretary for the Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (AU), including the formulation and execution of the AU budget; funding control and accounting activities; preparation of management studies; and provision of acquisition management support.

  5. Guiding drilling operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-06-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) was the overriding theme at this year's Offshore Technology Conference (OTC) exhibition and conference, with the emphasis more on drilling rather than production methods. A wide range of electronic aids to improve accuracy and speed in drilling operations - from calculators to computers - is described.

  6. Operational Pause at Savannah River Site Benefits Safety Culture, Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – EM and the Savannah River Site (SRS) management and operations contractor are seeing positive impacts on safety culture as the site works to restore operations following last year’s operational pause.

  7. Phase contrast and operation regimes in multifrequency atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Sergio

    2014-04-07

    In amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy the attractive and the repulsive force regimes induce phase shifts above and below 90°, respectively. In the more recent multifrequency approach, however, multiple operation regimes have been reported and the theory should be revisited. Here, a theory of phase contrast in multifrequency atomic force microscopy is developed and discussed in terms of energy transfer between modes, energy dissipation and the kinetic energy and energy transfer associated with externally driven harmonics. The single frequency virial that controls the phase shift might undergo transitions in sign while the average force (modal virial) remains positive (negative)

  8. BASE Operator's Manual - 88-Inch Cyclotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BASE Operator's Manual BASE_Facility_-_SEE_Software_Operation.doc

  9. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  10. Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf PDF icon Technology_Transfer_Memo.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy_Statement_on_Technology_Transfer.pdf Policy_Statement_on_TT.pdf livermorecmp.pdf

  11. Operations Research Analysts

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    programming skills and knowledge of energy industries and markets, designs and develops math- ematical models (e.g., matrix algebra, LP's, non-linear programs, linear and ...

  12. Parametric Sensivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Shook; Gopi Nalla; Gregory L. Mines; K. Kit Bloomfield

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  13. Parametric Sensitivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalla, G.; Shook, G.M.; Mines, G.L.; Bloomfield, K.K.

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  14. Miniature mechanical transfer optical coupler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abel, Philip; Watterson, Carl

    2011-02-15

    A miniature mechanical transfer (MT) optical coupler ("MMTOC") for optically connecting a first plurality of optical fibers with at least one other plurality of optical fibers. The MMTOC may comprise a beam splitting element, a plurality of collimating lenses, and a plurality of alignment elements. The MMTOC may optically couple a first plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a first MT connector with a second plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a second MT connector and a third plurality of fibers disposed in a plurality of ferrules of a third MT connector. The beam splitting element may allow a portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to pass through to the second plurality of fibers and simultaneously reflect another portion of each beam of light from the first plurality of fibers to the third plurality of fibers.

  15. NREL: Technology Transfer - Small Business Vouchers Pilot at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    303-275-4684. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  16. NREL: Technology Transfer - Small Business Vouchers Pilot at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Address: Submit Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements...

  17. Characterization and electrical modeling of semiconductors bridges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marx, K.D.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Wackerbarth, D.E.

    1997-03-01

    Semiconductor bridges (SCBs) are finding increased use as initiators for explosive and pyrotechnic devices. They offer advantages in reduced voltage and energy requirements, coupled with excellent safety features. The design of explosive systems which implement either SCBs or metal bridgewires can be facilitated through the use of electrical simulation software such as the PSpice{reg_sign} computer code. A key component in the electrical simulation of such systems is an electrical model of the bridge. This report has two objectives: (1) to present and characterize electrical data taken in tests of detonators which employ SCBs with BNCP as the explosive powder; and (2) to derive appropriate electrical models for such detonators. The basis of such models is a description of the resistance as a function of energy deposited in the SCB. However, two important features which must be added to this are (1) the inclusion of energy loss through such mechanisms as ohmic heating of the aluminum lands and heat transfer from the bridge to the surrounding media; and (2) accounting for energy deposited in the SCB through heat transfer to the bridge from the explosive powder after the powder ignites. The modeling procedure is entirely empirical; i.e., models for the SCB resistance and the energy gain and loss have been estimated from experimental data taken over a range of firing conditions. We present results obtained by applying the model to the simulation of SCB operation in representative tests.

  18. Nuclear Effects in Neutrino Interactions at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miltenberger, Ethan Ryan

    2015-05-01

    This is a study to identify predicted effects of the carbon nucleus environment on neutrino - nucleus interactions with low momentum transfer. A large sample of neutrino interaction data collected by the MINERvA experiment is analyzed to show the distribution of charged hadron energy in a region with low momentum transfer. These distributions reveal a major discrepancy between the data and a popular interaction model with only the simplest Fermi gas nuclear effects. Detailed analysis of systematic uncertainties due to energy scale and resolution can account for only a little of the discrepancy. Two additional nuclear model effects, a suppression/screening effect (RPA), and the addition of a meson exchange current process (MEC), are shown to improve the description of the data.

  19. THERMALLY OPERATED VAPOR VALVE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dorward, J.G. Jr.

    1959-02-10

    A valve is presented for use in a calutron to supply and control the vapor to be ionized. The invention provides a means readily operable from the exterior of the vacuum tank of the apparatuss without mechanical transmission of forces for the quick and accurate control of the ionizing arc by a corresponding control of gas flow theretos thereby producing an effective way of carefully regulating the operation of the calutron. The invention consists essentially of a tube member extending into the charge bottle of a calutron devices having a poppet type valve closing the lower end of the tube. An electrical heating means is provided in the valve stem to thermally vary the length of the stem to regulate the valve opening to control the flow of material from the charge bottle.

  20. Operations building | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations building Operations building Chemical recycling columns in an operations building

  1. SWiFT Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  2. Transmission and Storage Operations

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Transmission and Storage Operations Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Mitigation Workshop Mary Savalle, PMP, LSSGB Compression Reliability Engineer November 12, 2014 Agenda * DTE Gas Snapshot * NOx & CO - Combustion stability * Methane - Packing - Blowdowns * Capture vs Flare 2 SNAPSHOT * DTE Gas - 41 Units * Age Range: 8-59yrs (Average 45yrs) - 118,200HP * 1,000-15,000HP - 7 different manufacturers * Cooper-Bessemer, Solar, Waukesha, DeLaval, IR, CAT, Ariel - Complete Mixture *

  3. Fermilab | Tevatron | Tevatron Operation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tevatron Operation Fermilab's Accelerator Complex Fermilab's Accelerator Complex has 10 accelerators. The Tevatron, which shuts down on Sept. 30, is one of those accelerators. The Cockcroft Walton accelerates negative hydrogen ions to 740 kilo electron volts (KeV). The negative ions are then accelerated down the LINAC to 400 MeV. The particles enter the booster where the electrons are stripped off, leaving the protons. In the Booster, the protons are then accelerated to 8 GeV. Once the protons

  4. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechant, Lawrence; Smith, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  5. Operational health physics training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The initial four sections treat basic information concerning atomic structure and other useful physical quantities, natural radioactivity, the properties of {alpha}, {beta}, {gamma}, x rays and neutrons, and the concepts and units of radiation dosimetry (including SI units). Section 5 deals with biological effects and the risks associated with radiation exposure. Background radiation and man-made sources are discussed next. The basic recommendations of the ICRP concerning dose limitations: justification, optimization (ALARA concepts and applications) and dose limits are covered in Section seven. Section eight is an expanded version of shielding, and the internal dosimetry discussion has been extensively revised to reflect the concepts contained in the MIRD methodology and ICRP 30. The remaining sections discuss the operational health physics approach to monitoring radiation. Individual sections include radiation detection principles, instrument operation and counting statistics, health physics instruments and personnel monitoring devices. The last five sections deal with the nature of, operation principles of, health physics aspects of, and monitoring approaches to air sampling, reactors, nuclear safety, gloveboxes and hot cells, accelerators and x ray sources. Decontamination, waste disposal and transportation of radionuclides are added topics. Several appendices containing constants, symbols, selected mathematical topics, and the Chart of the Nuclides, and an index have been included.

  6. Vortex operators in gauge field theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polchinski, J.

    1980-07-01

    Several related aspects of the 't Hooft vortex operator are studied. The current picture of the vacuum of quantum chromodynamics, the idea of dual field theories, and the idea of the vortex operator are reviewed first. The Abelian vortex operator written in terms of elementary fields and the calculation of its Green's functions are considered. A two-dimensional solvable model of a Dirac string is presented. The expression of the Green's functions more neatly in terms of Wu and Yang's geometrical idea of sections is addressed. The renormalization of the Green's functions of two kinds of Abelian looplike operators, the Wilson loop and the vortex operator, is studied; for both operators only an overall multiplicative renormalization is needed. In the case of the vortex this involves a surprising cancellation. Next, the dependence of the Green's functions of the Wilson and 't Hooft operators on the nature of the vacuum is discussed. The cluster properties of the Green's functions are emphasized. It is seen that the vortex operator in a massive Abelian theory always has surface-like clustering. The form of Green's functions in terms of Feynman graphs is the same in Higgs and symmetric phases; the difference appears in the sum over all tadpole trees. Finally, systems having fields in the fundamental representation are considered. When these fields enter only weakly into the dynamics, a vortex-like operator is anticipated. Any such operator can no longer be local looplike, but must have commutators at long range. A U(1) lattice gauge theory with two matter fields, one singly charged (fundamental) and one doubly charged (adjoint), is examined. When the fundamental field is weakly coupled, the expected phase transitions are found. When it is strongly coupled, the operator still appears to be a good order parameter, a discontinuous change in its behavior leads to a new phase transition. 18 figures.

  7. Technology Transfer Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Overview Technology Transfer Overview Through strategic investments in science and technology, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) helps power and secure America's future. DOE's capabilities, and the innovations it supports, help ensure the country's role as a leader in science and technology. In particular, technology transfer supports the maturation and deployment of DOE discoveries, providing ongoing economic, security and environmental benefits for all Americans.

  8. Richland Operations Office - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office Richland Operations Office River Corridor Central Plateau Groundwater Mission Support Newsroom Richland Operations Office Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Registration for 2016 Hanford Cleanup Tours Hanford Public Comment Period Hanford Public Comment Period UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Richland Operations Office RL2016LogoVert StacyCharboneau Welcome to the Richland Operations Office (RL),

  9. GROUT HOPPER MODELING STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-08-30

    The Saltstone facility has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The dry feeds and the salt solution are already mixed in the mixer prior to being transferred to the hopper tank. The hopper modeling study through this work will focus on fluid stirring and agitation, instead of traditional mixing in the literature, in order to keep the tank contents in motion during their residence time so that they will not be upset or solidified prior to transferring the grout to the Saltstone disposal facility. The primary objective of the work is to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with the FLUENT{trademark} codes. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet. The modeling results show that when the two-stage agitator consisting of a 45{sup o} pitched propeller and radial flat-plate blades is run at 140 rpm speed with 28 in diameter, the agitator provides an adequate stirring of the feed materials for a wide range of yield stresses (1 to 21 Pa) and the vortex system is shed into the remote region of the tank boundary by the blade passage in an efficient way. The results of this modeling study were used to develop the design guidelines for the agitator stirring and dispersion of the Saltstone feed materials in a hopper tank.

  10. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Novel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Novel PlatinumChromium Alloy for the Manufacture of Improved Coronary Stents Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Partners A coronary...

  11. International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer Place: Yokkaichi, Japan Year Founded: 1990 Website: www.icett.or.jp Coordinates: 34.9651567, 136.6244847...

  12. Imaging Heterogeneous Ion Transfer: Lithium Ion Quantification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 24, 2014, Research Highlights Imaging Heterogeneous Ion Transfer: Lithium Ion Quantification using Mercury Amalgams as In Situ Electrochemical Probes in Nonaqueous Media ...

  13. Industrial Steam System Heat-Transfer Solutions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This brief provides an overview of considerations for selecting the best heat-transfer equipment for various steam systems and applications.

  14. WEBA transfer chutes improve coal distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-08-15

    American Electric Power has improved material flow and reduced dust generation by installing WEBA transfer chutes at some of their power plants. 4 photos.

  15. Idaho Administrator's Memorandum on Transfer Processing Policies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Administrator's Memorandum on Transfer Processing Policies and Procedures Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Idaho Administrator's...

  16. heat transfer | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer...

  17. Please transfer ALL data off house

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Please transfer ALL data off /house before 12/1/2013 Please transfer ALL data off house September 3, 2013 by Kjiersten Fagnan We are happy to announce that all the file systems: /global/projectb, /global/dna and /webfs are available for use. We now strongly encourage users to begin the data transfer process from /house to the other file systems. House will retire on December 20, 2013! For more information on the best ways to transfer data and what each file system should be used for, check this

  18. Working with SRNL - Technology Transfer - Contacts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and universities. 803.725.4185 dale.haas@srnl.doe.gov Dale Haas Commercialization Program Manager Haas provides program management for SRNL and SRNS technology transfer...

  19. HEAT TRANSFER ANALYSIS FOR NUCLEAR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2009-06-01

    The Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Design Authority is in the design stage of the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) for the treatment and solidification of the radioactive liquid waste streams generated by the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The waste streams will be mixed with a cementitious dry mix in a 55-gallon waste container. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been performing the testing and evaluations to support technical decisions for the WSB. Engineering Modeling & Simulation Group was requested to evaluate the thermal performance of the 55-gallon drum containing hydration heat source associated with the current baseline cement waste form. A transient axi-symmetric heat transfer model for the drum partially filled with waste form cement has been developed and heat transfer calculations performed for the baseline design configurations. For this case, 65 percent of the drum volume was assumed to be filled with the waste form, which has transient hydration heat source, as one of the baseline conditions. A series of modeling calculations has been performed using a computational heat transfer approach. The baseline modeling results show that the time to reach the maximum temperature of the 65 percent filled drum is about 32 hours when a 43 C initial cement temperature is assumed to be cooled by natural convection with 27 C external air. In addition, the results computed by the present model were compared with analytical solutions. The modeling results will be benchmarked against the prototypic test results. The verified model will be used for the evaluation of the thermal performance for the WSB drum. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  20. Arra: Tas::89 0227::Tas Recovery Act 100g Ftp: An Ultra-High Speed Data Transfer Service Over Next Generation 100 Gigabit Per Second Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YU, DANTONG

    2014-03-01

    Data-intensive applications, including high energy and nuclear physics, astrophysics, climate modeling, nano-scale materials science, genomics, and financing, are expected to generate exabytes of data over the coming years, which must be transferred, visualized, and analyzed by geographically distributed teams of users. High-performance network capabilities must be available to these users at the application level in a transparent, virtualized manner. Moreover, the application users must have the capability to move large datasets from local and remote locations across network environments to their home institutions. To solve these challenges, the main goal of our project is to design and evaluate high-performance data transfer software to support various data-intensive applications. First, we have designed a middleware software that provides access to Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) functionalities. This middleware integrates network access, memory management and multitasking in its core design. We address a number of issues related to its efficient implementation, for instance, explicit buffer management and memory registration, and parallelization of RDMA operations, which are vital to delivering the benefit of RDMA to the applications. Built on top of this middleware, an implementation and experimental evaluation of the RDMA-based FTP software, RFTP, is described and evaluated. This application has been implemented by our team to exploit the full capabilities of advanced RDMA mechanisms for ultra-high speed bulk data transfer applications on Energy Sciences Network (ESnet). Second, we designed our data transfer software to optimize TCP/IP based data transfer performance such that RFTP can be fully compatible with today’s Internet. Our kernel optimization techniques with Linux system calls sendfile and splice, can reduce data copy cost. In this report, we summarize the technical challenges of our project, the primary software design methods, the major project milestones achieved, as well as the testbed evaluation work and demonstrations during our project life time.