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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

Phipps, Steven J.

2

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

3

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

4

Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program ¤ IGERT intends to ¤ meet the challenges of educating U a cultural change in graduate education by establishing innovative new models for graduate education

5

Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California, with fieldwork beginning in 1994 (Verner and Figure 1--The Kings River administrative study area in the Sierra National Forest in central California includesFisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results

Standiford, Richard B.

6

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

7

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

Mousseau, Timothy A.

8

RESEARCH ARTICLE Response of an aridland ecosystem to interannual climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on ecosystem structure and function. In the south- western US, interactions among regional climate drivers (e drivers strongly affect the distribution and composition of ecosystems worldwide. Indeed, potential to which increased climate variability will affect ecosystem processes requires long-term analysis

10

PMEL Science Review Aug.26-28, 2008 PMEL Ecosystem Research Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Protect, Restore, and Manage Use of Coastal and Ocean Resources Through Ecosystem Approaches To Management leadership at the national and international levels Understanding and supporting NOAA's research objectives Investment and development of new technologies Accomplished through: Pubs Proposals Indicators of NCTR 34 8

11

Ecosystem Site Description Funding Opportunities for Research, Education, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Steer a committee towards ESD development. #12;Program Areas and Investment: FY 2010 Agriculture $22 million #12;Program Areas and Investment: FY 2010 Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education on foreign oil; have net positive social, environmental, and rural economic impacts; and are compatible

12

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

WinTransect Quick-Start Manual The Cropland Transect Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WinTransect Quick-Start Manual May 2010 The Cropland Transect Survey The Cropland Transect Survey and Software Program to measure soil erosion and cropping practices as part of a statewide effort to measure to be a valuable tool for collecting data on farming practices, crops grown and soil loss in their respective

Balser, Teri C.

14

Chesapeake Bay Land Margin Ecosystem Research (LMER): Trophic Interactions in Estuarine Systems (TIES)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transects, and in association with mid-water trawls and a hydraulic control bottom feature. We are moving Zone), and mid-water trawls. Acoustic data from the hydraulic control point in April and July were, that current shoals downstream but deepens upstream, rendering the upstream flow more subcritical

15

Problem Description:Problem Description: How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors?How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors? Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: Wireless Sensors to Monitor and Record Biodiversity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors?How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors? Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: Wireless Sensors to Monitor and Record Biodiversity and Ecological ChangesWireless Sensors to Monitor.jamesreserve.edu Introduction:Introduction: Embedded Sensors, a Model for Monitoring Wildlife in Their Habitat.Embedded Sensors

Hamilton, Michael P.

16

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findings contained in this report have not been, 2013 Final Report #12;CIVL 498C: Life Cycle Assessment of the Aquatic Ecosystems Research LaboratoryUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Daniel Tse Life Cycle

17

Research Summary Payments for Ecosystem Services: experience and perceptions in the US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(PES) in environmental management of carbon, water and biodiversity. Undertaken between spring 2007 and economic performance of PES schemes mascertain perceptions of PES as a tool for environmental management in which we live. However, many are threatened by environmental degradation. (The Millennium Ecosystem

18

azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

19

The NRS Transect 4:1 (fall 1985)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transect, Fall Publications Carpinteria Salt Marsh: Wayne R.natural history of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh, complete withencompasses the 120-acre Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, a

UC Natural Reserve System

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Graduate studies Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian Aquatic Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRADUATE RESEARCH OPPORTUNITIES IN APPLIED SCIENCE Effects of Hydroelectric Operations in Canadian with Fisheries and Oceans Canada (6 scientists) and 3 major hydroelectric companies (Nalcor, Manitoba Hydro

Cooke, Steven J.

22

Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

23

Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems (JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Stan Wullschleger of Oak Ridge National Laboratory on "Omics in the Arctic: Genome-enabled Contributions to Carbon Cycle Research in High-Latitude Ecosystems" on March 22, 2012 at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting in Walnut Creek, California.

Wullschleger, Stan [ORNL

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to energy extraction and conversion. ORNL researcher Ken Lowe with drill rig Ecosystem...

25

Ecosystems and Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

Tufford, Dan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

Mazzotti, Frank

27

Methodology for Augmenting Existing Paths with Additional Parallel Transects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Visual Sample Plan (VSP) is sample planning software that is used, among other purposes, to plan transect sampling paths to detect areas that were potentially used for munition training. This module was developed for application on a large site where existing roads and trails were to be used as primary sampling paths. Gap areas between these primary paths needed to found and covered with parallel transect paths. These gap areas represent areas on the site that are more than a specified distance from a primary path. These added parallel paths needed to optionally be connected together into a single paththe shortest path possible. The paths also needed to optionally be attached to existing primary paths, again with the shortest possible path. Finally, the process must be repeatable and predictable so that the same inputs (primary paths, specified distance, and path options) will result in the same set of new paths every time. This methodology was developed to meet those specifications.

Wilson, John E.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Influence of the Coast and Vegetation on Temperature Gradients across the Los Angeles Basin using Mobile Transect Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from sensible heat flux. Remote Sensing of Environment, 99(heat island study in winter by mobile transect and remote

Lee, Audrey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Random transect photography: use in long-term monitoring of coral populations at the Flower Garden Banks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L 0 6 81 rr a 4 4 3 2 Line Intercept Plantmeiry 0 I 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Transect length (meters) Figure 7. Comparison of planimetry and the line intercept method based on species representation with increasing transect length. The 18... of Transect Length. . 5 . . . . 7 . . 8 . . . . 9 METHODS. . . . . . . . 12 Study Area. Field Procedure. Laboratory Analysis. . . 12 . . 12 17 RESULTS. . . . . . 21 Sample Unit: Transect Length . Sample Size Determination Accuracy of Line...

Hagman, Derek Kristian

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Air pollutants effects on forest ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents the papers given at a conference on the effects of acid rain on forests. The conference was sponsored by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Topics considered at the conference included the status of US research on acid deposition and its effects contributing factors to the decline of forests, evidence for effects on ecosystems, the effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems in North America and Europe, forest management, and future scientific research programs and management approaches.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - alveolar nerve transection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Cell Biology, Volume 149, Number 5, May 29, 2000 11571166 Summary: of ancrod infusion, sciatic nerve crush or transection was performed. 8 d after the crush, mice were...

32

Radon Transect Studies in Vapor- and Liquid-Dominated Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This communication describes the transect analysis conducted at the vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and the liquid-dominated reservoirs at Cerro Prieto in Baja, California.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

Arkin, Adam P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is supported by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the DOE Office of Science.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project is supported by the Office 600 800 1000 1200 1400 m/z 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 8x10 Intensity Degradation products/Organic acids ­ Chemical Characteristics Summary and Implications In order to predict rates of carbon release from tundra

35

Engineering the global ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

Neher, Deborah A.

37

Assessment of Research Quality Institute for Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Research Quality Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics January 2007 Faculty of Science #12;Evaluation report Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics Universiteit of the Universiteit van Amsterdam, the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED) was one

van Rooij, Robert

38

EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

39

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

40

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the gas balance at night (when GPP is zero) and then GPP is calculated from Eq. 2. This gas COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

Berkowitz, Alan R.

42

Shelf-sea ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

Walsh, J J

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona forest ecosystem Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Forest, Arizona (Photo by P.B. Shafroth) 12;Water Resources Research Center College... Riparian Ecosystem Restoration in the Gila River Basin: Opportunities and...

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

46

Marine Ecosystems Ocean Environment Research Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

noise could double from 1950's levels by 2100 due to increased shipping Dziak (26 years of experience at PMEL) Leading the Teams #12;The ECO

47

Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges for Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges'scultural eutrophication and extensive efforts to reduce nutrient inputs. In 1987 a commitment was made to reduce of eutrophication were incompletely known. research, policies, and concerted management action Subsequent research

48

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations · Healthy and productive coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Original Paradigm #12;We had Consumers & Coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Control

49

Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately linked to major changes in the global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately the Cenozoic the Pacific plate has had a northward component. Thus, the Pacific is unique, in that the thick to drill an age transect ("flow-line") following the position of the paleo- equator in the Pacific

50

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

51

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A proposal for continuation of research on net ecosystem carbon dioxide and methane flux and sampling and analysis of soil samples from arctic tundra regions is presented.

Oechel, W.

1990-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

52

Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

Kumar, Anand R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

54

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems CNRS Institut ?cologie et scales. This book provides an overview of current sensors for ecology and makes a strong case of practical ecological applications, this text is meant to be an invaluable resource for students, researchers

van Tiggelen, Bart

55

A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

Hubbard, Susan

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

Moritz, Max A.

57

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

New Hampshire, University of

58

Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

Peters, E.C. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Richmond, R.H. [Univ. of Guam, Mangilao (Guam). Marine Lab.; Power, E.A. [EVS Environment Consultants, Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

CURRENT AND PAST RESEARCH Research on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Foundation gran on Coupled Nat- ural and Human Systems. The effort is looking at Acequia water systems in northern New Mexico and linking culture and nature in an integrated analysis of commu- nity, NRCS, and ARS on using alternative future scenarios using climate change urban growth to identify

Johnson, Eric E.

60

Thermal optimality of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and underlying mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Division, Ris National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; 9 Atmospheric, Switzerland; 16 European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Environment and Sustainability

Martin, Timothy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Eco-system of Nurturing Talent--MSRA Guest Professorship Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Eco-system of Nurturing Talent--MSRA Guest Professorship Program When Microsoft researchers for their internship program, and builds good relation- ships with technology faculty throughout China. "We know well

Narasayya, Vivek

62

RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in the School of Resource and Environmental Management of Philosophy Title of Dissertation: Resolving Equivocality in Ecosystem Management Examining Committee: Chair. A case study approach compared information available for selecting protected areas for species-at-risk

63

Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Kster CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Kster CIG, TU

Zachmann, Gabriel

64

PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

Palmer, Margaret A.

65

Tourism destinations as digital business ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism has been experiencing very relevant changes since when Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in all their forms, have started to pervade the industry and the market. In the last decade, a new concept gained the attention of both researchers and practitioners, that of Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE). It can be considered as a technological infrastructure aimed at creating a digital environment to support and enhance networking between enterprises and stakeholders operating within a sector. Aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the technological connection has affected the structural configuration of the tourism system and, specifically, of tourism destinations. The present study argues that two components can be considered when assessing the relationships among stakeholders within a tourism destination: a real and a virtual one. Further it shows how these two components are structurally strongly coupled and co-evolve forming a single system.

Baggio, Rodolfo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearch CORE-SHELL NANOPARTICLES AND

68

Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

Hardt, Marah Justine

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

70

Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

71

Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

72

Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems S.M.C.U.P. Subasinghe respectively. The forests are the most important ecosystems in wood energy aspect. Other than the energy all Originally published in the Proceedings of Workshop of Training of Trainers in Wood Energy Aspects in Sri

73

Turbulence Mixing and Transport Mechanisms in a Coastal Ecosystem: Bay of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ABSTRACT Turbulence Mixing and Transport Mechanisms in a Coastal Ecosystem: Bay of La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico. (May 2014) Burkely Ashton Pettijohn Department of Marine Sciences Texas A&M University Research Advisor: Dr. Ayal Anis...

Pettijohn, Burkely Ashton

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

74

Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

McNeal, Karen Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van. Most ecosystems will change in the future. 2. Loss of species and biodiversity will continue to happen Energy Demand Urbanisation Climate Change Water Availability Infectious Diseases Biodiversity Loss #12

76

Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: Eden Prairie,InfieldInstalledResearch CaltechIntecArea,

77

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium ,,Theoretical of natural communities #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Abstracts Carlos data sets and theory in a flexible framework. #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems

Wehrli, Bernhard

78

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

79

Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

80

Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

Rothstein, Lewis M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Digital Ecosystems: Evolving Service-Orientated Architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented, where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network, operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on evolutionary computing that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions to satisfy locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is accelerated and will yield better local optima, because the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, an Ecosystem Orientated Architecture (EOA) created by extending a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The Digital Ecosystem will allow services to recombine and evolve over time, ...

Briscoe, G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollination Cultural: Aesthetic, spiritual, educational, recreational Security: personal safety, secureEcosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith, happiness, social/community acceptance, recognition, etc) #12;Some problems: · ***What is `culture

83

The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to administer the project. Phase one of the project began in October 1999. During the initial meetings to begin planning the process of saltcedar removal, several major concerns emerged. First, the treatment method selected should provide a high rate...SR- 2004-01 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report C. Hart Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University 1 2003 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project...

Hart, C.

84

Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

Demers, Nora Egan

85

Marine Ecosystem Sensitivity to Climate Change Author(s): Raymond C. Smith, David Ainley, Karen Baker, Eugene Domack, Steve Emslie, Bill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marine Ecosystem Sensitivity to Climate Change Author(s): Raymond C. Smith, David Ainley, Karen records reveal ecologicaltransitionsin theAntarcticPeninsularegion RaymondC. Smith (Sansom 1989, Stark 1994, Rott et al. 1996, Smith et al. 1996). Signifi- cantly, polar ecosystem research

Howat, Ian M.

86

GIS solutions for ecosystem management in developing countries: A case study of Sao Tome and Principe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to promote awareness of the application of the Geographic information system (GIS) technology to the management of ecosystems in developing countries. The adoptation of systematic environmental research and management techniques by national and local conservation programs helps ensure the sustainability of important biological resources.

Barnes, L.; Barrasso, T. [Booz, Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States); Pinto da Costa, H. [ECO Sao Tome e Principe (Sao Tome and Principe)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK, zAbisko Scientific Research Station, SE 981-07 Abisko, Sweden-level experiments near Toolik Lake, Alaska, and Abisko, Sweden. We quantified aboveground biomass responses

88

[10-386] Assessing and Improving the Scale Dependence of Ecosystem Processes in Earth System Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Goodale Cornell U. *Overall Project Lead *Lead Institution Intellectual Merit: Earth system models include policies. Our research assesses and improves Earth system model simulations of the carbon cycle, ecosystem of the Community Climate System Model/Community Earth System Model, which includes statistical meteorological

89

ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY (ENVS 604) TR 5:30-8:30 PM --4 CREDITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes and relationships (textbook) 2. Learn how to identify flora, fauna, and abiotic properties by instructor) (e.g., see uts.cc.utexas.edu/~gilbert/research/fireants/faenviron/concept.html) Report #2 Team Project Ecosystem Simulation, and Dynamic and Static Systems Analysis 1. Construct a STELLA compartment

Fath, Brian D.

90

Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Response of tundra ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our past research shows that arctic tussock tundra responds to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with marked increases in net ecosystem carbon flux and photosynthetic rates. However, at ambient temperatures and nutrient availabilities, homeostatic adjustments result in net ecosystem flux rates dropping to those found a contemporary CO{sub 2} levels within three years. Evidence for ecosystem-level acclimation in the first season of elevated CO{sub 2} exposure was found in 1987. Photosynthetic rates of Eriophorum vaginatum, the dominant species, adjusts to elevated CO{sub 2} within three weeks. Past research also indicates other changes potentially important to ecosystem structure and function. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatment apparently delays senescence and increases the period of positive photosynthetic activity. Recent results from the 1987 field season verify the results obtained in the 1983--1986 field seasons: Elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in increased ecosystem-level flux rates. Regressions fitted to the seasonal flux rates indicate an apparent 10 d extension of positive CO{sub 2} uptake reflecting a delay of the onset of plant dormancy. This delay in senescence could increase the frost sensitivity of the system. Major end points proposed for this research include the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and the interaction of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with elevated soil temperature and increased nutrient availability on: (1) Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (2) Net photosynthetic rates; (3) Patterns and resource controls on homeostatic adjustment in the above processes to elevated CO{sub 2}; (4) Plant-nutrient status, litter quality, and forage quality; (5) Soil-nutrient status; (6) Plant-growth pattern and shoot demography.

Oechel, W.C.; Grulke, N.E.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Department of Ecosystem Science & SOIL RESEARCH CLUSTER LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Organometallics, Gasoline and fuels, Coal and coke, Graphite and carbides, Metals and alloys · Operator: Julie

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

94

Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

Bassil, Youssef

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 17621772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

Thorp, James H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle 24 Dr. Longley gone to NPS Workshop 26 Surface H20 Environments . 31 Water Treatment Feb 2Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006 Jan. 17 Introduction 19 Water Characteristics & Water Wastewater Treatment 7 Chlorination & other Treatment methods 9 San Marcos Treatment Plants tours 14 Species

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

100

JIANGXIAO QIU Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

focus: Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape-Madison Project: NSF Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC)--Climate change, shifting land use, and urbanization Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing China Thesis: Landscape pattern and urban morphology

Turner, Monica G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Soil as natural capital Ecosystem services and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

threats Decline in: Lead to: soil carbon soil erosion biological ac2 tool box Information on sustainable soil use incentives After Daiily et al 2009 "decision loop" #12;Soil is a natural capital Ecosystem services Nutrient retention Carbon storage Water retention

102

Deep-Sea Research II 47 (2000) 227}257 Variations in bioturbation across the oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep-Sea Research II 47 (2000) 227}257 Variations in bioturbation across the oxygen minimum zone 1999; received in revised form 25 March 1999; accepted 30 March 1999 Abstract Oxygen minimum zones) along a transect across the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) on the Oman margin. Bottom-water oxygen

Levin, Lisa

103

UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

104

Job Title:(Interdisciplinary) Research Ecologist or Research Rangeland Management Specialist Department:Department Of Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that affect rangeland ecosystem dynamics, plant-sheep interactions, and wildlife habitat that lead research on processes that affect rangeland ecosystem dynamics, plant-sheep interactions, and wildlife DUTY LOCATIONS: 1 vacancy in the following location: Dubois, ID United StatesView Map WHO MAY APPLY: US

Behmer, Spencer T.

105

Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

Han, Richard Y.

106

The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

107

White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective Yuan Luo, Lin Gao, and Jianwei Huang Abstract--The successful deployment of a TV white space network requires the coordination-users), which form the White Space Ecosystem. In this paper, we study the white space ecosystem from

Huang, Jianwei

108

Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of U.S. and international coral reef ecosystems. The CRCA also required that the National OceanicStatus of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam By Val Porter, Trina Leberer, Mike Gawel, Jay Gutierrez Marine Laboratory Technical Report No. 113 October 2005 #12;Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam

Mcilwain, Jenny

109

SUSTAINABLE RESERVOIR OPERATION: CAN WE GENERATE HYDROPOWER AND PRESERVE ECOSYSTEM VALUES?y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health operation; hydropower; sustainability; riverine ecosystems; ecological valuation; natural flow regime, influence the health of the downstream ecosystem. Healthy riverine ecosystems provide ecosystem services

Jager, Henriette I.

110

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production, and Tradeoffs at Landscape Scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production ECOSYSTEM SERVICES_ 4 o Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity tradeoff between biodiversity conservation and J?l ecosystem services. Scenarios involving more development

Vermont, University of

111

THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

Weiblen, George D

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - australia trans-disciplinary research Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: australia trans-disciplinary research Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND NRM PRACTICE: WHERE THE Summary: by diffusing knowledge and skills...

113

Office of Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office of Science Office of Biological and Environmental Research Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) U.S. Department of Energy Climate and Environmental Sciences AGU Town Hall ­ December 8 and Environmental Research2 #12;Department of Energy · Office of Science · Biological and Environmental Research3

114

Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight Cruces, NM 88012, USA, 4 USDA ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX 76502, USA, 5 Abstract Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due

Wall, Diana

115

RESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN 2011 www.PosterPresentations.com  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

service indicators into Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) in order to quantify large-scale ecosystem service. Including ecosystem services in life cycle assessment (LCA) is an important step to provide rigorousRESEARCH POSTER PRESENTATION DESIGN 2011 www.PosterPresentations.com Life Cycle Assessment

Hall, Sharon J.

116

arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

117

arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

118

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species interactions, (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species (more)

Isbell, Forest Isaac

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook of Data Reduction Procedures, Workbooks, and Exchange Templates is designed to support the Oncor geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The following data categories are covered: water-surface elevation and temperature, sediment accretion rate, photo points, herbaceous wetland vegetation cover, tree plots and site summaries, fish catch and density, fish size, fish diet, fish prey, and Chinook salmon genetic stock identification. The handbook is intended for use by scientists collecting monitoring and research data for the CEERP. The ultimate goal of Oncor is to provide quality, easily accessible, geospatial data for synthesis and evaluation of the collective performance of CEERP ecosystem restoration actions at a program scale.

Sather, Nichole K.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Serkowski, John A.; Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on: stimulation of ecosystem gas exchange by elevated atmospheric CO2; the architecture and distribution of coarse roots using the novel approach of ground penetrating radar; mechanisms for the disturbance of soil carbon pools via the "priming" effect; and how interannual and seasonal variation in precipitation alters the physiological response of key species to elevated CO2. This project was a collaboration between research groups at the Smithsonian Institution, NASA, the Dynamac Corporation, Northern Arizona University, and Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia.

Drake, Bert G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

Johnson, Pieter

124

Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

125

DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

Lawrence, Rick L.

126

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately

Gilli, Adrian

127

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Slatton, Clint

128

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

Watson, Craig A.

129

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan Envision a Dynamic Community of Wellbeing for innovation that can be exported outside of its boundaries. Umore Park: Ecosystems of Infrastructure it every day in the form of roads, buildings, power lines, stoplights, energy plants, water pipes, when

Netoff, Theoden

130

Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

131

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

132

ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

Iliffe, Thomas M.

133

Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

213 Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab- olism for Giltner in the estimation of ecosystem metabolism by open-channel methods (McCutchan et al. 2002; Hall and Tank 2005). To estimate metabolism in Giltner Spring Creek, Hall and Tank (2005) employ a mass-balance equation

Lewis Jr., William M.

134

USF College of Marine Science Awarded $11M for Gulf Spill Research Selected as one of eight centers nationwide for continued studies of BP spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Deepwater Horizon spill from the deep ocean to the fisheries, and specific ecosystem components Horizon oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico's ocean and coastal ecosystems and to build a better ways Horizon spill on key marine ecosystem processes and species. The goals of the research project include

Meyers, Steven D.

135

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

Minnesota, University of

136

Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

Landis, Doug

137

Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework energy levels as a strategic framework to help identify conservation priorities and22 those management of three energy levels to achieve conservation objectives. The24 #12;2 geographic distribution of each

Hansen, Andrew J.

138

Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

Mobrand, Lars E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, which is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost, and is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. Depending on the nature, rate, and magnitude of global environmental change, the arctic may have a positive or negative feedback on global change. Results from the DOE- funded research efforts of 1990 and 1991 indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Measurements made in the Barrow, Alaska region during 1992 support these results. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. There are obvious potential errors in scaling plot level measurements to landscape, mesoscale, and global spatial scales. In light of the results from the recent DOE-funded research, and the remaining uncertainties regarding the change in arctic ecosystem function due to high latitude warming, a revised set of research goals is proposed for the 1993--94 year. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long- term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}. (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux. (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales.

Oechel, W.C.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for survival. Aquatic ecosystems consist of living organisms together... filled with rainwater, and is trans- formed from an aquatic ecosystem into a terrestrial one when......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - animal ecosystem engineers Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the approach with regards to ecosystem engineering... in an engineered ecosystem (e.g., water purification, biomass production, etc.). In the short term, the objective......

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Starch Glucose Complex anaerobic... 12;Microbial Systems as Model Ecosystems P C R Energy Heat ... Source: Vallino, Joseph J. - Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological...

144

E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

processes and functions How do we define and quantify relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem function and Summary: biodiversity, ecosystem function and services at...

145

Evaluation of Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh and final annual report of a project (20042010) addressing evaluation of the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the 235-km-long lower Columbia River and estuary. The project, called the Cumulative Effects (CE) study, was conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District by a collaboration of research agencies led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We achieved the primary goal of the CE study to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat actions in the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. We delivered 1) standard monitoring protocols and methods to prioritize monitoring activities; 2) the theoretical and empirical basis for a CE methodology using levels-of-evidence; 3) evaluations of cumulative effects using ecological relationships, geo-referenced data, hydrodynamic modeling, and meta-analyses; and 4) an adaptive management process to coordinate and coalesce restoration efforts in the LCRE. A solid foundation has been laid for future comprehensive evaluations of progress made by the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program to understand, conserve, and restore ecosystems in the lower Columbia River and estuary.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Roegner, G. Curtis; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Skalski, John R.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl; Coleman, Andre M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Breithaupt, Stephen A.; Cameron, April; Corbett, C.; Donley, Erin E.; Jay, D. A.; Ke, Yinghai; Leffler, K.; McNeil, C.; Studebaker, Cindy; Tagestad, Jerry D.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

147

Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

148

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

149

Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input fromstates, tribes, federal...

150

Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

Jordan, John E.

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

152

California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Hap Dunning and Richard Frank, UC Davis School of Law Feb. 24 Farms, floods, fowl and fish on the Yolo, Yolo County; others TBA Mar. 10 Science and ecosystem reconciliation for the Delta. Peter Goodwin

Ferrara, Katherine W.

153

STUART E.G. FINDLAY Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and K.A. Kuehn. 2002. Microbial growth and nitrogen retention in litter of Phragmites australis.M. Groffman and S. Dye. 2003. Trade-offs among ecosystem functions during restoration: Phragmites removal from

154

The Oncor Geodatabase for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program: Annual Report, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted this project for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (Corps). The purpose of the project is to develop a geospatial, web-accessible database (called Oncor) for action effectiveness and related data from monitoring and research efforts for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). The intent is for the Oncor database to enable synthesis and evaluation, the results of which can then be applied in subsequent CEERP decision-making. This is the first annual report in what is expected to be a 3- to 4-year project, which commenced on February 14, 2012.

Coleman, Andre M.; Johnson, Gary E.; Borde, Amy B.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Seiple, Timothy E.; Serkowski, John A.

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

partitioning among marine species (Kohn 1959). Facilitation, which occurs when one species improves envi- ronmental conditions for others, is well documented in such marine ecosystems as salt marshes, coral reefs, and kelp forests (Knowlton 1999; Bruno et al... food per acre as a commercial shrimp farm. These complex services are provided by thousands of plant, animal, and microbial species. (c) Kelp forests and (d) coral reefs are some of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Recreational, commercial...

Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Field Trips (1) Boston: An Urban Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir and Watershed Trip Leaders: Steve DeStefano and Justin Compton, USGS Cooperative Research Unit. The Quabbin also plays an important role as wildlife habitat: moose, deer, bears, bobcats, fishers, beavers

DeStefano, Stephen

157

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain up to 455 Gt of C in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The soil carbon in these layers is equivalent to approximately 60% of the carbon currently in the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Much of this carbon is stored in the soil as dead organic matter. Its fate is subject to the net effects of global change on the plant and soil systems of northern ecosystems. The arctic alone contains about 60 Gt C, 90% of which is present in the soil active layer and upper permafrost. The arctic is assumed to have been a sink for CO{sub 2} during the historic and recent geologic past. The arctic has the potential to be a very large, long-term source or sink of CO{sub 2} with respect to the atmosphere. In situ experimental manipulations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, indicated that there is little effect of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} on leaf level photosynthesis or whole-ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux over the course of weeks to years, respectively. However, there may be longer- term ecosystem responses to elevated CO{sub 2} that could ultimately affect ecosystem CO{sub 2} balance. In addition to atmospheric CO{sub 2}, climate may affect net ecosystem carbon balance. Recent results indicate that the arctic has become a source of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. This change coincides with recent climatic variation in the arctic, and suggests a positive feedback of arctic ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} and global change. The research proposed in this application has four principal aspects: (A) Long-term response of arctic plants and ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2}; (B) Circumpolar patterns of net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (C) In situ controls by temperature and moisture on net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (D) Scaling of CO{sub 2} flux from plot, to landscape, to regional scales (In conjunction with research proposed for NSF support).

Oechel, W.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

Davis, Kenneth J.(Penn State)

159

Ecosystem Science Center (ESC) Approved: September 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but are not limited to: NSF Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) supplements and site awards, other targeted better graduate students to Michigan Tech. The ESC will to help sponsor national and international at appropriate national and international scientific meetings. The ESC will also promote the availability

160

Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Call for Research Proposals January 21, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials 3. Ecosystems and Earth Systems Science 4. Carbon Neutral Energy Production and Processing 5-CARES is to foster institutional, regional and international research on the development and production of different forms of renewable energy and the exploration of sustainable environmental systems and practices

Subramanian, Venkat

164

3D Corporate Tourism in the Marine Sciences: Application-Oriented Problem Solving in Marine and Coastal Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D corporate tourism in the marine sciences is a solution-based approach to innovation in science, engineering and design. Corporate international scientists, engineers and designers work with local experts in Malaysian marine and coastal environments: they jointly discover, develop and design complex materials and designs inspired by nature directly on site (e.g. at the UKM Marine Ecosystem Research Centre EKOMAR and Malaysian Marine Parks) and construct initial biomimetic prototypes and novel designs. Thereby, new links, networks and collaborations are established between communities of thinkers in different countries. 3D tourism aims at mapping new frontiers in emerging engineering and design fields. This provides a novel way to foster and promote innovative thinking in the sciences, and considers the need for synergy and collaboration between marine sciences, engineering and design rather than segmentation and isolation. With the concept of 3D corporate tourism the potential of Malaysian marine ecosystems...

Gebeshuber, Ille Christine; Esichaikul, Ranee; Macqueen, Mark; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Planning aquatic ecosystem restoration monitoring programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was conducted as part of the Evaluation of Environmental Investments Research Program (EEIRP). The EEIRP is sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The objectives of this work are to (1) identify relevant approaches and features for environmental investment measures to be applied throughout the project life; (2) develop methods to access the effectiveness of the approach or feature for providing the intended environmental output; (3) develop and provide guidance for formulating environmental projects; and (4) provide guidance for formulating and identifying relevant cost components of alternate restoration plans.

Thom, R.M.; Wellman, K.F.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Valuing ecosystem services: A shadow price for net primary production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States c Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston 2007 We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed

Myneni, Ranga B.

167

INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

Alvarez, Nadir

168

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing a Science Plan Lynn M September 2011 / Accepted: 31 January 2012 / Published online: 20 March 2012 Abstract Geoengineering methods and functioning in some regions. Two types of geoengineering activities that have been proposed are: carbon

Jackson, Robert B.

170

Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

171

Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

Standiford, Richard B.

172

BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

Walter, M.Todd

173

BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

Walter, M.Todd

174

"Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

desertification process; B) May affect economic and social resilience and further sustainable socio-economic right and organizations 5. Economic mechanisms of Self- governing Organizations "Green Gold" pasture to the changing conditions. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 8 Community Development Processes

175

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

Roulet, Nigel T.

176

Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

Reiterer, Harald

177

Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and afterTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute Sciences/US Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; 4 USDA

Vermont, University of

178

Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

179

Fire and Thinning Effects on Mixed-Conifer Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for low-intensity underburns but is now estimated to be over 600 years. · Tree density has dramatically out of a key question raised in the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project: Critical Findings Section, 1996. · Old-growth has fairly stable carbon and nutrient pools. · Old forest conditions are often what

North, Malcolm

180

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance A. Mansour*1 of the most up-to-date innovations in sensor technology and sensor networks, our current project should as well as the second phase of the project which consists in analyzing living underwater micro

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S, 2007) Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the conse- quences of species loss the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used

Brody, James P.

182

Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

Rey Benayas, José María

183

Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enjoying traction in places where ethical argu- ments for biodiversity conservation are given short shriftEditorial Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation Conservation biology began life as a crisis discipline, its central tenet to understand and help reverse losses of biodiversity

Vermont, University of

184

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

Mühlemann, Oliver

185

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C and lit- ter decomposition varied between Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow bioenergy plantations., 2009). Willow (Salix spp) short rotation coppice (SRC) is one of the most widely planted second

186

Original article Nutrient cycling in deciduous forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Castanea sativa chestnut coppice located in the Sierra de Gata mountains (Cen- tral System, western Spain coppice lie in the fact that in the latter ecosystem potentially more N, P, K, Mg, Na and Mn return). Additionally, the relative importance of some bioelements (N, P, K and Mn) in the chestnut coppice is different

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 · Failing or nearby septic tank systems · Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair · Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes · Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

Pitt, Robert E.

188

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

Lamberti, Gary A.

189

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

White, Luther

190

Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

191

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity Thorsten B. H. Reusch with such climatic extremes is a question central to contem- porary ecology and biodiversity conservation. Previous, and it may buffer against extreme climatic events. In a manipulative field experiment, increasing

Myers, Ransom A.

192

Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

193

Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

Beas, Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

Chen, Jiquan

195

Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seasonal carbon cycles in these ecosystems as well as the response of these systems to environmental change. One convenient method for continuously measuring CER in remote ecosystems is tower-based conditional sampling. With conditional sampling, CER...

Cobos, Douglas Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

196

SciTech Connect: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 This report...

197

Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

Sullivan, Matthew B.

198

Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem Zürcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

Mühlemann, Oliver

199

Lower Columbia River and Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Reference Site Study: 2011 Restoration Analysis - FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reference Site (RS) study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration [BPA], U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District [USACE], and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) Biological Opinions (BiOp). While the RS study was initiated in 2007, data have been collected at relatively undisturbed reference wetland sites in the LCRE by PNNL and collaborators since 2005. These data on habitat structural metrics were previously summarized to provide baseline characterization of 51 wetlands throughout the estuarine and tidal freshwater portions of the 235-km LCRE; however, further analysis of these data has been limited. Therefore, in 2011, we conducted additional analyses of existing field data previously collected for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP) - including data collected by PNNL and others - to help inform the multi-agency restoration planning and ecosystem management work underway in the LCRE.

Borde, Amy B.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Sagar, Jina; Buenau, Kate E.; Corbett, C.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ecological Research Division Theoretical Ecology Program. [Contains abstracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the goals of the Theoretical Ecology Program and abstracts of research in progress. Abstracts cover both theoretical research that began as part of the terrestrial ecology core program and new projects funded by the theoretical program begun in 1988. Projects have been clustered into four major categories: Ecosystem dynamics; landscape/scaling dynamics; population dynamics; and experiment/sample design.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1 Jess K in Caribbean ecosystems. Most (11) of the articles describe the responses of Caribbean forests to hurricane of the comparative responses of Caribbean ecosystems to different disturbances. Finally, we identify those areas

Willig, Michael

203

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25° C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

Standiford, Richard B.

204

This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

205

A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

Florida, University of

206

Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Ecosystem services Economic valuation Hedonic pricing Spatial econometrics a b s t r a c t A need. These include production function methods in which an ecosystem service or amenity is viewed as an inputEstimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic

Fried, Jeremy S.

207

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

208

Alternate spatial sampling approaches for ecosystem structure inventory using spaceborne lidar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used in aircraft lidar remote sensing where power, heat, and reliability are less of a concern since January 2011 Accepted 29 January 2011 Available online 23 March 2011 Keywords: Lidar Remote sensing Laser collected in transects and should be considered for future lidar remote sensing missions. © 2011 Elsevier

Lefsky, Michael

209

Model-Inspired Research. TES research uses modeling, prediction, and synthesis to identify  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Earth system models (ESMs). TES supports research to advance fundamental understanding of terrestrial-process models, ecosystem models, and the Community Earth System Model). This emphasis on the capture of advanced in Earth system models to increase the quality of climate model projections and to provide the scientific

210

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this multi-year study (2004-2010) is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River and estuary. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. Field research in 2005, 2006, and 2007 involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp vs. marsh), trajectory (restoration vs. reference site), and restoration action (tide gate vs. culvert vs. dike breach). The field work established two kinds of monitoring indicators for eventual cumulative effects analysis: core and higher-order indicators. Management implications of limitations and applications of site-specific effectiveness monitoring and cumulative effects analysis were identified.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Putman, Douglas A.; Roegner, G. C.; Russell, Micah; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles to Assess Vegetative Cover and Identify Biotic Resources in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems: Preliminary Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with the University of Idaho, is evaluating novel approaches for using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quicker and safer method for monitoring biotic resources. Evaluating vegetative cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. In assessing vegetative cover, methods that improve accuracy and cost efficiency could revolutionize how biotic resources are monitored on western federal lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species, some of which are important indicator species (e.g., sage grouse). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluation of these ecosystems. In this project, two types of UAV platforms (fixed wing and helicopter) were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate total percent cover, (2) estimate percent cover for six different types of vegetation, and (3) locate sage grouse based on representative decoys. The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetative cover. A software program called SamplePoint developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service was used to evaluate the imagery for percent cover for the six vegetation types (bare ground, litter, shrubs, dead shrubs, grasses, and forbs). Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy.

Robert P. Breckenridge

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

213

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary, Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of wetland salmon habitat in the tidal portion of the Columbia River is occurring at an accelerating pace and is anticipated to improve habitat quality and effect hydrological reconnection between existing and restored habitats. Currently multiple groups are applying a variety of restoration strategies in an attempt to emulate historic estuarine processes. However, the region lacks both a standardized means of evaluating the effectiveness of individual projects as well as methods for determining the cumulative effects of all restoration projects on a regional scale. This project is working to establish a framework to evaluate individual and cumulative ecosystem responses to restoration activities in order to validate the effectiveness of habitat restoration activities designed to benefit salmon through improvements to habitat quality and habitat opportunity (i.e. access) in the Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to the ocean. The review and synthesis of approaches to measure the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects focused on defining methods and metrics of relevance to the CRE, and, in particular, juvenile salmon use of this system. An extensive literature review found no previous study assessing the cumulative effects of multiple restoration projects on the fundamental processes and functions of a large estuarine system, although studies are underway in other large land-margin ecosystems including the Florida Everglades and the Louisiana coastal wetlands. Literature from a variety of scientific disciplines was consulted to identify the ways that effects can accumulate (e.g., delayed effects, cross-boundary effects, compounding effects, indirect effects, triggers and thresholds) as well as standard and innovative tools and methods utilized in cumulative effects analyses: conceptual models, matrices, checklists, modeling, trends analysis, geographic information systems, carrying capacity analysis, and ecosystem analysis. Potential indicators for detecting a signal in the estuarine system resulting from the multiple projects were also reviewed, i.e. organic matter production, nutrient cycling, sedimentation, food webs, biodiversity, salmon habitat usage, habitat opportunity, and allometry. In subsequent work, this information will be used to calculate the over net effect on the ecosystem. To evaluate the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary, a priority of this study has been to develop a set of minimum ecosystem monitoring protocols based on metrics important for the CRE. The metrics include a suite of physical measurements designed to evaluate changes in hydrological and topographic features, as well as biological metrics that will quantify vegetation and fish community structure. These basic measurements, intended to be conducted at all restoration sites in the CRE, will be used to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of various restoration procedures on target metrics, and (2) provide the data to determine the cumulative effects of many restoration projects on the overall system. A protocol manual is being developed for managers, professional researchers, and informed volunteers, and is intended to be a practical technical guide for the design and implementation of monitoring for the effects of restoration activities. The guidelines are intended to standardize the collection of data critical for analyzing the anticipated ecological change resulting from restoration treatments. Field studies in 2005 are planned to initiate the testing and evaluation of these monitoring metrics and protocols and initiate the evaluation of higher order metrics for cumulative effects.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Roegner, Curtis; Thom, Ronald M.; Dawley, Earl M.; Whiting, Allan H.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Michael G.; Ebberts, Blaine

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Balancing the Need to Develop Coastal Areas with the Desire for an Ecologically Functioning Coastal Environment: Is Net Ecosystem Improvement Possible?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global human population is growing exponentially, a majority lives and works near the coast, and coastal commerce and development are critical to the economies of many nations. Hence, coastal areas will continue to be a major focus of development and economic activity. People want and need the economics provided by coastal development but they also want and need the fisheries and social commodities supported by estuarine and coastal ecosystems. Because of these facts, we view the challenge of balancing coastal development with enhancing nearshore marine and estuarine ecosystems (i.e., net ecosystem improvement) as the top priority for coastal researchers in this century. Our restoration research in Pacific Northwest estuaries and participation in the design and mitigation of nearshore structures has largely dealt with these competing goals. To this end, we have applied conceptual models, comprehensive assessment methods, and principles of restoration ecology, conservation biology and adaptive management to incorporate science into decisions about use of estuarine systems. Case studies of Bainbridge Island and the Columbia River demonstrate the use of objective, defensible methods to prioritize estuarine areas for preservation, conservation and restoration. Case studies of Clinton, WA and Port Townsend, WA demonstrate the incorporation of an ecological perspective and technological solutions into design projects that affect the nearshore. Adaptive management has allowed coastal development and restoration uncertainties to be better evaluated, with the information used to improve management decisions. Although unproven on a large scale, we think that these kinds of methods can contribute to the net improvement of already degraded ecosystems. The challenges include applied science to understand the issues, education, incentives, empirical data (not rehashing of reviews), cumulative impact analysis, and an effective adaptive management program. Because the option of net ecosystem improvement is often more costly than other alternatives, commitment by the local or regional community to this approach is essential.

Thom, Ronald M.; Williams, Greg D.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

New Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2001). Little data are available on the use of native terrestrial ecosystems for waste- water treatmentNew Mexico Water Resources Research Institute, New Mexico State University http://wrri.nmsu.edu Land application of industrial effluent on a Chihuahuan Desert ecosystem: Impact on soil physical

Johnson, Eric E.

216

Comparing aquatic and terrestrial grazing ecosystems: is the grass really greener?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and kelp forests (Burkepile and Hay 2006). Likewise, in freshwater ecosystems, waterfowl, zooplankton and benthic invertebrates impact the rates of primary production and nutrient regeneration (Lamberti and Resh

Burkepile, Deron

217

Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

218

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - alpine lake ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: alpine lake ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sustainable Sediment Management of ine oirs considering ecological and economical aspects Summary:...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem including Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

submergedmacrophytes.Ecosystems9:112. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory at the Lake Erie Center (419) 530-4570; FAX: (419) 530... ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plant (more)

Kochsiek, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - agro-ecosystems annual progress Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to allow time... .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Agro-ecosystem; Bio-indicators; Farming systems; Micro Source: Adl, Sina - Department of Biology, Dalhousie University...

224

2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters, communication units, and related...

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems pollution Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for implementing aquatic ecosystem restoration projects pursuant to Section 206 of the Water Resources Development... for Section 206 projects (and separable elements thereof)...

226

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural landscapes ecosystem Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

uncertainty in ecosystem and ... Source: Minnesota, University of - Department of Soil, Water and Climate, Biometeorology Group Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5...

228

E-Print Network 3.0 - affect ecosystem metabolism Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

America Summary: . Stoichiometry of the net ecosystem metabolism in a coastal inlet affected by upwelling. The Ria de Arousa (NW... act as resource subsidies to many...

229

E-Print Network 3.0 - applied ecosystem analysis Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

life cycle assessment analysis (LCA), the article... of the problems with LCA. Linking industrial models with spatially explicit, dynamic and site-specific ecosystem......

230

Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massby direct effects of climate change including ocean warming,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to colonize northern Hispaniola during Columbus's second voyage in 1493. Livestock originating from or Hispaniola, whereas Peplow (1958) and Wellman (1954) claimed 6 animals arrived from Hispaniola. Irrespective

232

Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laura F. Huenneke and William H. Schlesinger The Jornada Basin of southern New Mexico has long been the magnitude and sustainability of plant production since the founding of the USDA Jornada Experimental Range unpredictable water inputs." Water and energy flows are considered to be coincident because plant production

233

Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

235

Research Summary Cultural values of trees, woods and forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between economic, social and environmental factors, as well as provide `ecosystem services' including of particular aspects of cultural benefit contemporary and heritage. Methods o The study began of forest management and policy, including the valuation of forests. The research highlights a distinction

236

Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of specieshabitat associations for coastal land-use decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

US Army Corps of Engineers

239

Long-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extending now for more than 14 years (2­5). The release of 42 million liters of Alaskan North Slope crudeLong-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Charles H. Peterson,1 * Stanley D. Rice The ecosystem response to the 1989 spill of oil from the Exxon Valdez into Prince William Sound, Alaska, shows

240

14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+ ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

Vincent, Warwick F.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

242

North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

243

Technology Transfer for Ecosystem Management1 Tim O'Keefe2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the "ecosystem management" program. This new program is a belated effort to redirect public forest management). In response to the Thomas report, and growing public pressures for a diverse, sustainable management system management is composed of both biological (ecosystem sustainablitily and diversity) and sociological (public

Standiford, Richard B.

244

EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EcoGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA TechnicalGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38 Fisheries Science Centers, NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, NatureServe's EBM Tools Network, and other

245

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 375392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

synthesis of these concepts in order to address the issue of valuation of ecosystem services. We wantEcological Economics 41 (2002) 375392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services is to elucidate concepts of value and methods of valuation that will assist in guiding human decisions vis

Vermont, University of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass ha?1 yr?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

Zhuang, Qianlai

247

Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest ecosystems are important in global carbon cycling be- cause 80% of the carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation is for- est biomass and forest soil contains more than 70% of the world's soil carbon- aged not only for timber and non-timber products, but also for CO2 sequestration. Therefore, ecosystem

Cohen, Ronald C.

248

Linkages between leaf traits and productivity in two resource-limited ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ecosystem level processes such as nutrient cycling and carbon allocation. To explore the linkages between leaf traits and productivity, we worked in two resource-limited ecosystems (a grassland and a forest), and used leaf traits to understand how species...

Chinchilla Soto, Isabel

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

249

Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem 3 credits Spring 2013 Instructors: Dr. Debbie Miller, Ph.D. Associate Professor Wildlife Ecology and Conservation 5988 Hwy. 90, Bldg description: History, structure, function and ecological and economic importance of longleaf pine ecosystems

Slatton, Clint

251

NREL Fall 2013 Seminar Series "Using Aquatic Ecosystem Science to Inform Freshwater Resource Use and Sustainability"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected by the combination of physical, biological and chemical transformations within aquatic ecosystems Freshwater Ecosystems" Dec 6 Ted Stets, US Geological Survey Title: "Century of Trends: Historical Perspectives on the Evolution of Water Quality in the US" Dec 13 Brian Bledsoe, CSU's Department of Civil

MacDonald, Lee

252

Lake Ecosystems Nelson G Hairston Jr, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are inland bodies of water that lack any direct exchange with an ocean. Lake ecosystems are made up water, waste removal, fisheries, agricultural irrigation, industrial activity and recreationLake Ecosystems Nelson G Hairston Jr, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA Gregor F Fussmann

Fussman, Gregor

253

Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions Ryan R. Rykaczewski-rich, subsurface water sustains high produc- tivity in the ocean's eastern boundary currents. These ecosystems.g., poultry, swine, and tuna) industries that depend on the fisheries' landings for income and feed. Because

Kudela, Raphael M.

254

Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems MATTHEW L: mljulius@stcloudstate.edu Abstract Microalgae are well known for their importance in aquatic ecosystems and for their utility as environ- mental indicators. These attributes are emphasized here for microalgae, especially

Julius, Matthew L.

255

IT Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IT ­ Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem of the traditional hierarchy ­ as backbone of last Century's Industrial Revolution - towards the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem ­ as backbone for this Century's on-going IT-Revolution. Socio-cultural and economic

Ulieru, Mihaela

256

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

257

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN URBAN FORESTS Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545 USA Abstract. Methane is a potent greenhouse investigated four factors that could be causing this inhibition; reduced diffusion of methane into soils

Lovett, Gary M.

258

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1983 annual report highlights research in five areas funded by the Ecological Sciences Division of the Office of Energy Research. The five areas include: western semi-arid ecosystems; marine sciences; mobilization fate and effects of chemical wastes; radionuclide fate and effects; and statistical and quantitative research. The work was accomplished under 19 individual projects. Individual projects are indexed separately.

Vaughan, B.E.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Ekstrom, Draft 11/14/08 California Current Large Marine Ecosystem: Publicly Available Dataset of State and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Engineering Informatics Group Structural Engineering and Geomechanics Civil & Environmental Engineering Jerry, ocean law, large marine ecosystem INTRODUCTION Historically, governments have managed ocean uses within approach, widely recognized as a major contributor to the deterioration of ocean ecosystems, has created

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA BRANDON, THOMAS M. BROOKS, ROBERT COSTANZA,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA, to analyze poten- tial synergies between conserving biodiversity and safe- guarding ecosystem services. Global-scale prioritization for biodiversity conservation is essential because biodiversity, threats

Vermont, University of

262

Money flows in the Internet ecosystem : strategic opportunities for telecom operators and other Internet agents in the digital age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The question about where the money goes is something really interesting for all the companies in the Internet ecosystem. While there is a huge interest, no clear answers have been provided, partially because the ecosystem ...

Valentin Vinagrero, Israel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Stratus cloud structure from MM-radar transects and satellite images: scaling properties and artifact detection with semi-discrete wavelet analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spatial and/or temporal variabilities of clouds is of paramount importance for at least two in tensely researched sub-problems in global and regional climate modeling: (1) cloud-radiation interaction where correlations can trigger 3D radiative transfer effects; and (2) dynamical cloud modeling where the goal is to realistically reproduce the said correlations. We propose wavelets as a simple yet powerful way of quantifying cloud variability. More precisely, we use 'semi-discrete' wavelet transforms which, at least in the present statistical applications, have advantages over both its continuous and discrete counterparts found in the bulk of the wavelet literature. With the particular choice of normalization we adopt, the scale-dependence of the variance of the wavelet coefficients (i.e,, the wavelet energy spectrum) is always a better discriminator of transition from 'stationary' to 'nonstationary' behavior than conventional methods based on auto-correlation analysis, second-order structure function (a.k.a. the semi-variogram), or Fourier analysis. Indeed, the classic statistics go at best from monotonically scale- or wavenumber-dependent to flat at such a transition; by contrast, the wavelet spectrum changes the sign of its derivative with respect to scale. We apply 1D and 2D semi-discrete wavelet transforms to remote sensing data on cloud structure from two sources: (1) an upward-looking milli-meter cloud radar (MMCR) at DOE's climate observation site in Oklahoma deployed as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Progrm; and (2) DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI), a high-resolution space-borne instrument in sunsynchronous orbit that is described in sufficient detail for our present purposes by Weber et al. (1999). For each type of data, we have at least one theoretical prediction - with empirical validation already in existence - for a power-law relation for wavelet statistics with respect to scale. This is what is expected in physical (i.e., finite scaling range) fractal phenomena. In particular, we find long-range correlations in cloud structure coming from the important nonstationary regime. More surprisingly, we also uncover artifacts the data that are traceable either to instrumental noise (in the satellite data) or to smoothing assumptions (in the MMCR data processing). Finally, we discuss the potentially damaging ramifications the smoothing artifact can have on both cloud-radiation and cloud-modeling studies using MMCR data.

Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Petrov, N. P. (Nikola P.); Clothiaux, E. E. (Eugene E.); Marshak, A. (Alexander)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Research Statement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entries in the natural numbers, into an undergraduate research project. ..... and developing the undergraduate research project described at the end of Section 2,

2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.govsciencehighlights Research...

266

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

267

Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

Florida, University of

268

Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

269

Persistence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in a California marine ecosystem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite major reductions in the dominant DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) input off Los Angeles (California, U.S.A.) in the early 1970s, the levels of these pollutants decreased only slightly from 1972 to 1975 both in surficial bottom sediments and in a flatfish bioindicator (Dover sole, Microstomus pacificus) collected near the submarine outfall. Concentrations of these pollutants in the soft tissues of the mussel Mytilus californianus, collected intertidally well inshore of the highly contaminated bottom sediments, followed much more closely the decreases in the outfall discharges. These observations suggest that contaminated sediments on the seafloor were the principal (although not necessarily direct) cause of the relatively high and persistent concentrations of DDT and PCB residues in tissues. The study indicated that residues of the higher-molecular-weight chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as DDT and PCB, can be highly persistent once released to coastal marine ecosystems and that their accumulation in surficial bottom sediments is the most likely cause of this persistence observed in the biota of the discharge zone.

Young, D.R.; Gossett, R.W.; Heesen, T.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Programs land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 20012006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Lifecycles of Apps in a Social Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apps are emerging as an important form of on-line content, and they combine aspects of Web usage in interesting ways --- they exhibit a rich temporal structure of user adoption and long-term engagement, and they exist in a broader social ecosystem that helps drive these patterns of adoption and engagement. It has been difficult, however, to study apps in their natural setting since this requires a simultaneous analysis of a large set of popular apps and the underlying social network they inhabit. In this work we address this challenge through an analysis of the collection of apps on Facebook Login, developing a novel framework for analyzing both temporal and social properties. At the temporal level, we develop a retention model that represents a user's tendency to return to an app using a very small parameter set. At the social level, we organize the space of apps along two fundamental axes --- popularity and sociality --- and we show how a user's probability of adopting an app depends both on properties of t...

Kloumann, Isabel; Kleinberg, Jon; Wu, Shaomei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Todays symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

Aquatic Microbiology for Ecosystem Scientists: New and Recycled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years is solar radiation. Irradiation, especially in the ultra-violet range has long been thought. This interaction between irradiation and organic matter (photolysis) may explain, in part, how dissolved organic prior research. In other cases, new avenues of research have changed our concepts of microbial food webs

274

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 120 Economic and environmental threats of alien plant,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 1­20 Economic and environmental threats of alien. Precise economic costs associated with some of the most ecologically damaging alien species; Animals; Alien; Economic; Ecology; Environment; Agriculture; Non-indigenous 1. Introduction Quantifying

California at Berkeley, University of

275

Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystem deep within the Earth Dylan Chivian 1,2 *, Eoin L.and Survival, Berkeley, CA Earth Sciences Division, Lawrenceecosystem deep within the Earth Dylan Chivian 1,2* , Eoin L.

Chivian, Dylan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

277

Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2.1.4 Deep Water................................................................................................. 143 1.2.3.4 Deep WaterMEFEPO Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881 Work Package 1

Hansen, René Rydhof

278

Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Moorcroft, Paul R.

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - african lake ecosystems Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record amounts of dissolved phosphorus hit Lake Erie Algae blooms could threaten Lake Erie... ecosystem (http:www.youtube.comwatch?v5TlXQazNx00) Oil disaster in the...

280

Sustaining Healthy Freshwater EcosystemsIssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber10,Winter2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

commodities and services to society. These services include flood control, transportation, recreation. · Aquatic ecosystems additionally require that sediments and shorelines, heat and light properties, chemical restoration efforts using well-grounded ecological principles as guidelines. 5) Maintaining and protecting

Jackson, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

Link, Percy Anne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Human Capital Ecosystem Underlying the PLAs Network Weapons Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Underlying the PLAs Network Weapons Developmentthe Peoples Liberation Army (PLA). Although Chinas networkdevelopment and some of the key PLA institutes that appear

McREYNOLDS, Joe; RAGLAND, Leigh A.; CHANG, Amy

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - african millennium ecosystem Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bank Kew, UK. The uniqueness of the area's plant biodiversity... I to IV). THE SHIMBA HILLS In Kenya, the Coastal Forest ecosystem is mainly confined to a relatively Source:...

284

Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

Redman, Cory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

285

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual ecosystem respiration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 CO2Exchange(umolCO2m2 duringdaytime) Summary: respiration. Ecosystem carbon and water exchange are not affected by the watering event. In April, however... carbon flux ...

286

Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

Abella, Scott R.

287

Trading places : the development of markets for ecosystem services in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concept of ecosystem services has become ubiquitous in environmental planning and policy. One way of turning the insight that society depends on nature for a wide range of benefits into practice is by creating markets ...

Van Maasakkers, Mattijs J. (Mattijs Johannes)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of species-led conservation on ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity conservation organisations have recently begun to consider a wider ecosystem services context targeted biodiversity conservation initiatives have been successful at con- serving species and habitats) demonstrates that biodiversity conservation often loses out to other interests (Wilcove et al. 1998

Vermont, University of

289

Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

Knox, Ryan Gary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The evolution of business ecosystems : interspecies competition in the steel industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis contributes toward the building of a theory of the evolution of business ecosystems by exploring the applicability of Piepenbrock's' theoretical framework to a commodity industrial setting, namely the U.S. steel ...

Mathur, Akshat

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Magnetotelluric Transect of Long Valley Caldera: Resistivity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of observed and computed TE impedance and vertical magnetic field data. The abrupt termination of conductive caldera sediments less than 10 km north and south of our profile...

292

Transect 24:1 (spring 2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kalawashaq program. Paul Gelles, a former UC Riv- ersideOne teaching role that Gelles takes on directly is makingknow these sites well, Gelles explains, so we take the

UC Natural Reserve System

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Transect 24:1 (spring 2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eagles away, were wiped out by DDT contamination. The baldwere vulnerable to discarded DDT that in?ltrated the marineWhen we were dumping DDT o? the southern California coast,

UC Natural Reserve System

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Transect 22:1 (spring 2004)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the future 12 Sweeney Granite Mountains Reserve celebratess Jack and Marilyn Sweeney Granite Mountains Desert Researchareas near the [Sweeney Granite Moun- tains] reserve, when I

UC Natural Reserve System

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Transect 21:2 (fall 2003)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

County), Coal Oil Point Natural Reserve (Santa Barbaraimpacts. At Coal Oil Point Natural Reserve, on the otherCounty] and Coal Oil Point Natural Reserve [Santa Bar- bara

UC Natural Reserve System

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transect 19:1 (spring 2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

six other NRS sites: Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve, Coalproperty sold) 1977: Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve 1978:

UC Natural Reserve System

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Transect 19:2 (winter 2001)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in stewardship of the Carpinteria Salt Marsh T 9 Longtime19:2 Water in the Carpinteria Salt Marsh originates in theis faculty manager of Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve. The

UC Natural Reserve System

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Transect 18:1 (summer 2000)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UC Santa Barbara 24 Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve 25 CoalLandels-Hill Big Creek, Carpinteria, Santa Cruz Island, Coalin obtaining funds to restore Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve

UC Natural Reserve System

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Population ecology of rodents in a mixed coniferous forest ecosystem, North Rim, Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POPULATION ECOLOGY OF RODENTS IN A MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST ECOSYSTEM, NORTH RIM, ARIZONA A Thesis by GEORGE ANDREW RUFPNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences POPULATION ECOLOGY OF RODENTS IN A MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST ECOSYSTEM, NORTH RIM, ARIZONA A Thesis by GEORGE ANDREW RUFFNER Approved as to style and content by: (Cha n...

Ruffner, George Andrew

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Received: 1 October 2009, Revised: 21 June 2010, Accepted: 5 August 2010, Published online in Wiley Online Library: 10 February 2011 Ecosystem valuation: some principles and a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and adapt definitions of ecosystem services in order to make an operational link to valuation methods. We clarification to practitioners on important considerations in ecosystem services valuation. We first review where valuation fits into the overall ecosystem services framework and discuss ecosystem service

Vermont, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Research review The mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy: a new framework for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on productivity in ecosystem and earth system models. Introduction A grand challenge in ecosystem science

Bruns, Tom

302

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quantifying Climatological Ranges and Anomalies for Pacific Coral Reef Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,2 , David G. Foley1,7 1 Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, University of Hawai`i at Ma, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia, 7

304

Perturbation dynamics of a planktonic ecosystem Katherine Healey1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences, University of Victoria, PO Box 3055 STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 3P6, Canada 2, Canada Submitted to Journal of Marine Research as an article August 20, 2008 #12;Abstract Planktonic

Monahan, Adam Hugh

305

ThePortugalMillenniumEcosystemAssessment(ptMA)(http://ecossistemas.org) is analyzing the condition of ecosystem services in Portugal, recent trends in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, cultivated, and urban. Montado, which is not a global MA system, is an ecolog- ical and economically the users interacted with the scientists, and how the scientists interacted with the local population into ecosystems based on the global MA systems: marine, coastal, inland water, forest, montado, island, mountain

Pereira, Henrique Miguel

306

Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Weile [NASA Ames Research Center; Wang, Han [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Hastings, Alan [University of California, Davis; Schimel, David [NEON Inc.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Research Gallery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community...

308

Crosscutting Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to, and encourage, greater synergy among disciplines and across each of the Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) core technology areas. Its mission space is bound by...

309

Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing changes in the global climate expose the world s ecosystems not only to increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures but also to altered precipitation (P) regimes. Using four well-established process-based ecosystem models (LPJ, DayCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production (NPP) in seven terrestrial ecosystems with distinctive vegetation types in different hydroclimatic zones. We found that NPP responses to P changes differed not only among sites but also within a year at a given site. The magnitudes of NPP change were basically determined by the degree of ecosystem water limitation, which was quantified here using the ratio between atmospheric transpirational demand and soil water supply. Humid sites and/or periods were least responsive to any change in P as compared with moderately humid or dry sites/periods. We also found that NPP responded more strongly to doubling or halving of P amount and a seasonal shift in P occurrence than that to altered P frequency and intensity at constant annual amounts. The findings were highly robust across the four models especially in terms of the direction of changes and largely consistent with earlier P manipulation experiments and modelling results. Overall, this study underscores the widespread importance of P as a driver of change in ecosystems, although the ultimate response of a particular site will depend on the detailed nature and seasonal timing of P change.

Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service; Sowerby, ALWYN [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Threats to and Sustainability of Ecosystems for Freshwater Mollusks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as nutrification and chemical pollution from non-point sources. Spring alteration can resuH in direct species in the family Unionidae, that have suffered declines due to lmman 1 Research Zoologst and Director, New Mexico Natural Heritage Program, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico USA. 2Aquatic /Ecologist

311

heavy-snowfall area. The annual NEP (net ecosystem productiv-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forests, the bal- ance of carbon assimilation and respiration induced by seasonal changes in solar, solar Highlight FLUXNET site FFPRI FFPRI (Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute) FluxNet sites, Japan by Yoshikazu Ohtani Figure 1: Flux towers and forests in FFPRI FluxNet, Japan. The FFPRI Flux

312

Evapotranspiration models compared on a Sierra Nevada forest ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are research forests across the United States, Canada, Brazil, and Costa Rica with instruments on towers ranged from simple temperature and solar radiation-driven equations to physically-based combination on a tower above the forest canopy. All models calculate potential evapotranspiration (assuming well

Cohen, Ronald C.

313

Ecosystem responses to habitat restoration are being evaluated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the population abundance and angler catch rates of sport fish such as largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides Ecology and Conservation and Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit), with funding from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). The Situation Channelization and flood control

Florida, University of

314

Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current Ecosystem by Lisa Ann Zeigler Doctor of Philosophyin Oceanography by Lisa Ann Zeigler Committee in Charge:Subramaniam Copyright Lisa Ann Zeigler, 2011 All rights

Zeigler, Lisa Ann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up."  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 6 Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up." James A. Garfield CONTENTS Overview

Pitt, Robert E.

316

Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration, April 29-30, 2008, Astoria, Oregon.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C. A compact disk, attached to the back cover, contains material in hypertext-markup-language from the conference website (http://cerc.labworks.org/) and the individual presentations.

Johnson, Gary E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Sutherland, G. Bruce [Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (retired)

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as salmon) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Global Journal of Environmental Research 2 (3): 102-109, 2008 ISSN 1990-925X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape to Eutrophication Alan L. Wright, K. Ramesh Reddy and Susan Newman1 2 3 Everglades Research of eutrophication in wetland ecosystems. We investigated the effects of nutrient loading on the distribution of soil capacity for P1 1 than underlying soil. Assessment of the impacts of eutrophication indicated that P

Florida, University of

319

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill By Scott Travis, Sun Sentinel 6:37 PM EDT, August 25, 2010 South Florida universities are well represented ecosystems, such that we can be better prepared when spills reoccur." Scott Travis can be reached at stravis@Sun

Belogay, Eugene A.

320

Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Creating a Digital Ecosystem: Service Orientated Architectures with Distributed Evolutionary Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on a genetic algorithm that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions satisfying locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is sped up and yields better local optima as the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, which is created by extending a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The EvE Digital Ecosystem will contain services specially supported by application software written to take advantage of the ecosy...

Briscoe, G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Research Help  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStories » RemovingResearchGallery ResearchHelp Research

323

Biotic Processes Regulating the Carbon Balance of Desert Ecosystems - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our results from the 10-year elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration study at the Nevada Desert FACE (Free-air CO{sub 2} Enrichment) Facility (NDFF) indicate that the Mojave Desert is a dynamic ecosystem with the capacity to respond quickly to environmental changes. The Mojave Desert ecosystem is accumulating carbon (C), and over the 10-year experiment, C accumulation was significantly greater under elevated [CO{sub 2}] than under ambient, despite great fluctuations in C inputs from year to year and even apparent reversals in which [CO{sub 2}] treatment had greater C accumulations.

Nowak, Robert S [UNR; Smith, Stanley D [UNLV; Evans, Dave [WSU; Ogle, Kiona [ASU; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

324

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

AR Researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicles with an emphasis in cooperative unmanned vehicle research and intelligent remote sensing. Cal Christensen, M.S., P.E., P.M.P Cal...

326

IR Researchers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers Eric D. Larsen Eric D. Larsen is a mechanical engineer at the Idaho National Laboratorywith 19 years of experience in design and integration of electro-mechanical and...

327

Strontium 90 in Maize Field, Cattail Marsh and Oakwood Ecosystems Author(s): J. D. Ovington and D. B. Lawrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strontium 90 in Maize Field, Cattail Marsh and Oakwood Ecosystems Author(s): J. D. Ovington and D Ecology. http://www.jstor.org #12;STRONTIUM 90 IN MAIZE FIELD, CATTAIL MARSH AND OAKWOOD ECOSYSTEMS BY J in themilkand vegetationfromfourfarmsin Minnesotaand kindlyagreedto determine strontium90

Minnesota, University of

328

Agent-based modeling of the effects of social norms on enrollment in payments for1 ecosystem services2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

norms5 8,304 words6 1Center for International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard7 2 Abstract19 Conservation investments are increasingly being implemented through payments for20 ecosystem services (PES) for the protection and restoration of ecosystem services around21 the world

329

"Real-Time Coastal Observing Systems for Ecosystem Dynamics and Harmful Algal Blooms" Resubmitted 4 March 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiation and Prediction in Large European Marine Ecosystems (HABILE) in the North Sea, Fisheries & Oceans"Real-Time Coastal Observing Systems for Ecosystem Dynamics and Harmful Algal Blooms" Resubmitted 4 ________________________________________________________________________ X.1 Introduction X X.2 Processes in the coastal ocean X X.2.1 Physical processes X X.2.2 Biological

Fabrikant, Sara Irina

330

Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1: The model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling environmental effects on the size-structured energy flow through marine ecosystems. Part 1 size-structured mathematical model of the energy flow through marine ecosystems, based on established-dependent. The physiological bases of the model are derived from the dynamic energy budget theory. The model outputs

Poggiale, Jean-Christophe

331

An overview of APECOSM, a spatialized mass balanced ``Apex Predators ECOSystem Model" to study physiologically structured tuna population dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physiologically structured tuna population dynamics in their ecosystem Olivier Maury * IRD (Institut de Recherche by the organisms are modelled according to the DEB (dynamic energy budget) theory (Kooijmann, 2000) and the size-structured- mental variability and fishing on the structure and dynamics of pe- lagic ecosystems. APECOSM uses a size

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

332

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during the past century: A retrospective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere at northern high latitudes during develop and use a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4 dynamics (3309); 1890 Hydrology: Wetlands; KEYWORDS: methane emissions, methane oxidation, permafrost

McGuire, A. David

333

Impact of monsoons, temperature, and CO2 on the rainfall and ecosystems of Mt. Kenya during the Common Era  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of monsoons, temperature, and CO2 on the rainfall and ecosystems of Mt. Kenya during Leaf waxes Glacial and early Holocene-age sediments from lakes on Mt. Kenya have documented strong and atmospheric CO2 concentra- tions. However, little is known about climate and ecosystem variations on Mt. Kenya

Vuille, Mathias

334

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and alleviate atmospheric pollution in colla- boration with DMU (the National En- vironmental Research Institute Countries is also part of this department. Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Department (Formerly

335

Genetic diversity enhances the resistance of a seagrass ecosystem to disturbance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, nutrient cycling, or resistance to disturbance or invasion relative to systems with fewer species of declining species richness on short-term processes such as pro- duction, community respiration, and nutrient). Nevertheless, many important ecosystems, such as kelp forests, cattail marshes, and fir forests, are dominated

Stachowicz, Jay

336

Spatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 2008 Accepted 18 April 2008 Keywords: Energy balance Soil heat flux Available energy Eddy variability in soil heat flux contributing to energy balance closure (EBC), by deploying a mobile energySpatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems Changliang Shao a

Chen, Jiquan

337

Redefinition and Global Estimation of Basal Ecosystem1 Respiration Rate2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division, Technical University of Denmark, Ris National Laboratory for50 Sustainable Energy, 2800 Kgs, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706, USA28 11 Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Climate Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University,54 Lund S-22100, Sweden55 27 Department of Physics

Leclerc, Monique Y.

338

COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Trophic Position of the Endophytic Beetle, Mordellistena aethiops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Trophic Position of the Endophytic Beetle, Mordellistena aethiops of the endophytic mordellid Mordellistena aethiops Smith and subjected plant and insect samples to stable isotope and the endophytic na- ture of the larvae (Ford and Jackman 1996). Mordellid larvae tunnel in dead wood or stems

Hanks, Lawrence M.

339

Endophyte symbiosis with tall fescue: how strong are the impacts on communities and ecosystems?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Endophyte symbiosis with tall fescue: how strong are the impacts on communities: Competition Herbivory Lolium arundinaceum MAXQ endophyte Neotyphodium coenophialum Predators Soil Trophc interactions a b s t r a c t We have investigated community and ecosystem consequences of endophyte symbiosis

Rudgers, Jennifer

340

Foliar Uptake of Fog in the Coast Redwood Ecosystem: a Novel Drought-Alleviation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the coast redwood forests of northern California frequently during the summer months (May to September) when, reducing solar radiation, and contributing water to the ecosystem through leaf wetness and fog drip et al. 2009). Plants with foliar uptake capacity can absorb this water whenever their crowns are wet

Standiford, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Soil surface properties in Mediterranean mountain ecosystems: Effects of environmental factors and implications of management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implications of management C. Oyonarte a,*, V. Aranda b , P. Durante a a Department of Soil Science, CITE II hand, the type of plant cover and management do not influence the geochemical properties of the soil management of forests (Hopmans et al., 2005). Criteria for sustainability must consider ecosystem integrity

Herrera, Carlos M.

342

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 445456 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based simulation engine or on their own computers by means of open-source software. The knowledge base will serve of ecosystem services has become an important vehicle for assuring social recognition and acceptance have been used in cost-benefit analyses for environmental management (Hanley and Spash, 1993), meta

Vermont, University of

343

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Energy-Use Efficiency: Positive Effects of Predation on Productivity Joseph Hakam Brown systems will be able to utilize more of the primary energy source and display higher productivity. While processing as much energy as possible within given resource and growth constraints. Bottom-up and top

Vallino, Joseph J.

344

Relating carrion breakdown rates to ambient resource level and community structure in four cave stream ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into ecosystems vary in quantity and quality (e.g., plant litter vs carrion). Variability in detrital quantity and quality potentially affects consumer biomass and rates of organic matter (OM) breakdown. We used cave streams to test 2 linked hypotheses regarding the influence of total detrital inputs on consumer biomass

Benstead, Jon

345

Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions. climate variability coastal marine ecosystems coastal ocean upwelling marine ecology Equatorward winds along the eastern boundaries of the world's oceans drive offshore surface Ekman

346

Ecological Modelling 174 (2004) 6784 Fuzzy pattern recognition of circadian cycles in ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Modelling 174 (2004) 67­84 Fuzzy pattern recognition of circadian cycles in ecosystems S: Pattern recognition; Decision support systems; Fuzzy systems; Eutrophication; Phytoplankton; Wastewater pattern recognition techniques. The algorithm is organised in three parts: in the first, typical patterns

347

C H A P T E R 3 Ecosystem functions and services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purify the air and water, generate oxygen, and stabilize our climate. Earth would not be fit for our oxygen is mostly generated and maintained by ecosystems and their constituent species, allowing humans and innumerable other oxygen-dependent organ- isms to survive. Oxygen also enables the atmo- sphere to "clean

Sekercioglu, Cagan Hakki

348

8. Discussion This thesis has quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of the Nhambita  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

destructive to woody biomass: aboveground carbon stocks can only be330 maintained under high intensity fires200 8. Discussion This thesis has quantified the ecosystem carbon stocks of the Nhambita area findings of this thesis and discuss some of the implications for 1) modelling the carbon cycle of miombo

349

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Biodiversity and Ecosystem Processes in Freshwater Sediments: Springer on behalf of Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/4314671@jstor.org. . Springer and Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences are collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve

Palmer, Margaret A.

350

Ecosystem response to a salmon disturbance regime: Implications for downstream nutrient fluxes in aquatic systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem response to a salmon disturbance regime: Implications for downstream nutrient fluxes the post-spawn period, downstream biofilm abundance exceeded pre-spawn values, indicating a near short spatial scales acts to retard the flushing of MDNs to downstream rearing lakes. The magnitude

Northern British Columbia, University of

351

Stakeholder Analysis of a Platform and Ecosystem for Open Innovation in SMEs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stakeholder Analysis of a Platform and Ecosystem for Open Innovation in SMEs Jan Zibuschka, Uwe Laufs, Wolf Engelbach Fraunhofer IAO, Nobelstr. 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany {firstname.lastname}@iao.fraunhofer.de Abstract. In today's globalized economy, innovations become more and more crucial for the success

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

352

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION COVER TYPES ON SEDIMENT by trapping sediment during tidal exchange. They are considered good sediment retention environments, but little is known about the spatial variability of sedimentation within these wetlands, and the role

Lovett, Gary M.

353

SEDIMENTS, SEC 4 SEDIMENT-ECOLOGY INTERACTIONS POSITION PAPER Anthropogenic pollutants affect ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEDIMENTS, SEC 4 · SEDIMENT-ECOLOGY INTERACTIONS · POSITION PAPER Anthropogenic pollutants affect ecosystem services of freshwater sediments: the need for a "triad plus x" approach Sabine Ulrike Gerbersdorf November 2010 /Accepted: 24 April 2011 # Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Purpose Freshwater sediments

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

354

Fire Effects and Fuel Management in Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire Effects and Fuel Management in Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Ricardo Vélez2 1 Presented, California. 2 Doctor Ingeniero de Montes, ICONA - Forest Fire Section, Madrid Spain. Abstract: Forest fuels in the Mediterranean eco- systems of Spain are characterized by generalized pyrophytism and large accumulations

Standiford, Richard B.

355

Ecosystem-scale measurements of biomass water using cosmic ray neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem-scale measurements of biomass water using cosmic ray neutrons Trenton E. Franz,1,2 Marek 2013. [1] Accurate estimates of biomass are imperative for under- standing the global carbon cycle. However, measurements of biomass and water in the biomass are difficult to obtain at a scale consistent

Zreda, Marek

356

Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction. Hypoxia has occurred frequently in the summer in western Lake Erie. HABs have been responsible The Laurentian Great Lakes are a major resource to North America, containing 18% of the world's surface

357

sampling locationsG The Lake Erie ecosystem faces a wide and varied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Lake Erie algal bloom. October 11, 2013. Credit: NOAA Great Lakes CoastWatch #12;Upwelling Upwellingsampling locationsG The Lake Erie ecosystem faces a wide and varied range of threats to its health Lakes, such as Green Bay, Lake Michigan; Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron; and the central basin of Lake Erie

358

Real-time Monitoring of the Resilience of Stream Ecosystems Tua Agustinus Tamba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

diversity in aquatic ecosystems. Eutrophication, which describes the excess of nutrient loading that leads]. The management of eutrophication is complicated due to the difficulties involved in measuring such a variety agriculture and urban lands. In the United States, eutrophication is driven mainly by the excessive use

Lemmon, Michael

359

Regional-scale effects of eutrophication on ecosystem structure and services of seagrass beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regional-scale effects of eutrophication on ecosystem structure and services of seagrass beds with increasing eutrophication. As eutrophication increased, phytoplankton biomass increased on average 1.8 times to increasing tissue nitrogen content above ground with eutrophication. Despite province- and species

Myers, Ransom A.

360

Preliminary report on: The coastal ecosystems 10 years after the 1991 Gulf War  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preliminary report on: The coastal ecosystems 10 years after the 1991 Gulf War oil spill by Dr-joerg.barth@geographie.uni-regensburg.de Abstract: In 1991 the Gulf War lead to the largest oil spill in human history. Over 700 km of coastline size analysis war carried out at the Jubail Marine Wildlife Sanctuary centre. Carbonate content

Damm, Bodo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL/ESS Spring 2013 Seminar Series "Core Values of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NREL/ESS Spring 2013 Seminar Series "Core Values of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability" Facilitated by Dr. John Moore (CSU NREL/ESS) This spring's seminar series is being co Energy Economy Title: "Sustainability as a Core Value" Feb 15 Dr. Melinda Laituri, Professor, ESS Title

MacDonald, Lee

362

Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basins of coexistence and extinction in spatially extended ecosystems of cyclically competing species Xuan Ni,1 Rui Yang,1,a Wen-Xu Wang,1 Ying-Cheng Lai,1,2,3 and Celso Grebogi3 1 School of species coexistence. In this pursuit almost all exist- ing works focus on the relevant dynamical behaviors

Lai, Ying-Cheng

363

A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

Lin, John Chun-Han

364

ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1- ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Course:00 J 127 -Simcoe Building (first lecture September 11, 2008) Office Hours: Prior to the start of class will deal with a rather wide array of topics in the environmental sciences, with particular emphasis

Fox, Michael

365

ZOL 897 Ecosystem Ecology & Global Change (4 credits) Course Information and Requirements (Spring 2013)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@kbs.msu.edu. Synopsis: An understanding of ecology at the ecosystem level provides the "big picture" that is essential, however, that you will be willing to give us your frank and constructive feedback so that we may instruct: Forms of C; Global budgets; Human perturbation Jan 17 Discussion: Climate change basics and GHG effect

366

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 393408 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 393408 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services to the main ecological, sociocultural and economic valuation methods. 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights: Integrating Economic and Ecological Perspectives A typology for the classification, description and valuation

Vermont, University of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Can agro-ecosystems efficiently complement protected area networks? David Troupin a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are often more severe and the natural/ semi-natural patches and protected areas (PAs) are smaller (Di GiulioCan agro-ecosystems efficiently complement protected area networks? David Troupin a, , Yohay Carmel analysis Protected areas Agri-environmental schemes Wildlife-friendly agriculture a b s t r a c t Threats

368

Chapter 10: Impacts of natural disturbance on soil carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 10: Impacts of natural disturbance on soil carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems. Steven T University, Flagstaff, AZ INTRODUCTION Forest soils are entities within themselves, self- organized and highly resilient over time. The transfer of energy bound in carbon (C) molecules drives the organization

369

COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Diversity Cascades in Alfalfa Fields: From Plant Quality to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Diversity Cascades in Alfalfa Fields: From Plant Quality abundance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) ?elds. We modi?ed arthropod communities using three nonfactorial corroborate previous studies in alfalfa that show complex indirect effects, such as trophic cascades, can

Dyer, Lee

370

Cooperative management and its effects on shade tree diversity, soil properties and ecosystem services of coffee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to differentiation: N, pH, P, K, and Ca. Higher tree richness was associated with higher soil pH, CEC, Ca, and MgCooperative management and its effects on shade tree diversity, soil properties and ecosystem management approaches affected shade tree diversity, soil properties, and provi- sioning and carbon

Vermont, University of

371

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

Brierley, Andrew

372

Linkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a dark water plume from near Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to the Dry Tortugas in the Florida Keys in mid, respectively. The dark color became increasingly dominated by colored dissolved organic matter, toward the DryLinkages between coastal runoff and the Florida Keys ecosystem: A study of a dark plume event

373

Urban Ecosystems, 7: 267281, 2004 c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured in The Netherlands.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the quality and utility of urban growth models. Having an empirical basis for making claims about construction. Fine scale design decisions about storm water movement or planting de- sign are unlikelyUrban Ecosystems, 7: 267­281, 2004 c 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Manufactured

Allan, David

374

EFFECTS OF OIL ON MARINE ECOSYSTEMS: A REVIEW FOR ADMINISTRATORS AND POLICY MAKERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF OIL ON MARINE ECOSYSTEMS: A REVIEW FOR ADMINISTRATORS AND POLICY MAKERS DALE R. EVANS1 is reviewed. The focus is on studies on crude oil. and the results are discussed with the purpose of providing in decisions concerning petroleum developments and related activities. The characteristics ofcrude oil

375

Woodland development and soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics and storage in a subtropical savanna ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

succession over the past century to subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by C3 trees/shrubs. To elucidate mechanisms of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil total N (STN) storage and dynamics in this ecosystem, I measured the mass and isotopic composition...

Liao, Julia Den-Yue

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

376

A lattice-based query system for assessing the quality of hydro-ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A lattice-based query system for assessing the quality of hydro-ecosystems Agn`es Braud1 Cristina used for building a hierarchy of site pro- files which are annotated by hydro in the project. This paper presents an application of Galois lattices to the hydro-ecological domain, focussing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

Palen, Wendy J.

378

Oxygen: A Fundamental Property Regulating Pelagic Ecosystem Structure in the Coastal Southeastern Tropical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen: A Fundamental Property Regulating Pelagic Ecosystem Structure in the Coastal Southeastern questions about the role of temperature. Here we investigate the role of oxygen in structuring fish that the distribution of oxygen in the ocean is changing with uncertain consequences. Methodology/Principal Findings

379

Side-effects of plant domestication: ecosystem impacts of changes in litter quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Side-effects of plant domestication: ecosystem impacts of changes in litter quality Pablo Garcia such as drought or pathogens. We hypothesized that predictions derived from the comparison of low vs high resource in microbial-poor and microbial-rich soils to exemplify intensively and extensively managed agricultural soils

Wall, Diana

380

The importance of mesophyll conductance in regulating forest ecosystem productivity during drought periods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mediterranean climate regions (Nemani et al., 2003). Projections of climate change suggest that higher of changing climate on these ecosystems is poor due to a lack of understanding concerning ecophysiological hour data gathered by the FLUXNET network across six Mediterranean sites. The measured canopy level

Keenan, Trevor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Impacts of exotic forest pathogens on Mediterranean ecosystems: four case studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, pollution, climate change and introduction of invasive species. Invasive tree pathogens are among planning assisted migration activities to enable plant species to cope with rapid climate change. KeywordsImpacts of exotic forest pathogens on Mediterranean ecosystems: four case studies Matteo Garbelotto

California at Berkeley, University of

382

Faster growth in warmer winters for large trees in a Mediterranean-climate ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Faster growth in warmer winters for large trees in a Mediterranean-climate ecosystem Seth W of large trees in a rapidly changing climate, we analyzed growth rings of five conifer species against 20th. Climatic Change DOI 10.1007/s10584-014-1060-0 Electronic supplementary material The online version

North, Malcolm

383

Rehabilitation of Tropical Rainforest Ecosystems 24 25 October 2011, Kuala Lumpur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

level in the Asian region is still high. Moreover, after the nuclear power plant accident caused phase activities in 2001 and has been monitoring atmospheric deposition and its impacts on ecosystems, dry deposition, soil and vegetation, and inland aquatic environment has been mostly conducted

Chappell, Nick A

384

Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Net ecosystem fluxes of isoprene over tropical South America inferred from Global Ozone Monitoring estimate isoprene emissions over tropical South America during 1997­2001 using column measurements (ATSR) firecounts and GOME NO2 columns. We find that South America can be split into eastern and western

Chance, Kelly

385

Water and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model (UPFLOW) suggested that at TS groundwater supplied an importanWater and nitrate exchange between cultivated ecosystems and groundwater in the Rolling Pampas Agropecuaria Parana´, INTA, Ruta 11 km 12.5, 3101 Oro Verde, Argentina 1. Introduction Biogeochemical exchange

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

386

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting the net carbon exchanges of crop rotations in Europe with an agro-ecosystem model S.Lehuger@art.admin.ch. Fax: (+41) 44 377 72 01. Phone: (+41) 44 377 75 13. hal-00414342,version2-1Sep2010 #12;Abstract Carbon and measuring land-atmosphere carbon exchanges from arable lands are important tasks to predict the influence

Boyer, Edmond

387

Spatial Variation in Extreme Winds Predicts Large Wildfire Locations in Chaparral Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Variation in Extreme Winds Predicts Large Wildfire Locations in Chaparral Ecosystems Max A are also reported to experience large fires driven by extreme wind events. The following are a sample from the popular press that highlight the importance of hot and dry winds in driving the growth of large fires

Moritz, Max A.

388

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 EFFECTS OF LITTER REMOVAL ON NITROGEN CYCLING IN A TIDAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WETLAND AFTER ERADICATION OF PHRAGMITES AUSTRALIS MIKAELA ROBERTSON Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 in these ecosystems. One increasingly common wetland macrophyte, Phragmites australis or the common reed, has been stands of Phragmites. In this study, we examined the effect of Phragmites australis litter on nitrogen

Lovett, Gary M.

389

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose ofthis document is to describe research, monitoring, and evaluation (RME) for the Federal Columbia River Estuary Program. The intent of this RME effort is to provide data and information to evaluate progress toward meeting program goals and objectives and support decision-making in the Estuary Program. The goal of the Estuary Program is to understand, conserve, and restore the estuary ecosystem to improve the performance of listed salmonid populations. The Estuary Program has five general objectives, designed to fulfill the program goal, as follows. 1. Understand the primary stressors affecting ecosystem controlling factors, such as ocean conditions and invasive species. 2. Conserve and restore factors controlling ecosystem structures and processes, such as hydrodynamics and water quality. 3. Increase the quantity and quality of ecosystem structures, i.e., habitats, juvenile salmonids use during migration through the estuary. 4. Maintain the food web to benefit salmonid performance. 5. Improve salmonid performance in terms of life history diversity, foraging success, growth, and survival. The goal of estuary RME is to provide pertinent and timely research and monitoring information to planners, implementers, and managers of the Estuary Program. In conclusion, the estuary RME effort is designed to meet the research and monitoring needs of the estuary Program using an adaptive management process. Estuary RME's success and usefulness will depend on the actual conduct of adaptive management, as embodied in the objectives, implrementation, data, reporting, and synthesis, evaluation, and decision-making described herein.

Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Tortorici, Cathy; Yerxa, Tracey; Leary, J.; Skalski, John R.

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Research Gallery  

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391

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392

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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393

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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395

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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396

Research Highlight  

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397

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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398

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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399

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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400

Research Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

Research Library  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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402

Research Opportunities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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403

Research | JCESR  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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404

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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405

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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406

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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407

Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Navigating Fragmented Ocean Law in the California Current: Tools to Identify and Measure Gaps and Overlaps for Ecosystem-Based Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management . 1 Transitionet al. 2000). Transition to holistic management An excellentto transition into an ecosystem-based management approach is

Ekstrom, Julia A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to document current patterns of CO{sub 2} flux in selected locations of the circumpolar arctic, and to develop the information necessary to predict how these fluxes may be affected by climate change. In fulfillment of these objectives, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured at several sites on the North Slope of Alaska during the 1990--94 growing season (June--August) to determine the local and regional patterns of seasonal CO{sub 2} exchange. In addition, net CO{sub 2} flux was measured in the Russian and Icelandic Arctic to determine if the patterns of CO{sub 2} exchange observed in Arctic Alaska were representative of the circumpolar Arctic, while cold-season CO{sub 2} flux measurements were carried out during the 1993--94 winter season to determine the magnitude of CO{sub 2} efflux not accounted for by the growing season measurements. Manipulations of soil water table depth and surface temperature, which were identified from the extensive measurements as being the most important variables in determining the magnitude and direction of net CO{sub 2} exchange, were carried out during the 1993--94 growing seasons in tussock and wet sedge tundra ecosystems. Finally, measurements of CH{sub 4} flux were also measured at several of the North Slope study sites during the 1990--91 growing seasons.

Oechel, W.C.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Research | Energy Frontier Research Centers  

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411

Research | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center  

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412

Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Director`s overview of research performed for DOE Office of Health And Environmental Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the research undertaken at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is focused on the strategic programs of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER). These programs, which include Environmental Processes (Subsurface Science, Ecosystem Function and Response, and Atmospheric Chemistry), Global Change (Climate Change, Environmental Vulnerability, and Integrated Assessments), Biotechnology (Human Genome and Structural Biology), and Health (Health Effects and Medical Applications), have been established by OHER to support DOE business areas in science and technology and environmental quality. PNL uses a set of critical capabilities based on the Laboratory`s research facilities and the scientific and technological expertise of its staff to help OHER achieve its programmatic research goals. Integration of these capabilities across the Laboratory enables PNL to assemble multidisciplinary research teams that are highly effective in addressing the complex scientific and technical issues associated with OHER-sponsored research. PNL research efforts increasingly are focused on complex environmental and health problems that require multidisciplinary teams to address the multitude of time and spatial scales found in health and environmental research. PNL is currently engaged in research in the following areas for these OHER Divisions: Environmental Sciences -- atmospheric radiation monitoring, climate modeling, carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, ecological research, subsurface sciences, bioremediation, and environmental molecular sciences; Health Effects and Life Sciences -- cell/molecular biology, and biotechnology; Medical Applications and Biophysical Research -- analytical technology, and radiological and chemical physics. PNL`s contributions to OHER strategic research programs are described in this report.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Creating win-wins from trade-offs? Ecosystem services for human well-being: A meta-analysis of ecosystem service trade-offs and synergies in the real world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

type of ecosystem trade-off or synergy (U Stakeholder type (where a stakeholder is an individual or group using a particular ecosystem service) Do the stakeholders hav the ecosystem service o companies have a priva timber, whereas the glo public... of the stakeholders have a private interest in one or more of the ES involved. For example, the sale of trees for timber (private interest) as opposed to their maintenance for climate regulation (public interest). In order to address these hypotheses we asked a number...

Howe, Caroline; Suich, Helen; Vira, Bhaskar; Mace, Georgina M.

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Research and Development with Full Scale Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings...

Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Managed Ecosystems Goal: Colorado State University will enhance its focus and depth in undergraduate education, graduate education, research,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

value, differentiated in the marketplace and produced with much higher cost land and water resources in the 21st century in response to changes in demography, water availability, water and agricultural and policy, range science, wildlife biology and ecology, forest science, and water sciences. Purpose

417

The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources and Tourism, Dar es Salaam. Nelson, F. , E. Sulle,census 2002. NBS, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Available fromna Nyota Publishers, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Willis, R.G.

Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Ecosystem Processes and Human Influences Regulate Streamflow Response to Climate Change at Long-Term Ecological Research Sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Mary Beth Adams, Melinda H. Benson, Emery Boose, Warren A. Brown, John L. Campbell, Alan Covich, DavidMery boose, Warren a. broWn, JoHn l. CaMpbell, alan CoviCH, david W. CloW, CliFFord n. daHM, Kelly elder. Larson, Evan S. Miles, Kathleen M. Miles, Stephen D. Sebestyen, Adam T. Spargo, Asa B. Stone, James M

Williams, Mark W.

419

The role of research in evaluating conservation strategies in Tanzania: the case of the Katavi-Rukwa ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

community outreach, ecotourism, an integrated conservationin conjunction with ecotourism and citizen science, hasof natural resources; ecotourism, where the government and/

Borgerhoff Mulder, Monique; Tim, Caro; Msago, Omari Ayubu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Health Research | 2 Global Health Research Supporting researchers in low- and middle-income countries to carry out health- related research within their own countries. Gl bal Health #12;3 | Global Health Research #12;Global Health Research | 4 We are a global charitable foundation dedicated

Rambaut, Andrew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fire Impacts on the Mojave Desert Ecosystem: Literature Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) is located within the Mojave Desert, which is the driest region in North America. Precipitation on the NNSS varies from an annual average of 130 millimeters (mm; 5.1 inches) with a minimum of 47 mm (1.9 inches) and maximum of 328 mm (12.9 inches) over the past 15 year period to an annual average of 205 mm (8.1 inches) with an annual minimum of 89 mm (3.5 inches) and maximum of 391 mm (15.4 inches) for the same time period; for a Frenchman Flat location at 970 meters (m; 3182 feet) and a Pahute Mesa location at 1986 m (6516 feet), respectively. The combination of aridity and temperature extremes has resulted in sparsely vegetated basins (desert shrub plant communities) to moderately vegetated mountains (mixed coniferous forest plant communities); both plant density and precipitation increase with increasing elevation. Whereas some plant communities have evolved under fire regimes and are dependent upon fire for seed germination, plant communities within the Mojave Desert are not dependent on a fire regime and therefore are highly impacted by fire (Brown and Minnich, 1986; Brooks, 1999). As noted by Johansen (2003) natural range fires are not prevalent in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts because there is not enough vegetation present (too many shrub interspaces) to sustain a fire. Fire research and hence publications addressing fires in the Southwestern United States (U.S.) have therefore focused on forest, shrub-steppe and grassland fires caused by both natural and anthropogenic ignition sources. In the last few decades, however, invasion of mid-elevation shrublands by non-native Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens and Bromus tectorum (Hunter, 1991) have been highly correlated with increased fire frequency (Brooks and Berry, 2006; Brooks and Matchett, 2006). Coupled with the impact of climate change, which has already been shown to be playing a role in increased forest fires (Westerling et al., 2006), it is likely that the fire frequency will further increase in the Mojave Desert (Knapp 1998; Smith et al., 1987; Smith et al., 2000).

Fenstermaker Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Journal of Plankton Research Vol.20 no.10 pp.1889-1914, 1998 Responses of epilimnetic phytoplankton to experimental nutrient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Introduction Eutrophication of lake ecosystems is of great concern, in part because humans rely heavily on clean water for fish, drinking, irrigation and industry. Research on eutrophication is extensive for biological studies of eutrophication for several reasons. First, growth of primary producers is tied directly

Notre Dame, University of

423

University Research  

Office of Science (SC) Website

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424

Research Highlight  

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425

Research Highlight  

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426

Research Highlight  

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427

Research Highlight  

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428

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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429

Research Highlight  

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430

Research Highlight  

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431

Research Highlight  

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432

Research Projects  

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433

PNNL: Research  

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434

Research Areas  

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435

Research Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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436

Research Techniques  

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437

Research Tools  

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438

Research | NREL  

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439

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch Form

440

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral Formulation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral FormulationAn

442

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneral

443

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch FormGeneralIntegrated

444

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearch

445

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations at

446

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations atARM

447

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud Observations

448

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloud

449

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloudObservational

450

Research Highlight  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergyResearchCloudObservationalA

451

Integrating cultural services and social value: Novel directions for ecosystem service management, valuation, and complexity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?between?biophysical,?economic,?and?social?dimensions.? Cultural?services?have?been?sidelined?by?their?intangible?characteristics?and?perceived? incommensurability?with?traditional?ecosystem?service?valuations?(ESV).?For?instance,? ecotourism?and?recreation?are?the...,?and?aesthetic?experience,?including,?e.g.,?knowledge?systems,?social? relations,?and?aesthetic?value?;?specifically,?this?includes??cultural?diversity,?spiritual?and? religious?values,?knowledge?systems,?educational?values,?inspiration,?aesthetic?values,?social? relations,?sense?of?place,?cultural?heritage?values,?recreation?and?ecotourism...

Wallen, Kenneth E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Research review The mycorrhizal-associated nutrient economy: a new framework for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in ecosystem and earth system models. Introduction A grand challenge in ecosystem science is to develop broadly

Phillips, Richard P.

453

Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effect of primary productivity and vertical mixing on PCB dynamics in planktonic model ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiolabeled polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) [[sup 14]C]-Aroclor 1242 were added to large planktonic model ecosystems. Two experiments were conducted to determine the influence of turbulent mixing and primary productivity on fate and transport of PCBs. High productivity increased the proportion of added PCBs that were adsorbed to particulate matter and sedimented. Retention of added PCBs within the model ecosystems increased the recovery in a budget of added PCBs. Volatilization losses increased at the high-mixing and low-productivity level. Highest recovery was with a high productivity-low mixing treatment. A third experiment was conducted in which PCBs adsorbed to clay were added to the hypolimnion of one model ecosystem. Results confirmed that PCBs unaccounted for in a budget of PCBs added to the epilimnion in the same manner were lost due to volatilization. A linear-fate model was developed to describe trends in PCB concentrations as well as fate of the added PCBs. Model parameters and predicted fate of added PCBs agreed closely with observed results. The model indicated that an unmeasured pool of particulate PCBs that were probably adsorbed to colloids and fine particulates was operationally measured with the soluble fraction.

Millard, E.S.; Minns, C.K.; Charlton, C.C.; Halfon, E. (Canada Centre for Inland Waters, Burlington, Ontario (Canada))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Toward a theory of the evolution of business ecosystems : enterprise architectures, competitive dynamics, firm performance & industrial co-evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation contributes toward the building of a theory of the evolution of business ecosystems. In the process, it addresses a question that has been posed by evolutionary theorists in the economics and sociology ...

Piepenbrock, Theodore F. (Theodore Frederick), 1965-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The valuation of off-site ecosystem service ows: Deforestation, erosion and the amenity value of lakes in Prescott, Arizona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis The valuation of off-site ecosystem service ows: Deforestation, erosion and the amenity service-based strategy for managing public lands and, to support this, the development of the methods

457

Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. Gurney and Clive G. Jones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patch dynamics in a landscape modified by ecosystem engineers Justin P. Wright, William S. C. We use data collected on the population dynamics of a model engineer, the beaver, to estimate the per

458

Toxicity Bioassays for Ecological Risk Assessment in Arid and Semiarid Ecosystems. Reviews Environmental Contamination and Toxicology 168:43-98.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses current limitations for performing ecological risk assessments in dry environments (i.e., ecosystems that are characteristic of many DOE Facilities) and presents novel approaches to addressing ecological risk in such systems.

Markwiese, J.T.; Ryti, R.T.; Hooten, M.M.; Michael, D.I.; Hlohowskyj, I.

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agencys (EPA) Science and Ecosystem Support Division  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Case study details EPA's decision to address water conservation and management for its Science and Ecosystem Support Division due to a severe drought. The plan aimed to reduce potable water usage through an air handler condensate recovery project.

460

Linking Ecological Function and Ecosystem Service Values of Estaurine Habitat Types Associated with a Barrier Island System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem services are benefits humans receive as a function of natural processes. Many current studies seek to express these benefits as an economic value per unit of habitat type without quantifying the ecological functions that allow...

Francis, Jeffrey Michael

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

462

A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

EMBL-EBI's Guy Cochrane on "A Collaborative Ecosystem Model for Metagenomics Data Preservation" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

Cochrane, Guy [EMBL-EBI

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

463

Changes in ecosystem services and runoff due to land use change in the watersheds of San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

services. Barbier (1994) identified wetland ecosystem services as prevention of storm damage, flood and water flow control, support of fisheries, nutrient and waste absorption, recreation and water transport, agriculture, wildlife products, wood products...CHANGES IN ECOSYSTEM SERVICES AND RUNOFF DUE TO LAND USE CHANGE IN THE WATERSHEDS OF SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis by HEATHER GRACE HARRIS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Harris, Heather Grace

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

A hierarchical perspective on the ecology of biological invasions:: impact of red imported fire ants on grassland ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences A HIERARCHICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ECOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS: IMPACT OF RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS ON GRASSLAND ECOSYSTEMS A Thesis Revin Lee...A HIERARCHICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ECOLOGY OF BIOLOGICAL INVASIONS: IMPACT OF RED IMPORTED FIRE ANTS ON GRASSLAND ECOSYSTEMS A Thesis REVIN LEE STOKER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Stoker, Revin Lee

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Water relations strategies of two grass and shrub species as influenced by prescribed burning in a semiarid ecosystem in Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RELATIONS STRATEGIES OF TWO GRASS AND SHRUB SPECIES AS INFLUENCED BY PRESCRIBED BURNING IN A SEMIARID ECOSYSTEM IN KENYA A Thesis by ALI RAMADHAN ALI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in Partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Range Science WATER RELATIONS STRATEGIES OF TWO GRASS AND SHRUB SPECIES AS INFLUENCED BY PRESCRIBED BURNING IN A SEMIARID ECOSYSTEM IN KENYA A Thesis by ALI RAMADHAN ALI...

Ali, Ali Ramadhan

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

2012 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Research Conferences and Gordon Research Seminar, August 4-10,2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2012 Gordon Conference will present and discuss cutting-edge research in the field of microbial metabolism of C1 compounds. The conference will feature the roles and application of C1 metabolism in natural and synthetic systems at scales from molecules to ecosystems. The conference will stress molecular aspects of the unique metabolism exhibited by autotrophic bacteria, methanogens, methylotrophs, aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophs, and acetogens.

Hanson, Thomas

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT 2010 ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT2010ANNUAL RESEARCH REPORT

Jawitz, James W.

468

Please cite this article in press as: Palmer, M.A., et al., From ecosystems to ecosystem services: Stream restoration as ecological engineering. Ecol. Eng. (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.07.059  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Stream restoration as ecological engineering. Ecol. Eng. (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.elsevier.com/locate/ecoleng From ecosystems to ecosystem services: Stream restoration as ecological engineering Margaret A. Palmera Article history: Available online xxx Keywords: Ecosystem services Streams Restoration Stormwater

Palmer, Margaret A.

469

MIDWESTERN REGIONAL CENTER OF THE DOE NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR CLIMATIC CHANGE RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of NICCR (National Institute for Climatic Change Research) was to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER. The NICCR Midwestern Regional Center (MRC) supported work in the following states: North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Oklahoma, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Wisconsin, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio. The MRC of NICCR was able to support nearly $8 million in climatic change research, including $6,671,303 for twenty projects solicited and selected by the MRC over five requests for proposals (RFPs) and $1,051,666 for the final year of ten projects from the discontinued DOE NIGEC (National Institute for Global Environmental Change) program. The projects selected and funded by the MRC resulted in 135 peer-reviewed publications and supported the training of 25 PhD students and 23 Masters students. Another 36 publications were generated by the final year of continuing NIGEC projects supported by the MRC. The projects funded by the MRC used a variety of approaches to answer questions relevant to the DOEs climate change research program. These included experiments that manipulated temperature, moisture and other global change factors; studies that sought to understand how the distribution of species and ecosystems might change under future climates; studies that used measurements and modeling to examine current ecosystem fluxes of energy and mass and those that would exist under future conditions; and studies that synthesized existing data sets to improve our understanding of the effects of climatic change on terrestrial ecosystems. In all of these efforts, the MRC specifically sought to identify and quantify responses of terrestrial ecosystems that were not well understood or not well modeled by current efforts. The MRC also sought to better understand and model important feedbacks between terrestrial ecosystems, atmospheric chemistry, and regional and global climate systems. The broad variety of projects the MRC has supported gave us a unique opportunity to greatly improve our ability to predict the future health, composition and function of important agricultural and natural terrestrial ecosystems within the Midwestern Region.

Burton, Andrew J. [Michigan Technological University

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

470

Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Public Interest Energy Research Program Research Development and Demonstration Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demonstration Plan Attachment IV - Carbon Sequestration in California's Terrestrial Ecosystems and Geological ..................................................................................................................................1 3.1 Global Warming and the Need for Carbon Sequestration.....................................................1 3.2 Carbon Sequestration Basics

472

Research and Commercialization Grants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Board of Research and Commercialization Technology provides grants for renewable resource research and development projects, among other types, to be conducted at research and commercialization...

473

Research Library Discontinues OPPIE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About the Library Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Research Library Discontinues OPPIE Find more information below. Questions? 505-667-5809 Email The Research Library is...

474

Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Platforms for Assessing Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a quick and safe method for monitoring biotic resources was evaluated. Vegetation cover and the amount of bare ground are important factors in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems and assessment of rangeland health. Methods that improve speed and cost efficiency could greatly improve how biotic resources are monitored on western lands. Sagebrush steppe ecosystems provide important habitat for a variety of species (including sage grouse and pygmy rabbit). Improved methods are needed to support monitoring these habitats because there are not enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, two UAV platforms, fixed wing and helicopter, were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover in sagebrush steppe ecosystems. This paper discusses the process for collecting and analyzing imagery from the UAVs to (1) estimate percent cover for six different vegetation types (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forb, litter, and bare ground) and (2) locate sage grouse using representative decoys. The field plots were located on the Idaho National Engineering (INL) site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho, in areas with varying amounts and types of vegetation cover. A software program called SamplePoint was used along with visual inspection to evaluate percent cover for the six cover types. Results were compared against standard field measurements to assess accuracy. The comparison of fixed-wing and helicopter UAV technology against field estimates shows good agreement for the measurement of bare ground. This study shows that if a high degree of detail and data accuracy is desired, then a helicopter UAV may be a good platform to use. If the data collection objective is to assess broad-scale landscape level changes, then the collection of imagery with a fixed-wing system is probably more appropriate.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Sera White

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Distribution and fate of technical chlordane and mirex residues in a central Texas aquatic ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIST!(IDU!'IO;l AitlD l=A! E OF TEC;lN!CAL CNLOROAN. Al, 'D illREX RESIDUES IiN A CEiNTRAL TLXAS AQUA IC ECOSYSTEH A Thesis by HAROLD ERLE JANSSEN, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College o F Texas Anil Universi ty in partia1 fulfillment... of the requirement for the dec!ree of NASTER OF SC1El&CE Nay 1976 Najor Subject: Civil Engineering DISTRIBUTION AND FATE OF TECHNICAL CHLORDAI'lE AND llIREX RESIDUES IN A CENTRAl TEXAS AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by HAROLD ERLE JANSSEN, JR. Approved...

Janssen, Harold Erle

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Metal uptake by agricultural plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two agricultural species at a study site where ecosystem restoration practices (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brewer, S.R. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)] [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

The effects of PAT on the Savannah River ecosystem, particularly fisheries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the pre-startup activities at K-Reactor, i.e., Power Ascension Testing (PAT), have caused damage because of temperature rises in the Savannah River. Therefore, the biological studies were mainly aimed at providing information as to changes that might cause the damage of the fish population, and to other important organisms in the ecosystem. To determine if deleterious effects had occurred, one had to review the past studies to determine the condition and diversity of aquatic life before these PAT studies started. Therefore old reports were reviewed and a current study made in 1992.

Patrick, R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a synthesis project of a long-term global change experiment conducted at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, investigating how increasing concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) influences the functioning of a fire-dominated scrub-oak ecosystem. The experiment began in 1996 and ended in 2007. Results presented here summarize the effects of elevated CO2 on plant growth, soil processes, carbon and nutrient cycling, and other responses. Products include archived data from the experiment, as well as six publications in the peer-reviewed literature.

Hungate, Bruce

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

479

Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

480

Ecosystem Controls on C & N Sequestration Following Afforestation of Agricultural Lands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In our project, we proposed to continue analysis of our available soil samples and data, and to develop new studies to answer the following objectives: Objective 1) Broaden field based studies of ecosystem C and N compartments to enhance current understanding of C and N sequestration and dynamics. Objective 2) Improve our understanding of mechanism controlling C and N stabilization and dynamics. Objective 3) Investigate the interrelated role of soil temperature and organism type and activity as controlling mechanism in SOC dynamics and sequestration.

E.A. Paul, S.J. Morris, R.T. Conant

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "transect ecosystem research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division: Best Management Practice Case Study #14; Alternate Water Sources (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FEMP Water Efficiency Best Management Practice #14 Case Study: Overview of the air handler condensate recovery program at the Environmental Protection Agency's Science and Ecosystem Support Division.

Not Available

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Impacts of indigenous and exotic tree species on ecosystem services : Case study on the mountain cloud forests of Taita Hills, Kenya.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Although forest ecosystems are crucial for human survival they are constantly under threat from human interventions and natural disasters which reduce their capacities to effectively (more)

Omoro, Loice M A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

How Argonne's Intense Pulsed Neutron Source came to life and gained its niche : the view from an ecosystem perspective.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At first glance the story of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) appears to have followed a puzzling course. When researchers first proposed their ideas for an accelerator-driven neutron source for exploring the structure of materials through neutron scattering, the project seemed so promising that both Argonne managers and officials at the laboratory's funding agency, the Department of Energy (DOE), suggested that it be made larger and more expensive. But then, even though prototype building, testing, and initial construction went well a group of prominent DOE reviewers recommended in fall 1980 that it be killed, just months before it had been slated to begin operation, and DOE promptly accepted the recommendation. In response, Argonne's leadership declared the project was the laboratory's top priority and rallied to save it. In late 1982, thanks to another review panel led by the same scientist who had chaired the panel that had delivered the death sentence, the project was granted a reprieve. However, by the late 1980s, the IPNS was no longer top priority within the international materials science community, at Argonne, or within the DOE budget because prospects for another, larger materials science accelerator emerged. At just this point, the facility started to produce exciting scientific results. For the next two decades, the IPNS, its research, and its experts became valued resources at Argonne, within the U.S. national laboratory system, and within the international materials science community. Why did this Argonne project prosper and then almost suffer premature death, even though it promised (and later delivered) good science? How was it saved and how did it go on to have a long, prosperous life for more than a quarter of a century? In particular, what did an expert assessment of the quality of IPNS science have to do with its fate? Getting answers to such questions is important. The U.S. government spends a lot of money to produce science and technology at multipurpose laboratories like Argonne. For example, in the mid-1990s, about the time the IPNS's fortunes were secured, DOE spent more than $6 billion a year to fund nine such facilities, with Argonne's share totaling $500 million. And an important justification for funding these expensive laboratories is that they operate expensive but powerful scientific tools like the IPNS, generally considered too large to be built and managed by universities. Clearly, 'life and death' decision making has a lot to tell us about how the considerable U.S. federal investment in science and technology at national laboratories is actually transacted and, indeed, how a path is cleared or blocked for good science to be produced. Because forces within Argonne, DOE, and the materials science community obviously dictated the changing fortunes of the IPNS, it makes sense to probe the interactions binding these three environments for an understanding of how the IPNS was threatened and how it survived. In other words, sorting out what happened requires analyzing the system that includes all three environments. In an attempt to find a better way to understand its twists and turns, I will view the life-and-death IPNS story through the lens of an ecological metaphor. Employing the ideas and terms that ecologists use to describe what happens in a system of shared resources, that is, an ecosystem, I will describe the IPNS as an organism that vied with competitors for resources to find a niche in the interrelated environments of Argonne, DOE, and the materials science community. I will start with an explanation of the Argonne 'ecosystem' before the advent of the IPNS and then describe how the project struggled to emerge in the 1970s, how it scratched its way to a fragile niche in the early 1980s, and how it adapted and matured through the turn of the 21st century. The paper will conclude with a summary of what the ecosystem perspective shows about the life and death struggle of the IPNS and reflect on what that perspective reveals about how researc

Westfall, C.; Office of The Director

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

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Energy Frontier Research Centers | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | Research Areas | Energy Frontier Research Centers SHARE Energy Frontier Research Centers Advanced Materials research...

485

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation or ecosystem services (Daily, 1997). These include ecological functions such as water purification, air, USA d Eastern Forest Environmental Threat Assessment Center, USDA Forest Service Southern Research

Hargrove, William W.

486

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an important step in developing environmental monitoring systems that can help prevent and/or minimize to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors negative impacts on ecosystem function. Due to the nature of military land use, it may degrade or fragment

Florida, University of

487

UNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 6(3): 45-62 (2004) An ecological assessment of the trophic structure of York Pond in Coos County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as nutrient loading through poor farming practices, development of wetland systems and riparian zonesUNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 6(3): 45-62 (2004) An ecological assessment composition and interspecific interactions), which is the driving force behind biocomplexity of the ecosystem

New Hampshire, University of

488

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling Survey, Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718, USA 3 Department parasite species in many branches of parasitology, and few people in the next generation of scientists

Sehgal, Ravinder

489

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

490

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

491

Using Unmanned Helicopters to Assess Vegetation Cover in Sagebrush Steppe Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evaluating vegetation cover is an important factor in understanding the sustainability of many ecosystems. Methods that have sufficient accuracy and improved cost efficiency could dramatically alter how biotic resources are monitored on both public and private lands. This will be of interest to land managers because there are rarely enough resource specialists or funds available for comprehensive ground evaluations. In this project, unmanned helicopters were used to collect still-frame imagery to assess vegetation cover during May, June, and July in 2005. The images were used to estimate percent cover for six vegetative cover classes (shrub, dead shrub, grass, forbs, litter, and bare ground). The field plots were located on the INL site west of Idaho Falls, Idaho. Ocular assessments of digital imagery were performed using a software program called SamplePoint, and the results were compared against field measurements collected using a point-frame method to assess accuracy. The helicopter imagery evaluation showed a high degree of agreement with field cover class values for litter, bare ground, and grass, and reasonable agreement for dead shrubs. Shrub cover was often overestimated and forbs were generally underestimated. The helicopter method took 45% less time than the field method to set plots and collect and analyze data. This study demonstrates that UAV technology provides a viable method for monitoring vegetative cover on rangelands in less time and with lower costs. Tradeoffs between cost and accuracy are critical management decisions that are important when managing vegetative conditions across vast sagebrush ecosystems throughout the Intermountain West.

Robert P. Breckenridge; Maxine Dakins; Stephen Bunting; Jerry Harbour; Randy Lee

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Impacts of nitrogen on forests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 directed EPA to establish standards for use and disposal of sewage sludge (biosolids). This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in non-agricultural ecosystems. Ecological risk assessments rarely focus on nutrients as stressors. The nutrient components of municipal sewage sludge may impact tree community composition, growth and production, habitat and forage quality for wildlife, and nutrient cycling. The focus here is on three forest ecosystems: northwestern Douglas-fir forest (Pack Forest, WA), southeastern loblolly pine plantation (Athens, GA), and eastern deciduous forest (Hubbard Brook, NH). A model called LINKAGES has been developed at ORNL to examine the relationships between nitrogen cycling and long-term forest stand dynamics, limited by climate and soil water status. Plant-available nitrogen from biosolids is added in several application scenarios and compared to the no-amendment case. All changes are noted, even if they may be viewed as benefits rather than risks. Model outputs include: above-ground biomass, individual species biomass, net above-ground production, leaf litter, evapotranspiration, available nitrogen, and dead trunks. The changes in plant community composition and production are dependent on the rate, frequency, and duration of sludge application and on the age of the stand at the time of application. Model outputs are compared to empirical studies of forests where biosolids have been applied.

Efroymson, R.A.; Tharp, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; Sample, B.E.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

493

Restoring Resiliency: Case Studies from Pacific Northwest Estuarine Eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of many ecological restoration projects is to establish an ecosystem with fully developed structure and function that exhibits resistance to and resilience from disturbances. Coastal restoration projects in the Pacific Northwest provide opportunities to understand what is required to restore the resilience of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) populations. Factors influencing resilience observed in three case studies of eelgrass restoration include minimum viable population, adaptations of transplant populations, and natural and anthropogenic disturbances at restoration sites. The evaluation of resiliency depends on selecting appropriate monitoring metrics and the frequency and duration of monitoring. Eelgrass area, cover and shoot density provide useful and reliable metrics for quantifying resilience of restored meadows. Further, five years of monitoring of these metrics provides data that can reasonably predict the long-term viability of a planted plot. Eelgrass appears to be a resilient ecosystem in general, though one that data suggest may exhibit tipping points brought about by compounded environmental conditions outside of its tolerance ranges. Explicit inclusion of resilience in the planning and practice of habitat restoration may reduce uncertainties and improve the performance of restored systems by increasing buffering capacity, nurturing sources of renewal (e.g., seeds and rhizomes), and managing for habitat forming and maintaining processes (e.g., sediment dynamics) at multiple scales.

Thom, Ronald M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Research Foundation Research Foundation Medical Student Research Fellowships Scientists of Tomorrow #12 medical Provides medical Sarnoff Cardiovascular Sarnoff Cardiovascular Research Foundation Research

Bushman, Frederic

495

AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

Law, B E

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

496

Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Nevada Desert FACE Facility (NDFF)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. NDFF whole-ecosystem manipulation is a flagship experiment of the Terrestrial Carbon Process (TCP) research program of the US Dept. of Energy. It is also a core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) and a contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The NDFF was developed in conjunction with the National Science Foundation (NSF) and DOE-EPSCoR programs. FACE (Free-Air-Carbon dioxide-Enrichment) technology allows researchers to elevate the carbon dioxide level in large study plots while minimizing ecosystem disturbance. At the NDFF the concentration of CO2 was elevated by 50 percent above the present atmospheric levels in three plots in the Mojave Desert ecosystem, while six other plots remained at the current level. This experimental design provided a large area in which integrated teams of scientists could describe and quantify processes regulating carbon, nutrient, and water balances in desert ecosystems.

497

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ renewable/ November 2010 Sonoma County RESCO A Local Level Approach to Renewable Energy Portfolios. The Issue To address energy usage that contributes to climate change, California has enacted legislation to guide

498

External Research Funding Agreements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 External Research Funding Agreements University Policy No: RH8200 Classification: Research and university employees under Research Funding Agreements. DEFINITIONS 2.00 Research Funding Agreement means funding provided through an agreement with the university to be used for research purposes, whether

Victoria, University of

499

Forest Research: Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

500

Transforming Health Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transforming Health Research the first two years National Institute for Health Research Progress For Information R OCR R ef: 0 Gateway R ef: 9298 Title Transforming Health Research the first two years. Health Institute for Health Research Progress Report i Transforming Health Research the first two years National

Diggle, Peter J.