National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for trans-mexican volcanic belt

  1. Laterally bendable belt conveyor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterson, William J.

    1985-01-01

    An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

  2. Belt attachment and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schneider, Abraham D.; Davidson, Erick M.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein is a belt assembly including a flexible belt with an improved belt attachment. The belt attachment includes two crossbars spaced along the length of the belt. The crossbars retain bearings that allow predetermined movement in six degrees of freedom. The crossbars are connected by a rigid body that attaches to the bearings. Implements that are attached to the rigid body are simply supported but restrained in pitching rotation.

  3. Replace V-Belts with Notched or Synchronous Belt Drives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... However, synchronous belts are noisier than V-belts, less suited for use on shock-loaded ... However, notched belts may be a better choice when vibration damping is needed or shock ...

  4. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian ...

  5. SLH Timing Belt Powertrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, Abe

    2014-04-09

    The main goal of this proposal was to develop and test a novel powertrain solution for the SLH hydroEngine, a low-cost, efficient low-head hydropower technology. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. renewable electricity is produced by hydropower (EIA 2010). According to the U.S. Department of Energy; this amount could be increased by 50% with small hydropower plants, often using already-existing dams (Hall 2004). There are more than 80,000 existing dams, and of these, less than 4% generate power (Blankinship 2009). In addition, there are over 800 irrigation districts in the U.S., many with multiple, non-power, low-head drops. These existing, non-power dams and irrigation drops could be retrofitted to produce distributed, baseload, renewable energy with appropriate technology. The problem is that most existing dams are low-head, or less than 30 feet in height (Ragon 2009). Only about 2% of the available low-head hydropower resource in the U.S. has been developed, leaving more than 70 GW of annual mean potential low-head capacity untapped (Hall 2004). Natel Energy, Inc. is developing a low-head hydropower turbine that operates efficiently at heads less than 6 meters and is cost-effective for deployment across multiple low-head structures. Because of the unique racetrack-like path taken by the prime-movers in the SLH, a flexible powertrain is required. Historically, the only viable technological solution was roller chain. Despite the having the ability to easily attach blades, roller chain is characterized by significant drawbacks, including high cost, wear, and vibration from chordal action. Advanced carbon- fiber-reinforced timing belts have been recently developed which, coupled with a novel belt attachment system developed by Natel Energy, result in a large reduction in moving parts, reduced mass and cost, and elimination of chordal action for increased fatigue life. The work done in this project affirmatively addressed each of the following 3 major uncertainties concerning

  6. SunBelt Biofuels | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SunBelt Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SunBelt Biofuels Name: SunBelt Biofuels Place: Soperton, Georgia Zip: 30457 Sector: Biomass Product: Freedom Giant Miscanthus...

  7. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  8. Replace V-Belts with Notched or Synchronous Belt Drives | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy V-Belts with Notched or Synchronous Belt Drives Replace V-Belts with Notched or Synchronous Belt Drives Belt drives provide flexibility in the positioning of the motor relative to the load. Pulleys (sheaves) of varying diameters allow the speed of the driven equipment to be increased or decreased relative to the motor speed. A properly designed belt power-transmission system offers high efficiency and low noise, requires no lubrication, and presents low maintenance requirements.

  9. San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern

  10. Upgrading Orinoco belt heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcantara, J.; Castillo, O.

    1982-09-01

    The Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt of Venezuela is a subsurface geological formation of petroleum-bearing sands that is approximately 700 km long and between 60 and 80 km wide. The results of recent explorations have shown the area to contain over one trillion barrels of oil in-place, ranging from 8/sup 0/ API to 14/sup 0/ APE gravity. In an effort to develop these resources, Petroleos de Venezuela has undertaken a program to evaluate and develop this heavy oil belt. The objectives of this program are discussed along with the process technology selection, pilot plants, and environmental protection measures. (JMT)

  11. Upgrading Orinoco Belt heavy oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliantara, J.; Castillo, O.

    1982-05-01

    Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA), in an effort to develop new oil resources, has undertaken a program to evaluate and develop the Orinoco Heavy Oil Belt, in the eastern part of Venezuela. Lagoven, S.A., a subsidiary of PDVSA, has been assigned the responsibility for developing and upgrading part of the Orinoco belt. This paper describes the most relevant aspects of Lagoven's first upgrading module, a facility that will convert Orinoco oil into a premium crude with a very high yield of products of great market demand.

  12. Synchronous and Cogged Fan Belt Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, D.; Dean, J.; Acosta, J.

    2014-02-01

    The GSA Regional GPG Team commissioned the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to perform monitoring of cogged V-belts and synchronous belts on both a constant volume and a variable air volume fan at the Byron G. Rodgers Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Denver, Colorado. These motor/fan combinations were tested with their original, standard V-belts (appropriately tensioned by an operation and maintenance professional) to obtain a baseline for standard operation. They were then switched to the cogged V-belts, and finally to synchronous belts. The power consumption by the motor was normalized for both fan speed and air density changes. This was necessary to ensure that the power readings were not influenced by a change in rotational fan speed or by the power required to push denser air. Finally, energy savings and operation and maintenance savings were compiled into an economic life-cycle cost analysis of the different belt options.

  13. CD-2: Orogenic Belt | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    basin or orogenic mountain belt. Significant crustal subsidence (up to several kilometers) occurs in sedimentary sequences. This subsidence is due to the weight of the...

  14. Corn Belt Power Cooperative Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Corn Belt Power Cooperative is a generation and transmission electric cooperative that provides power to nine distribution rural electric cooperatives and one municipal electric cooperative. These...

  15. Belt Vision Inspection System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in mining conveyance systems. Provides a user interface for belt inspection at installation points using software that controls the cameras, collects encoder data, and ...

  16. Volcanic studies at Katmai

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-31

    The Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) is a national effort supported by the Department of Energy, the US Geological Survey, and the National Science Foundation. One of the projects proposed for the CSDP consists of drilling a series of holes in Katmai National Park in Alaska to give a third dimension to the model of the 1912 eruption of Novarupta, and to investigate the processes of explosive volcanism and hydrothermal transport of metals (Eichelberger et al., 1988). The proposal for research drilling at Katmai states that ``the size, youth, elevated temperature, and simplicity of the Novarupta vent make it a truly unique scientific target.`` The National Park Service (NPS), which has jurisdiction, is sympathetic to aims of the study. However, NPS wishes to know whether Katmai is indeed uniquely suited to the research, and has asked the Interagency Coordinating Group to support an independent assessment of this claim. NPS suggested the National Academy of Sciences as an appropriate organization to conduct the assessment. In response, the National Research Council -- the working arm of the Academy -- established, under the aegis of its US Geodynamics Committee, a panel whose specific charge states: ``The proposed investigation at Katmai has been extensively reviewed for scientific merit by the three sponsoring and participating agencies. Thus, the scientific merit of the proposed drilling at Katmai is not at issue. The panel will review the proposal for scientific drilling at Katmai and prepare a short report addressing the specific question of the degree to which it is essential that the drilling be conducted at Katmai as opposed to volcanic areas elsewhere in the world.``

  17. Study finds surprising variability in shape of Van Allen Belts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Study finds surprising variability in shape of Van Allen Belts Study finds surprising variability in shape of Van Allen Belts Understanding the shape and size of the belts, which shrink and swell in response to magnetic storms coming from the sun, is crucial for protecting our technology in space. February 23, 2016 1. The traditional idea of the radiation belts includes a larger, more dynamic outer belt and a smaller, more stable inner belt with an empty slot region separating the two. However,

  18. Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace Authors: Reeves, ...

  19. Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Radiation Belts and Ring Current The Energetic Geospace You are accessing a ...

  20. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, W.

    1983-09-20

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched there between. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants. 4 figs.

  1. Electric filter with movable belt electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Werner

    1983-01-01

    A method and apparatus for removing airborne contaminants entrained in a gas or airstream includes an electric filter characterized by a movable endless belt electrode, a grounded electrode, and a filter medium sandwiched therebetween. Inclusion of the movable, endless belt electrode provides the driving force for advancing the filter medium through the filter, and reduces frictional drag on the filter medium, thereby permitting a wide choice of filter medium materials. Additionally, the belt electrode includes a plurality of pleats in order to provide maximum surface area on which to collect airborne contaminants.

  2. Congressional panel makes recommendations on belt safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-12-15

    The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act) called for a Technical Study Panel to present a review and make recommendations on the use of belt air and the composition and fire retardant properties of belt materials in underground coal mining. In October 2007 the Panel released 20 recommendations publicly. These are presented in the article. Many recommendations encouraged the MSHA to enforce existing laws of maintenance and fire protection or example more vigorously. Maybe the biggest change recommended was that the industry should adopt the Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT) standard proposed in 1992. Another important recommendation was one that would help eliminate hazards associated with point feeding. 1 photo.

  3. Picture of the Week: Bulging Van Allen Belts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Bulging Van Allen Belts Learn about the Van Allen Belts and how new findings from NASA's Van Allen Probes could impact how we protect technology in space. February 25, 2016 Bulging Van Allen Belts Watch the video on YouTube. Bulging Van Allen Belts Learn about the Van Allen Belts and how new findings from NASA's Van Allen Probes could impact how we protect technology in space

  4. A new picture of the Van Allen Belts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A new picture of the Van Allen Belts A new picture of the Van Allen Belts A study conducted by Los Alamos and the New Mexico Consortium reveals that the shape of the Van Allen Belts is actually quite different than previously believed. January 21, 2016 van allen belts During geomagnetic storms, the empty region between the two belts can fill in completely with lower-energy electrons. Traditionally, scientists thought this slot region filled in only during the most extreme geomagnetic storms

  5. Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HOPE for radiation belt storm probes Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes The HOPE analyzer is one of a suite of instruments that was successfully launched as part of the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission. August 30, 2012 Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Artist's rendering showing two

  6. Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic...

  7. Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic...

  8. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui Blind...

  9. Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic...

  10. Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field...

  11. Gold deposits in the late Archaean Nzega-Igunga greenstone belt, central plateau of tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feiss, P.G.; Siyomana, S.

    1985-01-01

    2.2 m oz of gold have been produced, since 1935, from late Archaean (2480-2740 Ma) greenstone belts of the Central Plateau, Tanzania. North and east of Nzega (4/sup 0/12'S, 3/sup 0/11'E), 18% of the exposed basement, mainly Dodoman schists and granites, consists of metavolcanics and metasediments of the Nyanzian and Kavirondian Series. Four styles of mineralization are observed. 1. Stratabound quartz-gold veins with minor sulfides. Host rocks are quartz porphyry, banded iron formation (BIF), magnetite quartzite, and dense, cherty jasperite at the Sekenke and Canuck mines. The Canuck veins are on strike from BIF's in quartz-eye porphyry of the Igusule Hills. 2. Stratabound, disseminated gold in coarse-grained, crowded feldspar porphyry with lithic fragments and minor pyrite. At Bulangamilwa, the porphyry is conformable with Nyanzian-aged submarine (.) greenstone, volcanic sediment, felsic volcanics, and sericite phyllite. The deposits are on strike with BIF of the Wella Hills, which contains massive sulfide with up to 15% Pb+Zn. 3. Disseminated gold in quartz-albite metasomes in Nyanzian greenstones. At Kirondatal, alteration is associated with alaskites and feldspar porphyry dikes traceable several hundred meters into post-Dodoman diorite porphyry. Gold is with pyrite, arsenopyrite, pyrrhotite, minor chalcopyrite, and sphalerite as well as tourmalinite and silica-cemented breccias. 4. Basal Kavirondian placers in metaconglomerates containing cobbles and boulders of Dodoman and Nyanzian rocks several hundred meters up-section from the stratabound, disseminated mineralization at Bulangamilwa.

  12. New compounds will help coal operators comply with BELT standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    US coal producers will soon have a new set of conveyor belting standards, which are currently proposed as a rulemaking by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), to bring higher levels of resistance to propagation of fire by a secondary source. The new test being put into effect is known as a Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT). The article, submitted by Fenner Dunlop, discusses the company's testing procedures and the development of conveyors to comply with regulations. 2 photos.

  13. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, J.A.; Stewart, W.F.; Henke, M.D.; Kalash, K.E.

    1986-04-03

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77 K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

  14. Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barclay, John A.; Stewart, Walter F.; Henke, Michael D.; Kalash, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

  15. Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Priest, G.R.

    1987-01-01

    A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

  16. Mysterious electron stash found hidden among Van Allen belts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    have confirmed a never-before-seen phenomenon-a long-lived zone of high-energy electrons residing between the inner and outer radiation belts. (Credit: NASA illustration)...

  17. Angle stations in or for endless conveyor belts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steel, Alan

    1987-04-07

    In an angle station for an endless conveyor belt, there are presented to each incoming run of the belt stationary curved guide members (18, 19) of the shape of a major segment of a right-circular cylinder and having in the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) thereof rectangular openings (15) arranged in parallel and helical paths and through which project small freely-rotatable rollers (14), the continuously-changing segments of the curved surfaces of which projecting through said openings (15) are in attitude to change the direction of travel of the belt (13) through 90.degree. during passage of the belt about the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) of the guide member (18 or 19). The rectangular openings (15) are arranged with their longer edges lengthwise of the diagonals representing the mean of the helix but with those of a plurality of the rows nearest to each end of the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) slightly out of axial symmetry with said diagonals, being slightly inclined in a direction about the intersections (40) of the diagonals of the main portion of the openings, to provide a "toe-in" attitude in relation to the line of run of the endless conveyor belt.

  18. Geometry and evolution of the frontal part of the Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt (Vicuna Area), Tierra del Fuego, southern Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; McClay, K.R. ); Harambour, S.; Rojas, L.; Skarmeta, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt is a thin-skinned foreland thrust and fold belt of Paleocene to Oligocene age that deforms Upper Jurassic through Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and siliciclastic strata of the Magallanes basin, southern Andean Cordillera, Chile. This paper is a detailed description and analysis of the geology and structural evolution of the thrust front (Vicuna area of southern Tierra del Fuego). Reflection seismic and well data, together with 1:50,000 scale geological mapping, have been used in the analysis. In the southern part of the Vicuna area, two different thrust systems have been found: an upper imbricate fan that deforms Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, and a younger, lower duplex composed of Cretaceous and probably Upper Jurassic rocks. The imbricate fan is characterized by fault-propagation folding in which listric thrust faults merge downward into a sole thrust that probably is located within the Upper Jurassic stratigraphy. The sole thrust of the upper imbricates forms the roof thrust of the underlying duplex. In the northern part of the Vicuna area, the syntectonic sedimentary wedge of the foredeep consists of Late Cretaceous through Tertiary siliciclastics that have been deformed and uplifted by passive back thrusting at the triangle zone. The structural style in the foreland region shows three main subhorizontal detachment levels located within the sedimentary wedge as a result of the progressive transfer of slip from the thrust belt to the foreland. Minor blind thrusts produce stacked [open quotes]pop up[close quotes] and triangle structures that result in complex geometries in the cores of anticlines. A forward-breaking sequence of thrusting is interpreted. During deformation, the active foredeep wedge migrated at least 10 km northward. Balanced geological cross sections indicate approximately 60% (-30 km) shortening for this part of the Magallanes thrust belt.

  19. Early Proterozoic transcontinental orogenic belts in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Schmus, W.R. . Dept. of Geology); Bickford, M.E. . Dept. of Geology); Condie, K.C. . Dept. Geoscience)

    1993-02-01

    It has been recognized for many years that Early Proterozoic orogenic rocks in the western US range from 1.8 to 1.6 Ga, with a general distribution such that 1.8 to 1.7 Ga rocks underlie Colorado, northern Arizona, and northern New Mexico and 1.7 to 1.6 Ga rocks underlie southern Arizona and southern New Mexico. Recent U-Pb geochronologic and Sm-Nd isotopic studies by a variety of research groups have refined crustal history in the western region and have extended knowledge eastward into the buried midcontinent basement. As a result, the authors propose that 1.8 Ga to 1.6 Ga crust of the US by divided into two distinct, but overlapping, orogenic belts: a 1.8 to 1.7 Ga Inner Accretionary Belt and a 1.7 to 1.6 Ga Outer Tectonic Belt. The Inner Accretionary Belt (IAB) comprises rock suites with compositions and isotopic signatures compatible with origin as juvenile crustal terranes formed as oceanic or off-shore and related terranes that were accreted to southern Laurentia between 1.8 and 1.6 Ga. The IAB includes the Yavapai Province of Arizona, Early Proterozoic basement of Colorado and southern Wyoming, and the basement of Nebraska. The Mojave Province of California may be part of this belt, although it also includes components derived from older Proterozoic or Archean crust. Extension of the IAB eastward from Nebraska is uncertain at present, although coeval rocks that may be eastern manifestations of this 1.8 to 1.7 Ga orogenesis occur in Wisconsin (1.76 Ga granite-rhyolite suite), Ontario (Killarney granite), Labrador (Makkovic Province) and southern Greenland (Ketilidian orogen). The Outer Tectonic Belt (OTB) comprises rock suites which have compositions, structures, and isotopic signature compatible with origin in continental margin tectonic settings between 1.7 and 1.6 Ga.

  20. Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balasingam, Pirahas; Park, Jinyong; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W.

    2005-03-01

    A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty

  1. Dotiki saves money and time with power tool and belt fasteners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargo, K.

    2009-11-15

    The use of a Hilti power tool to improve belt splice installations to minimise downtime is described. 3 photos.

  2. Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Fromme

    2006-06-01

    This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of low-cost prototype hardware, acquisition of infrared thermal data, and initial design of a Smart-Camera based system.

  3. Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Fromme

    2006-06-01

    This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

  4. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thompson, 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Thompson, 1985) Exploration...

  6. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical...

  7. Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  8. Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Francisco...

  9. Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco...

  10. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)...

  11. Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness...

  12. Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen...

  13. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael...

  14. Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration...

  15. Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity...

  16. Collection and Analysis of Geothermal and Volcanic Water and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal and Volcanic Water and Gas Discharges Authors Werner F. Giggenbach and R.L. Goguel Published Department of Scientific and Industrial Research, Chemistry Division,...

  17. A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge...

  18. Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

  19. Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David LaRose

    2006-07-01

    This document details progress on the project ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2005 to May 14, 2006. Highlights include significant improvements in the accuracy and reliability of computer-vision based vulcanized splice detection, deployment of the vulcanized splice detection algorithms for daily use in two working mines, and successful demonstration of an early prototype of a Smart-Camera based system for on-site mechanical splice detection in coal mine installations.

  20. Effective Conveyer Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David LaRose

    2006-11-14

    This document details progress on the project ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from May 15, 2006 to November 14, 2006. Progress during this period includes significant advances in development of a Smart Camera based prototype system for on-site mechanical splice detection, and continued deployment of both the mechanical splice detection system and the vulcanized splice detection system in area coal mines.

  1. Data From HANE-Generated Radiation Belts and the Origin of Diffusion Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winske, Dan

    2012-07-16

    In this presentation we briefly review some of the published data regarding the artificial radiation belts produced by the Starfish and R2 high altitude nuclear explosions in 1962. The data showed slow temporal variations of the belts in altitude (L) and pitch angle ({alpha}) that could be modeled as a diffusion process. That early work formed the basis for more complex radiation belt diffusion models that are in use at present.

  2. DREAM3D simulations of inner-belt dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, Gregory Scott

    2015-05-26

    A 1973 paper by Lyons and Thorne explains the two-belt structure for electrons in the inner magnetosphere as a balance between inward radial diffusion and loss to the atmosphere, where the loss to the atmosphere is enabled by pitch-angle scattering from Coulomb and wave-particle interactions. In the 1973 paper, equilibrium solutions to a decoupled set of 1D radial diffusion equations, one for each value of the first invariant of motion, ?, were computed to produce the equilibrium two-belt structure. Each 1D radial diffusion equation incorporated an L-and ?-dependent `lifetime' due to the Coulomb and wave-particle interactions. This decoupling of the problem is appropriate under the assumption that radial diffusion is slow in comparison to pitch-angle scattering. However, for some values of ? and L the lifetime associated with pitch-angle scattering is comparable to the timescale associated with radial diffusion, suggesting that the true equilibrium solutions might reflect `coupled modes' involving pitch-angle scattering and radial diffusion and thus requiring a 3D diffusion model. In the work we show here, we have computed the equilibrium solutions using our 3D diffusion model, DREAM3D, that allows for such coupling. We find that the 3D equilibrium solutions are quite similar to the solutions shown in the 1973 paper when we use the same physical models for radial diffusion and pitch-angle scattering from hiss. However, we show that the equilibrium solutions are quite sensitive to various aspects of the physics model employed in the 1973 paper that can be improved, suggesting that additional work needs to be done to understand the two-belt structure.

  3. Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation,...

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal history...

  5. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  6. A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A...

  7. A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Miocene...

  8. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots Simulations Run at NERSC Show How Seismic Waves Travel Through Mantle September 2, 2015 Robert Sanders, rlsanders@berkeley.edu, (510) 643-6998 NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project Title: Imaging and Calibration of Mantle Structure at Global and Regional Scales Using Full-Waveform Seismic Tomography NERSC Resources Used:

  9. Volcanic hazards of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1994-12-01

    Potential volcanic hazards are assessed, and hazard zone maps are developed for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and adjacent areas. The basis of the hazards assessment and mapping is the past volcanic history of the INEL region, and the apparent similarity of INEL volcanism with equivalent, well-studied phenomena in other regions of active volcanism, particularly Hawaii and Iceland. The most significant hazards to INEL facilities are associated with basaltic volcanism, chiefly lava flows, which move slowly and mainly threaten property by inundation or burning. Related hazards are volcanic gases and tephra, and ground disturbance associated with the ascent of magma under the volcanic zones. Several volcanic zones are identified in the INEL area. These zones contain most of the volcanic vents and fissures of the region and are inferred to be the most probable sites of future INEL volcanism. Volcanic-recurrence estimates are given for each of the volcanic zones based on geochronology of the lavas, together with the results of field and petrographic investigations concerning the cogenetic relationships of INEL volcanic deposits and associated magma intrusion. Annual probabilities of basaltic volcanism within the INEL volcanic zones range from 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 16,000-year interval between eruptions) for the axial volcanic zone near the southern INEL boundary and the Arco volcanic-rift zone near the western INEL boundary, to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} per year (average 100,000-year interval between eruptions) for the Howe-East Butte volcanic rift zone, a geologically old and poorly defined feature of the central portion of INEL. Three volcanic hazard zone maps are developed for the INEL area: lava flow hazard zones, a tephra (volcanic ash) and gas hazard zone, and a ground-deformation hazard zone. The maps are useful in land-use planning, site selection, and safety analysis.

  10. First ultraviolet reflectance measurements of several Kuiper Belt objects, Kuiper Belt object satellites, and new ultraviolet measurements of A Centaur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, S. A.; Schindhelm, E.; Cunningham, N. J.

    2014-05-01

    We observed the 2600-3200 (hereafter, mid-UV) reflectance of two Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), two KBO satellites, and a Centaur, using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS). Other than measurements of the Pluto system, these constitute the first UV measurements obtained of KBOs, and KBO satellites, and new HST UV measurements of the Centaur 2060 Chiron. We find significant differences among these objects, constrain the sizes and densities of Haumea's satellites, and report the detection of a possible spectral absorption band in Haumea's spectrum near 3050 . Comparisons of these objects to previously published UV reflectance measurements of Pluto and Charon are also made here.

  11. Gravity and magnetic anomalies associated with Tertiary volcanism and a Proterozoic crustal boundary, Hopi Buttes volcanic field, Navajo Nation (Arizona)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donovan-Ealy, P.F. . Geology Dept.); Hendricks, J.D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Hopi Buttes volcanic field is located in the Navajo Nation of northeastern Arizona, near the southern margin of the Colorado Plateau. Explosive phreatomagmatic eruptions from late Miocene to mid-Pliocene time produced more than 300 maar-diatremes and deposited limburgite tuffs and tuff breccia and monchiquite dikes, necks and flows within a roughly circular 2,500 km[sup 2] area. The volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks make up the middle member of the Bidahochi Formation, whose lower and upper members are lacustrine and fluvial, respectively. The Bidahochi Formation overlies gently dipping Mesozoic sedimentary rocks exposed in the southwestern portion of the volcanic field. Two significant gravity and magnetic anomalies appear within the Hopi Buttes volcanic field that are unlike the signatures of other Tertiary volcanic fields on the Colorado Plateau. A circular 20 mGal negative gravity anomaly is centered over exposed sedimentary rocks in the southwestern portion of the field. The anomaly may be due to the large volume of low density pyroclastic rocks in the volcanic field and/or extensive brecciation of the underlying strata from the violent maar eruptions. The second significant anomaly is the northeast-trending Holbrook lineament, a 5 km-wide gravity and magnetic lineament that crosses the southeastern part of the volcanic field. The lineament reflects substantial gravity and magnetic decreases of 1.67 mGals/km and 100 gammas/km respectively, to the southeast. Preliminary two-dimensional gravity and magnetic modeling suggests the lineament represents a major Proterozoic crustal boundary and may correlate with one of several Proterozoic faults exposed in the transition zone of central Arizona. Gravity modeling shows a 3--5 km step'' in the Moho near the crustal boundary. The decrease in depth of the Moho to the northwest indicates either movement along the fault or magmatic upwelling beneath the volcanic field.

  12. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q. -G.; Zhou, X. -Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y. -X.; Gao, Zhonglei; et al

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULFmore » waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.« less

  13. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Zhu, Hui; Xiao, Fuliang; Zong, Q. -G.; Zhou, X. -Z.; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Hao, Y. -X.; Gao, Zhonglei; He, Zhaoguo; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Blake, J. B.; Wygant, J. R.

    2015-12-22

    The Van Allen radiation belts are typically two zones of energetic particles encircling the Earth separated by the slot region. How the outer radiation belt electrons are accelerated to relativistic energies remains an unanswered question. Recent studies have presented compelling evidence for the local acceleration by very-low-frequency (VLF) chorus waves. However, there has been a competing theory to the local acceleration, radial diffusion by ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves, whose importance has not yet been determined definitively. Here we report a unique radiation belt event with intense ULF waves but no detectable VLF chorus waves. So, our results demonstrate that the ULF waves moved the inner edge of the outer radiation belt earthward 0.3 Earth radii and enhanced the relativistic electron fluxes by up to one order of magnitude near the slot region within about 10 h, providing strong evidence for the radial diffusion of radiation belt relativistic electrons.

  14. MAIN-BELT COMET P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Kaluna, Heather M.; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Micheli, Marco; Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Kleyna, Jan; Veres, Peter; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Ansdell, Megan; Elliott, Garrett T.; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Meech, Karen J.; Riesen, Timm E.; Sonnett, Sarah; Novakovic, Bojan; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Moskovitz, Nicholas A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We present initial results from observations and numerical analyses aimed at characterizing the main-belt comet P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS). Optical monitoring observations were made between 2012 October and 2013 February using the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope, the Keck I telescope, the Baade and Clay Magellan telescopes, Faulkes Telescope South, the Perkins Telescope at Lowell Observatory, and the Southern Astrophysical Research Telescope. The object's intrinsic brightness approximately doubles from the time of its discovery in early October until mid-November and then decreases by {approx}60% between late December and early February, similar to photometric behavior exhibited by several other main-belt comets and unlike that exhibited by disrupted asteroid (596) Scheila. We also used Keck to conduct spectroscopic searches for CN emission as well as absorption at 0.7 {mu}m that could indicate the presence of hydrated minerals, finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q{sub CN} < 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} mol s{sup -1}, from which we infer a water production rate of Q{sub H{sub 2O}}<5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 25} mol s{sup -1}, and no evidence of the presence of hydrated minerals. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2012 T1 is largely dynamically stable for >100 Myr and is unlikely to be a recently implanted interloper from the outer solar system, while a search for potential asteroid family associations reveals that it is dynamically linked to the {approx}155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  15. Magmatic-tectonic evolution of a volcanic rifted margin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eldholm, O. )

    1990-05-01

    Many North Atlantic margins are underlain by huge volcanic edifices near the continent-ocean boundary. A crustal hole drilled at the outer Voering Plateau during ODP (Ocean Drilling Project) Leg 104 has provided important constraints on the breakup history and the subsequent margin evolution by penetrating more than 900 m of igneous rocks and interbedded sediment below a post-early Eocene cover. The recovered basement rocks constitute two different volcanic series. The Upper Series, comprising a seaward-dipping reflector wedge, consists of transitional mid-oceanic tholeiitic lava flows and thin volcaniclastic sediments. Dacitic flows, some dikes and thicker sediments constitute the Lower Series. The margin evolved by Paleocene crustal extension, uplift and pervasive intrusion in the rift zone. Just prior to breakup, magma from shallow crustal melts produced the Lower Series. The Upper Series was constructed during an intense, rapidly waning subaerial surge following breakup in the earliest Eocene. The Upper Series covers both new oceanic crust and large areas of continental crust. The dipping wedge was formed by subsidence due to loading and thermal contraction probably amplified by a tectonic force. When the surge had abated, the injection center subsided and a normal oceanic crust was formed. A direct temporal and compositional relationship exists between the onshore North Atlantic Volcanic Province and the volcanic margins. Whereas the central transverse part of the province, near the Iceland hotspot has been active for 60 m.y., the volcanic margins reflect a 2,000-km-long transient phenomenon lasting only 3 m.y. The breakup volcanism and lack of initial subsidence are related to a regional, about 50C{degree}, increased temperature at the base of the lithosphere (hot carpet) combined with opening in previously extended crust.

  16. Dynamical implantation of objects in the Kuiper Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brasil, P. I. O.

    2014-09-01

    Several models have been suggested in the past to describe the dynamical formation of hot Kuiper Belt objects (hereafter Hot Classicals or HCs for short). Here, we discuss a dynamical mechanism that allows orbits to evolve from the primordial planetesimal disk at ≲ 35 AU to reach the orbital region now occupied by HCs. We performed three different sets of numerical simulations to illustrate this mechanism. Two of these simulations were based on modern theories for the early evolution of the solar system (the Nice and jumping-Jupiter models). The third simulation was performed with the purpose of increasing the resolution at 41-46 AU. The common aspect of these simulations is that Neptune scatters planetesimals from ≲ 35 AU to >40 AU and then undergoes a long phase of slow residual migration. Our results show that to reach an HC orbit, a scattered planetesimal needs to be captured in a mean motion resonance (MMR) with Neptune where the perihelion distance rises due to the Kozai resonance (which occurs in MMRs even for moderate inclinations). Finally, while Neptune is still migrating, the planetesimal is released from the MMR on a stable HC orbit. We show that the orbital distribution of HCs expected from this process provides a reasonable match to observations. The capture efficiency and the mass deposited into the HC region appears to be sensitive to the maximum eccentricity reached by Neptune during the planetary instability phase. Additional work will be needed to resolve this dependency in detail.

  17. Grenville foreland thrust belt hidden beneath the eastern US midcontinent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hauser, E.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1993-01-01

    Grenville foreland thrust structures are observed beneath the eastern US midcontinent on COCORP (Consortium for Continental Reflection Profiling) line OH-1 and a short seismic line in southwest Ohio. These structures represent the first evidence for a significant Grenville foreland thrust belt preserved in eastern North America. On the COCORP lines, the structures include a thrust ramp anticline and an associated asymmetric syncline. The Grenville front tectonic zone appears to truncate these foreland structures, indicating a later, second phase expressed as a deeply penetrating, out-of-sequence thrust zone associated with the main uplift of the Grenville province on the east. A short, shallow seismic line in southwestern Ohio reveals an east-dipping sequence of prominently layered rocks that may lie above a footwall ramp to a deeper Grenville thrust fault. A drill hole into the less reflective top of this dipping sequence encountered unmetamorphosed sedimentary rocks like those increasingly reported from other drill holes in southwestern Ohio and adjacent states. Although possibly part of a late Precambrian (Keweenawan ) rift, these clastic sedimentary rocks may instead preserve evidence of a heretofore unrecognized Grenville foreland basin in eastern North America. Alternatively these Precambrian sedimentary rocks together with an underlying, but yet undrilled, strongly layered sequence may correlate with similarly layered rocks observed on COCORP and industrial seismic lines within the Middle Proterozoic granite-rhyolite province to the west in Indiana and Illinois and indicate that unmetamorphosed sedimentary material is an important constituent of the granite-rhyolite province. 25 refs., 6 figs.

  18. COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A.

    2013-06-15

    The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

  19. The evolution and hydrocarbon habitat of the Papuan fold belt, PNG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dalton, D.G.; Smith, R.I.; Cawley, S.J. )

    1990-05-01

    After over 70 years of hydrocarbon exploration in the Papuan fold belt of PNG (Papua New Guinea) there have been a number of hydrocarbon discoveries over recent years that have confirmed its potential as a significant producing province. The Papuan basin developed during the early Mesozoic as part of the northeast corner of the Australian passive margin. The basin's tertiary evolution and the development of the Papuan fold belt within the Papuan basin has evolved in response to oblique convergence between the northerly moving Australian plate and westerly moving Pacific plate. Restacking of the Mesozoic passive margin sequence within the Papuan Basin was initiated in the early miocene by southward abduction of the Solomon Sea plate and the subsequent collision, in the late Miocene, of the Melanesian Island arc along the northeastern margin of PNG. This later collision provided the driving mechanism for the development of the papuan thrust belt. To date, all the significant hydrocarbon discoveries made within the Papuan fold belt have been located within the frontal zone of the fold belt, which is characterized by relatively simple ramp anticlines and thick-skinned inversion structures. The primary proven reservoir fairway is the Jurassic Toro formation, which is a sequence of stacked submarine bars prograding out across a shallow-marine low-gradient shelf. Geochemical analysis of produced hydrocarbons and samples collected from the many surface seeps found in the fold belt indicate two main families of oil. A model explains the distribution of hydrocarbons discovered to date, which involves Jurassic and Cretaceous source intervals and a complex history of secondary migration and entrapment. The unique technical problems associated with exploration of the Papuan fold belt leave many elements of the proven play systems uncertain, but in so doing, they present many challenges and opportunities for the future.

  20. Status of volcanism studies for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wells, S. [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Bowker, L.; Finnegan, K. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Geissman, J.; McFadden, L.

    1995-02-01

    Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. The long time of activity and characteristic small volume of the Postcaldera basalt of the YMR result in one of the lowest eruptive rates in a volcanic field in the southwest United States. Chapter 5 summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 summarizes the history of volcanism studies (1979 through early 1994), including work for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project and overview studies by the state of Nevada and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Chapter 7 summarizes probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment using a three-part conditional probability model. Chapter 8 describes remaining volcanism work judged to be needed to complete characterization studies for the YMR. Chapter 9 summarizes the conclusions of this volcanism status report.

  1. Nonstorm time dropout of radiation belt electron fluxes on 24 September 2013

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Su, Zhenpeng; Gao, Zhonglei; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Zhu, Hui; Li, Wen; Zheng, Huinan; Wang, Yuming; Wang, Shui; Spence, H. E.; et al

    2016-07-15

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts during the main phase of geomagnetic storms have received increasing attention in recent years. Here we focus on a rarely reported nonstorm time dropout event observed by Van Allen Probes on 24 September 2013. Within several hours, the radiation belt electron fluxes exhibited a significant (up to 2 orders of magnitude) depletion over a wide range of radial distances (L > 4.5), energies (~500 keV to several MeV) and equatorial pitch angles (0° ≤ αe ≤ 180°). STEERB simulations show that the relativistic electron loss in the region L = 4.5–6.0 was primarily caused bymore » the pitch angle scattering of observed plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves. Furthermore, our results emphasize the complexity of radiation belt dynamics and the importance of wave-driven precipitation loss even during nonstorm times.« less

  2. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outer radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.

  3. Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

    1981-03-01

    A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

  4. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; et al

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22more » September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.« less

  5. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in August–September 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 13–22 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.

  6. Source and seed populations for relativistic electrons: Their roles in radiation belt changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Baker, D. N.; Singer, H. J.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Loto'aniu, T. M.; Ali, A. F.; Elkington, S. R.; Li, X.; Kanekal, S. G.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2015-09-09

    Strong enhancements of outer Van Allen belt electrons have been shown to have a clear dependence on solar wind speed and on the duration of southward interplanetary magnetic field. However, individual case study analyses also have demonstrated that many geomagnetic storms produce little in the way of outer belt enhancements and, in fact, may produce substantial losses of relativistic electrons. In this study, focused upon a key period in AugustSeptember 2014, we use GOES geostationary orbit electron flux data and Van Allen Probes particle and fields data to study the process of radiation belt electron acceleration. One particular interval, 1322 September, initiated by a short-lived geomagnetic storm and characterized by a long period of primarily northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF), showed strong depletion of relativistic electrons (including an unprecedented observation of long-lasting depletion at geostationary orbit) while an immediately preceding, and another immediately subsequent, storm showed strong radiation belt enhancement. We demonstrate with these data that two distinct electron populations resulting from magnetospheric substorm activity are crucial elements in the ultimate acceleration of highly relativistic electrons in the outer belt: the source population (tens of keV) that give rise to VLF wave growth and the seed population (hundreds of keV) that are, in turn, accelerated through VLF wave interactions to much higher energies. ULF waves may also play a role by either inhibiting or enhancing this process through radial diffusion effects. Furthermore, if any components of the inner magnetospheric accelerator happen to be absent, the relativistic radiation belt enhancement fails to materialize.

  7. Exploration for hydrocarbons under thrust belts - a challenging new frontier in the Carpathians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picha, F.J. )

    1993-09-01

    The Carpathian thrust belt has been explored with mixed results. Large reserves of oil and gas have been found in Romania and the western Ukraine, while exploration in other areas has been disappointing. Deep drilling and seismic profiling, as well as better understanding of structure, however, has contributed to the opening of promising new plays beneath the allochthonous belt. The thin-skinned Carpathian thrust belt is characterized by a long-range tectonic transport over the Neogene foredeep and the underlying European platform. The complex structure of the platform involves Caledonian and Variscan compressional deformation, Mesozoic extension, related to the development of the northern Tethyan margins, and Cenozoic normal faulting and wrenching associated with the Alpine Orogeny. Elements of the platform were also detached and incorporated into the thrust belt proper. In addition to numerous structural plays, significant morphologic features, such as large Paleogene and neogene buried valleys, have been found within the platform margins. Both the valley fill and the associated subsea fans and channels represent promising plays. Generation of hydrocarbons from various source rocks within the platform was greatly enhanced by emplacement of the wedge-shaped Carpathian thrust belt. The low heat flow, typical for the subthrust setting, enabled generation and preservation of hydrocarbons at great depths. Although several oil and gas fields have been found in shallower parts of the platform, the deeper structures (below 5 km) remain mostly unexplored. The complexity and diversity of subthrust geology offers a big challenge to exploration, but also provides an opportunity for finding significant oil and gas accumulations not only in the Carpathians, but elsewhere under thin-skinned thrust belts.

  8. Approach, methods and results of an individual elicitation for the volcanism expert judgment panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.

    1996-06-01

    Probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA) of future magnetic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site was completed as a participating member of the volcanism export judgment panel conducted by Geomatrix Consultants for the Department of Energy. The purpose of this summary is to describe the data assumptions, methods, and results of the elicitation and to contrast this assessment with past volcanism studies conducted for the Yucca Mountain Project.

  9. Uranium and thorium decay series disequilibria in young volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Two of the central questions in igneous geochemistry that study of radioactive disequilibria can help to answer are: what are the rates of magma genesis; and what are the timescales of magma separation and transport. In addition to the temporal information that may be extracted from disequilibria data, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of a young rock may be used as a tracer of the Th/U ratio of its source region. Measurements were made by isotope dilution alpha-spectrometry of {sup 238}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 232}Th in 20 subduction related, 3 oceanic intraplate, and 10 continental intraplate volcanics. {sup 210}Pb was measured in all, {sup 226}Ra was measured in about half, and {sup 228}Th was measured in 10 of the most recent samples. Disequilibrium between {sup 228}Th and {sup 232}Th was found only in the Nacarbonatite samples from Oldoinyo Lengai volcano in Tanzania, which is attributable to {sup 228}Ra/{sup 232}Th {approximately} 27 at the time of eruption. These rocks also have {sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th > 60. Three Ra-enrichment models are developed which constrain carbonatite magma formation at less than 20 years before eruption. The effects of different partial melting processes on the {sup 238}U decay series are investigated. If mid-ocean ridge basalts are formed by a dynamic melting process, the {sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th of the basalts provides a minimum estimate of the Th/U ratio of the source region. The {sup 238}U enrichment in arc volcanics is probably the results of metasomatism of the source by fluids derived from the subducting slab, and the {sup 230}Th enrichment observed for other volcanics is probably due to the partial melting process in the absence of U-bearing fluids.

  10. Preliminary geologic map of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.M.; Perry, F.V.

    1991-07-01

    The Sleeping Butte volcanic centers comprise two, spatially separate, small-volume (<0.1 km{sup 3}) basaltic centers. The centers were formed by mildly explosive Strombolian eruptions. The Little Black Peak cone consists of a main scoria cone, two small satellitic scoria mounds, and associated lobate lava flows that vented from sites at the base of the scoria cone. The Hidden Cone center consists of a main scoria cone that developed on the north-facing slope of Sleeping Butte. The center formed during two episodes. The first included the formation of the main scoria cone, and venting of aa lava flows from radial dikes at the northeast base of the cone. The second included eruption of scoria-fall deposits from the summit crater. The ages of the Little Black Peak and the Hidden Cone are estimated to be between 200 to 400 ka based on the whole-rock K-Ar age determinations with large analytical undertainty. This age assignment is consistent with qualitative observations of the degree of soil development and geomorphic degradation of volcanic landforms. The younger episode of the Hidden Cone is inferred to be significantly younger and probably of Late Pleistocene or Holocene age. This is based on the absence of cone slope rilling, the absence of cone-slope apron deposits, and erosional unconformity between the two episodes, the poor horizon- development of soils, and the presence of fall deposits on modern alluvial surfaces. Paleomagnetic data show that the centers record similar but not identical directions of remanent magnetization. Paleomagnetic data have not been obtained for the youngest deposits of the Hidden Cone center. Further geochronology, soils, geomorphic, and petrology studies are planned of the Sleeping Butte volcanic centers 20 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Fold Belt, Cymric-McKittrick fields, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farley, T. )

    1990-05-01

    The Tulare fold belt is a series of asymmetric, generally northeast-verging anticlines and synclines in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Tulare Formation that trend northwestward through the Cymric-McKittrick fields. Anticlines within the deformed belt generally originated as fault propagation folds above decollements, the most important of which is the regional decollement on top of the Amnicola sand, the basal Tulare unit. The Amnicola decollement is the northeast subsurface extension of the McKittrick thrust, a low-angle fault that has displaced the Miocene Antelope shale over the Pliocene San Joaquin Formation and locally over the Tulare Formation. The Amnicola decollement is itself deformed by folding related to a younger, deeper decollement near the base of the San Joaquin Formation that merges westward with the Amnicola decollement and defines a zone of faulting associated with the McKittrick thrust Heavy oil reservoirs in the Tulare Formation are currently undergoing active development by thermal recovery techniques. In general, the geometry of heavy oil reservoirs is determined by location within the Tulare fold belt combined with the position of a subhorizontal fluid level trap that forms the updip limit of fluid-saturated rock Reservoir geometry is complicated by complex local structure, discontinuous stratigraphy, and partial depletion of heavy oil reservoirs by fluid withdrawal due to gravity drainage. Proper resolution of fold geometry, fault geometry, and position of the fluid level trap is crucial to the design and monitoring of thermal recovery projects within the Tulare fold belt.

  12. NEPTUNE ON TIPTOES: DYNAMICAL HISTORIES THAT PRESERVE THE COLD CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Schuyler; Dawson, Rebekah I.; Murray-Clay, Ruth A. E-mail: rdawson@cfa.harvard.edu

    2012-02-20

    The current dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt was shaped by the orbital evolution of the giant planets, especially Neptune, during the era following planet formation when the giant planets may have undergone planet-planet scattering and/or planetesimal-driven migration. Numerical simulations of this process, while reproducing many properties of the Belt, fail to generate the high inclinations and eccentricities observed for some objects while maintaining the observed dynamically 'cold' population. We present the first of a three-part parameter study of how different dynamical histories of Neptune sculpt the planetesimal disk. Here we identify which dynamical histories allow an in situ planetesimal disk to remain dynamically cold, becoming today's cold Kuiper Belt population. We find that if Neptune undergoes a period of elevated eccentricity and/or inclination, it secularly excites the eccentricities and inclinations of the planetesimal disk. We demonstrate that there are several well-defined regimes for this secular excitation, depending on the relative timescales of Neptune's migration, the damping of Neptune's orbital inclination and/or eccentricity, and the secular evolution of the planetesimals. We model this secular excitation analytically in each regime, allowing for a thorough exploration of parameter space. Neptune's eccentricity and inclination can remain high for a limited amount of time without disrupting the cold classical belt. In the regime of slow damping and slow migration, if Neptune is located (for example) at 20 AU, then its eccentricity must stay below 0.18 and its inclination below 6 Degree-Sign .

  13. AN ASTEROID BELT INTERPRETATION FOR THE TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR B1937+21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Jessner, A.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K. E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu

    2013-03-20

    Pulsar timing observations have revealed companions to neutron stars that include other neutron stars, white dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and planets. We demonstrate that the correlated and apparently stochastic residual times of arrival from the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 are consistent with the signature of an asteroid belt having a total mass {approx}< 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Unlike the solar system's asteroid belt, the best fit pulsar asteroid belt extends over a wide range of radii, consistent with the absence of any shepherding companions. We suggest that any pulsar that has undergone accretion-driven spin-up and subsequently evaporated its companion may harbor orbiting asteroid mass objects. The resulting timing variations may fundamentally limit the timing precision of some of the other millisecond pulsars. Observational tests of the asteroid belt model include identifying periodicities from individual asteroids, which are difficult; testing for statistical stationarity, which becomes possible when observations are conducted over a longer observing span; and searching for reflected radio emission.

  14. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Timothy D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Dykes, Charles D.

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  15. Study of movement of the western and central belts of Peninsular Malaysia using GPS data analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramli, Siti Hafizah; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim

    2014-09-03

    Since the large earthquakes in Sumatera and Nias, there were some tremors incidents at Bukit Tinggi. Therefore, a study on the earth’s crust movement and the effects of the earthquake in Indonesia on the tectonic blocks of Peninsular Malaysia have been carried out using GPS data analysis. GPS data from five MyRTKnet stations within Peninsular Malaysia have been analyzed to monitor the movement of two major tectonic blocks of Peninsular Malaysia which are the western belt represented by the Behrang (BEHR) and UPM Serdang (UPMS) stations and the central belt represented by Bentong (BENT), Jerantut (JRNT) and Temerloh (TLOH) stations. GPS data recorded from 2005 to 2010 were analysed based on horizontal and vertical displacements of the respective stations by using Trimble Business Centre (TBC) software. Based on the results of accumulated displacements of recorded GPS data from January 2006 to December 2013, it shows that the western belt which represented by UPMS has shifted 0.096m towards northwest with changes of ellipsoidal height of +0.030m while the central belt which represented by TLOH has shifted 0.080m towards northwest with changes of ellipsoidal height of −0.015m. Meanwhile, BENT station which is located on the Bentong-Raub suture zone turns to its original position as well as JRNT station. However, BEHR station which are located in western belt do not show any movements. All of these movements may be due to the influence of reactive faults in the stations area stimulated by several large earthquakes that occurred in 2005 to 2010. Study on using the GPS data analysis and combine with integrated geophysical methods are necessary to understand in detail about the tectonic evolution of Peninsular Malaysia.

  16. Temporal relations of volcanism and hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WoldeGabriel, G.; Goff, F. )

    1989-11-01

    Two hydrothermal alteration events (8.07 Ma, one sample; 6.51-5.60 Ma, six samples) related to the waning stages of late Miocene volcanism ({ge} 13 to {le} 5.8 Ma) are recognized at the Cochiti district (southeast Jemez Mountains). Most of the K/Ar dates (0.83 {plus minus} 0.11-0.66 {plus minus} 0.21 Ma, four samples) in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A at Sulfur Springs, Valles caldera, indicate post-Valles caldera hydrothermal alteration. A sample from acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole was too young to be dated by the K/Ar method and is possibly associated with current hot-spring activity and the youngest pulses of volcanism. Oxygen-isotope data from illite/smectite clays in the Cochiti district are zonally distributed and range from {minus}2.15{per thousand} to {plus}7.97{per thousand} (SMOW), depending upon temperature, extent of rock-fluid interaction, and composition. The samples from VC-2A get lighter with depth ({minus}0.20{per thousand} to {plus}1.62{per thousand}). The K/Ar and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were deposited in the late Miocene (5.99-5.60 Ma) and mid-Quaternary ({approximately}0.66 Ma), respectively, by hydrothermal fluids composed primarily of meteoric water.

  17. THE NUCLEUS OF MAIN-BELT COMET 259P/GARRADD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLennan, Eric M.; Hsieh, Henry H. E-mail: emaclenn@utk.edu

    2012-10-10

    We present observations of the main-belt comet 259P/Garradd, previously known as P/2008 R1 (Garradd), obtained in 2011 and 2012 using the Gemini North Telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii and the SOAR telescope at Cerro Pachon in Chile, with the goal of computing the object's phase function and nucleus size. We find an absolute magnitude of H{sub R} = 19.71 {+-} 0.05 mag and slope parameter of G{sub R} = -0.08 {+-} 0.05 for the inactive nucleus, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} = 0.30 {+-} 0.02 km, assuming an R-band albedo of p{sub R} = 0.05. We also revisit observations reported for 259P while it was active in 2008 to quantify the dust mass loss and compare the object with other known main-belt comets.

  18. Geology of oil and gas accumulations in the Papuan fold and thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foo, W.K. )

    1990-06-01

    The high level of exploration interest in Papua New Guinea has developed in large part because of recent discoveries in the western Papuan fold and thrust belt and shows in the adjacent foreland region. Results from recent drilling in the Iagifu/Hedinia area by a Chevron-led joint venture have outlined several pools in culminations along a 50 km long structural axis. Oil and gas are sourced from a thick succession of Jurassic marine shales that were deposited along the rifted northern margin of the Australian plate. Generation and migration is interpreted to have peaked coincident with development of the fold and thrust belt during the Neogene. Trapping occurred as anticlines and thrust sheets developed sequentially from northeast to southwest. Several trends remain untested on lands held by various groups, primarily in the area west of the Juha gas condensate pool.

  19. THE EXTRAORDINARY MULTI-TAILED MAIN-BELT COMET P/2013 P5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewitt, David; Agarwal, Jessica; Weaver, Harold; Mutchler, Max; Larson, Stephen

    2013-11-20

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of main-belt comet P/2013 P5 reveal an extraordinary system of six dust tails that distinguish this object from any other. Observations two weeks apart show dramatic morphological change in the tails while providing no evidence for secular fading of the object as a whole. Each tail is associated with a unique ejection date, revealing continued, episodic mass loss from the 0.24 ± 0.04 km radius nucleus over the last five months. As an inner-belt asteroid and probable Flora family member, the object is likely to be highly metamorphosed and unlikely to contain ice. The protracted period of dust release appears inconsistent with an impact origin, but may be compatible with a body that is losing mass through a rotational instability. We suggest that P/2013 P5 has been accelerated to breakup speed by radiation torques.

  20. A SOUTHERN SKY AND GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY FOR BRIGHT KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Udalski, Andrzej; Kubiak, Marcin; Pietrzynski, Grzegorz; Poleski, Radoslaw; Soszynski, Igor; Szymanski, Michal K.; Ulaczyk, Krzysztof; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2011-10-15

    About 2500 deg{sup 2} of sky south of declination -25{sup 0} and/or near the Galactic Plane were surveyed for bright outer solar system objects. This survey is one of the first large-scale southern sky and Galactic Plane surveys to detect dwarf planets and other bright Kuiper Belt Objects in the trans-Neptunian region. The survey was able to obtain a limiting R-band magnitude of 21.6. In all, 18 outer solar system objects were detected, including Pluto which was detected near the Galactic center using optimal image subtraction techniques to remove the high stellar density background. Fourteen of the detections were previously unknown trans-Neptunian objects, demonstrating that the southern sky had not been well searched to date for bright outer solar system objects. Assuming moderate albedos, several of the new discoveries from this survey could be in hydrostatic equilibrium and thus could be considered dwarf planets. Combining this survey with previous surveys from the northern hemisphere suggests that the Kuiper Belt is nearly complete to around 21st magnitude in the R band. All the main dynamical classes in the Kuiper Belt are occupied by at least one dwarf-planet-sized object. The 3:2 Neptune resonance, which is the innermost well-populated Neptune resonance, has several large objects while the main outer Neptune resonances such as the 5:3, 7:4, 2:1, and 5:2 do not appear to have any large objects. This indicates that the outer resonances are either significantly depleted in objects relative to the 3:2 resonance or have a significantly different assortment of objects than the 3:2 resonance. For the largest objects (H < 4.5 mag), the scattered disk population appears to have a few times more objects than the main Kuiper Belt (MKB) population, while the Sedna population could be several times more than that of the MKB.

  1. New Horizons Science Photos from NASA's Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE provided the power supply for NASA's New Horizons Mission, a mission to the Pluto and Charon, a double-planet system, and the Kuiper Belt. There are science photos posted on the New Horizons website, along with mission photos, spacecraft images, launch photos, posters and renderings that are both scientific and artistic. The images can be searched by keywords, by date, or by subject topic. They can also be browsed as an entire list. Each image has a detailed description.

  2. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration: A superposed epoch analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Bortnik, J.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.; Kanekal, S. G.; Spence, H. E.; Green, J. C.

    2015-09-07

    In this study by determining preferential solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron acceleration is crucial for predicting radiation belt electron dynamics. Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed epoch analysis of the corresponding solar wind parameters and geomagnetic indices. By directly comparing efficient and inefficient acceleration events, we clearly show that prolonged southward Bz, high solar wind speed, and low dynamic pressure are critical for electron acceleration to >1 MeV energies in the heart of the outermore » radiation belt. We also evaluate chorus wave evolution using the superposed epoch analysis for the identified efficient and inefficient acceleration events and find that chorus wave intensity is much stronger and lasts longer during efficient electron acceleration events, supporting the scenario that chorus waves play a key role in MeV electron acceleration.« less

  3. Near-infrared spectra of high-albedo outer main-belt asteroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Shirahata, Mai; Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Okamura, Natsuko; Hasegawa, Sunao

    2015-02-01

    Most outer main-belt asteroids have low albedos because of their carbonaceouslike bodies. However, infrared satellite surveys have revealed that some asteroids have high albedos, which may suggest the presence of unusual surface minerals for those primitive objects. We present new near-infrared (1.12.5 ?m) spectra of four outer main-belt asteroids with albedos ? 0.1. The C-complex asteroids (555) Norma and (2542) Calpurnia are featureless and have (50%60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroids (701) Oriola (which is a C-complex asteroid) and (2670) Chuvashia (a D/T-type or M-type asteroid) show possible broad absorption bands (1.52.1 ?m). The feature can be reproduced by either Mg-rich amorphous pyroxene (with 50%60% and 80%95% Mg, respectively) or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), which might be responsible for the high albedos. No absorption features of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 ?m) are detected in the objects. We discuss the origin of high albedo components in the outer main-belt asteroids and their physical relations to comets.

  4. Exploration within the Sub-Andean Thrust Belt of Southern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, K.J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Sub-Andean thrust belt of Southern Bolivia is a proven hydrocarbon province. Chevron began a regional study of the area in 1988 and chose the Caipipendi block due to its high potential for significant new oil reserves. A regional work program designed to acquire and integrate seismic data, geologic field data, geochemistry, and gravity data was used to generated structural models, evaluate regional risk components and to detail leads. The structural style within the Caipipendi block is interpreted as being an in sequence, thin skinned thrust belt with eastward verging folds and thrust faults. Tight surface anticlines associated with a Middle Devonian detachment have been later folded by deeper fault bend folds associated with the Silurian detachment. While the tight surface folds are presently producing oil, the deeper broader structures associated with the Silurian detachement have not been tested. Seismic data, utilized for the first time in this part of the Sub-Andean thrust belt, integrated with balanced structural cross sections, is the key to evaluating this new play. Geochemical analysis, including oil biomarker work, indicate that the oils are sourced from the Silurian-Devonian sequence. A generative oil system model formulated by integrating the geochemical analysis with maturation modeling indicates that the Devonian Los Monos formation is the primary oil source. Anticipated reservoirs for the new play are Carboniferous and Devonian sandstones which are also productive elsewhere in the basin.

  5. The quest for better seismic imaging in the sub-Andean thrust belt of southern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, J.F.; Nelson, K.J.

    1996-08-01

    Like many thrust belts around the world, the sub-Andean thrust belt of southern Bolivia is a difficult place to acquire good seismic data because of the challenges of complex geology, rugged topography, and remote access. This is further aggravated by the fact that we generally desire to image below the surface anticlines, where the conditions for acquiring good data are the worst. Near-surface, steeply-dipping beds also challenge some of the fundamental assumptions of seismic processing. Our approach has been to integrate detailed structural analysis of the surface and subsurface with the seismic interpretation. Seismic imaging of structural geometry is a fundamental risk element in thrust belt hydrocarbon exploration. Acquiring high-quality seismic data in mountainous terrain has been a difficult, time consuming, and costly task. We have exerted considerable effort into finding innovative ways to improve data quality. After an initial round of acquisition in Bolivia, we designed a seismic test program to optimize acquisition parameters. We found that standard parameters were acceptable in the valleys, but larger dynamite charges yielded better results in the mountainous areas where imaging had previously been poor. Additionally, a swath line layout (three parallel receiver lines 200 m apart) helped improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Better static solutions, detailed velocity analysis, and careful structural modeling and depth migrations all help to yield better data and a more reliable interpretation.

  6. THE COLOR DIFFERENCES OF KUIPER BELT OBJECTS IN RESONANCE WITH NEPTUNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.

    2012-12-01

    The optical colors of 58 objects in mean motion resonance with Neptune were obtained. The various Neptune resonant populations were found to have significantly different surface color distributions. The 5:3 and 7:4 resonances have semimajor axes near the middle of the main Kuiper Belt and both are dominated by ultra-red material (spectral gradient: S {approx}> 25). The 5:3 and 7:4 resonances have statistically the same color distribution as the low-inclination 'cold' classical belt. The inner 4:3 and distant 5:2 resonances have objects with mostly moderately red colors (S {approx} 15), similar to the scattered and detached disk populations. The 2:1 resonance, which is near the outer edge of the main Kuiper Belt, has a large range of colors with similar numbers of moderately red and ultra-red objects at all inclinations. The 2:1 resonance was also found to have a very rare neutral colored object showing that the 2:1 resonance is really a mix of all object types. The inner 3:2 resonance, like the outer 2:1, has a large range of objects from neutral to ultra-red. The Neptune Trojans (1:1 resonance) are only slightly red (S {approx} 9), similar to the Jupiter Trojans. The inner 5:4 resonance only has four objects with measured colors but shows equal numbers of ultra-red and moderately red objects. The 9:5, 12:5, 7:3, 3:1, and 11:3 resonances do not have reliable color distribution statistics since few objects have been observed in these resonances, though it appears noteworthy that all three of the measured 3:1 objects have only moderately red colors, similar to the 4:3 and 5:2 resonances. The different color distributions of objects in mean motion resonance with Neptune are likely a result from the disruption of the primordial Kuiper Belt from the scattering and migration of the giant planets. The few low-inclination objects known in the outer 2:1 and 5:2 resonances are mostly only moderately red. This suggests if the 2:1 and 5:2 have a cold low-inclination component

  7. 2007 TY430: A COLD CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT TYPE BINARY IN THE PLUTINO POPULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Scott S.; Ragozzine, Darin; Trujillo, Chadwick

    2012-03-15

    Kuiper Belt object 2007 TY430 is the first wide, equal-sized, binary known in the 3:2 mean motion resonance with Neptune. The two components have a maximum separation of about 1 arcsec and are on average less than 0.1 mag different in apparent magnitude with identical ultra-red colors (g - i = 1.49 {+-} 0.01 mag). Using nearly monthly observations of 2007 TY430 from 2007 to 2011, the orbit of the mutual components was found to have a period of 961.2 {+-} 4.6 days with a semi-major axis of 21000 {+-} 160 km and eccentricity of 0.1529 {+-} 0.0028. The inclination with respect to the ecliptic is 15.68 {+-} 0.22 deg and extensive observations have allowed the mirror orbit to be eliminated as a possibility. The total mass for the binary system was found to be 7.90 {+-} 0.21 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} kg. Equal-sized, wide binaries and ultra-red colors are common in the low-inclination 'cold' classical part of the Kuiper Belt and likely formed through some sort of three-body interactions within a much denser Kuiper Belt. To date 2007 TY430 is the only ultra-red, equal-sized binary known outside of the classical Kuiper Belt population. Numerical simulations suggest 2007 TY430 is moderately unstable in the outer part of the 3:2 resonance and thus 2007 TY430 is likely an escaped 'cold' classical object that later got trapped in the 3:2 resonance. Similar to the known equal-sized, wide binaries in the cold classical population, the binary 2007 TY430 requires a high albedo and very low density structure to obtain the total mass found for the pair. For a realistic minimum density of 0.5 g cm{sup -3} the albedo of 2007 TY430 would be greater than 0.17. For reasonable densities, the radii of either component should be less than 60 km, and thus the relatively low eccentricity of the binary is interesting since no tides should be operating on the bodies at their large distances from each other. The low prograde inclination of the binary also makes it unlikely that the Kozai

  8. On the time needed to reach an equilibrium structure of the radiation belts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ripoll, J. -F.; Loran, V.; Cunningham, Gregory Scott; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Shprits, Y. Y.

    2016-06-04

    In this paper, we complement the notion of equilibrium states of the radiation belts with a discussion on the dynamics and time needed to reach equilibrium. We solve for the equilibrium states obtained using 1D radial diffusion with recently developed hiss and chorus lifetimes at constant values of Kp = 1, 3 and 6. We find that the equilibrium states at moderately low Kp, when plotted vs L-shell (L) and energy (E), display the same interesting S-shape for the inner edge of the outer belt as recently observed by the Van Allen Probes. The S-shape is also produced as themore » radiation belts dynamically evolve toward the equilibrium state when initialized to simulate the buildup after a massive dropout or to simulate loss due to outward diffusion from a saturated state. Physically, this shape, intimately linked with the slot structure, is due to the dependence of electron loss rate (originating from wave-particle interactions) on both energy and L-shell. Equilibrium electron flux profiles are governed by the Biot number (τDiffusion/τloss), with large Biot number corresponding to low fluxes and low Biot number to large fluxes. The time it takes for the flux at a specific (L, E) to reach the value associated with the equilibrium state, starting from these different initial states, is governed by the initial state of the belts, the property of the dynamics (diffusion coefficients), and the size of the domain of computation. Its structure shows a rather complex scissor form in the (L, E) plane. The equilibrium value (phase space density or flux) is practically reachable only for selected regions in (L, E) and geomagnetic activity. Convergence to equilibrium requires hundreds of days in the inner belt for E > 300 keV and moderate Kp (≤3). It takes less time to reach equilibrium during disturbed geomagnetic conditions (Kp ≥ 3), when the system evolves faster. Restricting our interest to the slot region, below L = 4, we find that only small regions in (L, E) space

  9. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee...

  10. A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The...

  11. Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages ... ages of various rocks they dated, so locations were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). ...

  12. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Abstract Large, young calderas...

  13. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  14. Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

    1986-08-01

    Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

  15. Late Cenozoic volcanism in the Lassen area, southernmost Cascade Range, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clynne, M.A.; Muffler, L.J.P.; Dalrymple, G.B. )

    1993-04-01

    Volcanism in the southernmost Cascade Range can be characterized on two scales. Regional volcanism is predominantly basaltic to andesitic, and hundreds of coalescing volcanoes of small volume (10[sup [minus]3] to 10[sup 1] km[sup 3]) with short lifetimes have built a broad platform. Superimposed on the regional volcanism are a few long-lived ([approximately]10[sup 6] years) much larger (>10 [sup 2] km[sup 3]) volcanic centers. Each of these larger centers consists of a basaltic-andesite to andesite composite cone and flanking silicic domes and flows. The evolution of these volcanic centers conforms to a generalized three-stage model during which a conspicuous edifice is constructed. Stages 1 and 2 comprise a dominantly andesitic composite cone; Stage 3 marks a change to dominantly silicic volcanism and is accompanied by development of a hydrothermal system in the permeable core of the andesitic composite cone. Subsequent fluvial and glacial erosion produces a caldera-like depression with a topographically high resistant rim of Stage 2 lavas surrounding the deeply eroded, hydrothermally altered core of the composite cone. Two types of basalt are recognized in the southernmost Cascades; medium-K calc-alkaline (CAB) and low-K olivine tholeiite (LKOT). CAB exhibits considerable geochemical diversity and is the parent magma for the volcanic-center lavas and the majority of the evolved regional lavas. LKOT is chemically homogeneous, and outcrops sporadically in association with extensional tectonics of the Basin and Range Province, and is related to Pleistocene encroachment of Basin-and-Range tectonics on the subduction-related volcanism of the Cascade Range.

  16. Sky-polarization data for volcanic and non-volcanic periods. Report for April-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longtin, D.R.; Volz, F.E.

    1986-10-01

    Volz has monitored the Arago and Babinet neutral points at Lexington and Bedford, Mass. for the years 1968 to 1986. These data, along with measurements of turbidity, twilight color ratio, solar aureole, and cloud and snow cover, have been assembled into a data base and checked for error. The neutral-point data were then corrected for day-to-day variations in tropospheric turbidity and separated into groups that coincide with time periods of known volcanic influences and seasonal events. 3-D plots indicate that both the Arago and Babinet points were strongly affected by the presence of the El Chichon dust cloud; however, the features were not as pronounced as in the tropics. Measurements made after the El Chichon eruptions also suggest a movement of the neutral points after sunset which was not observed after the eruptions of Mt. Pelee in 1902 and Katmai in 1911. The present measurements did not show an effect from the eruptions of Fuego in 1971 and late 1974.

  17. Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

    1980-09-01

    Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

  18. New Horizons Science Photos from NASA's Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE provided the power supply for NASA's New Horizons Mission, a mission to the Pluto and Charon, a double-planet system, and the Kuiper Belt. There are 61 science photos posted on the New Horizons website, along with mission photos, spacecraft images, launch photos, posters and renderings that are both scientific and artistic. Dates range from June of 2006 to February of 2008. The images can be searched by keywords, by date, or by subject topic. They can also be browsed as an entire list. Each image has a detailed description.

  19. A compound power-law model for volcanic eruptions: Implications for risk assessment of volcanism at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Chih-Hsiang

    1994-10-17

    Much of the ongoing debate on the use of nuclear power plants in U.S.A. centers on the safe disposal of the radioactive waste. Congress, aware of the importance of the waste issue, passed the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, requiring the federal government to develop a geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high level radioactive wastes from civilian nuclear power plants. The Department of Energy (DOE) established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in 1983 to identify potential sites. When OCRWM had selected three potential sites to study, Congress enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987, which directed the DOE to characterize only one of those sites, Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada. For a site to be acceptable, theses studies must demonstrate that the site could comply with regulations and guidelines established by the federal agencies that will be responsible for licensing, regulating, and managing the waste facility. Advocates and critics disagree on the significance and interpretation of critical geological features which bear on the safety and suitability of Yucca Mountain as a site for the construction of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Recent volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain is readily recognized as an important factor in determining future public and environmental safety because of the possibility of direct disruption of a repository site by volcanism. In particular, basaltic volcanism is regarded as direct and unequivocal evidence of deep-seated geologic instability. In this paper, statistical analysis of volcanic hazard assessment at the Yucca Mountain site is discussed, taking into account some significant geological factors raised by experts. Three types of models are considered in the data analysis. The first model assumes that both past and future volcanic activities follow a homogeneous Poisson process (HPP).

  20. Re-Entries: New strategies in development zones at the Orinoco Oil Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, R.; Briceno, M.; Figueroa, J.; Bolanos, C.

    1996-08-01

    Drilling of horizontal wells in Venezuela began in the Orinoco Oil Belt with the wells CI-87 and CI-97 in the J-20 block, drilled in 1989 and 1990, respectively. Well CI-87 produces up to 1000 BPD without steam injection. Due to the success of this well, the exploitation strategy was oriented toward re-entry and sidetracking wells with mechanical problems, high water cut and low potential. The purpose of this programme was to enhance drainage patterns, access new reservoirs through existing bores, and increase oil production while reducing per-barrel costs. Eighteen (18) wells were re-drilled in different pay zones such as O-12, O-13, O-14 and O-15 with horizontal sections between a thousand feet and one thousand six hundred feet. Those wells were completed with progressive cavity pumps, sucker rod beam pumps and electrical submersible pumps. Presented in this paper are the results of the re-entries at the Orinoco Oil Belt and the future re-entry strategy.

  1. OBSERVATIONAL AND DYNAMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF MAIN-BELT COMET P/2010 R2 (La Sagra)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Yang Bin; Haghighipour, Nader; Jedicke, Robert; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Denneau, Larry; Kaluna, Heather M.; Kleyna, Jan; Novakovic, Bojan; Abe, Shinsuke; Chen Wenping; Ip, Wing; Kinoshita, Daisuke; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Lacerda, Pedro; Granvik, Mikael; Grav, Tommy; Knight, Matthew M.; Lisse, Carey M.; Maclennan, Eric; and others

    2012-05-15

    We present observations of the recently discovered comet-like main-belt object P/2010 R2 (La Sagra) obtained by Pan-STARRS1 and the Faulkes Telescope-North on Haleakala in Hawaii, the University of Hawaii 2.2 m, Gemini-North, and Keck I telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Danish 1.54 m telescope (operated by the MiNDSTEp consortium) at La Silla, and the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma. An antisolar dust tail is observed to be present from 2010 August through 2011 February, while a dust trail aligned with the object's orbit plane is also observed from 2010 December through 2011 August. Assuming typical phase darkening behavior, P/La Sagra is seen to increase in brightness by >1 mag between 2010 August and December, suggesting that dust production is ongoing over this period. These results strongly suggest that the observed activity is cometary in nature (i.e., driven by the sublimation of volatile material), and that P/La Sagra is therefore the most recent main-belt comet to be discovered. We find an approximate absolute magnitude for the nucleus of H{sub R} = 17.9 {+-} 0.2 mag, corresponding to a nucleus radius of {approx}0.7 km, assuming an albedo of p = 0.05. Comparing the observed scattering surface areas of the dust coma to that of the nucleus when P/La Sagra was active, we find dust-to-nucleus area ratios of A{sub d} /A{sub N} = 30-60, comparable to those computed for fellow main-belt comets 238P/Read and P/2008 R1 (Garradd), and one to two orders of magnitude larger than for two other main-belt comets (133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR). Using optical spectroscopy to search for CN emission, we do not detect any conclusive evidence of sublimation products (i.e., gas emission), finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q{sub CN} < 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} mol s{sup -1}, from which we infer an H{sub 2}O production rate of Q{sub H{sub 2O}} < 10{sup 26} mol s{sup -1}. Numerical simulations indicate that P/La Sagra is dynamically stable for >100 Myr

  2. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  3. Quaternary volcanism, tectonics, and sedimentation in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackett, W.R.; Smith, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    In this article, we discuss the regional context and describe localities for a two-day field excursion in the vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). We address several geologic themes: (1) Late Cenozoic, bimodal volcanism of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), (2) the regional tectonics and structural geology of the Basin and Range province to the northwest of the ESRP, (3) fluvial, lacustrine, and aeolian sedimentation in the INEL area, and (4) the influence of Quaternary volcanism and tectonics on sedimentation near the INEL.

  4. LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowee, Misa; Liu, Kaijun; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    2012-07-17

    We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

  5. The Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in northwestern Montana and northern Idaho from COCORP and industry seismic reflection data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoos, T.R.; Potter, C.J.; Thigpen, J.L.; Brown, L.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1991-06-01

    COCORP and petroleum industry seismic reflection profiles in northwestern Montana reveal the structure of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt. The Front Ranges consist of thick thrust sheets containing Precambrian Belt Supergroup and Paleozoic miogeoclinal shelf rocks above a thin remnant of Paleozoic rocks and gently westward-dipping North American basement. Interpretation of the seismic data and results from a recent petroleum exploration well suggest that 15-22 km of Precambrian Belt Supergroup sedimentary rocks are present in several thrust plates beneath the eastern Purcell anticlinorium. Previous hypotheses of a large mass of Paleozoic miogeoclinal sedimentary rocks or slices of crystalline basement located beneath the eastern Purcell anticlinorium do not appear to be supported by the data. The easternmost occurrence of allochthonous basement is interpreted to be in the western part of the anticlinorium near the Montana-Idaho border. Comparison of the Cordilleran foreland thrust belt in northwestern Montana and southern Canada suggest that a change in the deep structure of the Purcell anticlinorium occurs along strike. The anticlinorium in southern Canada has been interpreted as a hanging-wall anticline that was thrust over the western edge of thick Proterozoic North American basement, whereas in northwestern Montana the anticlinorium appears to consist of a complex series of thrust sheets above highly attenuated North American basement.

  6. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28 June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.

  7. Variscan fold belt and its foreland in western Europe from late Carboniferous to Permian time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mascle, A.; Benard, F.; Cazes, M.; Le Gall, B.

    1988-08-01

    The Variscan front was emplaced in the Later Carboniferous with a south-to-north or southeast-to-northwest-trending vergence of thrusting. At the same time, folds were formed in the foreland. In England and southern Scotland, such structures were induced by an east-west direction of shortening, followed by a more subdued north-south compressive event. In Stephanian time, isolated basins developed on the Hercynian belt. In the Massif Central Marues Massif, they are closely related to transcurrent faults which developed in response to north-south-trending compressive stresses. The distribution of stresses completely changed in Early Permian time when extension dominated almost everywhere. Three kinds of basins developed at that time: those related to the relaxation of stresses on the Hercynian range, a north-south-trending rift system in the western United Kingdom and the North Sea, and a broad flexural evaporitic basin from eastern England to Poland.

  8. SUBLIMATION-DRIVEN ACTIVITY IN MAIN-BELT COMET 313P/GIBBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Hainaut, Olivier; Novaković, Bojan; Bolin, Bryce; Denneau, Larry; Haghighipour, Nader; Kleyna, Jan; Meech, Karen J.; Schunova, Eva; Wainscoat, Richard J.; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Kokotanekova, Rosita; Snodgrass, Colin; Lacerda, Pedro; Micheli, Marco; Moskovitz, Nick; Wasserman, Lawrence; Waszczak, Adam

    2015-02-10

    We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24 ± 10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28 ± 10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H{sub R} = 17.1 ± 0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r{sub e} ∼ 1.00 ± 0.15 km. The object’s faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P’s orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T{sub l} = 12,000 yr and being located near two three-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ∼155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.

  9. Structural styles of subandean fold and thrust belt of Peru and Southern Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Along-strike variations in structural styles of the east-verging Subandean fold and thrust belt (SAFTB) in Peru and southern Ecuador are controlled by the presence or absence of thick Late Permian to Jurassic evaporite sequences rather than changes in subducting plate geometries as has been suggested previously for the Andes. Salt distribution and thickness have not only controlled the styles and segmentation along the SAFTB but also have been important factors in strike variations across the belt. The southern Ecuador SAFTB lacks significant evaporite units and is characterized by thick-skinned deformation that encompasses high-angle reverse faults, and broad, low-amplitude folds. The style changes to thin-skinned deformation near 2S lat. and it is well illustrated in the Santiago and Huallaga basins where thick evaporite units are present. This segment is characterized by a major decollement on the salt, grabens formed by salt withdrawal from reactivation of thrust faults as listric normal faults, salt piercement at or near synclinal axes, and periclines and asymmetric folds. The frontal thrust of this thin-skinned segment consists of box, overturned and upright folds above shallow salt domes, and by a major backthrust at the mountain front. This segment extends to 1030'S lat., near Oxapampa, Peru, where the thin-skinned SAFTB is narrow and changes across strike to a thick-skinned deformation as the evaporite units thin and disappear eastward. South of 1030'S lat., a new thick-skinned deformation segment is present in southern Peru and characterizes most of the deformation in the SAFTB of the Ucayali and Madre De Dios basins.

  10. A PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM FOR DETECTION OF WATER AND METHANE ICES ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Schaller, Emily L. E-mail: sheppard@dtm.ciw.edu

    2011-04-01

    We present a new near-infrared photometric system for detection of water ice and methane ice in the solar system. The system consists of two medium-band filters in the K-band region of the near-infrared, which are sensitive to water ice and methane ice, plus continuum observations in the J band and Y band. The primary purpose of this system is to distinguish between three basic types of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs)-those rich in water ice, those rich in methane ice, and those with little absorbance. In this work, we present proof-of-concept observations of 51 KBOs using our filter system, 21 of which have never been observed in the near-infrared spectroscopically. We show that our custom photometric system is consistent with previous spectroscopic observations while reducing telescope observing time by a factor of {approx}3. We use our filters to identify Haumea collisional family members, which are thought to be collisional remnants of a much larger body and are characterized by large fractions of water ice on their surfaces. We add 2009 YE{sub 7} to the Haumea collisional family based on our water ice band observations (J - H{sub 2}O = -1.03 {+-} 0.27) which indicate a high amount of water ice absorption, our calculated proper orbital elements, and the neutral optical colors we measured, V - R = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which are all consistent with the rest of the Haumea family. We identify several objects dynamically similar to Haumea as being distinct from the Haumea family as they do not have water ice on their surfaces. In addition, we find that only the largest KBOs have methane ice, and Haumea itself has significantly less water ice absorption than the smaller Haumea family members. We find no evidence for other families in the Kuiper Belt.

  11. Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V.; Rolland, G.

    2012-12-15

    We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

  12. SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R.

    2011-05-10

    The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

  13. Pitch-angle diffusion of electrons through growing and propagating along a magnetic field electromagnetic wave in Earth's radiation belts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, C.-R. Dokgo, K.; Min, K.-W.; Woo, M.-H.; Choi, E.-J.; Hwang, J.; Park, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-Y.

    2015-06-15

    The diffusion of electrons via a linearly polarized, growing electromagnetic (EM) wave propagating along a uniform magnetic field is investigated. The diffusion of electrons that interact with the growing EM wave is investigated through the autocorrelation function of the parallel electron acceleration in several tens of electron gyration timescales, which is a relatively short time compared with the bounce time of electrons between two mirror points in Earth's radiation belts. Furthermore, the pitch-angle diffusion coefficient is derived for the resonant and non-resonant electrons, and the effect of the wave growth on the electron diffusion is discussed. The results can be applied to other problems related to local acceleration or the heating of electrons in space plasmas, such as in the radiation belts.

  14. An evaluation of the effect of volcanic eruption on the solar radiation at Australian and Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yatko, B.R.; Garrison, J.D.

    1996-11-01

    Peak (most probable) and average values of {angstrom}`s turbidity coefficient {beta} and peak (most probable) and average values of the diffuse index k{sub d} are obtained from the solar radiation data from 21 stations in Australia and 5 stations in Canada. These data exhibit clear increases in their values when the volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere increase following volcanic eruptions of sufficient magnitude. The effect of the eruptions of Fuego (1974), El Chichon (1982) and Pinatubo (1991) are seen most clearly in the data. The effect of lesser eruptions is also seen. The store of volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere shifts with the season so that scattering by volcanic aerosols in the spring half of the year is stronger than in the fall.

  15. Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru

    2012-09-04

    This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

  16. Localization of Volcanic Activity: Topographic Effects on Dike Propagation, Eruption and COnduit Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac

    2006-05-12

    Magma flow in a dike rising in a crack whose strike runs from a highland or a ridge to an adjacent lowland has been modeled to determine the effect of topography on the flow. It is found that there is a distinct tendency for the flow to be diverted away from the highland end of the strike toward the lowland. Separation of the geometric effect of the topography from its effect on lateral confining stresses on the crack indicates that both contribute to the effect but that the effect of stress is less important. Although this analysis explains a tendency for volcanic eruptions to occur in low lands, it does not preclude eruptions on highlands. The particular configuration modeled mimics topography around the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, so that the results may indicate some reduction in the volcanic hazard to the site.

  17. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic electrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Su, Zhenpeng; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Zhaoguo; He, Yihua; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-10-05

    Van Allen radiation belts consist of relativistic electrons trapped by Earth's magnetic field. Trapped electrons often drift azimuthally around Earth and display a butterfly pitch angle distribution of a minimum at 90° further out than geostationary orbit. This is usually attributed to drift shell splitting resulting from day–night asymmetry in Earth’s magnetic field. However, direct observation of a butterfly distribution well inside of geostationary orbit and the origin of this phenomenon have not been provided so far. Here we report high-resolution observation that a unusual butterfly pitch angle distribution of relativistic electrons occurred within 5 Earth radii during the 28more » June 2013 geomagnetic storm. In conclusion, simulation results show that combined acceleration by chorus and magnetosonic waves can successfully explain the electron flux evolution both in the energy and butterfly pitch angle distribution. Finally, the current provides a great support for the mechanism of wave-driven butterfly distribution of relativistic electrons.« less

  18. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; et al

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations revealmore » an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.« less

  19. Integration of upgrading in the production of extra heavy crudes from the orinoco belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solari, R.B.; Marzin, R.; Soler, L.

    1996-12-31

    Four heavy oil upgrading joint ventures with major oil players are currently being developed by Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. (PDVSA) affiliates. Their objective is to build integrated production-upgrading complexes to transform the low quality heavy oil from the Orinoco Belt into valuable synthetic crude oil (SCO). One of this joint ventures, a partnership between Corpoven, S.A. and ARCO International Oil and Gas Co., thoroughly evaluated the new HDH{trademark} hydroprocessing technology of Intevep, S.A. as an option to upgrade 99 API Hamaca extraheavy crude. This paper summarizes the characteristics and economics of an integrated worldscale production-upgrading complex based on the HDH{trademark} technology as compared to a similar complex based on the well known delayed coking process. It concludes that whenever high liquid yields and/or feedstock cost drives the process economics, HDH{trademark} can compite advantageously with these more conventional technologies. At present, Maraven, S.A., another PDVSA affiliate, is developing the first HDH{trademark} commercial unit, to be built in its Cardon Refinery. It is anticipated that the 100 m{sup 3}/h unit will be in operation by 1998, allowing the demonstration of the process, as well as further optimizations of the scheme, thereby improving its economic competitiveness. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. A long-lived relativistic electron storage ring embedded in Earth's Outer Van Allen belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hoxie, V. C.; Henderson, M. G.; Li, X.; Spence, H. E.; Elkington, S. R.; Friedel, R. H. W.; Goldstein, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Reeves, G. D.; Thorne, R. M.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2013-02-28

    Since their discovery over 50 years ago, the Earth’s Van Allen radiation belts are thought to consist of two distinct zones of trapped, highly energetic charged particles. The outer zone is comprised predominantly of mega-electron volt (MeV) electrons that wax and wane in intensity on time scales ranging from hours to days depending primarily on external forcing by the solar wind. Thus, the spatially separated inner zone is comprised of commingled high-energy electrons and very energetic positive ions (mostly protons), the latter being stable in intensity levels over years to decades. In situ energy-specific and temporally resolved spacecraft observations reveal an isolated third ring, or torus, of high-energy (E > 2 MeV) electrons that formed on 2 September 2012 and persisted largely unchanged in the geocentric radial range of 3.0 to ~3.5 Earth radii for over four weeks before being disrupted (and virtually annihilated) by a powerful interplanetary shock wave passage.

  1. Highly relativistic radiation belt electron acceleration, transport, and loss: Large solar storm events of March and June 2015

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baker, Daniel N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Fennell, J. F.; Blake, J. B.; Zhao, H.; Li, X.; Elkington, S. R.; et al

    2016-07-26

    Two of the largest geomagnetic storms of the last decade were witnessed in 2015. On 17 March 2015, a coronal mass ejection-driven event occurred with a Dst (storm time ring current index) value reaching –223 nT. On 22 June 2015 another strong storm (Dst reaching –204 nT) was recorded. These two storms each produced almost total loss of radiation belt high-energy (E ≳ 1 MeV) electron fluxes. Following the dropouts of radiation belt fluxes there were complex and rather remarkable recoveries of the electrons extending up to nearly 10 MeV in kinetic energy. The energized outer zone electrons showed amore » rich variety of pitch angle features including strong “butterfly” distributions with deep minima in flux at α = 90°. However, despite strong driving of outer zone earthward radial diffusion in these storms, the previously reported “impenetrable barrier” at L ≈ 2.8 was pushed inward, but not significantly breached, and no E ≳ 2.0 MeV electrons were seen to pass through the radiation belt slot region to reach the inner Van Allen zone. Altogether, these intense storms show a wealth of novel features of acceleration, transport, and loss that are demonstrated in the present detailed analysis.« less

  2. Hydrocarbon exploration through remote sensing and field work in the onshore Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, Gulf province, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, F.; Balkwill, H.; Slater, A. ); Herner, R. ); Kampschuur, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Over the years several types of remote sensing surveys have been acquired of the Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, in the Gulf Province of Papua New Guinea. These include aerial photographs, Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Each has been used by Petro-Canada Inc. for interpreting the geologic structure and stratigraphy of onshore hydrocarbon prospects. Analysis of available remotely sensed imagery reveals greater structural complexity than is shown on published geologic maps. Foremost among the images is SAR because of its low, artificial sun angle. Hence, a comprehensive view of the area has been acquired revealing many structural elements previously not appreciated. A distinct difference in structural style is found between the northern and southern segment of the Eastern Papuan fold belt in the study area. The northern segment shows discontinuous, open folds with widely separated anticlines set in featureless valleys. The southern segment is tightly folded, possessing few anticlines and synclines clearly recognizable on the imagery. However, structural components can be traced easily for tens of miles. Recent field work supports an SAR structural interpretation suggesting most, if not all, anticlines in the northern segment are overturned. The combination of remote sensing and field work proved invaluable in understanding the fold belt tectonics and has aided considerably in the selection of drilling locations.

  3. Magnetostratigraphic constraints on the development of paired fold-thrust belts/foreland basins in the Argentine Andes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.H. ); Damanti, J.F. ); Jordan, T.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of a paired fold thrust-thrust belt/foreland basin is correlated to the flattening of the subducting Nazca plate between 28-33{degree}S. Magnetostratigraphic studies in neogene basin-filling continental strata determine local basin subsidence rates and provide relatively precise chronostratigraphic correlation between different depositional environments. The data demonstrate that most existing lithostratigraphic units are diachronous and require new tectonic interpretations. Increases in sediment accumulation rates closely correspond to changes in provenance and indicate that the Frontal Cordillera, on the Chile-Argentina border was a positive topographic province by 18 Ma. The Precordillera evolved from {approx}16 Ma to the present as thrusting migrated from west to east. Published ages from intercalated airfall tuffs constrain some sedimentary sections in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas where the earliest uplift occurred since 10 Ma. The youngest uplifts are on the west side close to continuing thrusting in the Precordillera. Not all fold-thrust belt/foreland basin pairs are associated with flat subduction, suggesting that tectonic controls exceeding the scale of individual plate segments may be important. The hydrocarbon-producing Subandean fold-thrust belt/foreland basin, located in the area of 'steep' subduction that underlies northern Argentina and Bolivia (18-24{degree}S), is also believed to have evolved since middle Miocene time. Recently initiated magnetostratigraphic studies in the Subandean foreland basin will attempt to temporally constrain the Neogene tectonic evolution for comparison with the southern region.

  4. Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

    1981-05-01

    A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

  5. Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dykes, Charles D.; Daniel, Sabah S.; Wood, J. F. Barry

    1990-02-20

    In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

  6. Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

  7. PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MAIN-BELT COMET 176P/LINEAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsieh, Henry H.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David E-mail: p.lacerda@qub.ac.uk E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu

    2011-07-15

    We present a physical characterization of comet 176P/LINEAR, the third discovered member of the new class of main-belt comets, which exhibit cometary activity but are dynamically indistinguishable from main-belt asteroids. Observations show the object exhibiting a fan-shaped tail for at least one month in late 2005, but then becoming inactive in early 2006. During this active period, we measure broadband colors of B - V = 0.63 {+-} 0.02, V - R = 0.35 {+-} 0.02, and R - I = 0.31 {+-} 0.04. Using data from when the object was observed to be inactive, we derive best-fit IAU phase function parameters of H = 15.10 {+-} 0.05 mag and G = 0.15 {+-} 0.10, and best-fit linear phase function parameters of m(1, 1, 0) = 15.35 {+-} 0.05 mag and {beta} = 0.038 {+-} 0.005 mag deg{sup -1}. From this baseline phase function, we find that 176P exhibits a mean photometric excess of {approx}30% during its active period, implying an approximate total coma dust mass of M{sub d} {approx} (7.2 {+-} 3.6) x 10{sup 4} kg. From inactive data obtained in early 2007, we find a rotation period of P{sub rot} = 22.23 {+-} 0.01 hr and a peak-to-trough photometric range of {Delta}m {approx} 0.7 mag. Phasing our photometric data from 176P's 2005 active period to this rotation period, we find that the nucleus exhibits a significantly smaller photometric range than in 2007 that cannot be accounted for by coma damping effects, and as such, are attributed by us to viewing geometry effects. A detailed analysis of these geometric effects showed that 176P is likely to be a highly elongated object with an axis ratio of 1.8 < b/a < 2.1, an orbital obliquity of {epsilon} {approx} 60{sup 0}, and a solstice position at a true anomaly of {nu}{sub o} = 20{sup 0} {+-} 20{sup 0}. Numerical modeling of 176P's dust emission found that its activity can only be reproduced by asymmetric dust emission, such as a cometary jet. We find plausible fits to our observations using models assuming {approx}10 {mu}m dust particles

  8. Will new horizons see dust clumps in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitense, Christian; Krivov, Alexander V.; Lhne, Torsten

    2014-06-01

    Debris disks are thought to be sculptured by neighboring planets. The same is true for the Edgeworth-Kuiper debris disk, yet no direct observational evidence for signatures of giant planets in the Kuiper Belt dust distribution has been found so far. Here we model the dust distribution in the outer solar system to reproduce the dust impact rates onto the dust detector on board the New Horizons spacecraft measured so far and to predict the rates during the Neptune orbit traverse. To this end, we take a realistic distribution of trans-Neptunian objects to launch a sufficient number of dust grains of different sizes and follow their orbits by including radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson and stellar wind drag, as well as the perturbations of four giant planets. In a subsequent statistical analysis, we calculate number densities and lifetimes of the dust grains in order to simulate a collisional cascade. In contrast to the previous work, our model not only considers collisional elimination of particles but also includes production of finer debris. We find that particles captured in the 3:2 resonance with Neptune build clumps that are not removed by collisions, because the depleting effect of collisions is counteracted by production of smaller fragments. Our model successfully reproduces the dust impact rates measured by New Horizons out to ?23 AU and predicts an increase of the impact rate of about a factor of two or three around the Neptune orbit crossing. This result is robust with respect to the variation of the vaguely known number of dust-producing scattered disk objects, collisional outcomes, and the dust properties.

  9. Hubble space telescope investigation of main-belt comet 133P/Elst-Pizarro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewitt, David; Ishiguro, Masateru; Weaver, Harold; Agarwal, Jessica; Mutchler, Max; Larson, Steven

    2014-05-01

    We report new observations of the prototype main-belt comet (active asteroid) 133P/Elst-Pizarro taken at high angular resolution using the Hubble Space Telescope. The object has three main components: (1) a point-like nucleus; (2) a long, narrow antisolar dust tail; and (3) a short, sunward anti-tail. There is no resolved coma. The nucleus has a mean absolute magnitude H{sub V} = 15.70 0.10 and a light curve range ?V = 0.42 mag, the latter corresponding to projected dimensions 3.6 5.4 km (axis ratio 1.5:1) at the previously measured geometric albedo of 0.05 0.02. We explored a range of continuous and impulsive emission models to simultaneously fit the measured surface brightness profile, width, and position angle of the antisolar tail. Preferred fits invoke protracted emission, over a period of 150 days or less, of dust grains following a differential power-law size distribution with index 3.25 ?q ? 3.5 and with a wide range of sizes. Ultra-low surface brightness dust projected in the sunward direction is a remnant from emission activity occurring in previous orbits, and consists of the largest (?cm-sized) particles. Ejection velocities of one-micron-sized particles are comparable to the ?1.8 m s{sup 1} gravitational escape speed of the nucleus, while larger particles are released at speeds less than the gravitational escape velocity. The observations are consistent with, but do not prove, a hybrid hypothesis in which mass loss is driven by gas drag from the sublimation of near-surface water ice, but escape is aided by centripetal acceleration from the rotation of the elongated nucleus. No plausible alternative hypothesis has been identified.

  10. Predicting methane accumulations generated from humic Carboniferous coals in the Donbas fold belt (Ukraine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alsaab, D.; Elie, M.; Izart, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Privalov, V.A.

    2008-08-15

    The numerical modeling of the Ukrainian part of the Donbas fold belt indicates that the coalification pattern was controlled mainly by the maximum burial depth of coal seams and the heat flow (HF) (40-75 mW/m{sup 2}) during the Permian. The coalification pattern was overprinted by magmatic events during the Late Permian in the south syncline (150 mW/m{sup 2}) and during the Permian-Triassic in the north of the Krasnoarmeisk region (120 mW/m{sup 2}). The coalification pattern shows a strong increase in vitrinite reflectance values toward the east and southeastern parts of the study area likely caused by (1) an eastward increase in burial depth, (2) a probable eastward increase in HF, and, (3) probable magmatic activity. An increase in total erosion toward the eastern and southeastern parts was also observed with a maximum erosional amount of approximately 8 km (5 mi) in the southeastern part of the study area. The basin modeling of this area predicts that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred during the Carboniferous-Early Permian subsidence. The magmatic events that occurred during the Permian-Triassic caused renewed pulses of hydrocarbon generation. A large amount of the generated hydrocarbons was lost to the surface because of a lack of seals. However, the numerical simulation predicts accumulations of about 2 tcf (57 billion m{sup 3}) of methane generated from Carboniferous coals in the south and main synclines, where Lower Permian seal rocks are preserved. Finally, this study provides data on methane resources along the northern flank

  11. Crustal structure of mountain belts and basins: Industry and academic collaboration at Cornell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allmendinger, R.; Barazangi, M.; Brown, L.

    1995-08-01

    Interdisciplinary investigations of the large-scale structure and evolution of key basins and orogenic belts around the world are the focal point of academic-industry interaction at Cornell. Ongoing and new initiatives with significant industry involvement include: Project INDEPTH (Interdisciplinary Deep Profiling of Tibet and the Himalayas), a multinational effort to delineate deep structure across the type example of active continent-continent collision. 300 km of deep reflection profiling was collected across the Himalaya: and southern Tibet Plateau in 1992 and 1994. CAP (Cornell Andes Project), a long-standing interdisciplinary effort to understand the structure and evolution of the Andes, with a focus on Argentina, Chile and Bolivia. A deep reflection profile is tentatively planned for 1997. Intra-plate Orogeny in the Middle East and North Africa is the focus of multidisciplinary regional syntheses of existing seismic reflection and other databases in Syria (Palmyrides)and Morocco (Atlas), with an emphasis on reactivation and inversion tectonics. Project URSEIS (Urals Reflection Seismic Experiment and Integrated Studies) is a collaboration with EUROPROBE to collect 500 km of vibroseis and dynamite deep reflection profiling across the southern Urals in 1995. Project CRATON, an element in COCORP`s systematic exploration of the continental US, is a nascent multi-disciplinary effort to understand the buried craton of the central US and the basins built upon it. Global Basins Research Network (GBRN) is a diversified observational and computational effort to image and model the movement of pore fluids in detail and on a regional scale for a producing oil structure in the Gulf of Mexico.

  12. Los Humeros Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Chignautla, Puebla, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase:...

  13. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Singla, P.; Bursik, M.; Dehn, J.; Jones, M.; Patra, A.; Pavolonis, M.; Pitman, E.B.; Singh, T.; Webley, P.

    2014-08-15

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 1416 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  14. Contact metasomatic and hydrothermal minerals in the SH2 deep well, Sabatini Volcanic District, Latium, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavarretta, G.; Tecce, F.

    1987-01-01

    Metasomatic and hydrothermal minerals were logged throughout the SH2 geothermal well, which reached a depth of 2498 m in the Sabatini volcanic district. Below 460 m of volcanics, where the newly formed minerals were mainly chlorite, calcite and zeolites (mostly phillipsite), drilling entered the Allochthonous Flysch Complex. Evidence of the ''Cicerchina facies'' was found down to 1600 m depth. Starting from 1070 m, down to hole bottom, a contact metasomatic complex was defined by the appearance of garnet. Garnet together with K-fledspar, vesuvianite, wilkeite, cuspidine, harkerite, wollastonite and apatite prevail in the top part of the contact metasomatic complex. Vesuvianite and phlogopite characterize the middle part. Phlogopite, pyroxene, spinel and cancrinite predominate in the bottom part. The 1500 m thick metasomatic complex indicates the presence at depth of the intrusion of a trachytic magma which released hot fluids involved in metasomatic mineral-forming reactions. Minerals such as harkerite, wilkeite, cuspidine, cancrinite, vesuvianite and phlogopite indicate the intrusive melt had a high volatile content which is in agreement with the very high explosivity index of this volcanic district. The system is at present sealed by abundant calcite and anhydrite. It is proposed that most, if not all, of the sulphates formed after reaction of SO/sub 2/ with aqueous calcium species rather than from sulphates being remobilized from evaporitic (Triassic) rocks as previously inferred. The hypothesis of a CO/sub 2/-rich deep-derived fluid ascending through major fracture systems and contrasting cooling in the hottest areas of Latium is presented.

  15. TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  16. Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Leon Gwynn

    2010-05-01

    Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and

  17. Atmospheric Dispersal and Dispostion of Tephra From a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Keating; W.Statham

    2004-02-12

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (ASHPLUME) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. The ASHPLUME conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The ASHPLUME mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report will improve and clarify the previous documentation of the ASHPLUME mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model.

  18. The Cobb-Eickelberg seamount chain: Hotspot volcanism with mid-ocean ridge basalt affinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desonie, D.L.; Duncan, R.A. )

    1990-08-10

    Cobb hotspot, currently located beneath Axial seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge, has the temporal but not the isotopic characteristics usually attributed to a mantle plume. The earlier volcanic products of the hotspot, form eight volcanoes in the Cobb-Eickelberg seamount (CES) chain, show a westward age progression away from the hotspot and a westward increase in the age difference between the seamounts and the crust on which they formed. These results are consistent with movement of the Pacific plate over a fixed Cobb hotspot and eventual encroachment by the westwardly migrating Juan de Fuca ridge. CES lavas are slightly enriched in alkalies and incompatible elements relative to those of the Juan de Fuca ridge but they have Sr, Nd, and Pb isotopic compositions virtually identical to those found along the ridge. Therefore, Cobb hotspot is a stationary, upper mantle melting anomaly whose volcanic products show strong mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. These observations can be explained by low degrees of partial melting of entrained heterogeneous upper mantle MORB source material within a thermally driven lower mantle diapir or by an intrinsic MORB-like composition of the deeper mantle source region from which northeast Pacific plumes rise.

  19. Restoration of geological surface-UNFOLD method-a validation of complex structural mapping interpretation in the Andean Thrust Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guillier, B. ); Oller, J.; Mendez, E.; Leconte, J.C.; Letouzey, J.; Specht, M.; Gratier, J.P.

    1993-02-01

    One of the most important problems in petroleum structural geology is dependable interpretation of structural maps obtained by seismic and sub-surface data. One method for validating the geometry of geological structures is the balancing cross-section technique which allows verification of cross-section geometry by a return to its initial horizontal state. However, this can not be used for of 3D halokinesis, shale tectonics, structures formed by polyphased noncoaxial tectonic events, or strike-slip and wrench faulting. An alternative approach is to test the restoration of folded and faulted surfaces to verify 3D structures by balancing geological surfaces represented by a structural map. This method tests the geometry of studied horizon and faults and is based upon the fact that, initially, actual folded/faulted structures were continuous at deposition. The balancing surface program, UNFOLD, restores the actual geological surface to its initial state. Misfits along faults implied poor structural map drawings or strong internal deformation of the geological level. By trial and error method, we returned to the initial data interpretation modifications. This method has been applied to 2D and 3D seismic structural interpretation in different structural styles, environments, rift zones, salt basins, wrench faulting, thrust belt,etc. Some applications to oil field structures in the Andean Thrust Belt have been done to check and validate the complex structural mapping interpretation.

  20. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to

  1. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  2. The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowe, B.; Morley, R.; Wells, S.; Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F.; Murrell, M.; Poths, J.; Forman, S.

    1993-03-01

    The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is located 20 km south of the potential Yucca Mountain site, at the south end of the Yucca Mountain range. It has long been recognized as the youngest basalt center in the region. However, determination of the age and eruptive history of the center has proven problematic. The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results.

  3. Multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiang, Zheng; Ni, Binbin; Zhou, Chen; Zou, Zhengyang; Gu, Xudong; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Xianguo; Zhang, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shenyi; Li, Xinlin; et al

    2016-05-03

    Radiation belt electron flux dropouts are a kind of drastic variation in the Earth's magnetosphere, understanding of which is of both scientific and societal importance. We report multi-satellite simultaneous observations of magnetopause and atmospheric losses of radiation belt electrons during an event of intense solar wind dynamic pressure pulse, using electron flux data from a group of 14 satellites. Moreover, when the pulse occurred, magnetopause and atmospheric loss could take effect concurrently contributing to the electron flux dropout. Losses through the magnetopause were observed to be efficient and significant at L ≳ 5, owing to the magnetopause intrusion into Lmore » ~6 and outward radial diffusion associated with sharp negative gradient in electron phase space density. Losses to the atmosphere were directly identified from the precipitating electron flux observations, for which pitch angle scattering by plasma waves could be mainly responsible. While the convection and substorm injections strongly enhanced the energetic electron fluxes up to hundreds of keV, they could delay other than avoid the occurrence of electron flux dropout at these energies. Finally, we demonstrate that the pulse-time radiation belt electron flux dropout depends strongly on the specific interplanetary and magnetospheric conditions and that losses through the magnetopause and to the atmosphere and enhancements of substorm injection play an essential role in combination, which should be incorporated as a whole into future simulations for comprehending the nature of radiation belt electron flux dropouts.« less

  4. CHANGES OF THE SOLAR MERIDIONAL VELOCITY PROFILE DURING CYCLE 23 EXPLAINED BY FLOWS TOWARD THE ACTIVITY BELTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schuessler, M.

    2010-09-10

    The solar meridional flow is an important ingredient in Babcock-Leighton type models of the solar dynamo. Global variations of this flow have been suggested to explain the variations in the amplitudes and lengths of the activity cycles. Recently, cycle-related variations in the amplitude of the P{sup 1}{sub 2} term in the Legendre decomposition of the observed meridional flow have been reported. The result is often interpreted in terms of an overall variation in the flow amplitude during the activity cycle. Using a semi-empirical model based upon the observed distribution of magnetic flux on the solar surface, we show that the reported variations of the P{sup 1}{sub 2} term can be explained by the observed localized inflows into the active region belts. No variation of the overall meridional flow amplitude is required.

  5. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting on the Development and Evolution of Geothermal Systems: Collaborative Project in Chile presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  6. Volcanic episodes near Yucca Mountain as determined by paleomagnetic studies as Lathrop Wells, Crater Flat, and Sleeping Butte, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Champion, D.E.

    1991-12-31

    It has been suggested that mafic volcanism in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is both recent (20 ka) and a product of complex {open_quotes}polycyclic{close_quotes} eruptions. This pattern of volcanism, as interpreted by some workers at the Lathrop Wells volcanic complex, comprises a sequence of numerous small-volume eruptions that become more tephra-producing over time. Such sequences are thought to occur over timespans as long as 100,000 years. However, paleomagnetic studies of the tephra and lava flows from mafic volcanoes near Yucca Mountain fail to find evidence of repeated eruptive activity over timespans of 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} years, even though samples have been taken that represent approximately 95% of the products of these volcanoes. Instead, the eruptions seem to have occurred as discrete episodes at each center and thus can be considered to be {open_quotes}monogenetic.{close_quotes} Dates of these episodes have been obtained by the proven radiometric-geochronometer methods of K-Ar or {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating.

  7. Four-year prospective study of the respiratory effects of volcanic ash from Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buist, A.S.; Vollmer, W.M.; Johnson, L.R.; Bernstein, R.S.; McCamant, L.E.

    1986-04-01

    This report describes the 4-yr follow-up of 712 loggers exposed over an extended period to varying levels of fresh volcanic ash from the 1980 eruptions of Mt. St. Helens. Concerns related to the irritant effect the ash might have on the airways and also to its fibrogenic potential if exposures were intense and continued over many years. Our subjects were divided into 3 groups: high, low, and no exposure. Baseline testing was begun in June 1980, 1 month after the major eruption, and follow-up testing continued on an annual basis through 1984; 88% of the loggers have been tested at least 3 times. Analysis of lung function data showed that a significant, exposure-related decline in FEV1 occurred during the first year after the eruption. The decline was short-lived, however, and by 1984 the differences between exposure groups were no longer significant. Self-reported symptoms of cough, phlegm, and wheeze showed a similar pattern. No ash-related changes were seen in chest roentgenograms taken in 1980 and in 1984. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the inhaled ash caused mucus hypersecretion and/or airway inflammation that reversed when the exposure levels decreased. The ash levels to which the loggers were exposed were low compared with permissible occupational levels for nuisance dusts, but generally higher than the total suspended particulate levels permissible in ambient air.

  8. Heteromorphism and crystallization paths of katungites, Navajo volcanic field, Arizona, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, A.W.; Charles, R.W.; Aldrich, M.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    A swarm of thin, isochemical but heteromorphic dikes crops out in the valley of Hasbidito Creek in NE Arizona. The swarm is part of the dominantly potassic, mid-Tertiary Navajo volcanic field of the Colorado Plateau. Whole-rock chemical analyses of five samples from four of the dikes indicate that they are chemically identical to the katungites of Uganda. These dikes show the characteristic seriate-porphyritic texture of lamprophyres. Samples of an olivine-melilitite dike from the same swarm lack this texture and the chemical analysis, while similar to those of the other dikes, shows effects from the incorporation of xenocrystic olivine. Over 20 mineral phases have been identified in the Arizona samples and as many as 18 phases may occur in a single sample. The major phases are phlogopite, olivine, perovskite, opaque oxides, +- melilite and +- clinopyroxene. Based upon the modal mineralogies and textures of ten dike samples, we recognize five general non-equilibrium assemblages. Comparison of these assemblages with recent experimental results shows that they represent various combinations of complete and incomplete reactions. Reaction relations were determined by entering melt and phase compositions into the computer program GENMIX to obtain balanced reactions. By combining petrographic observations with mineral chemical data, balanced reactions from GENMIX, and the recently determined phase diagrams we are able to trace crystallization paths for the katungite magma.

  9. Analysis of fractures in volcanic cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Prothro, L.B.; Roberson, K.E.

    1997-09-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County, southern Nevada, was the location of 828 announced underground nuclear tests, conducted between 1951 and 1992. Approximately one-third of these tests were detonated near or below the water table. An unavoidable consequence of these testing activities was introducing radionuclides into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. Groundwater flows beneath the NTS almost exclusively through interconnected natural fractures in carbonate and volcanic rocks. Information about these fractures is necessary to determine hydrologic parameters for future Corrective Action Unit (CAU)-specific flow and transport models which will be used to support risk assessment calculations for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Underground Test Area (UGTA) remedial investigation. Fracture data are critical in reducing the uncertainty of the predictive capabilities of CAU-specific models because of their usefulness in generating hydraulic conductivity values and dispersion characteristics used in transport modeling. Specifically, fracture aperture and density (spacing) are needed to calculate the permeability anisotropy of the formations. Fracture mineralogy information is used qualitatively to evaluate diffusion and radionuclide retardation potential in transport modeling. All these data can best be collected through examination of core samples.

  10. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. II. THE CEPHEUS FLARE OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirk, Jason M.; Ward-Thompson, Derek; Di Francesco, James E-mail: derek.ward-thompson@astro.cf.ac.uk

    2009-11-01

    We present Spitzer Infrared Array Camera (IRAC; {approx}2 deg{sup 2}) and Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; {approx}8 deg{sup 2}) observations of the Cepheus Flare, which is associated with the Gould Belt, at an approximate distance of {approx}300 pc. Around 6500 sources are detected in all four IRAC bands, of which {approx}900 have MIPS 24 {mu}m detections. We identify 133 young stellar object (YSO) candidates using color-magnitude diagram techniques, and a large number of the YSO candidates are associated with the NGC 7023 reflection nebula. Cross-identifications were made with the Guide Star Catalog II and the IRAS Faint Source Catalog, and spectral energy distributions (SEDs) were constructed. SED modeling was conducted to estimate the degree of infrared excess. It was found that a large majority of disks were optically thick accreting disks, suggesting that there has been little disk evolution in these sources. Nearest-neighbor clustering analysis identified four small protostellar groups (L1228, L1228N, L1251A, and L1251B) with 5-15 members each and the larger NGC 7023 association with 32 YSO members. The star-formation efficiency for cores with clusters of protostars and for those without clusters was found to be {approx}8% and {approx}1%, respectively. The cores L1155, L1241, and L1247 are confirmed to be starless down to our luminosity limit of L {sub bol} = 0.06 L {sub sun}.

  11. A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  12. CONSTRAINTS ON THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT COMET P/2013 R3 FROM ITS BREAKUP EVENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Snchez, Diego Paul; Gabriel, Travis; Scheeres, Daniel J.

    2014-07-01

    Jewitt etal. recently reported that main belt comet P/2013 R3 experienced a breakup, probably due to rotational disruption, with its components separating on mutually hyperbolic orbits. We propose a technique for constraining physical properties of the proto-body, especially the initial spin period and cohesive strength, as a function of the body's estimated size and density. The breakup conditions are developed by combining mutual orbit dynamics of the smaller components and the failure condition of the proto-body. Given a proto-body with a bulk density ranging from 1000kgm{sup 3} to 1500kgm{sup 3} (a typical range of the bulk density of C-type asteroids), we obtain possible values of the cohesive strength (40-210Pa) and the initial spin state (0.48-1.9hr). From this result, we conclude that although the proto-body could have been a rubble pile, it was likely spinning beyond its gravitational binding limit and would have needed cohesive strength to hold itself together. Additional observations of P/2013 R3 will enable stronger constraints on this event, and the present technique will be able to give more precise estimates of its internal structure.

  13. A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

    2012-08-01

    This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

  14. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be

  15. The influences of solar wind pressure and interplanetary magnetic field on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt electrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, J.; Li, L. Y.; Cao, J. B.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H.

    2016-07-22

    Using the Van Allen Probe in situ measured magnetic field and electron data, we examine the solar wind dynamic pressure and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) effects on global magnetic field and outer radiation belt relativistic electrons (≥1.8 MeV). The dynamic pressure enhancements (>2 nPa) cause the dayside magnetic field increase and the nightside magnetic field reduction, whereas the large southward IMFs (Bz-IMF < –2nT) mainly lead to the decrease of the nightside magnetic field. In the dayside increased magnetic field region (magnetic local time (MLT) ~ 06:00–18:00, and L > 4), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons are mainly pancakemore » distributions with a flux peak around 90° (corresponding anisotropic index A > 0.1), and the higher-energy electrons have stronger pancake distributions (the larger A), suggesting that the compression-induced betatron accelerations enhance the dayside pancake distributions. However, in the nighttime decreased magnetic field region (MLT ~ 18:00–06:00, and L ≥ 5), the pitch angles of relativistic electrons become butterfly distributions with two flux peaks around 45° and 135° (A < 0). The spatial range of the nighttime butterfly distributions is almost independent of the relativistic electron energy, but it depends on the magnetic field day-night asymmetry and the interplanetary conditions. The dynamic pressure enhancements can make the nighttime butterfly distribution extend inward. The large southward IMFs can also lead to the azimuthal expansion of the nighttime butterfly distributions. As a result, these variations are consistent with the drift shell splitting and/or magnetopause shadowing effect.« less

  16. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. V. OPHIUCHUS NORTH OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatchell, J.; Terebey, S.; Huard, T.; Mamajek, E. E. E-mail: sterebe@calstatela.edu; and others

    2012-08-01

    We present Spitzer IRAC (2.1 deg{sup 2}) and MIPS (6.5 deg{sup 2}) observations of star formation in the Ophiuchus North (Oph N) molecular clouds. This fragmentary cloud complex lies on the edge of the Sco-Cen OB association, several degrees to the north of the well-known {rho} Oph star-forming region, at an approximate distance of 130 pc. The Oph N clouds were mapped as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt project under the working name 'Scorpius'. In the regions mapped, selected to encompass all the cloud with visual extinction A{sub V} > 3, 11 young stellar object (YSO) candidates are identified, 8 from IRAC/MIPS color-based selection and 3 from Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) K{sub S} /MIPS colors. Adding to one source previously identified in L43, this increases the number of YSOcs identified in Oph N to 12. During the selection process, four color-based YSOcs were rejected as probable asymptotic giant branch stars and one as a known galaxy. The sources span the full range of YSOc classifications from Class 0/1 to Class III, and starless cores are also present. Twelve high extinction (A{sub V} > 10) cores are identified with a total mass of {approx}100 M{sub Sun }. These results confirm that there is little ongoing star formation in this region (instantaneous star formation efficiency <0.34%) and that the bottleneck lies in the formation of dense cores. The influence of the nearby Upper Sco OB association, including the 09V star {zeta} Oph, is seen in dynamical interactions and raised dust temperatures but has not enhanced levels of star formation in Oph N.

  17. THE SPITZER SURVEY OF INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS IN THE GOULD BELT. IV. LUPUS V AND VI OBSERVED WITH IRAC AND MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spezzi, Loredana; Vernazza, Pierre; Merin, Bruno; Allen, Lori E.; Evans, Neal J. II; Harvey, Paul M.; Joergensen, Jes K.; Bourke, Tyler L.; Peterson, Dawn; Cieza, Lucas A.; Dunham, Michael M.; Huard, Tracy L.; Tothill, Nick F. H.

    2011-04-01

    We present Gould's Belt (GB) Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the Lupus V and VI clouds and discuss them in combination with near-infrared (2MASS) data. Our observations complement those obtained for other Lupus clouds within the frame of the Spitzer 'Core to Disk' (c2d) Legacy Survey. We found 43 young stellar object (YSO) candidates in Lupus V and 45 in Lupus VI, including two transition disks, using the standard c2d/GB selection method. None of these sources was classified as a pre-main-sequence star from previous optical, near-IR, and X-ray surveys. A large majority of these YSO candidates appear to be surrounded by thin disks (Class III; {approx}79% in Lupus V and {approx}87% in Lupus VI). These Class III abundances differ significantly from those observed for the other Lupus clouds and c2d/GB surveyed star-forming regions, where objects with optically thick disks (Class II) dominate the young population. We investigate various scenarios that can explain this discrepancy. In particular, we show that disk photoevaporation due to nearby OB stars is not responsible for the high fraction of Class III objects. The gas surface densities measured for Lupus V and VI lie below the star formation threshold (A{sub V} {approx} 8.6 mag), while this is not the case for other Lupus clouds. Thus, few Myr older age for the YSOs in Lupus V and VI with respect to other Lupus clouds is the most likely explanation of the high fraction of Class III objects in these clouds, while a higher characteristic stellar mass might be a contributing factor. Better constraints on the age and binary fraction of the Lupus clouds might solve the puzzle but require further observations.

  18. ON THE EFFECT OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE SCATTERING OF PARENT BODIES OF IRON METEORITE FROM THE TERRESTRIAL PLANET REGION INTO THE ASTEROID BELT: A CONCEPT STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haghighipour, Nader; Scott, Edward R. D.

    2012-04-20

    In their model for the origin of the parent bodies of iron meteorites, Bottke et al. proposed differentiated planetesimals, formed in 1-2 AU during the first 1.5 Myr, as the parent bodies, and suggested that these objects and their fragments were scattered into the asteroid belt as a result of interactions with planetary embryos. Although viable, this model does not include the effect of a giant planet that might have existed or been growing in the outer regions. We present the results of a concept study where we have examined the effect of a planetary body in the orbit of Jupiter on the early scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial region into the asteroid belt. We integrated the orbits of a large battery of planetesimals in a disk of planetary embryos and studied their evolutions for different values of the mass of the planet. Results indicate that when the mass of the planet is smaller than 10 M{sub Circled-Plus }, its effects on the interactions among planetesimals and planetary embryos are negligible. However, when the planet mass is between 10 and 50 M{sub Circled-Plus }, simulations point to a transitional regime with {approx}50 M{sub Circled-Plus} being the value for which the perturbing effect of the planet can no longer be ignored. Simulations also show that further increase of the mass of the planet strongly reduces the efficiency of the scattering of planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region into the asteroid belt. We present the results of our simulations and discuss their possible implications for the time of giant planet formation.

  19. Volcanic lightning and plume behavior reveal evolving hazards during the April 2015 eruption of Calbuco Volcano, Chile

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Eaton, Alexa R.; Behnke, Sonja Ann; Amigo, Alvaro; Bertin, Daniel; Mastin, Larry G.; Giacosa, Raul E.; Gonzalez, Jeronimo; Valderrama, Oscar; Fontijn, Karen

    2016-04-12

    Soon after the onset of an eruption, model forecasts of ash dispersal are used to mitigate the hazards to aircraft, infrastructure, and communities downwind. However, it is a significant challenge to constrain the model inputs during an evolving eruption. Here we demonstrate that volcanic lightning may be used in tandem with satellite detection to recognize and quantify changes in eruption style and intensity. Using the eruption of Calbuco volcano in southern Chile on 22 and 23 April 2015, we investigate rates of umbrella cloud expansion from satellite observations, occurrence of lightning, and mapped characteristics of the fall deposits. Our remotemore » sensing analysis gives a total erupted volume that is within uncertainty of the mapped volume (0.56 ± 0.28 km3 bulk). Furthermore, observations and volcanic plume modeling further suggest that electrical activity was enhanced both by ice formation in the ash clouds >10 km above sea level and development of a low-level charge layer from ground-hugging currents.« less

  20. THE HERSCHEL AND JCMT GOULD BELT SURVEYS: CONSTRAINING DUST PROPERTIES IN THE PERSEUS B1 CLUMP WITH PACS, SPIRE, AND SCUBA-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadavoy, S. I.; Di Francesco, J.; Johnstone, D.; Fallscheer, C.; Matthews, B.; Currie, M. J.; Jenness, T.; Drabek, E.; Hatchell, J.; Nutter, D.; Andre, Ph.; Hennemann, M.; Hill, T.; Koenyves, V.; Benedettini, M.; Bernard, J.-P.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Friesen, R.; Greaves, J.; Collaboration: JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Survey teams; and others

    2013-04-20

    We present Herschel observations from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey and SCUBA-2 science verification observations from the JCMT Gould Belt Survey of the B1 clump in the Perseus molecular cloud. We determined the dust emissivity index using four different techniques to combine the Herschel PACS+SPIRE data at 160-500 {mu}m with the SCUBA-2 data at 450 {mu}m and 850 {mu}m. Of our four techniques, we found that the most robust method was filtering out the large-scale emission in the Herschel bands to match the spatial scales recovered by the SCUBA-2 reduction pipeline. Using this method, we find {beta} Almost-Equal-To 2 toward the filament region and moderately dense material and lower {beta} values ({beta} {approx}> 1.6) toward the dense protostellar cores, possibly due to dust grain growth. We find that {beta} and temperature are more robust with the inclusion of the SCUBA-2 data, improving estimates from Herschel data alone by factors of {approx}2 for {beta} and by {approx}40% for temperature. Furthermore, we find core mass differences of {approx}< 30% compared to Herschel-only estimates with an adopted {beta} = 2, highlighting the necessity of long-wavelength submillimeter data for deriving accurate masses of prestellar and protostellar cores.

  1. The Spitzer survey of interstellar clouds in the gould belt. VI. The Auriga-California molecular cloud observed with IRAC and MIPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda C.; Harvey, Paul M.; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Huard, Tracy L.; Miller, Jennifer F.; Tothill, Nicholas F. H.; Nutter, David; Bourke, Tyler L.; DiFrancesco, James; Jørgensen, Jes K.; Allen, Lori E.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Dunham, Michael M.; Merín, Bruno; Terebey, Susan; Peterson, Dawn E.; and others

    2014-05-01

    We present observations of the Auriga-California Molecular Cloud (AMC) at 3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 24, 70, and 160 μm observed with the IRAC and MIPS detectors as part of the Spitzer Gould Belt Legacy Survey. The total mapped areas are 2.5 deg{sup 2} with IRAC and 10.47 deg{sup 2} with MIPS. This giant molecular cloud is one of two in the nearby Gould Belt of star-forming regions, the other being the Orion A Molecular Cloud (OMC). We compare source counts, colors, and magnitudes in our observed region to a subset of the SWIRE data that was processed through our pipeline. Using color-magnitude and color-color diagrams, we find evidence for a substantial population of 166 young stellar objects (YSOs) in the cloud, many of which were previously unknown. Most of this population is concentrated around the LkHα 101 cluster and the filament extending from it. We present a quantitative description of the degree of clustering and discuss the relative fraction of YSOs in earlier (Class I and F) and later (Class II) classes compared to other clouds. We perform simple SED modeling of the YSOs with disks to compare the mid-IR properties to disks in other clouds and identify 14 classical transition disk candidates. Although the AMC is similar in mass, size, and distance to the OMC, it is forming about 15-20 times fewer stars.

  2. Development of transfer zones and location of oil and gas fields in frontal part of Bolivian Andean fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baby, P. ); Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Mendez, E. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    The frontal part of the Bolivian Andean thrust belt consists of a thick series of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks (5 to 8 km thick) which are folded and thrusted towards the east on a sole thrust at the base of paleozoic series. The front of this tectonic wedge is characterized by transfer zones of various scales and geometries. The main oil and gas fields are located in these transfer zones. A study realized from YPFB (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos) seismic data shows that in all the cases, the deformation is controlled by the geometry and thickness variations of the paleozoic basin. The most spectacular transfer zone appears at the bolivian orocline scale and corresponds to the famous bending of the andean thrust front close to Santa Cruz. More to the south (19 to 22[degrees] S) the southern foreland fold and thrust belt is characterized by a set of local right lateral offset transfer zones ([open quotes]en echellon[close quotes] folds). The difference of geometry and scale of the transfer zones seems to be related to the variation of the angle value between the shortening direction and the direction of the paleozoic basin borders. In order to test our interpretation, to constrain the boundary conditions and to study the thrust propagation sequence, we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  3. Dynamic coupling of volcanic CO2 flow and wind at the HorseshoeLake tree kill, Mammoth Mountain, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Tosha, T.; Aoyagi, R.; Yamamoto, K.; Benson, S.M.

    2006-11-20

    We investigate spatio-temporal relationships between soilCO2 flux (FCO2), meteorological variables, and topography over a ten-dayperiod (09/12/2006 to 09/21/2006) at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill,Mammoth Mountain, CA. Total CO2 discharge varied from 16 to 52 t d-1,suggesting a decline in CO2 emissions over decadal timescales. Weobserved systematic changes in FCO2 in space and time in association witha weather front with relatively high wind speeds from the west and lowatmospheric pressures. The largest FCO2 changes were observed inrelatively high elevation areas. The variations in FCO2 may be due todynamic coupling of wind-driven airflow through the subsurface and flowof source CO2 at depth. Our results highlight the influence of weatherfronts on volcanic gas flow in the near-surface environment and how thisinfluence can vary spatially within a study area.

  4. Los Azufres Geothermal Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volcanic Belt Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash, Binary, Back Pressure Energy Purchaser Comisin Federal de Electricidad Commercial Online Date 1982 Power Plant...

  5. Los Azufres II Geothermal Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Transmexican Volcanic Belt Plant Information Facility Type Single Flash Developer Alstom Energy Purchaser Comisin Federal de Electricidad Commercial Online Date 2003 Power Plant...

  6. Lithospheric flexure and composite tectonic loads in the foreland of the Marathon orogenic belt: Permian Basin, west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kenn Ming; Dorobek, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure caused by loading of orogenic belts is regarded as the main process that produces subsidence in foreland basins. However in some foreland areas, subsidence may be affected by synorogenic foreland uplifts that act as additional loads. The Permian Basin is located in the foreland area of the late Paleozoic Marathon orogenic belt (Mob). The Permian Basin consists of several sub-basins that are separated by several structurally complex uplifts. Uplift of the Central Basin Platform (CBP) and subsidence in adjacent basins were coeval with final stages of deformation in the Marathon orogen. The CBP is oriented at high angles to the Marathon orogen and consists of several blocks arranged in an en echelon pattern. Data suggest that uplift of the CBP was affected by clockwise rotation of crustal blocks between NNW-SSE trending boundary faults. Although both the Delaware Basin (DB) and Val Verde Basin (VVB) are adjacent to the Mob, the synorogenic geometries of these basins are different. The VVB has a typical flexural profile that apparently is due to loading of the Marathon orogen. However, the flexural profile becomes narrower and deeper toward the western end of the VVB where the basin is bordered by the southernmost block of the CBP. In contrast, synorogenic DB profiles have composite wavelengths which show maximum deflection next to the Mob and toward the uplifted blocks of the CBP. This suggests that synorogenic subsidence of the DB was affected by loading of the CBP. In addition, the loading geometry across the uplifted CBP is asymmetric, with greater uplift and basement shortening on the western side of the CBP and less uplift and basement shortening on the eastern side. This may explain greater synorogenic subsidence in the DB than the Midland Basin.

  7. Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael; Keating, Elizabeth H

    2010-12-02

    Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

  8. Iridium geochemistry of volcanic ash layers from the early Eocene rifting of the northeastern North Atlantic and some other Phanerozoic events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitz, B.; Asaro, F. |

    1996-04-01

    This study shows that some types of explosive volcanism can result in significant Ir anomalies (up to 750 ppt); however, these are readily discerned from impact-related, extraterrestrial Ir amomalies by other chemical and mineralogical criteria. Iridium and major and trace elements were analyzed in 34 of the >180 volcanic ash layers in the Fur Formation of early Eocene age in Denmark. These ashes originate from explosive volcanism during rifting of the Greenland-Eurasia continent and subsequent sea-floor spreading in the young northeastern North Atlantic. In addition, 15 older Phanerozoic ashes, associated with other dramatic global events, have been analyzed for Ir. The Fur Formation ashes are unusually well preserved and have a wide compositional range - for example, rhyolitic, dacitic, tholeiitic and alkaline basaltic, mafic alkaline, and different salic alkaline ashes, and ashes with intermediate or unknown magma origin. Iridium shows a bimodal distribution, where all types of salic (alkaline as well as subalkaline) ashes have very low Ir concentrations (<50 ppt), similar to values for average continental crust, whereas all types of basaltic ashes show higher concentrations, generally in the range 70-450 ppt. A strongly alkaline, mafic (nephelinitic) ash holds 102{+-}29 ppt Ir. 97 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies, Department of Geoscience annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, E.I. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Center for Volcanic and Tectonic Studies

    1990-11-01

    This report summarizes our activities during the period October 1, 1989 to September 30, 1990. Our goal was to develop an understanding of late-Miocene and Pliocene volcanism in the Great Basin by studying Pliocene volcanoes in the vicinity of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Field studies during this period concentrated on the Quaternary volcanoes in Crater Flat, Yucca Mountain, Fortification Hill, at Buckboard Mesa and Sleeping Butte, and in the Reveille Range. Also, a study was initiated on structurally disrupted basaltic rocks in the northern White Hills of Mohave County, Arizona. As well as progress reports of our work in Crater Flat, Fortification Hill and the Reveille Range, this paper also includes a summary of model that relates changing styles of Tertiary extension to changing magmatic compositions, and a summary of work being done in the White Hills, Arizona. In the Appendix, we include copies of published papers not previously incorporated in our monthly reports.

  10. Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WoldeGabriel, G.

    1989-03-01

    K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

  11. Hydrothermal dolomitization of Jurassic-Cretaceous limestones in the southern Alps (Italy): Relation to tectonics and volcanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cervato, C. )

    1990-05-01

    Dolomitization has affected up to 750m of the Jurassic and Cretaceous pelagic carbonate sequence of the southern continental margin of the Alpine Tethys; the sequence crops out in the southern Alps of Italy (Monti Lessini). Late Paleocene to Miocene extrusion of basaltic tuffs, breccias, and lavas was contemporaneous with the dolomitization was was associated with extensive tectonism in an ancient back-arc basin. More than 200 samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscopy, stable isotope ratios (carbon, oxygen, strontium), and clay mineralogy. The dolomite contains 40% to 50% MgCO{sub 3}. In thin sections, the crystal size distribution is unimodal (about 100 {mu}m), possibly indicating a single nucleation for the main crystallization phase. The {delta}{sup 13}C of the dolomite is not appreciably different from the undolomitized pelagic limestone (+1.0{per thousand} to +2.0{per thousand} Peedee belemnite (PDB)). The {delta}{sup 18}O variation (-5.0{per thousand} to -13.0{per thousand} PDB) is due to temperature variation in the system. The {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio in the dolomite (0.70839-0.70867) is consistent with the ratio in late Oligocene-Miocene marine water. Clay minerals in limestone and dolomite differ in the presence of neoformed Mg-chlorite, indicating a maximum temperature of about 150C for dolomitization. The dolomite is suggested to have a hydrothermal origin. The heat flow associated with the volcanism allowed marine water to penetrate the system and circulate in convective cells through the tectonic breccias, locally dolomitizing the limestone.

  12. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F. ); Swift, C.M. Jr. )

    1996-01-01

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  13. Soro West: A non-seismically defined, fault cut-off prospect in the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, W.F.; Swift, C.M. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Soro West is a fault cut-off prospect located in the frontal portion of the Papuan Fold and Thrust Belt. Prospective Toro and Imburu sandstones are interpreted to be in the hanging wall of the Soro Thrust. Truncation against the thrust, both updip and through lateral ramps, provides the trapping mechanism. The Soro West Prospect was defined using geological, geochemical, remote sensing, and geophysical data. The definition and location of the trap is a primary risk and work was focused on this aspect. Surface geological data (lithology, strikes, and dips) topography and synthetic aperture radar imagery were incorporated into the evaluation. Statistical curvature analysis techniques helped define the shape of the structure and the locations of the lateral ramps. Strontium isotope analyses of Darai Limestone surface samples refined erosional levels using a locally-derived reference curve. Severe karst precludes the acquisition of coherent surface seismic data, so the primary geophysical tool used was magnetotellurics (MT). A detailed, pre-survey feasibility study defined expected responses from alternative structural models. The MT data demonstrated that the limestone at surface is underlain by thick conductive clastics and not another Darai Limestone sheet. The data also constrained the range of fault cut-off positions significantly. Multiple, three-dimensionally consistent, restorable alternative structural models were created using results from all analyses. These led to a positive assessment of the prospect and an exploratory test is to be drilled in 1996.

  14. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I.

    2012-10-10

    The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and CO-CH{sub 4} systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH{sub 2}N{sub 2}), and its radical fragment (HCN{sub 2}); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the azide radical (N{sub 3}). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

  15. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.R. Jr.

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  16. Conveyor-belt clock synchronization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N.C.; Lloyd, Seth

    2004-10-01

    A protocol for synchronizing distant clocks is proposed that does not rely on the arrival times of the signals which are exchanged, and an optical implementation based on coherent-state pulses is described. This protocol is not limited by any dispersion that may be present in the propagation medium through which the light signals are exchanged. Possible improvements deriving from the use of quantum-mechanical effects are also addressed.

  17. Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W.

    1997-07-01

    The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

  18. Sequence stratigraphy of carbonate buildups developed in an active tectonic/volcanic setting: Triassic (Late Ladinian and Carnian) of the Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yose, L.A. ); Littmann, P. )

    1991-03-01

    Late Ladinian and Carnian deposits of the Dolomites record the evolution of carbonate buildups developed during the waning phases of a major period of volcanism and strike-slip tectonics. Each separate buildup provides an independent record of eustasy, tectonism, and competing carbonate and volcaniclastic sedimentation. Palynomorphs, calibrated with ammonites, are used to correlate between buildups and provide a means for distinguishing local variations in buildup histories from regional, synchronous trends in sedimentation which may record third-order eustasy. Although individual buildup histories vary dramatically, two depositional sequences may be recorded at a regional scale: one of late Ladinian age (early to late Longobardian) and another of late Ladinian to middle Carnian age (late Longobardian to Cordevolian). A relative sea-level fall in the late Ladinian resulted in an increased supply of volcaniclastics that onlap the flanks of many buildups and/or downslope shifts in carbonate production. Buildups of the second sequence developed in response to a relative sea-level rise and are similar in diversity to those of the first sequence. Extensive buildup progradation and accretion during this phase, concomitant with mixed-carbonate/volcaniclastic basin filling and diminished tectonic activity, result in a regional suturing of the complex paleogeography developed during the middle Ladinian. Local paleogeography, determined by the distribution of earlier platforms in addition to tectonic and volcanogenic processes, is interpreted as the primary control over buildup geometries and the variability of buildups within sequences. However, the regional extent and synchroneity of the sequences described above many record third-order eustasy.

  19. Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This article is a stub. You...

  20. DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

    2005-11-01

    The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

  1. Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Expansion 25 MW25,000 kW 25,000,000 W 25,000,000,000 mW 0.025 GW 2.5e-5 TW Chignautla, Puebla, Mexico Los Humeros Geothermal Area Transmexican Volcanic Belt 19 December 2013...

  2. Solar wind conditions leading to efficient radiation belt electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Van Allen Probes electron observations (>1 MeV) from 2012 to 2015, we identify a number of efficient and inefficient acceleration events separately to perform a superposed ...

  3. Geologic Setting of the Central Alaskan Hot Springs Belt: Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the power production scheme at CHS is given. As another approach to the question of sustainability, thisdissertation explores the ways in which external benefits of...

  4. Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A signed application and installation invoice must be received by Wabash Valley Power within 60 days of the installation completion date. View the program web site listed above and the Power Move...

  5. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... half-width df, a band between f and f (ref. 51). b2 2Bt2 VPdf erf v df ff (f - fm)' (df)2 . (4) here Bt2 is the wave amplitude in units of Tesla and erf is the error function. ...

  6. Modeling of the radiation belt megnetosphere in decisional timeframes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koller, Josef; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H.W.

    2013-04-23

    Systems and methods for calculating L* in the magnetosphere with essentially the same accuracy as with a physics based model at many times the speed by developing a surrogate trained to be a surrogate for the physics-based model. The trained model can then beneficially process input data falling within the training range of the surrogate model. The surrogate model can be a feedforward neural network and the physics-based model can be the TSK03 model. Operatively, the surrogate model can use parameters on which the physics-based model was based, and/or spatial data for the location where L* is to be calculated. Surrogate models should be provided for each of a plurality of pitch angles. Accordingly, a surrogate model having a closed drift shell can be used from the plurality of models. The feedforward neural network can have a plurality of input-layer units, there being at least one input-layer unit for each physics-based model parameter, a plurality of hidden layer units and at least one output unit for the value of L*.

  7. Wave-driven butterfly distribution of Van Allen belt relativistic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    He, Yihua 1 ; Baker, D. N. 4 ; Spence, H. E. 5 ; Funsten, H. O. 6 ; Blake, J. B. 7 + Show Author Affiliations Changsha Univ. of Science and Technology, Changsha (China). ...

  8. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    anomalies coincides with the mapped extent of several post-caldera rhyolitic lavas. Linear magnetic anomalies reflect the rectilinear fault systems characteristic of...

  9. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and hot springs in the Lassen area for comparison. Analytical methods are outlined in Goff and Janik (2002, p.305). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity...

  10. Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    indicate that the well has penetrated a lateral outflow plume of thermal water (Goff et al., 1988). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid...

  11. Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Authors Deal, E. G., Elston, W.E., Erb, E. E., Peterson, S. L., & Reiter and D. E. Conference 29th Field...

  12. Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the understanding of volcanoes by being the method which is most sensitive to change in temperature and, therefore, can best map heat budget and hydrological character to aid in...

  13. A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982; Carey and Sigurdsson, 1982; Rose and Hoffman, 1982). There is some evidence to suggest that particle aggregation is particularly...

  14. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson...

  15. Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    F 1,035.27 R References Colin F. Williams, Marshall J. Reed and Arlene F. Anderson. 2011. Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources - Presentation. In:...

  16. CT Scan of Earth Links Mantle Plumes with Volcanic Hotspots

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC PI: Barbara Romanowicz Lead Institution: University of California, Berkeley Project ... Image: Scott French, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, ...

  17. A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    or temporary storage in shoreline or shallow water environments prior to redeposition. Red, oxidised lava and scoria clasts in bedded breccia and conglomerate also imply that the...

  18. A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    activity including a decrease in the level of the lake water, mud eruptions, and red hot glows on the crater wall. Temporal variations in the geomagnetic field observed...

  19. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Environmental Issues Click "Edit With Form" above to add content Exploration History First Discovery Well Completion Date: Well Name: Location: Depth: Initial Flow...

  20. Helium Isotopes in Geothermal and Volcanic Gases of the Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are also occurring, although near-surface, pH-related CO2HCO3 equilibria obscure the nature of this effect.Substantial changes in View the MathML source ratios were observed in...

  1. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    meeting held in Denver, Colorado. collaborativeprojectchilepeer2013.pdf (916.09 KB) ... Systems, Hawaii & Maui Validation of Innovation Exploration Technologies for Newberry ...

  2. CV-2b: Plutonic - Inactive Volcanism | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    properties:2 Geologic Setting - Convergent Margins with Recent Plutonism (< 3 Ma), Young Orogens, Post-orogenic Phase Heat SourceStorage Properties of Reservoir - Young...

  3. Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to moderate Surface manifestations - Restricted- depending on depth and shallow ground water Permeability - Low to moderate fracture permeability - often high Examples Want to...

  4. Stratigraphic Nomenclature of Volcanic Rocks in the Jemez Mountains...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the formations are refined by radiometric dating. Authors Roy A. Bailey, Robert Leland Smith and Clarence Samuel Ross Published U.S. Geological Survey, 1969 DOI Not Provided Check...

  5. Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+K+ and Na+Cl remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers...

  6. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  7. COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at PPPL, adult visitors must show a government-issued photo I.D. - for example, a passport or a driver's license. Non-U.S. citizens must show a government-issued photo I.D.,...

  8. Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the base flow of the streams, and is the source of water supply in the region. This report is a brief preliminary description of ground water in part of the Jemez Mountains...

  9. Magnetic Modeling Of The Phlegraean Volcanic District With Extension...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structures associated with CFc and Ischia, Procida-Vivara, Ventotene and Santo Stefano islands, have been interpreted as igneous bodies that may be solidified intrusions or...

  10. Heterogeneous Structure Around the Jemez Volcanic Field, New...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    such as magma ascent from the upper mantle to the crust. Authors Takeshi Nishimura, Michael Fehler, W. Scott Baldridge, Peter Roberts and Lee Steck Published Journal...

  11. Effects of Volcanism, Crustal Thickness, and Large Scale Faulting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Feb. 2013 Interpret data in context of regional and local geology Initial interpretation completed - analysis ongoing Ongoing 12 | US DOE ...

  12. Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat...

  13. Application Of Gravity And Deep Dipole Geoelectrics In The Volcanic...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    classes, by a trial-and-error adjustment to the relationship between resistivity and density, a 3-D block model of the basement was finally constructed, which consistently...

  14. Volcanic gas emissions and their effect on ambient air character

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.

    1994-01-01

    This bibliography was assembled to service an agreement between Department of Energy and the USGS to provide a body of references and useful annotations for understanding background gas emissions from Kilauea volcano. The current East Rift Zone (ERZ) eruption of Kilauea releases as much as 500,000 metric tonnes of SO{sub 2} annually, along with lesser amounts of other chemically and radiatively active species including H{sub 2}S, HCl, and HF. Primary degassing locations on Kilauea are located in the summit caldera and along the middle ERZ. The effects of these emissions on ambient air character are a complex function of chemical reactivity, source geometry and effusivity, and local meteorology. Because of this complexity, we organized the bibliography into three main sections: (1) characterizing gases as they leave the edifice; (2) characterizing gases and chemical reaction products away from degassing sources; and (3) Hawaii Island meteorology.

  15. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other Additional Comments Cancel Submit Categories: Geothermal Available for Case Study Geothermal Resource Areas...

  16. Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bridge. Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (4) Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1984) Geothermal Literature Review At Geysers...

  17. Melt Zones Beneath Five Volcanic Complexes in California: An...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    No.: LBL-18232. Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (1) Geothermal Literature Review At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Goldstein & Flexser, 1984) Areas (1)...

  18. San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  19. Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  20. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  1. San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  2. Volcanism, Structure, and Geochronology of Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mono County, California Abstract Long Valley caldera, a 17- by 32-km elliptical depression on the east front of the Sierra Nevada, formed 0.7 m.y. ago during eruption of the...

  3. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and oxygen-isotope data provide strong evidence that the epithermal quartz-vein-hosted gold-silver mineralization at Cochiti and the sub-ore grade molybdenite at VC-2A were...

  4. Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References J. C. Varekamp, P. R. Buseck (1983) Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Additional...

  5. Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending...

  6. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  7. Ultra-low-frequency wave-driven diffusion of radiation belt relativist...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Wang, Shui 1 ; Hao, Y. -X. 3 ; Gao, Zhonglei 1 ; He, Zhaoguo 4 ; Baker, D. N. 5 ; Spence, H. E. 6 ; Reeves, G. D. 7 ; Blake, J. B. 8 ; Wygant, J. R. ...

  8. Exploration in the Sub Andean thrust/fold belt of northwest Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulz, A.; Alarcon, M.; Aramayo, F.; Santiago, M.; Ashby, W.J.

    1996-08-01

    A significant portion of the 15,000 square kilometer Aguarague exploration permit is located with the Sub Andean zone of northwest Argentina bordering Bolivia. The Sub Andean sedimentary section is dominated by a succession of tectonostratigraphic cycles of Silurian to recent age. These cycles display a complex geological history prior to the onset of the Andean deformation of Upper Miocene age. As the structures are complex, several different exploration techniques were combined, including satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, geological mapping, geochemistry, microtectonic studies, magneto stratigraphy, seismic modeling and seismic with pre- and post-stack depth migration. The interpretation of these techniques produced three dimensional structural models, at regional and prospect scales, that demonstrated the deformation mechanism, sequence and timing of the structures; these were then linked to the timing of generation/expulsion of hydrocarbons. The physical properties of the sedimentary sequence produces three structural environs, each with distinct fold and fault mechanisms. 1. (Upper): A product of the cumulative deformation of the underlying environs; 2. (Middle): The presence of an incompetent shale, the principal source rock, within this unit produces {open_quotes}fold disharmony {close_quotes} (horizontally and vertically) between the overlying and underlying environs. 3. (Lower): Characterized by folds developed by Fault Bend Fold processes. Hydrocarbon fields and exploration prospects are present within all three environs. The work performed has permitted the successful evaluation of several structures within the Sub Andean of the UTE Aguarague.

  9. Method and apparatus for setting precise nozzle/belt and nozzle/edge dam block gaps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carmichael, Robert J.; Dykes, Charles D.; Woodrow, Ronald

    1989-05-16

    A pair of guide pins are mounted on sideplate extensions of the caster and mating roller pairs are mounted on the nozzle assembly. The nozzle is advanced toward the caster so that the roller pairs engage the guide pins. Both guide pins are remotely adjustable in the vertical direction by hydraulic cylinders acting through eccentrics. This moves the nozzle vertically. The guide pin on the inboard side of the caster is similarly horizontally adjustable. The nozzle roller pair which engage the inboard guide pin are flanged so that the nozzle moves horizontally with the inboard guide pin.

  10. Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai’i and Maui

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fercho, Steven; Owens, Lara; Walsh, Patrick; Drakos, Peter; Martini, Brigette; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Kennedy, Burton M.

    2015-08-01

    Suites of new geophysical and geochemical exploration surveys were conducted to provide evidence for geothermal resource at the Haleakala Southwest Rift Zone (HSWRZ) on Maui Island, Hawai’i. Ground-based gravity (~400 stations) coupled with heli-bourne magnetics (~1500 line kilometers) define both deep and shallow fractures/faults, while also delineating potentially widespread subsurface hydrothermal alteration on the lower flanks (below approximately 1800 feet a.s.l.). Multi-level, upward continuation calculations and 2-D gravity and magnetic modeling provide information on source depths, but lack of lithologic information leaves ambiguity in the estimates. Additionally, several well-defined gravity lows (possibly vent zones) lie coincident with magnetic highs suggesting the presence of dike intrusions at depth which may represent a potentially young source of heat. Soil CO2 fluxes were measured along transects across geophysically-defined faults and fractures as well as young cinder cones along the HSWRZ. This survey generally did not detect CO2 levels above background, with the exception of a weak anomalous flux signal over one young cinder cone. The general lack of observed CO2 flux signals on the HSWRZ is likely due to a combination of lower magmatic CO2 fluxes and relatively high biogenic surface CO2 fluxes which mix with the magmatic signal. Similar surveys at the Puna geothermal field on the Kilauea Lower East Rift Zone (KLERZ) also showed a lack of surface CO2 flux signals, however aqueous geochemistry indicated contribution of magmatic CO2 and He to shallow groundwater here. As magma has been intercepted in geothermal drilling at the Puna field, the lack of measured surface CO2 flux indicative of upflow of magmatic fluids here is likely due to effective “scrubbing” by high groundwater and a mature hydrothermal system. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations, δ13C compositions and 3He/4He values were sampled at Maui from several shallow groundwater samples indicating only minor additions of magmatic CO2 and He to the groundwater system, although much less than observed near Puna. The much reduced DIC and He abundances at Maui, along with a lack of hotsprings and hydrothermal alteration, as observed near Puna, does not strongly support a deeper hydrothermal system within the HSWRZ.