Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Influence of the geological history of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-eight populations (210 individuals) were sequenced for one nuclear (rpb2) and two chloroplast (trnL­F and psb time, geology, Mexico, nuclear marker, phylogeography, plant spe- ciation, psbA­trnH, rpb2, Trans-Miocene around the mod- ern-day cities of Morelia and Queretaro in central Mexico, ª 2013 Blackwell Publishing

2

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to:...

3

A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Statistics-Based Method For The Short-Wave Infrared Spectral Analysis Of Altered Rocks- An Example From The Acoculco Caldera, Eastern Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: We propose a simple graphic and statistical method for processing short-wave infrared (SWIR) reflectivity spectra of alteration minerals, which classifies spectra according to their shape and absorption features, thus obtaining groups of spectra equivalent to mineral assemblages. It also permits selection of fewer samples for further mineralogical verification.

4

Laterally bendable belt conveyor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An endless, laterally flexible and bendable belt conveyor particularly adapted for coal mining applications in facilitating the transport of the extracted coal up- or downslope and around corners in a continuous manner is disclosed. The conveying means includes a flat rubber belt reinforced along the middle portion thereof along which the major portion of the belt tension is directed so as to cause rotation of the tubular shaped belt when trammed around lateral turns thus preventing excessive belt bulging distortion between adjacent belt supports which would inhibit belt transport. Pretension induced into the fabric reinforced flat rubber belt by conventional belt take-up means supports the load conveyed when the belt conveyor is making lateral turns. The carrying and return portions of the belt are supported and formed into a tubular shape by a plurality of shapers positioned along its length. Each shaper is supported from above by a monorail and includes clusters of idler rollers which support the belt. Additional cluster rollers in each shaper permit the belt supporting roller clusters to rotate in response to the belt's operating tension imposed upon the cluster rollers by induced lateral belt friction forces. The freely rotating roller clusters thus permit the belt to twist on lateral curves without damage to itself while precluding escape of the conveyed material by effectively enclosing it in the tube-shaped, inner belt transport length.

Peterson, William J. (Coraopolis, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reexamining the Cold Conveyor Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the popularity of the conveyor-belt model for portraying the airflow through midlatitude cyclones, questions arise as to the path of the cold conveyor belt, the lower-tropospheric airflow poleward of and underneath the warm front. Some ...

David M. Schultz

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Kuiper Belt Occultation Predictions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we present observations of 7 large Kuiper Belt Objects. From these observations, we extract a point source catalog with $\\sim0.01"$ precision, and astrometry of our target Kuiper Belt Objects with $0.04-0.08"$ precision within that catalog. We have developed a new technique to predict the future occurrence of stellar occultations by Kuiper Belt Objects. The technique makes use of a maximum likelihood approach which determines the best-fit adjustment to cataloged orbital elements of an object. Using simulations of a theoretical object, we discuss the merits and weaknesses of this technique compared to the commonly adopted ephemeris offset approach. We demonstrate that both methods suffer from separate weaknesses, and thus, together provide a fair assessment of the true uncertainty in a particular prediction. We present occultation predictions made by both methods for the 7 tracked objects, with dates as late as 2015. Finally, we discuss observations of three separate close passages of Quaoar to field star...

Fraser, Wesley C; Trujillo, Chad; Stephens, Andrew W; Kavelaars, JJ; Brown, Michael E; Bianco, Federica B; Boyle, Richard P; Brucker, Melissa J; Hetherington, Nathan; Joner, Michael; Keel, William C; Langill, Phil P; Lister, Tim; McMillan, Russet J; Young, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of activity at this laboratory is on applying natural electromagnetic methods along with other geophysical techniques to studying the dynamical processes and thermal regimes associated with centers of major volcanic activity. We are presently emphasizing studies of the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex, the Cascades Volcanic Belt, and the Valles Caldera. This work addresses questions regarding geothermal energy, chemical transport of minerals in the crust, emplacement of economic ore deposits, and optimal siting of drill-holes for scientific purposes. In addition, since much of our work is performed in the intermontane sedimentary basins of the western US (along with testing our field-system in some of the graben structures in the Northeast), there is an application of these studies to developing exploration and interpretational strategies for detecting and delineating structures associated with hydrocarbon reserves.

Hermance, J.F.

1987-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San San Juan Montana Thrust Belt WY Thrust Belt Black Warrior Paradox - San Juan NW (2) Uinta- Piceance Paradox - San Juan SE (2) Florida Peninsula Appalachian- NY (1) Appalachian OH-PA (2) Appalachian Eastern PA (3) Appalachian Southern OH (4) Appalachian Eastern WV (5) Appalachian WV-VA (6) Appalachian TN-KY (7) Piceance Greater Green River Eastern OR-WA Ventura Williston Williston NE (2) Williston NW (1) Williston South (3) Eastern Great Basin Ventura West, Central, East Eastern OR-WA Eastern Great Basin Appalachian Denver Florida Peninsula Black Warrior W Y T h ru st B e lt Powder River Paradox- Uinta- Grtr Green River MT Thrust Belt Powder River North (1) Powder River South (2) Denver North (1) Denver South (3) Denver Middle (2) TX CA MT AZ ID NV NM CO IL OR UT KS WY IA NE SD MN ND OK FL WI MO AL WA GA AR LA MI IN PA NY NC MS TN KY VA OH SC

9

Thermal regimes of major volcanic centers: Magnetotelluric constraints  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interpretation of geophysical/electromagnetic field data has been used to study dynamical processes in the crust beneath three of the major tectono-volcanic features in North America: the Long Valley/Mono Craters Volcanic Complex in eastern California, the Cascades Volcanic Belt in Oregon, and the Rio Grande Rift in the area of Socorro, New Mexico. Primary accomplishments have been in the area of creating and implementing a variety of 2-D generalized inverse computer codes, and the application of these codes to fields studies on the basin structures and he deep thermal regimes of the above areas. In order to more fully explore the space of allowable models (i.e. those inverse solutions that fit the data equally well), several distinctly different approaches to the 2-D inverse problem have been developed: (1) an overdetermined block inversion; (2) an overdetermined spline inverstion; (3) a generalized underdetermined total inverse which allows one to tradeoff certain attributes of their model, such as minimum structure (flat models), roughness (smooth models), or length (small models). Moreover, we are exploring various approaches for evaluating the resolution model parameters for the above algorithms. 33 refs.

Hermance, J.F.

1989-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

SunBelt Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunBelt Biofuels SunBelt Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Logo: SunBelt Biofuels Name SunBelt Biofuels Place Soperton, Georgia Zip 30457 Sector Biomass Product Freedom Giant Miscanthus Website http://www.sunbeltbiofuelsllc. Coordinates 32.3771182°, -82.5923554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.3771182,"lon":-82.5923554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

11

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Models of volcanic eruption hazards  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic eruptions pose an ever present but poorly constrained hazard to life and property for geothermal installations in volcanic areas. Because eruptions occur sporadically and may limit field access, quantitative and systematic field studies of eruptions are difficult to complete. Circumventing this difficulty, laboratory models and numerical simulations are pivotal in building our understanding of eruptions. For example, the results of fuel-coolant interaction experiments show that magma-water interaction controls many eruption styles. Applying these results, increasing numbers of field studies now document and interpret the role of external water eruptions. Similarly, numerical simulations solve the fundamental physics of high-speed fluid flow and give quantitative predictions that elucidate the complexities of pyroclastic flows and surges. A primary goal of these models is to guide geologists in searching for critical field relationships and making their interpretations. Coupled with field work, modeling is beginning to allow more quantitative and predictive volcanic hazard assessments.

Wohletz, K.H.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Property:VolcanicAge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:VolcanicAge Jump to: navigation, search Property Name VolcanicAge Property Type String Description Describes the time of the most recent volcanism by epoch, era, or period per available data. Subproperties This property has the following 7 subproperties: E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area Pages using the property "VolcanicAge" Showing 19 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + No volcanism + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + no volcanism + Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area + No volcanism +

14

Volcanic Contributions to the Stratospheric Sulfate Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have detected the transport of volcanic sulfate through the tropical tropopause. This is particularly noteworthy because the source volcanic eruption was only of modest intensity and, therefore, not normally thought to be of stratospheric ...

Ronald W. Fegley; Howard T. Ellis; J. L. Heffter

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Corn Belt Power Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Power Coop Corn Belt Power Coop Place Iowa Utility Id 4363 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO Other Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Corn_Belt_Power_Coop&oldid=41053

16

Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation is made of the disruptive effects of volcanic activity with respect to long term isolation of radioactive waste through deep geologic storage. Three major questions are considered. First, what is the range of disruption effects of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity. Second, is it possible, by selective siting of a repository, to reduce the risk of disruption by future volcanic activity. And third, can the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity be quantified. The main variables involved in the evaluation of the consequences of repository disruption by volcanic activity are the geometry of the magma-repository intersection (partly controlled by depth of burial) and the nature of volcanism. Potential radionuclide dispersal by volcanic transport within the biosphere ranges in distance from several kilometers to global. Risk from the most catastrophic types of eruptions can be reduced by careful site selection to maximize lag time prior to the onset of activity. Certain areas or volcanic provinces within the western United States have been sites of significant volcanism and should be avoided as potential sites for a radioactive waste repository. Examples of projection of future sites of active volcanism are discussed for three areas of the western United States. Probability calculations require two types of data: a numerical rate or frequency of volcanic activity and a numerical evaluation of the areal extent of volcanic disruption for a designated region. The former is clearly beyond the current state of art in volcanology. The latter can be approximated with a reasonable degree of satisfaction. In this report, simplified probability calculations are attempted for areas of past volcanic activity.

Crowe, B.M.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Corn Belt Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Corn Belt Energy Corporation Corn Belt Energy Corporation Place Illinois Utility Id 4362 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png INDUSTRIAL SUBSTATION RATE ("ISR") Industrial RATE 1 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 10 ELECTRIC HEAT FOR RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE Residential RATE 11 RESIDENTIAL & FARM SERVICE - INTERRUPTIBLE Residential RATE 12 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRICALLY HEATED APARTMENTS Residential

18

Urban Decline in Rust-Belt Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many Rust-Belt cities have seen almost half their populations move from inside the city borders to the surrounding suburbs and elsewhere since the 1970s. As populations shifted, neighborhoods changedin their average income, educational profi le, and housing prices. But the shift did not happen in every neighborhood at the same rate. Recent research has uncovered some of the patterns characterizing the process. Most major Rust-Belt cities have seen their populations shrink since their heydays, and with that decline, the average income of the remaining residents has fallen as well. Cities such as Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, and Pittsburgh have each lost more than 40 percent of their populations over the last four decades. However, the losses have not been uniform across neighborhoods. Some neighborhoods have declined more rapidly than others. The uneven population decline across neighborhoods implies that the distributions of income, house prices, and human capital have also shifted within cities and the larger

Daniel Hartley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Kuiper Belt and Other Debris Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the current knowledge of the Solar system, focusing on bodies in the outer regions, on the information they provide concerning Solar system formation, and on the possible relationships that may exist between our system and the debris disks of other stars. Beyond the domains of the Terrestrial and giant planets, the comets in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud preserve some of our most pristine materials. The Kuiper belt, in particular, is a collisional dust source and a scientific bridge to the dusty "debris disks" observed around many nearby main-sequence stars. Study of the Solar system provides a level of detail that we cannot discern in the distant disks while observations of the disks may help to set the Solar system in proper context.

Jewitt, David; Lacerda, Pedro

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Numerical Investigations of Kuiper Belt Binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of the Kuiper Belt indicate that a larger than expected percentage of KBO's (approximately 8 out of 500) are in binary pairs. The formation and survival of such objects presents a conundrum [1]. Two competing theories have been postulated to try to solve this problem. One entails the physical collision of bodies [2] while the other utilizes dynamical friction or a third body to dissipate excess momentum and energy from the system [3]. Although in general known binaries tend to differ significantly in mass, such as seen in the Earth-Moon or asteroid binary systems [4], Kuiper binaries discovered to date tend to instead be of similar size [5, 6]. This paper investigates the stability, development and lifetimes for Kuiper Belt binaries by tracking their orbital dynamics and subsequent evolution. Section two details the numerical model while Section three discusses the initial conditions. Finally, in Section four the results are discussed with Section five containing the conclusions.

R. C. Nazzario; T. W. Hyde

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LABORATORY MODELLING OF THE EARTH RADIATION BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Method of the laboratory modelling of the Earth radiation belt is presented. Method can be used for the estimation of consequences of global energetic and communication projects realizations. The radiation belt of the Earth is the inner part of the magnetosphere, in which the geomagnetic field hold charged particles with kinetic energy from 10 KeV to 100 MeV. This belt play the essential role for the sun radiation regime for the Earth and for the electromagnetic waves propagation. As it is well known, even small alteration of solar activity influent essential upon the biological and ecological balance at the Earth for all levels- from viruses and micro-organisms to biological societies and ecological systems at all. The most bright indicator of the solar activity alteration are changes of the pathogenic organisms activity as a result of a displacement of biological equilibrium. But the other phenomena, which are not connected with pathogenic biological objects are very important for thelife on the Earth and ecological balance too, although they can not be so obviously observed.

Dr. Alexander Luchinskiy A; Prof Dr; Yakov S. Shifrin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique...

23

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to:...

24

Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HOPE for radiation belt storm probes HOPE for radiation belt storm probes Los Alamos provides HOPE for radiation belt storm probes The HOPE analyzer is one of a suite of instruments that was successfully launched as part of the Radiation Belt Storm Probe mission. August 30, 2012 Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Artist's rendering showing two spacecraft representing the not-yet-designed Radiation Belt Storm Probes that will study the sun and its effects on Earth. PHOTO CREDIT: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email "Today we are boldly going where no spacecraft ever wants to go."

25

New compounds will help coal operators comply with BELT standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal producers will soon have a new set of conveyor belting standards, which are currently proposed as a rulemaking by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), to bring higher levels of resistance to propagation of fire by a secondary source. The new test being put into effect is known as a Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT). The article, submitted by Fenner Dunlop, discusses the company's testing procedures and the development of conveyors to comply with regulations. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with belt of ferro or paramagnetic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 12 to 77 K range utilizes a belt which carries ferromagnetic or paramagnetic material and which is disposed in a loop which passes through the center of a solenoidal magnet to achieve cooling. The magnetic material carried by the belt, which can be blocks in frames of a linked belt, can be a mixture of substances with different Curie temperatures arranged such that the Curie temperatures progressively increase from one edge of the belt to the other. This magnetic refrigerator can be used to cool and liquefy hydrogen or other fluids.

Barclay, J.A.; Stewart, W.F.; Henke, M.D.; Kalash, K.E.

1986-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Mysterious electron stash found hidden among Van Allen belts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

findings, discovered by NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes), were outlined Thursday in Science Express and during a press conference at...

28

Corn Belt Energy Corporation- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy Corporation (CBEC), in association with the Wabash Valley Power Association, provides its customers with the "Power Moves" energy efficiency rebate program. Through this program,...

29

Airborne Volcanic Ash Forecast Area Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of aircraft flight safety operations, daily comparisons between modeled, hypothetical, volcanic ash plumes calculated with meteorological forecasts and analyses were made over a 1.5-yr period. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian ...

Barbara J. B. Stunder; Jerome L. Heffter; Roland R. Draxler

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Operational Implications of Airborne Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic ash clouds pose a real threat to aircraft safety. The ash is abrasive and capable of causing serious damage to aircraft engines, control surfaces, windshields, and landing lights. In addition, ash can clog the pitotstatic systems, which ...

Gary L. Hufford; Leonard J. Salinas; James J. Simpson; Elliott G. Barske; David C. Pieri

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Exploration for uranium deposits, Grants mineral belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt, New Mexico, occur in fluvial sandstones in the Morrison Formation (Jurassic). Uranium mineralization is concentrated by a dark-gray to black substance that has been identified as humate, which is derived from decaying vegetation. Black ore is truncated by overlying sandstone in at least three ore deposits, documenting an early age for mineralization. Ore deposits in the Grants mineral belt vary greatly in size and shape, tend to occur in clusters, and often present difficult drill targets. Current exploration is largely a matter of drilling in stages to distinguish favorable from unfavorable ground on a wide spacing, to seek mineralization in favorable ground, and to conduct close-spaced drilling in mineralized areas. Criteria for favorability differ among exploration groups but generally include 1) presence of a host sandstone, 2) anomalous mineralization, 3) color of the host rock, 4) presence of carbonaceous matter, and 5) position of the area relative to mineralized trends. A description of the drilling sequence, from ore discovery to the development of a mine at the Johnny M deposit (in the east part of the Ambrosia Lake district), exemplifies the problem of predicting where orebodies may occur. A study of the drill data at the Johnny M indicates the uranium ore is not related to specific geologic features other than humate, which is commonly associated with coalified plant fragments in mudstone-rich parts of the host sandstone.

Fitch, D.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

INCLINATION MIXING IN THE CLASSICAL KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the long-term evolution of the inclinations of the known classical and resonant Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This is partially motivated by the observed bimodal inclination distribution and by the putative physical differences between the low- and high-inclination populations. We find that some classical KBOs undergo large changes in inclination over gigayear timescales, which means that a current member of the low-inclination population may have been in the high-inclination population in the past, and vice versa. The dynamical mechanisms responsible for the time variability of inclinations are predominantly distant encounters with Neptune and chaotic diffusion near the boundaries of mean motion resonances. We reassess the correlations between inclination and physical properties including inclination time variability. We find that the size-inclination and color-inclination correlations are less statistically significant than previously reported (mostly due to the increased size of the data set since previous works with some contribution from inclination variability). The time variability of inclinations does not change the previous finding that binary classical KBOs have lower inclinations than non-binary objects. Our study of resonant objects in the classical Kuiper Belt region includes objects in the 3:2, 7:4, 2:1, and eight higher-order mean motion resonances. We find that these objects (some of which were previously classified as non-resonant) undergo larger changes in inclination compared to the non-resonant population, indicating that their current inclinations are not generally representative of their original inclinations. They are also less stable on gigayear timescales.

Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu, E-mail: kvolk@lpl.arizona.edu [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A phased, multihole drilling program with associated science is proposed as a means of furthering our understanding of the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon, and northern California. The information obtained from drilling and ancillary geological and geophysical investigations will contribute to our knowledge in the following general areas: (1) the magnitude of the regional background heat flow of parts of the Quaternary volcanic belt dominated by the most abundant volcanic rock types, basalt and basaltic andesite; (2) the nature of the heat source responsible for the regional heat-flow anomaly; (3) the characteristics of the regional hydrothermal and cold-water circulation; the rates of volcanism for comparison with models for the rate and direction of plate convergence of the Cascades; (5) the history of deformation and volcanism in the volcanic arc that can be related to subduction; (6) the present-day stress regime of the volcanic arc and the relation of these stresses to plate interactions and possible large earthquakes; and the current geometry of the subducted oceanic plate below the Cascade Range and the relationship of the plate to the distribution of heat flow, Quaternary volcanism, and Quaternary deformation. Phase I research will be directed toward a detailed investigation of the Santiam Pass segment. In concert with the Santiam Pass research, a detailed study of the nearby Breitenbush Hot Springs area is also recommended as a component of Phase I. The object of the Breitenbush research is to study one of the hottest known Cascade hydrothermal systems, which coincidentally also has a good geological and geophysical data base. A coordinated program of drilling, sampling, subsurface measurements, and surface surveys will be associated with the drilling of several holes.

Priest, G.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Warped Plane of the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By numerically integrating the orbits of the giant planets and of test particles for four billion years, we follow the evolution of the location of the midplane of the Kuiper belt. The Classical Kuiper belt conforms to a warped sheet that precesses with a 1.9 Myr period. The present-day location of the Kuiper belt plane can be computed using linear secular perturbation theory: the local normal to the plane is given by the theory's forced inclination vector, which is specific to every semi-major axis. The Kuiper belt plane does not coincide with the invariable plane, but deviates from it by up to a few degrees in stable zones. A Kuiper belt object keeps its free inclination relative to the Kuiper belt plane nearly constant, even while the plane departs from the trajectory predicted by linear theory. The constancy of free inclination simply reflects the undamped amplitude of free oscillation. Current observations of Classical Kuiper belt objects are consistent with the plane being warped by the giant planets al...

Chiang, Eugene

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Geochronologic studies in the Grants mineral belt  

SciTech Connect

Geologic observation coupled with radiometric age dating can be used to assess ages of ore formation and, in some cases, ages of sedimentation in the Grants mineral belt. Rb-Sr studies indicate the earliest mineralization is trend ore at Ambrosia Lake and Smith Lake, dated at 139 +- 9.5 m.y. This date is similar to that for barren-rock montmorillonite from the Jackpile sandstone (Late Jurassic): 142 +- 14 m.y.; it may be used, with caution, to indicate the minimum age of sedimentation for the Morrison Formation. Geologic evidence indicates epigenetic rather than syngenetic ore formation. Barren-rock montmorillonites from Ambrosia Lake yield a poorly defined isochron of 132 +- 26 m.y. Early formed ore at the Jackpile-Paguate mine, Laguna district, was remobilized and reprecipitated at 113 +- 7 m.y. This date is older than the range of dates for the Dakota Formation (Cretaceous) and Mancos Shale. The 113 +- 7 m.y. mid-Cretaceous date for the Jackpile-Paguate ore is consistent with geologic evidence; geologic control suggests that other ore deposits are post-Late Jurassic but pre-Dakota Formation. Based on geologic evidence, mineralization in the Dakota Formation is thought to be very young. Laramide mineralization (60 to 70 m.y.) is evidenced by the presence of some stack ore. At least one uranium deposit, located partly in oxidized ground at the main redox front of the Grants mineral belt, may represent Tertiary mineralization; the clay-mineral Rb-Sr systematics of this deposit have been severely perturbed. Younger mineralization is indicated by U-Pb dates on uranophane (9 to 10 m.y.), and Pleistocene mineralization is noted for some ore. U-Pb dates of U/sup 4 +/ -rich ore minerals cluster between 80 and 100 m.y., although some are as old as 140 to 150 m.y. K-Ar dates on clay minerals range from 49 to 138 m.y. The reasons for this scatter are not known, although loss of radiogenic /sup 40/Ar due to burial is probable.

Brookins, D.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Climatology of Tropical System Rainfall on the Eastern Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the frequency of greater than 2.54 cm (1 in) daily rainfall totals averaged within a climate division (CD) associated with tropical systems that moved through the Eastern Corn Belt region during the growing season. These ...

Alex Haberlie; Kari Gale; David Changnon; Mike Tannura

38

Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association, offersbusiness, school, and farm customers a variety of energy efficient rebates and incentives through its "Power Moves" program....

39

Air Temperature Model Evaluation in the North Mediterranean Belt Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparative assessment of air temperature models, using hourly and daily air temperature measurements in 34 different stations in the north Mediterranean belt, is presented. Four air temperature models were used to estimate hourly and daily ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro H. de Miguel; Harry D. Kambezidis

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Warm Conveyor Belts in Idealized Moist Baroclinic Wave Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This idealized modeling study of moist baroclinic waves addresses the formation of moist ascending airstreams, so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), their characteristics, and their significance for the downstream flow evolution. Baroclinic wave ...

Sebastian Schemm; Heini Wernli; Lukas Papritz

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A 15-Year Climatology of Warm Conveyor Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents the first climatology of so-called warm conveyor belts (WCBs), strongly ascending moist airstreams in extratropical cyclones that, on the time scale of 2 days, rise from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere. The ...

Sabine Eckhardt; Andreas Stohl; Heini Wernli; Paul James; Caroline Forster; Nicole Spichtinger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Angle stations in or for endless conveyor belts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an angle station for an endless conveyor belt, there are presented to each incoming run of the belt stationary curved guide members (18, 19) of the shape of a major segment of a right-circular cylinder and having in the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) thereof rectangular openings (15) arranged in parallel and helical paths and through which project small freely-rotatable rollers (14), the continuously-changing segments of the curved surfaces of which projecting through said openings (15) are in attitude to change the direction of travel of the belt (13) through 90.degree. during passage of the belt about the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) of the guide member (18 or 19). The rectangular openings (15) are arranged with their longer edges lengthwise of the diagonals representing the mean of the helix but with those of a plurality of the rows nearest to each end of the part-cylindrical portion (16 or 17) slightly out of axial symmetry with said diagonals, being slightly inclined in a direction about the intersections (40) of the diagonals of the main portion of the openings, to provide a "toe-in" attitude in relation to the line of run of the endless conveyor belt.

Steel, Alan (Glasgow, GB6)

1987-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region, Japan.  

SciTech Connect

A 1 km square regular grid system created on the Universal Transverse Mercator zone 54 projected coordinate system is used to work with volcanism related data for Sengan region. The following geologic variables were determined as the most important for identifying volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate geologic variable vectors at each of the 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system. Cluster analysis was performed on the 23949 complete variable vectors to classify each center of 1 km cell into one of five different statistically homogeneous groups with respect to potential volcanism spanning from lowest possible volcanism to highest possible volcanism with increasing group number. A discriminant analysis incorporating Bayes theorem was performed to construct maps showing the probability of group membership for each of the volcanism groups. The said maps showed good comparisons with the recorded locations of volcanism within the Sengan region. No volcanic data were found to exist in the group 1 region. The high probability areas within group 1 have the chance of being the no volcanism region. Entropy of classification is calculated to assess the uncertainty of the allocation process of each 1 km cell center location based on the calculated probabilities. The recorded volcanism data are also plotted on the entropy map to examine the uncertainty level of the estimations at the locations where volcanism exists. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the high volcanism regions (groups 4 and 5) showed relatively low mapping estimation uncertainty. On the other hand, the volcanic data cell locations that are in the low volcanism region (group 2) showed relatively high mapping estimation uncertainty. The volcanic data cell locations that are in the medium volcanism region (group 3) showed relatively moderate mapping estimation uncertainty. Areas of high uncertainty provide locations where additional site characterization resources can be spent most effectively. The new data collected can be added to the existing database to perform future regionalized mapping and reduce the uncertainty level of the existing estimations.

Balasingam, Pirahas (University of Arizona); Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Maximum Rebate Custom Project: $0.06 per kWh reduced or 50% of project cost, up to $50,000 Program Info State Illinois Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Cooled Unitary Packaged AC/Split Systems: $60 - $75/ton Air Source Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Geothermal Heat Pumps: $60 - $75/ton Packaged Terminal Heat Pump: $50/ton Room A/C: $20 Air Economizer: $150 - $180 Night Covers: $6 Programmable Thermostat: $20 - $25

45

Wheat Belt Public Power Dist | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Belt Public Power Dist Belt Public Power Dist Jump to: navigation, search Name Wheat Belt Public Power Dist Place Nebraska Utility Id 20509 Utility Location Yes Ownership P NERC Location WECC/MRO NERC MRO Yes NERC WECC Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png DISTRIBUTION HEAVY INDUSTRIAL (E-2) Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Industrial GENERAL PURPOSE - LARGE COMMERCIAL Commercial GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL Residential GENERAL PURPOSE - SMALL COMMERCIAL Commercial IRRIGATION Multi Phase Commercial LARGE POWER Industrial

46

A Stochastic Model for the Angular Momentum Budget of Latitude Belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stochastic model of Weickmann et al. for the global angular momentum budget is modified to become applicable to latitude belts. In particular, a Langevin equation is added for the flux divergence of angular momentum in a belt. The friction ...

Joseph Egger

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dotiki saves money and time with power tool and belt fasteners  

SciTech Connect

The use of a Hilti power tool to improve belt splice installations to minimise downtime is described. 3 photos.

Bargo, K.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanic National Park Geothermal Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date 1982 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Develop parameters to identify geothermal region Notes Statistical methods are outlined to separate spatially, temporally, and magnitude-dependent portions of both the random and non-random components of the seismicity. The methodology employed compares the seismicity distributions with a generalized Poisson distribution. Temporally related

49

Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Mercury Vapor At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Jump to:...

50

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric...

51

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. Michael Thompson (1985) Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park...

52

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to:...

53

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active...

54

Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity  

SciTech Connect

This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

Chris Fromme

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity  

SciTech Connect

This document details progress on the project entitled ''Effective Conveyor Belt Inspection for Improved Mining Productivity'' during the period from November 15, 2004 to May 14, 2004. Highlights include fabrication of an improved LED lightbar, fabrication of a line-scan sensor head for the Smart-Camera based prototype, and development of prototype vulcanized splice detection algorithms.

Chris Fromme

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A HYPOTHESIS FOR THE COLOR DIVERSITY OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We propose a chemical and dynamical process to explain the surface colors of the Kuiper belt. In our hypothesis, the initial bulk compositions of the bodies themselves can be quite diverse-as is seen in comets-but the early surface compositions are set by volatile evaporation after the objects are formed. Strong gradients in surface composition, coupled with UV and particle irradiation, lead to the surface colors that are seen today. The objects formed in the inner part of the primordial belt retain only H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} as the major ice species on their surfaces. Irradiation of these species plausibly results in the dark neutrally colored centaurs and Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). Object formed further in the disk retain CH{sub 3}OH, which has been shown to lead to brighter redder surfaces after irradiation, as seen in the brighter redder centaurs and KBOs. Objects formed at the current location of the cold classical Kuiper belt uniquely retain NH{sub 3}, which has been shown to affect irradiation chemistry and could plausibly lead to the unique colors of these objects. We propose observational and experimental tests of this hypothesis.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Crop-Hail Damage in the Midwest Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crop-hail damage in the ten Midwest corn belt states is examined during the period 195781. Estimates of crop losses due to hail are made from hail insurance data for each state and each significant crop in the region. The crop-hail losses are ...

Harry J. Hillaker Jr.; Paul J. Waite

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions and increased the international consensus to improve volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low volcanic ash ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

59

Supercomputer modeling of volcanic eruption dynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our specific goals are to: (1) provide a set of models based on well-defined assumptions about initial and boundary conditions to constrain interpretations of observations of active volcanic eruptions--including movies of flow front velocities, satellite observations of temperature in plumes vs. time, and still photographs of the dimensions of erupting plumes and flows on Earth and other planets; (2) to examine the influence of subsurface conditions on exit plane conditions and plume characteristics, and to compare the models of subsurface fluid flow with seismic constraints where possible; (3) to relate equations-of-state for magma-gas mixtures to flow dynamics; (4) to examine, in some detail, the interaction of the flowing fluid with the conduit walls and ground topography through boundary layer theory so that field observations of erosion and deposition can be related to fluid processes; and (5) to test the applicability of existing two-phase flow codes for problems related to the generation of volcanic long-period seismic signals; (6) to extend our understanding and simulation capability to problems associated with emplacement of fragmental ejecta from large meteorite impacts.

Kieffer, S.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Valentine, G.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Woo, Mahn-Ling [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Mechanisms Linking Volcanic Aerosols to the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the sensitivity of the climate system to volcanic aerosol forcing in the third climate configuration of the Met Office Unified Model (HadCM3). The main test case was based on the 1880s when there were several volcanic eruptions,...

Alan M. Iwi; Leon Hermanson; Keith Haines; Rowan T. Sutton

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Multiple Ruptures For Long Valley Microearthquakes- A Link To Volcanic Tremor(Question) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Despite several episodes of ground deformation and intense seismic activity starting in 1978, the Long Valley, California, volcanic area has not produced clearly recognized volcanic tremor. Instead, a variety of atypical microearthquakes have been recorded during these episodes, including events dominated by low-frequency (long-period) or mixed high and low-frequency (hybrid) signals. During a 1997 episode, a number of unusual microearthquakes occurred within a temporary 40-station

62

A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Distinction Technique Between Volcanic And Tectonic Depression Structures Based On The Restoration Modeling Of Gravity Anomaly- A Case Study Of The Hohi Volcanic Zone, Central Kyushu, Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: In this study, we propose a numerical modeling technique which restores the gravity anomaly of tectonic origin and identifies the gravity low of caldera origin. The identification is performed just by comparing the restored gravity anomalies with the observed gravity anomalies, thus we

63

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic Areas Of Western United States Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: A better understanding of active volcanic areas in the United States through electromagnetic geophysical studies received foundation from the many surveys done for geothermal exploration in the 1970's. Investigations by governmental, industrial, and academic agencies include (but are not limited to) mapping of the Cascades. Long Valley/Mono area, the Jemez volcanic field, Yellowstone Park, and an area in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity,

64

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone National Park Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over Yellowstone National Park (YNP) show contrasting patterns reflecting differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene, Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, a series of mostly altered, andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks partially exposed in mountains on the eastern margin of YNP, produces high-amplitude, positive magnetic

65

Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Dictionary.png Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

66

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

67

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is currently limited to those objects that can be detected directly. Objects with diameters less than $\\sim$10km reflect too little light to be detected. These smaller bodies could contain most of the mass in the Kuiper Belt while the abundance of these bodies may constrain the distribution of mass. The overall size distribution of bodies within the Kuiper Belt can also be inferred from the relative abundances of sub-km and larger bodies. Stellar occultations are already used to study dark objects in the Solar System, such as asteroids or planetary rings. Occultation by a KBO of a size comparable to, or larger than, that of the Fresnel Scale will result in Fresnel diffraction. Detection of diffraction effects requires fast multiple-star photometry, which will be conducted in July 2007 using the Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera (OPTIC) mounted on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This paper details how knowledge of the mass and structure of the outer Solar System may be obtained through the detection of serendipitous stellar occultations.

R. Stevenson

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

69

Detection of Small Kuiper Belt Objects by Stellar Occultations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of the Kuiper Belt is currently limited to those objects that can be detected directly. Objects with diameters less than $\\sim$10km reflect too little light to be detected. These smaller bodies could contain most of the mass in the Kuiper Belt while the abundance of these bodies may constrain the distribution of mass. The overall size distribution of bodies within the Kuiper Belt can also be inferred from the relative abundances of sub-km and larger bodies. Stellar occultations are already used to study dark objects in the Solar System, such as asteroids or planetary rings. Occultation by a KBO of a size comparable to, or larger than, that of the Fresnel Scale will result in Fresnel diffraction. Detection of diffraction effects requires fast multiple-star photometry, which will be conducted in July 2007 using the Orthogonal Parallel Transfer Imaging Camera (OPTIC) mounted on the University of Hawaii 2.2m telescope on Mauna Kea. This paper details how knowledge of the mass and structure of the outer ...

Stevenson, R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Digital field trip to the Central Nevada Thrust Belt  

SciTech Connect

Hydrocarbon exploration in the Central Nevada Thrust Belt is still in its infancy. However, this thrust belt contains all the elements necessary for hydrocarbon accumulations: thick, organically-rich shales; reefs, regional unconformities, karst surfaces, porous sandstones, and extensive and pervasive fractures; anticlines tens of miles long by miles wide; thrust faults that juxtapose potential source and reservoir rocks; and oil seeps. Along a fairway from Las Vegas to Elko, for example, thick Mississippian shales contain 4-6% total organic carbon and are oil-prone and thermally mature. This presentation from a laptop computer and LCD projector is a multimedia version of our October 12-14, 1995 field trip to document the hydrocarbon potential of the thrust belt in Clark, Lincoln, and Nye Counties. Outcrop images were recorded by a digital camera that has a resolution equivalent to a 14 inch computer screen; these images were then downloaded to the computer. All of the images were processed digitally on location to enhance picture quality and color contrast. Many were annotated on location with our observations, measurements, and interpretations. These field annotations are supplemented in this presentation by laboratory analyses. The presentation includes full-color, annotated outcrop images, sounds, and animations. The results show the viability of the new, inexpensive digital cameras to geologic field work in which a multimedia report, ready for presentation to management, can be generated in the field.

Chamberlain, A.K. (Cedar Strat Corp., Hiko, NV (United States)); Hook, S.C. (Texaco E P Technology Department, Houston, TX (United States)); Frost, K.R. (Texaco Exploration and Production, Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii and Maui Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt and Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawai'i and Maui Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description The project will perform a suite of stepped geophysical and geochemical surveys and syntheses at both a known, active volcanic system at Puna, Hawai'i and a blind geothermal system in Maui, Hawai'i. Established geophysical and geochemical techniques for geothermal exploration including gravity, major cations/anions and gas analysis will be combined with atypical implementations of additional geophysics (aeromagnetics) and geochemistry (CO2 flux, 14C measurements, helium isotopes and imaging spectroscopy). Importantly, the combination of detailed CO2 flux, 14C measurements and helium isotopes will provide the ability to directly map geothermal fluid upflow as expressed at the surface. Advantageously, the similar though active volcanic and hydrothermal systems on the east flanks of Kilauea have historically been the subject of both proposed geophysical surveys and some geochemistry; the Puna Geothermal Field (Puna) (operated by Puna Geothermal Venture [PGV], an Ormat subsidiary) will be used as a standard by which to compare both geophysical and geochemical results.

73

Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morgan, Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermal Literature Review At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Geothermal Literature Review Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Paul Morgan, Wendell Duffield, John Sass, Tracey Felger (2003) Searching For An Electrical-Grade Geothermal Resource In Northern Arizona To Help Geopower The West Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geothermal_Literature_Review_At_San_Francisco_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Morgan,_Et_Al.,_2003)&oldid=510822" Category: Exploration Activities What links here

74

An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Expert System For The Tectonic Characterization Of Ancient Volcanic Rocks Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The expert system approach enables geochemical evidence to be integrated with geological, petrological and mineralogical evidence in identifying the eruptive setting of ancient volcanic rocks. This paper explains the development of ESCORT, an Expert System for Characterization of Rock Types. ESCORT uses as its knowledge base a set of dispersion matrices derived from a geochemical data bank of some 8000 immobile element analyses, together with tables of magma-type membership probabilities based

75

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Data Acquisition-Manipulation Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References

76

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

77

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the Coso Range, Inyo County, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Range lies at the west edge of the Great Basin, adjacent to the southern part of the Sierra Nevada. A basement complex of pre-Cenozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks is partly buried by approx.35 km^3 of late Cenozoic volcanic rocks that were erupted during two periods, as defined by K-Ar dating: (1) 4.0--2.5 m.y., approx.31 km^3 of basalt, rhyodacite, dacite, andesite, and rhyolite, in descending order of abundance, and (2) < or =1.1 m.y., nearly equal amounts of basalt and

78

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity- Fuego And Mount St Helens Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The large amount of scientific data collected on the Mount St. Helens eruption has resulted in significant changes in thinking about the atmospheric hazards caused by explosive volcanic activity. The hazard posed by fine silicate ash with long residence time in the atmosphere is probably much less serious than previously thought. The Mount St. Helens eruption released much fine ash in the upper atmosphere. These silicates were removed very rapidly due to a process of particle aggregation (Sorem, 1982;

79

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation, Shimane Peninsula, Sw Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Miocene volcanic complex of the Takashibiyama Formation consists largely of subalkali, subaqueous basalt to andesite lavas and andesite to dacite subaqueous volcaniclastic flow deposits. Most of subaqueous lavas are moderately to intensely brecciated with rugged rough surfaces and ramp structures similar to subaerial block lava. Volcaniclastic flow deposits commonly include basalt to andesite lava fragments and/or pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal

80

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The 3-D P-wave velocity and P- to S-wave velocity ratio structure of the Yellowstone volcanic field, Wyoming, has been determined from local earthquake tomography using new data from the permanent Yellowstone seismic network. We selected 3374 local earthquakes between 1995 and 2001 to invert for the 3-D P-wave velocity (Vp) and P-wave to S-wave velocity ratio (Vp/Vs) structure. Vp anomalies of small size (15_15 km) are reliably

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

82

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Applications Of The Vlf Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic Processes Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The very low-frequency (VLF) induction method has found exceptional utility in studying various volcanic processes of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii because: (1) significant anomalies result exclusively from ionically conductive magma or still-hot intrusions (> 800°C) and the attendant electrolytically conductive hot groundwater; (2) basalt flows forming the bulk of Kilauea have very high resistivities at shallow depths that result in low geologic noise levels and relatively deep depths of

83

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The...

84

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Major Volcanic Eruptions and Climate: A Critical Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines whether major volcanic eruptions of the past century have had a significant impact on surface land and ocean temperatures surface pressure and precipitation. Both multieruption composites and individual eruption time series ...

Clifford F. Mass; David A. Portman

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Effect of Explosive Tropical Volcanism on ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the response of El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) to massive volcanic eruptions in a suite of coupled general circulation model (CGCM) simulations utilizing the Community Climate System Model, version 3 (CCSM3). The authors ...

Shayne McGregor; Axel Timmermann

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Seasonally Modulated Tropical Drought Induced by Volcanic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major volcanic events with a high loading of stratospheric aerosol have long been known to cause cooling, but their impact on precipitation has only recently been emphasized, especially as an analog for potential geoengineering of climate. Here, ...

Renu Joseph; Ning Zeng

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 4/27/2011 12:00:00 AM... Concerns about the damage that volcanic ash clouds can inflict on aircraft engines resulted in last year's $2 billion...

89

Quality-Driven Volcanic Earthquake Detection Using Wireless Sensor Networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power-hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ...

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lassen Volcanic National Park Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

91

Keck Pencil-Beam Survey for Faint Kuiper Belt Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a pencil-beam survey of the Kuiper Belt using the Keck 10-m telescope. A single 0.01 square degree field is imaged 29 times for a total integration time of 4.8 hr. Combining exposures in software allows the detection of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) having visual magnitude V < 27.9. Two new KBOs are discovered. One object having V = 25.5 lies at a probable heliocentric distance d = 33 AU. The second object at V = 27.2 is located at d = 44 AU. Both KBOs have diameters of about 50 km, assuming comet-like albedos of 4%. Data from all surveys are pooled to construct the luminosity function from red magnitude R = 20 to 27. The cumulative number of objects per square degree, N (< R), is fitted to a power law of the form log_(10) N = 0.52 (R - 23.5). Differences between power laws reported in the literature are due mainly to which survey data are incorporated, and not to the method of fitting. The luminosity function is consistent with a power-law size distribution for objects having dia...

Chiang, E I

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Collisional Family in the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical evolution of Classical Kuiper Belt Objects (CKBOs) divides into two parts, according to the secular theory of test particle orbits. The first part is a forced oscillation driven by the planets, while the second part is a free oscillation whose amplitude is determined by the initial orbit of the test particle. We extract the free orbital inclinations and free orbital eccentricities from the osculating elements of 125 known CKBOs. The free inclinations of 32 CKBOs strongly cluster about 2 degrees at orbital semi-major axes between 44 and 45 AU. We propose that these objects comprise a collisional family, the first so identified in the Kuiper Belt. Members of this family are plausibly the fragments of an ancient parent body having a minimum diameter of \\~800 km. This body was disrupted upon colliding with a comparably sized object, and generated ejecta having similar free inclinations. Our candidate family is dynamically akin to the Koronis family of asteroids; both families exhibit a wider range i...

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

A Collisional Family in the Classical Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical evolution of Classical Kuiper Belt Objects (CKBOs) divides into two parts, according to the secular theory of test particle orbits. The first part is a forced oscillation driven by the planets, while the second part is a free oscillation whose amplitude is determined by the initial orbit of the test particle. We extract the free orbital inclinations and free orbital eccentricities from the osculating elements of 125 known CKBOs. The free inclinations of 32 CKBOs strongly cluster about 2 degrees at orbital semi-major axes between 44 and 45 AU. We propose that these objects comprise a collisional family, the first so identified in the Kuiper Belt. Members of this family are plausibly the fragments of an ancient parent body having a minimum diameter of \\~800 km. This body was disrupted upon colliding with a comparably sized object, and generated ejecta having similar free inclinations. Our candidate family is dynamically akin to a sub-family of Koronis asteroids located at semi-major axes less than 2.91 AU; both families exhibit a wider range in free eccentricity than in free inclination, implying that the relative velocity between parent and projectile prior to impact lay mostly in the invariable plane of the solar system. We urge more discoveries of new CKBOs to test the reality of our candidate family and physical studies of candidate family members to probe the heretofore unseen interior of a massive, primitive planetesimal.

E. I. Chiang

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

94

Research on Magnetic Signal Extracting and Filtering of Coal Mine Wire Rope Belt Conveyer Defects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of wire rope conveyer belt with high load operating and complex conditions of coal mine, it is prone to cause conveyer belt horizontal rupture. It will bring tremendous hazards for coal mine safe production. Defects of wire rope and joints displacement ...

Qinghua Mao; Hongwei Ma; Xuhui Zhang; Dawei Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geomorphometric features and tectonic activities in sub-Himalayan thrust belt, Pakistan, from satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sub-Himalayan thrust belt is an active thrust wedge which progresses southward over the north-dipping Indian plate. The north-south compression resulted in severe deformation of sedimentary rocks in this belt. Distinct thrust geometries and topography ... Keywords: DEM, Himayayas, Landsat ETM+, Tectonics, Topography

Lize Chen; Shuhab D. Khan

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

New Directions in Polyvanadate Chemistry:From Cages and Clusters to Baskets, Belts, Bowls, and Barrels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Directions in Polyvanadate Chemistry:From Cages and Clusters to Baskets, Belts, Bowls recently ex- panded beyond classical cage/cluster structures to include hitherto unknown basket, belt, bowl. Klemperer, T. A. Marquart, 0.M. Yaghi Department of Chemistry and Beckman Insitute for Advanced Science

Yaghi, Omar M.

97

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

98

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

99

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

100

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Remote monitoring of volcanic gases using passive Fourier transform spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic gases provide important insights on the internal workings of volcanoes and changes in their composition and total flux can warn of impending changes in a volcano`s eruptive state. In addition, volcanoes are important contributors to the earth`s atmosphere, and understanding this volcanic contribution is crucial for unraveling the effect of anthropogenic gases on the global climate. Studies of volcanic gases have long relied upon direct in situ sampling, which requires volcanologists to work on-site within a volcanic crater. In recent years, spectroscopic techniques have increasingly been employed to obtain information on volcanic gases from greater distances and thus at reduced risk. These techniques have included UV correlation spectroscopy (Cospec) for SO{sub 2} monitoring, the most widely-used technique, and infrared spectroscopy in a variety of configurations, both open- and closed-path. Francis et al. have demonstrated good results using the sun as the IR source. This solar occultation technique is quite useful, but puts rather strong restrictions on the location of instrument and is thus best suited to more accessible volcanoes. In order to maximize the flexibility and range of FTIR measurements at volcanoes, work over the last few years has emphasized techniques which utilize the strong radiance contrast between the volcanic gas plume and the sky. The authors have successfully employed these techniques at several volcanoes, including the White Island and Ruapehu volcanoes in New Zealand, the Kilauea volcano on Hawaii, and Mt. Etna in Italy. But Popocatepetl (5452 m), the recently re-awakened volcano 70 km southeast of downtown Mexico City, has provided perhaps the best examples to date of the usefulness of these techniques.

Love, S.P.; Goff, F.; Counce, D.; Schmidt, S.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Siebe, C.; Delgado, H. [Univ. Nactional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico)

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Tropical "NAT-like" belt observed from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical properties of cold tropical tropopause clouds are examined on a global scale, using two years of space-borne lidar observations from CALIPSO (June 2006 ? May 2008). The linear depolarization ratio, color ratio and backscatter signal are analyzed in tropical clouds colder than 200 K in a way similar to recent studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). It is found that the three categories of particles encountered in PSC (Ice, Sulfate Ternary Solutions or STS, and Nitric Acid Trihydrate or NAT) do also occur in tropical cold cloud layers. Particles with optical properties similar to NAT are few, but they cover the tropical belt and represent about 20% of cold cloud tropical particles. The optical behavior of these particles requires them to be small, non-spherical, optically thin, and persistent in the TTL at temperatures colder than 200 K; NAT particles and very small ice crystals meet these criteria.

Chepfer, Hlne; 10.1029/2008GL036289

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

On the Plutinos and Twotinos of the Kuiper Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illuminate dynamical properties of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) in the 3:2 (``Plutino'') and 2:1 (``Twotino'') Neptunian resonances within the model of resonant capture and migration. We analyze a series of numerical integrations, each involving the 4 migratory giant planets and 400 test particles distributed throughout trans-Neptunian space, to measure efficiencies of capture as functions of migration speed. Snapshots of the spatial distribution of resonant KBOs reveal that Twotinos cluster +/- 75 degrees away from Neptune's longitude, while Plutinos cluster +/- 90 degrees away. Longitudinal clustering persists even for surveys that are not volume-limited in their ability to detect resonant KBOs. Remarkably, between -90 degrees and -60 degrees of Neptune's longitude, we find the sky density of Twotinos to nearly equal that of Plutinos, despite the greater average distance of Twotinos. We couple our findings to observations to crudely estimate that the intrinsic Twotino population is within a factor of 3 of ...

Chiang, E I

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Spectral properties and reflectance curves of the revealed volcanic rocks in Syria using radiometric measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research aimed at studying the spectral reflectance intensity of different exposed volcanic rocks in Syria, and drawing their curves by radiometer measurements. In order to reach this goal, we have studied different kinds of volcanic rocks related ...

M. Rukieh; A. M. Al-Kafri; A. W. Khalaf

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

An Advanced System to Monitor the 3D Structure of Diffuse Volcanic Ash Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Major disruptions of the aviation system from recent volcanic eruptions have intensified discussions about and increased the international consensus toward improving volcanic ash warnings. Central to making progress is to better discern low ...

J.-P. Vernier; T. D. Fairlie; J. J. Murray; A. Tupper; C. Trepte; D. Winker; J. Pelon; A. Garnier; J. Jumelet; M. Pavolonis; A. H. Omar; K. A. Powell

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cover rocks of the Raft River metamorphic core complex, located in the Sevier belt hinterland, preserve a structural and metamorphic history that predates the middle Tertiary extension of the region. In the eastern Raft River Mountains, Cambrian-Permian rocks form two allochthons that occur in the hanging wall of the mid-Miocene Raft River detachment fault. Dramatically attenuated, metamorphosed Cambrian-Pennsylvanian strata

107

Stationary Barotropic Flow Induced by a Mountain over a Tropical Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stationary solutions in the presence of bottom topography are computed for a tropical atmospheric belt. A primitive divergent barotropic model is assumed. An iterative time-averaging method proposed by Edelmann (1972b) is used for the purpose of ...

Fredrick H. M. Semazzi

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Diurnal Cycle of LandAtmosphere Interactions across Oklahomas Winter Wheat Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manuscript documents the impact of Oklahomas winter wheat belt (WWB) on the near-surface atmosphere by comparing the diurnal cycle of meteorological conditions within the WWB relative to conditions in adjacent counties before and after the ...

Matthew J. Haugland; Kenneth C. Crawford

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Circulation Regimes of Rainfall Anomalies in the African-South Asian Monsoon Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study explores the spatial differentiation of climate anomalies and associated circulation mechanisms across the African-South Asian monsoon belt through empirical analyses mainly for the period 194883. Observations include surface ship ...

Uma S. Bhatt

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASAs New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter

S. Alan Stern A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Frequency of Precipitation across the Northern U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the frequency of precipitation events can aid in managing water resources, but little is known concerning the regional variability in the frequency of daily precipitation events in the northern U.S. Corn Belt. The frequency ...

B. S. Sharratt; J. Zandlo; G. Spoden

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy VP 100: Brevini Wind Factory Helps Rust Belt Town's Economy October 5, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Brevini Wind is building a 127,000-square foot state-of-the-art factory in Muncie, Ind.| Photo courtesy of Brevini Wind Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What are the key facts? Brevini Wind awarded $12.8 million tax credit to build wind gear box plant Company will tap into manufacturing workforce, creating 450 jobs in next two years Faced with a recession and an auto industry that ran out gas, many manufacturing towns in the Rust Belt have reinvented themselves. Some found

113

Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

COLOR DEPENDENCE IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS REVISITED  

SciTech Connect

The size distribution of the asteroid belt is examined with 16956 main belt asteroids detected in data taken from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey in two filters (g' and r'). The cumulative H (absolute magnitude) distribution is examined in both filters, and both match well to simple power laws down to H = 17, with slopes in rough agreement with those reported the literature. This implies that disruptive collisions between asteroids are gravitationally dominated down to at least this size, and probably sub-kilometer scales. The slopes of these distributions appear shallower in the outer belt than the inner belt, and the g' distributions appear slightly steeper than the r'. The slope shallowing in the outer belt may reflect a real compositional difference: the inner asteroid belt has been suggested to consist mostly of stony and/or metallic S-type asteroids, whereas carbonaceous C-types are thought to be more prevalent further from the Sun. No waves are seen in the size distribution above H = 15. Since waves are expected to be produced at the transition from gravitationally-dominated to internal strength-dominated collisions, their absence here may imply that the transition occurs at sub-kilometer scales, much smaller than the H = 17 (diameter {approx} 1.6 km) cutoff of this study.

August, Tyler M.; Wiegert, Paul A., E-mail: tx_august@laurentian.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Dictionary.png Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources. Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Sedimentary-hosted volcanic-related resources are special in that the

116

A tropical NAT-like belt observed from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optical properties of cold tropical tropopause clouds are examined on a global scale, using two years of space-borne lidar observations from CALIPSO (June 2006- May 2008). The linear depolarization ratio, color ratio and backscatter signal are analyzed in tropical clouds colder than 200 K in a way similar to recent studies of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs). It is found that the three categories of particles encountered in PSC (Ice, Sulfate Ternary Solutions or STS, and Nitric Acid Trihydrate or NAT) do also occur in tropical cold cloud layers. Particles with optical properties similar to NAT are few, but they cover the hal-00439695, version 1- 8 Dec 2009 tropical belt and represent about 20 % of cold cloud tropical particles all year long. The optical behavior of these particles requires them to be very small, non-spherical, optically thin, and persistent in the TTL at temperatures colder than 200 K; NAT particles and very small ice crystals meet these criteria and are right now the best candidates to explain the presented observations. 2

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

118

Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

Htun, K.M.

1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

119

Simulation of dynamics of radiation belt electrons during geomagnetic storms driven by high speed solar wind streams.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Satellite observations have shown that fluxes of relativistic electrons in the earth's radiation belts can vary by orders of magnitude during periods of high solar (more)

Yu, Bin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF LARGE KUIPER BELT OBJECT 2007 OR10  

SciTech Connect

We present photometry and spectra of the large Kuiper belt object 2007 OR10. The data show significant near-infrared absorption features due to water ice. While most objects in the Kuiper belt with water ice absorption this prominent have the optically neutral colors of water ice, 2007 OR10 is among the reddest Kuiper belt objects known. One other large Kuiper belt object-Quaoar-has similar red coloring and water ice absorption, and it is hypothesized that the red coloration of this object is due to irradiation of the small amounts of methane able to be retained on Quaoar. 2007 OR10, though warmer than Quaoar, is in a similar volatile retention regime because it is sufficiently larger that its stronger gravity can still retain methane. We propose, therefore, that the red coloration on 2007 OR10 is also caused by the retention of small amounts of methane. Positive detection of methane on 2007 OR10 will require spectra with higher signal to noise. Models for volatile retention on Kuiper belt objects appear to continue to do an excellent job reproducing all of the available observations.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Burgasser, A. J., E-mail: aburgasser@ucsd.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Science, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Lightning-induced coupling of the radiation belts to geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions  

SciTech Connect

Very low frequency (VLF) radio observations in Antarctica and North America provide the first evidence that bursts of energetic electrons from the earth's radiation belts commonly precipitate into geomagnetically conjugate ionospheric regions in response to lightning. The electrons, with energies ranging from tens of keV to over one MeV, appear to be scattered out of their otherwise stable trap in the earth's magnetic field by magnetospheric interactions with a regularly observed class of transient, lightning-generated VLF radio waves known as ducted whistlers. The precipitating electrons ionize atmospheric molecules at altitudes between 40 and 90 km, creating transient enhancements of ionization levels in conjugate locations. These ionospheric disturbances can be detected by their characteristic perturbations, sometimes called 'Trimpi events,' of the amplitude and phase of VLF transmitter signals propagating subionospherically within 200 to 250 km of the disturbed areas. The first detailed, one-to-one comparison of such signal perturbations, monitored in conjugate regions, with the multipath structure, arrival azimuths, and predicted electron scattering of simultaneously observed ducted whistlers suggests that every ducted whistler precipitates bursts of radiation belt electrons. If so, the estimated rate at which ducted whistlers contribute to radiation belt losses is comparable to that predicted for plasmaspheric hiss, a different class of magnetospheric wave that is often considered to control the structure of the belts. Lightning could therefore play a significant role in the maintenance of radiation belt equilibrium.

Burgess, W.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

STIS Coronagraphic Imaging of Fomalhaut: Main Belt Structure and the Orbit of Fomalhaut b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new optical coronagraphic data of the bright star Fomalhaut obtained with the HST in 2010/2012 using STIS. Fomalhaut b is recovered at both epochs to high significance. The observations include the discoveries of tenuous nebulosity beyond the main dust belt detected to at least 209 AU projected radius and a ~50 AU wide azimuthal gap in the belt northward of Fom b. The morphology of Fomalhaut b appears elliptical in the STIS detections. We show that residual noise in the processed data can plausibly result in point sources appearing extended. A MCMC analysis demonstrates that the orbit of Fom b is highly eccentric, with e=0.8+/-0.1, a=177+/-68 AU, and q = 32+/-24 AU. Fom b is apsidally aligned with the belt and 90% of allowed orbits have mutual inclination 36 deg or less. Fomalhaut b's orbit is belt-crossing in projection, but only 12% of possible orbits have nodes within a 25 AU wide belt annulus (133-158 AU). The high e invokes a dynamical history where Fom b may have experienced a significant dyn...

Kalas, Paul; Fitzgerald, Michael P; Clampin, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Pliocene Shoaling Basaltic Seamount- Ba Volcanic Group At Rakiraki, Fiji Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: At Rakiraki in northeastern Viti Levu, the Pliocene Ba Volcanic Group comprises gently dipping, pyroxene-phyric basaltic lavas, including pillow lava, and texturally diverse volcanic breccia interbedded with conglomerate and sandstone. Three main facies associations have been identified: (1) The primary volcanic facies association includes massive basalt (flows and sills), pillow lava and related in-situ breccia (pillow-fragment breccia, autobreccia, in-situ hyaloclastite, peperite).

124

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Teleseismic-Seismic_Monitoring_At_Lassen_Volcanic_National_Park_Area_(Janik_%26_Mclaren,_2010)&oldid=425654"

125

A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Physical Model For The Origin Of Volcanism Of The Tyrrhenian Margin- The Case Of Neapolitan Area Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The onset of volcanism in the Neapolitan area and the tensile tectonics of the Tyrrhenian margin of the Apennine chain have been related to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Basin, which may have resulted in horizontal asthenosphere flows giving rise, in turn, to crustal distension, local mantle upwellings and ensuing volcanism. Geological and structural data were taken into consideration: the existence of a shallow crust-mantle discontinuity in the Neapolitan area, the onset of volcanism in a

126

NEP for a Kuiper Belt Object Rendezvous Mission  

SciTech Connect

Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) are a recently-discovered set of solar system bodies which lie at about the orbit of Pluto (40 AU) out to about 100 astronomical units (AU). There are estimated to be about 100,000 KBOS with a diameter greater than 100 km. KBOS are postulated to be composed of the pristine material which formed our solar system and may even have organic materials in them. A detailed study of KBO size, orbit distribution, structure, and surface composition could shed light on the origins of the solar system and perhaps even on the origin of life in our solar system. A rendezvous mission including a lander would be needed to perform chemical analysis of the surface and sub-surface composition of KBOS. These requirements set the size of the science probe at around a ton. Mission analyses show that a fission-powered system with an electric thruster could rendezvous at 40 AU in about 13.0 years with a total {Delta}V of 46 krnk. It would deliver a 1000-kg science payload while providing ample onboard power for relaying data back to earth. The launch mass of the entire system (power, thrusters, propellant, navigation, communication, structure, science payload, etc.) would be 7984 kg if it were placed into an earth-escape trajectory (C=O). Alternatively, the system could be placed into a 700-km earth orbit with more propellant,yielding a total mass in LEO of 8618 kg, and then spiral out of earth orbit to arrive at the KBO in 14.3 years. To achieve this performance, a fission power system with 100 kW of electrical power and a total mass (reactor, shield, conversion, and radiator) of about 2350 kg. Three possible configurations are proposed: (1) a UZrH-fueled, NaK-cooled reactor with a steam Rankine conversion system, (2) a UN-fueled gas-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system, and (3) a UN-fueled heatpipe-cooled reactor with a recuperated Brayton conversion system. (Boiling and condensation in the Rankine system is a technical risk at present.) All three of these systems have the potential to meet the weight requirement for the trip and to be built in the near term.

HOUTS,MICHAEL G.; LENARD,ROGER X.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; PATTON,BRUCE; POSTON,DAVID I.; WRIGHT,STEVEN A.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

128

Gravity survey of the southwestern part of the sourthern Utah geothermal belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gravity survey covering an area of 6200 km/sup 2/ was made over the southwestern part of the southern Utah geothermal belt. The objective of the gravity survey is to delineate the geologic structures and assist in the understanding of the geothermal potential of the area. A total of 726 new gravity stations together with 205 existing gravity stations, are reduced to give: (1) a complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map, and (2) a fourth-order residual gravity anomaly map; both maps have a 2-mgal contour interval. The complete Bouguer gravity anomaly map shows an east-trending regional gravity belt with a total relief of about 70 mgal which crosses the central portion of the survey area. The gravity belt is attributed to a crustal lateral density variation of 0.1 gm/cc from a depth of 5 to 15 km.

Green, R.T.; Cook, K.L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Kuiper Belt Object Occultations: Expected Rates, False Positives, and Survey Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that: (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu^{-1}, corresponding to 40 s^{-1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt Asteroids will produce occultations lightcurves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116 deg 7-8 sigma should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

Bickerton, Steven; Kavelaars, JJ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

EXPLORATION OF THE KUIPER BELT BY HIGH-PRECISION PHOTOMETRIC STELLAR OCCULTATIONS: FIRST RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report here the first detection of hectometer-size objects by the method of serendipitous stellar occultation. This method consists of recording the diffraction shadow created when an object crosses the observers line of sight and occults the disk of a background star. One of our detections is most consistent with an object between Saturn and Uranus. The two other diffraction patterns detected are caused by Kuiper Belt objects beyond 100 AU from the Sun and hence are the farthest known objects in the solar system. These detections show that the Kuiper Belt is much more extended than previously believed and that the outer part of the disk could be composed of smaller objects than the inner part. This gives critical clues to understanding the problem of the formation of the outer planets of the solar system. Key words: Kuiper Belt occultations solar system: formation 1.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

A RESOLVED MILLIMETER EMISSION BELT IN THE AU Mic DEBRIS DISK  

SciTech Connect

We present imaging observations at 1.3 mm of the debris disk surrounding the nearby M-type flare star AU Mic with beam size 3'' (30 AU) from the Submillimeter Array. These data reveal a belt of thermal dust emission surrounding the star with the same edge-on geometry as the more extended scattered light disk detected at optical wavelengths. Simple modeling indicates a central radius of {approx}35 AU for the emission belt. This location is consistent with the reservoir of planetesimals previously invoked to explain the shape of the scattered light surface brightness profile through size-dependent dust dynamics. The identification of this belt further strengthens the kinship between the debris disks around AU Mic and its more massive sister star {beta} Pic, members of the same {approx}10 Myr old moving group.

Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M.; MacGregor, Meredith A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Meredith Hughes, A. [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

132

KUIPER BELT OBJECT OCCULTATIONS: EXPECTED RATES, FALSE POSITIVES, AND SURVEY DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method of generating artificial scintillation noise is developed and used to evaluate occultation rates and false positive rates for surveys probing the Kuiper Belt with the method of serendipitous stellar occultations. A thorough examination of survey design shows that (1) diffraction-dominated occultations are critically (Nyquist) sampled at a rate of 2 Fsu{sup -1}, corresponding to 40 s{sup -1} for objects at 40 AU, (2) occultation detection rates are maximized when targets are observed at solar opposition, (3) Main Belt asteroids will produce occultations light curves identical to those of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) if target stars are observed at solar elongations of: 116{sup 0} {approx}7-8{sigma} should be adopted to ensure that viable candidate events can be disentangled from false positives.

Bickerton, S. J. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)], E-mail: bick@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: welch@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: JJ.Kavelaars@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Waterproofing and Strengthening Volcanic Tuff in Waste Repositories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste repositories from surface trenches and shafts at Los Alamos to drilled tunnels at Yucca Mountain are being built in volcanic Tuff, a soft compacted material that is permeable to water and air. US Department of Energy documents on repository design identify the primary design goal of 'preventing water from reaching the waste canisters, dissolving the canisters and carrying the radioactive waste particles away from the repository'. Designers expect to achieve this by use of multiple barriers along with careful placement of the repository both well above the water table and well above the ground level in a mountain. Though repositories are located in areas that have a historically dry climate to minimize the impact of rainfall infiltration, global warming phenomena may have the potential to alter regional climate patterns - potentially leading to higher infiltration rates. Conventional methods of sealing fractures within volcanic tuff may not be sufficiently robust or long lived to isolate a repository shaft from water for the required duration. A new grouting technology based on molten wax shows significant promise for producing the kind of long term sealing performance required. Molten wax is capable of permeating a significant distance through volcanic tuff, as well as sealing fractures by permeation that is thermally dependent instead of chemically or time dependent. The wax wicks into and saturates tuff even if no fractures are present, but penetrates and fills only the heated area. Heated portions of the rock fill like a vessel. The taffy-like wax has been shown to waterproof the tuff, and significantly increase its resistance to fracture. This wax was used in 2004 for grouting of buried radioactive beryllium waste at the Idaho National Laboratory, chiefly to stop the water based corrosion reactions of the waste. The thermoplastic material contains no water and does not dry out or change with age. Recent studies indicate that this kind of wax material may be inherently resistant to bio-degradation. (authors)

Carter, E.E.; Carter, P.E. [Technologies Co, Texas (United States); Cooper, D.C. [Ph.D. Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Planck intermediate results. XII: Diffuse Galactic components in the Gould Belt System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform an analysis of the diffuse low-frequency Galactic components in the Southern part of the Gould Belt system ($130^\\circ\\leq l\\leq 230^\\circ$ and $-50^\\circ\\leq b\\leq -10^\\circ$). Strong UV flux coming from the Gould Belt super-association is responsible for bright diffuse foregrounds that we observe from our position inside the system and that can help us improve our knowledge of the Galactic emission. Free-free emission and anomalous microwave emission (AME) are the dominant components at low frequencies ($\

Ade, P A R; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Bedini, L; Benabed, K; Benot, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Coulais, A; Cuttaia, F; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dobler, G; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dor, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Enlin, T A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Gnova-Santos, R T; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Hraud, Y; Gonzlez-Nuevo, J; Grski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D; Hernndez-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Juvela, M; Keihnen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lhteenmki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lawrence, C R; Leach, S; Leonardi, R; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vrnle, M; Lubin, P M; Macas-Prez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martnez-Gonzlez, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschnes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nrgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Peel, M; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rubio-Martn, J A; Rusholme, B; Salerno, E; Sandri, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Spencer, L; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Tibbs, C T; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Valenziano, L; Van Tent, B; Varis, J; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Ysard, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

MILLIMETER IMAGING OF THE {beta} PICTORIS DEBRIS DISK: EVIDENCE FOR A PLANETESIMAL BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present observations at 1.3 mm wavelength of the {beta} Pictoris debris disk with beam size 4.''3 x 2.''6 (83 x 50 AU) from the Submillimeter Array. The emission shows two peaks separated by {approx}7'' along the disk plane, which we interpret as a highly inclined dust ring or belt. A simple model constrains the belt center to 94 {+-} 8 AU, close to the prominent break in slope of the optical scattered light. We identify this region as the location of the main reservoir of dust-producing planetesimals in the disk.

Wilner, David J.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hughes, A. Meredith [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

High Resolution Aircraft Scanner Mapping of Geothermal and Volcanic Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High spectral resolution GEOSCAN Mkll multispectral aircraft scanner imagery has been acquired, at 3-6 m spatial resolutions, over much of the Taupo Volcanic Zone as part of continuing investigations aimed at developing remote sensing techniques for exploring and mapping geothermal and volcanic areas. This study examined the 24-band: visible, near-IR (NIR), mid-IR (MIR) and thermal-IR (TIR) imagery acquired over Waiotapu geothermal area (3 m spatial resolution) and White Island volcano (6 m resolution). Results show that color composite images composed of visible and NIR wavelengths that correspond to color infrared (CIR) photographic wavelengths can be useful for distinguishing among bare ground, water and vegetation features and, in certain cases, for mapping various vegetation types. However, combinations which include an MIR band ({approx} 2.2 {micro}m) with either visible and NIR bands, or two NIR bands, are the most powerful for mapping vegetation types, water bodies, and bare and hydrothermally altered ground. Combinations incorporating a daytime TIR band with NIR and MIR bands are also valuable for locating anomalously hot features and distinguishing among different types of surface hydrothermal alteration.

Mongillo, M.A.; Cochrane, G.R.; Wood, C.P.; Shibata, Y.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Interpretation of Accurate UV Polarization Lidar Measurements: Application to Volcanic Ash Number Concentration Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, accurate UV polarization measurements are performed on a volcanic ash cloud after long-range transport at Lyon, France (45.76N, 4.83E). The volcanic particles are released from the mid-April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull ...

A. Miffre; G. David; B. Thomas; M. Abou Chacra; P. Rairoux

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Deep explosive volcanism on the Gakkel Ridge and seismological constraints on Shallow Recharge at TAG Active Mound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seafloor digital imagery and bathymetric data are used to evaluate the volcanic characteristics of the 85E segment of the ultraslow spreading Gakkel Ridge (9 mm yr-). Imagery reveals that ridges and volcanic cones in the ...

Pontbriand, Claire Willis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Advances in the remote sensing of volcanic activity and hazards, with special consideration to applications in developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of remote sensing for studies of volcanic activity and hazards have developed rapidly in the past 40 years. This has facilitated the observation of volcanic processes, such as ground deformation and thermal emission changes, lava flows, ...

G. G. J. Ernst; M. Kervyn; R. M. Teeuw

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

AN ASTEROID BELT INTERPRETATION FOR THE TIMING VARIATIONS OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR B1937+21  

SciTech Connect

Pulsar timing observations have revealed companions to neutron stars that include other neutron stars, white dwarfs, main-sequence stars, and planets. We demonstrate that the correlated and apparently stochastic residual times of arrival from the millisecond pulsar B1937+21 are consistent with the signature of an asteroid belt having a total mass {approx}< 0.05 M{sub Circled-Plus }. Unlike the solar system's asteroid belt, the best fit pulsar asteroid belt extends over a wide range of radii, consistent with the absence of any shepherding companions. We suggest that any pulsar that has undergone accretion-driven spin-up and subsequently evaporated its companion may harbor orbiting asteroid mass objects. The resulting timing variations may fundamentally limit the timing precision of some of the other millisecond pulsars. Observational tests of the asteroid belt model include identifying periodicities from individual asteroids, which are difficult; testing for statistical stationarity, which becomes possible when observations are conducted over a longer observing span; and searching for reflected radio emission.

Shannon, R. M.; Cordes, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Metcalfe, T. S. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)] [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Cognard, I.; Desvignes, G.; Theureau, G. [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France)] [LPC2E/CNRS-Universite d'Orleans, Orleans, F-45071, Cedex 2 (France); Janssen, G. H.; Purver, M. B.; Stappers, B. W. [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [University of Manchester and Jodrell Bank Observatory, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Jessner, A.; Kramer, M.; Lazaridis, K., E-mail: ryan.shannon@csiro.au, E-mail: cordes@astro.cornell.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastonomie, Bonn, D-53121 (Germany)

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Impact of Oklahoma's Winter Wheat Belt on the Mesoscale Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oklahoma Mesonet data were used to measure the impact of Oklahoma's winter wheat belt on the mesoscale environment from 1994 to 2001. Statistical analyses of monthly means of near-surface air temperatures demonstrated that 1) a well-defined cool ...

Renee A. McPherson; David J. Stensrud; Kenneth C. Crawford

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Streamer Belt Structure at Solar Minima John D. Richardson and Karolen I. Paularen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, formin hocks, which modify the solar wind flow and transfer kinetic energy into thermal energy, m heatingStreamer Belt Structure at Solar Minima a C John D. Richardson and Karolen I. Paularen enter from IMP 8 and Voyager 2 demonstrating the character o he current (1996) solar minimum and compare

Richardson, John

143

Precipitation of relativistic electrons of the Van Allen belts into the proton aurora  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Van Allen electron belts consist of two regions encircling the earth in which relativistic electrons are trapped in the earth's magnetic field. Populations of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts vary greatly with geomagnetic disturbance and they are a major source of damage to space vehicles. In order to know when and by how much these populations of relativistic electrons increase, it is important to elucidate not only the cause of acceleration of relativistic electrons but also the cause of their loss from the Van Allen belts. Here we show the first evidence that left-hand polarized electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere, on the basis of results of an excellent set of ground and satellite observations showing coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The proton aurora was produced by precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keV due to EMIC waves near the plasma pause, which is a manifestation of wave-particle interactions. These observations clarify that ions with energies of tens of keV affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the Van Allen belts via parasitic resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoshi, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [SEC/NOAA; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-temperature deformation in the Neoproterozoic transpressional Ribeira belt, southeast Brazil^ncias da Universidade de Sa~o Paulo, Rua do Lago 562, Cep: 05508-080, Sa~o Paulo, SP, Brazil b Laboratoire Geologia, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000, Ouro Pre^to, MG, Brazil Received 5 April 2001

Bascou, Jérôme

145

Factors controlling the evolution of the Perdido Fold Belt, northwestern Gulf of Mexico, determined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Factors controlling the evolution of the Perdido Fold Belt, northwestern Gulf of Mexico, determined) is a prominent salt- cored deep water structure in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. It is characterized of the Gulf of Mexico show that toe-of-slope folding is a viable mechanism to develop diapirs in the deep salt

Beaumont, Christopher

146

Young close-by neutron stars: the Gould Belt vs. the Galacic disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in the Belt and have been estimated from available SN progenitors counts (Tammann et al., 1994 and Grenier formation in . 1 kpc around the Sun. Originally this idea has been suggested by Grenier (2000) and Gehrels their cooling model to our disposal. SP thanks Isabelle Grenier for discus- sions. The work of MP and SP

Popov, Sergei

147

A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Morphometric Analysis Of The Submarine Volcanic Ridge South-East Of Pico Island, Azores Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A region of crustal extension, the Azores Plateau contains excellent examples of submarine volcanic edifices constructed over a wide range of ocean depths along the Pico Ridge. Using bathymetric data and Towed Ocean Bottom Instrument (TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric development of a submarine ridge. Our analysis and interpretation of the measurement and

148

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

149

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

150

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Clarkson & Reiter, 1987) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this study we combine thermal maturation models, based on the level of maturation of the Fruitland Formation coals, and time-dependet temperature models, based on heat-flow data in the San Juan region, to further investigate both the thermal history of the region and the nature of the influence of the San Juan volcanic field thermal source on the thermal

151

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Isotopic Analysis At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Rock At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Rock Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Oxygen isotopes. References Peter B. Larson, Hugh P. Taylor Jr (1986) An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City Caldera, San Juan Mountains, Colorado Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis_At_San_Juan_Volcanic_Field_Area_(Larson_%26_Jr,_1986)&oldid=687474" Categories: Exploration Activities

152

COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm February 13, 2013, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Volcanism, Impacts and Mass Extinctions: Causes and Effects Professor Gerta Keller Princeton University Presentation: WC13FEB2014_GKeller.pptx The nature and causes of mass extinctions in the geological past have remained topics of intense scientific debate for the past three decades. Central to this debate is the question of whether one, or several large bolide impacts, the eruption of large igneous provinces (LIP) or a combination of the two were the primary mechanisms driving the environmental changes that are universally regarded as the proximate causes for four of the five major Phanerozoic extinction events. Recent years have seen a revolution in our understanding of interplanetary

153

Intracaldera volcanism and sedimentation-Creede caldera, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Within the Creede caldera, Colorado, many of the answers to its postcaldera volcanic and sedimentary history lie within the sequence of tuffaceous clastic sedimentary rocks and tuffs known as the Creede Formation. The Creede Formation and its interbedded ash deposits were sampled by research coreholes Creede 1 and 2, drilled during the fall of 1991. In an earlier study of the Creede Formation, based on surface outcrops and shallow mining company coreholes, Heiken and Krier (1987) concluded that the process of caldera structural resurgence was rapid and that a caldera lake had developed in an annulus (``moat``) located between the resurgent dome and caldera wall. So far we have a picture of intracaldera activity consisting of intermittent hydrovoleanic eruptions within a caldera lake for the lower third of the Creede Formation, and both magmatic and hydrovolcanic ash eruptions throughout the top two-thirds. Most of the ash deposits interbedded with the moat sedimentary rocks are extremely fine-grained. Ash fallout into the moat lake and unconsolidated ash eroded from caldera walls and the slopes of the resurgent dome were deposited over stream delta distributaries within relatively shallow water in the northwestern moat, and in deeper waters of the northern moat, where the caldera was intersected by a graben. Interbedded with ash beds and tuffaceous siltstones are coarse-grained turbidites from adjacent steep slopes and travertine from fissure ridges adjacent to the moat. Sedimentation rates and provenance for clastic sediments are linked to the frequent volcanic activity in and near the caldera; nearly all of the Creede Formation sedimentary rocks are tuffaceous.

Heiken, G.; Krier, D.; Snow, M.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McCormick, T. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

155

Preliminary volcanic hazards evaluation for Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities and Operations : current state of knowledge and proposed path forward  

SciTech Connect

The integration of available information on the volcanic history of the region surrounding Los Alamos National Laboratory indicates that the Laboratory is at risk from volcanic hazards. Volcanism in the vicinity of the Laboratory is unlikely within the lifetime of the facility (ca. 50100 years) but cannot be ruled out. This evaluation provides a preliminary estimate of recurrence rates for volcanic activity. If further assessment of the hazard is deemed beneficial to reduce risk uncertainty, the next step would be to convene a formal probabilistic volcanic hazards assessment.

Keating, Gordon N.; Schultz-Fellenz, Emily S.; Miller, Elizabeth D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

SYSTHESIS OF VOLCANISM STUDIES FOR THE YUCCA MOUNTAIN SITE CHARACTERIZATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The hazard of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The distribution of Pliocene and Quaternary basaltic volcanic centers is evaluated with respect to tectonic models for detachment, caldera, regional and local rifting, and the Walker Lane structural zone. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of past basaltic volcanic centers and possible future magmatic processes. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be greater than 10{sup -7} events per year. Bounding probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Arnargosa Valley and Crater Flat. The results of simulation modeling are used to assess the sensitivity of the disruption probability for the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain site. A new section on modeling of radiological releases associated with surface and subsurface magmatic activity has been added to chapter 6. The modeling results are consistent with past total system performance assessments that show future volcanic and magmatic events are not significant components of repository performance and volcanism is not a prio

FV PERRY, GA CROWE, GA VALENTINE AND LM BOWKER

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

157

Detectability of Occultation of Stars by Objects in the Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The serendipitous detection of stellar occultations by Outer Solar System objects is a powerful method for ascertaining the small end ($r \\lesssim 15$ km) of the size distribution of Kuiper Belt Objects and may potentially allow the exploration of objects as far out as the Oort Cloud. The design and implementation of an occultation survey is aided by a detailed understanding of how diffraction and observational parameters affect the detection of occultation events. In this study, stellar occultations are simulated, accounting for diffraction effects, finite source sizes, finite bandwidths, stellar spectra, sampling, and signal-to-noise. Finally, the possibility of detecting small Outer Solar System objects from the Kuiper Belt all the way out to the Oort Cloud is explored for three photometric systems: a proposed space telescope, Whipple (Kaplan et al. 2003), the Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (Lehner et al. 2006), and the Multi Mirror Telescope (Bianco 2007).

T. C. Nihei; M. J. Lehner; F. B. Bianco; S. -K. King; J. M. Giammarco; C. Alcock

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Volterra network modeling of the nonlinear finite-impulse reponse of the radiation belt flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how a general class of spatio-temporal nonlinear impulse-response forecast networks (Volterra networks) can be constructed from a taxonomy of nonlinear autoregressive integrated moving average with exogenous inputs (NAR-MAX) input-output equations, and used to model the evolution of energetic particle f uxes in the Van Allen radiation belts. We present initial results for the nonlinear response of the radiation belts to conditions a month earlier. The essential features of spatio-temporal observations are recovered with the model echoing the results of state space models and linear f nite impulse-response models whereby the strongest coupling peak occurs in the preceding 1-2 days. It appears that such networks hold promise for the development of accurate and fully data-driven space weather modelling, monitoring and forecast tools.

Taylor, M.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A. [Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing(ISARS), National Observatory of Athens (NOA), Metaxa and Vasillis Pavlou Street, Penteli, Athens 15236 (Greece); Vassiliadis, D. [Department of Physics, Hodges Hall, PO Box 6315, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 (United States)

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

A POSSIBLE DIVOT IN THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF THE KUIPER BELT'S SCATTERING OBJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via joint analysis of a calibrated telescopic survey, which found scattering Kuiper Belt objects, and models of their expected orbital distribution, we explore the scattering-object (SO) size distribution. Although for D > 100 km the number of objects quickly rise as diameters decrease, we find a relative lack of smaller objects, ruling out a single power law at greater than 99% confidence. After studying traditional ''knees'' in the size distribution, we explore other formulations and find that, surprisingly, our analysis is consistent with a very sudden decrease (a divot) in the number distribution as diameters decrease below 100 km, which then rises again as a power law. Motivated by other dynamically hot populations and the Centaurs, we argue for a divot size distribution where the number of smaller objects rises again as expected via collisional equilibrium. Extrapolation yields enough kilometer-scale SOs to supply the nearby Jupiter-family comets. Our interpretation is that this divot feature is a preserved relic of the size distribution made by planetesimal formation, now ''frozen in'' to portions of the Kuiper Belt sharing a ''hot'' orbital inclination distribution, explaining several puzzles in Kuiper Belt science. Additionally, we show that to match today's SO inclination distribution, the supply source that was scattered outward must have already been vertically heated to the of order 10 Degree-Sign .

Shankman, C.; Gladman, B. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agriculture Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Kaib, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queens University (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J. [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Petit, J. M. [Institut UTINAM, CNRS-Universite de Franche-Comte, Besancon (France)

2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Examining the specific entropy (density of adiabatic invariants) of the outer electron radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using temperature and number-density measurements of the energetic-electron population from multiple spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit, the specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} of the outer electron radiation belt is calculated. Then 955,527 half-hour-long data intervals are statistically analyzed. Local-time and solar-cycle variations in S are examined. The median value of the specific entropy (2.8 x 10{sup 7} eVcm{sup 2}) is much larger than the specific entropy of other particle populations in and around the magnetosphere. The evolution of the specific entropy through high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms and through magnetic-cloud-driven geomagnetic storms is studied using superposed-epoch analysis. For high-speed-stream-driven storms, systematic variations in the entropy associated with electron loss and gain and with radiation-belt heating are observed in the various storm phases. For magnetic-cloud-driven storms, multiple trigger choices for the data superpositions reveal the effects of interplanetary shock arrival, sheath driving, cloud driving, and recovery phase. The specific entropy S = T/n{sup 2/3} is algebraically expressed in terms of the first and second adiabatic invariants of the electrons: this allows a relativistic expression for S in terms of T and n to be derived. For the outer electron radiation belt at geosynchronous orbit, the relativistic corrections to the specific entropy expression are -15%.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter closest approach occurred on 28 February 2007. It was competitively selected by NASA for development on 29 November 2001. New Horizons is the first mission to the Pluto system and the Kuiper belt; and will complete the reconnaissance of the classical planets. The ~400 kg spacecraft carries seven scientific instruments, including imagers, spectrometers, radio science, a plasma and particles suite, and a dust counter built by university students. NH will study the Pluto system over a 5-month period beginning in early 2015. Following Pluto, NH will go on to reconnoiter one or two 30-50 kilometer diameter Kuiper belt Objects (KBOs), if NASA approves an extended mission. If successful, NH will represent a watershed development in the scientific exploration of a new class of bodies in the solar system - dwarf planet...

Stern, S Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

The New Horizons Pluto Kuiper belt Mission: An Overview with Historical Context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NASA's New Horizons (NH) Pluto-Kuiper belt (PKB) mission was launched on 19 January 2006 on a Jupiter Gravity Assist (JGA) trajectory toward the Pluto system for a 14 July 2015 closest approach; Jupiter closest approach occurred on 28 February 2007. It was competitively selected by NASA for development on 29 November 2001. New Horizons is the first mission to the Pluto system and the Kuiper belt; and will complete the reconnaissance of the classical planets. The ~400 kg spacecraft carries seven scientific instruments, including imagers, spectrometers, radio science, a plasma and particles suite, and a dust counter built by university students. NH will study the Pluto system over a 5-month period beginning in early 2015. Following Pluto, NH will go on to reconnoiter one or two 30-50 kilometer diameter Kuiper belt Objects (KBOs), if NASA approves an extended mission. If successful, NH will represent a watershed development in the scientific exploration of a new class of bodies in the solar system - dwarf planets, of worlds with exotic volatiles on their surfaces, of rapidly (possibly hydrodynamically) escaping atmospheres, and of giant impact derived satellite systems. It will also provide the first dust density measurements beyond 18 AU, cratering records that shed light on both the ancient and present-day KB impactor population down to tens of meters, and a key comparator to the puzzlingly active, former dwarf planet (now satellite of Neptune) called Triton, which is as large as Eris and Pluto.

S. Alan Stern

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

164

Thermal and Structural Constraints on the Tectonic Evolution of the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah Thrust Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The timing of motion on thrust faults in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah (IWU) thrust belt comes from synorogenic sediments, apatite thermochronology and direct dating of fault rocks coupled with good geometrical constraints of the subsurface structure. The thermal history comes from the analyses of apatite thermochronology, thermal maturation of hydrocarbon source rocks and isotope analysis of fluid inclusions from syntectonic veins. New information from zircon fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He analysis provide constraints on the thermal evolution of the IWU thrust belt over geological time. These analyses demonstrate that the time-temperature pathway of the rocks sampled never reached the required conditions to reset the thermochronometers necessary to provide new timing constraints. Previous thermal constraints for maximum temperatures of IWU thrust belt rocks, place the lower limit at ~110C and the upper limit at ~328C. New zircon fission track results suggest an upper limit at ~180C for million year time scales. ID-TIMS and LA-ICPMS of syntectonic calcite veins suggest that new techniques for dating times of active deformation are viable given that radiogenic isotope concentrations occur at sufficient levels within the vein material.

Chapman, Shay Michael

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

166

Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Both fluid and gas isotopic analysis. References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

167

Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Static Temperature Survey At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Static Temperature Survey Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In 1978, the Walker "O" No. 1 well at Terminal Geyser was drilled to 1222 m, all in volcanic rocks (Beall, 1981). Temperature-log profiles made 10

168

Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration Patterns In Volcanic Rocks Within An East-West Traverse Through Central Nicaragua Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The volcanic rocks investigated in a cross-section between the Pacific and Atlantic coasts of Nicaragua - with the exception of Recent and some Pleistocene lavas - are incipiently to strongly altered. Alteration patterns on different scales can be discerned in the Tertiary sequences: (i) a regional burial diagenesis or very low-grade burial metamorphism at the low-temperature end of the zeolite facies (mordenite subfacies) with an inferred thermal gradient of < 50°C/km, grading into (ii) a geothermal

169

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Some Aspects Of Exploration In Non-Volcanic Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geothermal exploration in non-volcanic areas must above all rely on geophysical techniques to identify the reservoir, as it is unable to resort to volcanological methodologies. A brief description is therefore given of the contribution that can be obtained from certain types of geophysical prospectings. Author(s): Raffaello Nannini Published: Geothermics, 1986 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Aerial Photography (Nannini, 1986) Aeromagnetic Survey (Nannini, 1986) Ground Gravity Survey (Nannini, 1986)

170

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

171

On Numerical Simulation of the Global Distribution of Sulfate Aerosol Produced by a Large Volcanic Eruption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcanic eruptions play an important role in the global sulfur cycle of the earth's atmosphere and have a relatively big influence on potential fluctuations of the atmospheric variables on both subclimatic and climatic scales. The objective of ...

J. A. Pudykiewicz; A. P. Dastoor

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Inside Volcanic Clouds: Remote Sensing of Ash Plumes Using Microwave Weather Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical and dynamical features of volcanic tephra due to Plinian and sub-Plinian eruptions can be quantitatively monitored by using ground-based microwave weather radars. The methodological rationale and unique potential of this remote-sensing ...

Frank S. Marzano; Errico Picciotti; Mario Montopoli; Gianfranco Vulpiani

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Effects of the El Chichon Volcanic Cloud on Direct and Diffuse Solar Irradiances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct normal and diffuse solar irradiances and 500 nm aerosol optical depths measured at the University of Michigan departed far from normal on 26 October 1982, when it is concluded that the main stratospheric cloud from the El Chichon volcanic ...

C. Bruce Baker; William R. Kuhn; Edward Ryznar

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Helium and lead isotope geochemistry of oceanic volcanic rocks from the East Pacific and South Atlantic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The isotopic evolution of helium and lead in the Earth is coupled by virtue of their common radioactive parents uranium and thorium. The isotopic signatures in oceanic volcanic rocks provide constraints on the temporal ...

Graham, David W. (David William)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Direct numerical simulations of multiphase flow with applications to basaltic volcanism and planetary evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiphase flows are an essential component of natural systems: They affect the explosivity of volcanic eruptions, shape the landscape of terrestrial planets, and govern subsurface flow in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Advancing ...

Suckale, Jenny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Climate Studies with a Multilayer Energy Balance Model. Part III: Climatic Impact of Stratospheric Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative and climatic effects of stratospheric volcanic aerosols are studied with a multilayer energy balance model. The results show that the latitudinal distribution of aerosols has a significant effect on climate sensitivity. When ...

Ming-Dah Chou; Li Peng; Albert Arking

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Impact of Strong Tropical Volcanic Eruptions on ENSO Simulated in a Coupled GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of strong tropical volcanic eruptions (SVEs) on the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) and its phase dependency is investigated using a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). This paper investigates the response of ENSO to an ...

Masamichi Ohba; Hideo Shiogama; Tokuta Yokohata; Masahiro Watanabe

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Satellite Measurement of Sea Surface Temperature in the Presence of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation studies have shown that volcanic aerosols in the stratosphere, such as those produced by the eruption of El Chichn, significantly affect satellite measurements in the three AVHRR thermal window channels centered at 3.7, 11 and 12 ?m. ...

Charles Walton

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Volcanic and Solar Forcing of Climate Change during the Preindustrial Era  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The climate response to variability in volcanic aerosols and solar irradiance, the primary forcings during the preindustrial era, is examined in a stratosphere-resolving general circulation model. The best agreement with historical and proxy data ...

Drew T. Shindell; Gavin A. Schmidt; Ron L. Miller; Michael E. Mann

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Effect of Volcanic Eruptions on the Vertical Temperature Profile in Radiosonde Data and Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both observed and modeled upper-air temperature profiles show the tropospheric cooling and tropical stratospheric warming effects from the three major volcanic eruptions since 1960. Detailed comparisons of vertical profiles of Radiosonde ...

Melissa Free; John Lanzante

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Polarization Lidar and Synoptic Analyses of an Unusual Volcanic Aerosol Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over an unusually brief three-day period in early August 1989, spectacular twilight effects indicative of a stratospheric volcanic cloud were seen at Salt Lake City, Utah. Concurrent polarization lidar observations detected an aerosol layer at ...

Kenneth Sassen; John D. Horel

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Response of Summer Precipitation over Eastern China to Large Volcanic Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of the effects of large volcanic eruptions on regional climate so far have focused mostly on temperature responses. Previous studies using proxy data suggested that coherent droughts over eastern China are associated with explosive low-...

Youbing Peng; Caiming Shen; Wei-Chyung Wang; Ying Xu

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Global Relationships among the Earth's Radiation Budget, Cloudiness, Volcanic Aerosols, and Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analyses of Cess are extended to consider global relationships among the earth's radiation budget (including solar insulation and changes in optically active gass), cloudiness, solar constant, volcanic aerosols, and surface temperature. ...

Philip E. Ardanuy; H. Lee Kyle; Douglas Hoyt

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effects of the Mount St. Helens Volcanic Cloud on Turbidity at Ann Arbor, Michigan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of turbidity were made at the University of Michigan irradiance and meteorological measurement facility just prior to, during and after the passage of the volcanic cloud from the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. They were ...

Edward Ryznar; Michael R. Weber; Thomas S. Hallaron

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Melt zones beneath five volcanic complexes in California: an assessment of shallow magma occurrences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent geological and geophysical data for five magma-hydrothermal systems were studied for the purpose of developing estimates for the depth, volume and location of magma beneath each area. The areas studied were: (1) Salton Trough, (2) The Geysers-Clear Lake, (3) Long Valley caldera, (4) Coso volcanic field, and (5) Medicine Lake volcano, all located in California and all selected on the basis of recent volcanic activity and published indications of crustal melt zones. 23 figs.

Goldstein, N.E.; Flexser, S.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geologic evolution of the Jemez Mountains and their potential for future volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geophysical and geochemical data and the geologic history of the Rio Grande rift and the vicinity of the Jemez Mountains are summarized to determine the probability of future volcanic activity in the Los Alamos, New Mexico area. The apparent cyclic nature of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains may be related to intermittent thermal inputs into the volcanic system beneath the region. The Jemez lineament, an alignment of late Cenozoic volcanic centers that crosses the rift near Los Alamos, has played an important role in the volcanic evolution of the Jemez Mountains. Geophysical data suggest that there is no active shallow magma body beneath the Valles caldera, though magma probably exists at about 15 km beneath this portion of the rift. The rate of volcanism in the Jemez Mountains during the last 10 million years has been 5 x 10/sup -9//km/sup 2//y. Lava or ash flows overriding Laboratory radioactive waste disposal sites would have little potential to release radionuclides to the environment. The probability of a new volcano intruding close enough to a radioactive waste disposal site to effect radionuclide release is 2 x 10/sup -7//y.

Burton, B.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Uranium mineralization in fluorine-enriched volcanic rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several uranium and other lithophile element deposits are located within or adjacent to small middle to late Cenozoic, fluorine-rich rhyolitic dome complexes. Examples studied include Spor Mountain, Utah (Be-U-F), the Honeycomb Hills, Utah (Be-U), the Wah Wah Mountains, Utah (U-F), and the Black Range-Sierra Cuchillo, New Mexico (Sn-Be-W-F). The formation of these and similar deposits begins with the emplacement of a rhyolitic magma, enriched in lithophile metals and complexing fluorine, that rises to a shallow crustal level, where its roof zone may become further enriched in volatiles and the ore elements. During initial explosive volcanic activity, aprons of lithicrich tuffs are erupted around the vents. These early pyroclastic deposits commonly host the mineralization, due to their initial enrichment in the lithophile elements, their permeability, and the reactivity of their foreign lithic inclusions (particularly carbonate rocks). The pyroclastics are capped and preserved by thick topaz rhyolite domes and flows that can serve as a source of heat and of additional quantities of ore elements. Devitrification, vapor-phase crystallization, or fumarolic alteration may free the ore elements from the glassy matrix and place them in a form readily leached by percolating meteoric waters. Heat from the rhyolitic sheets drives such waters through the system, generally into and up the vents and out through the early tuffs. Secondary alteration zones (K-feldspar, sericite, silica, clays, fluorite, carbonate, and zeolites) and economic mineral concentrations may form in response to this low temperature (less than 200 C) circulation. After cooling, meteoric water continues to migrate through the system, modifying the distribution and concentration of the ore elements (especially uranium).

Burt, D.M.; Sheridan, M.F.; Bikun, J.; Christiansen, E.; Correa, B.; Murphy, B.; Self, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Retrieval of volcanic ash and ice cloud physical properties together with gas concentration from IASI measurements using the AVL model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observation and tracking of volcanic aerosols are important for preventing possible aviation hazards and determining the influence of aerosols on climate. The useful information primary includes the concentration

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Faulting, fracturing, and sealing in foreland thrust belts: Examples from the subalpine chains  

SciTech Connect

The hydrocarbon potential of foreland thrust belts arises from source and reservoir rocks juxtaposed by the movement of thrust sheets, promoting maturation by loading and generating structural traps. Deformation in thrust belts can be localized on fault zones or distributed throughout thrust sheets; different deformation mechanisms operate to increase and decrease permeability. Migration and reservoir properties may be enhanced or reduced by faulting and fault-related deformation. These processes are examined in detail using examples from the northwest subalpine chains of France, a fold-and-thrust belt of well-differentiated Mesozoic shales and carbonates. Seeps of bitumen in foreland basin sediments indicate some migration of hydrocarbons along faults linking probable source and reservoir areas. Detailed examination of fault rocks and thrust sheets shows that fracture formation is an important strain mechanism which has the potential to form regions of enhanced permeability in structures such as hanging wall anticlines. However, the fractures observed are in general recemented, forming with crack-seal crystal growth. The faults themselves are complex zones up to tens of meters thick of subparallel anastomosing gouge, fractures, stylolites, and crystalline calcite, indicating synchronous cataclasis and pressure solution. The range of scales of fracturing suggests stick-slip (microseismic) fault activity. Permeability of the fault zones is enhanced during seismic fault slip and is otherwise steadily decreased by pressure solution and calcite deposition. The available migration pathways, and hence the location of potential reservoirs, is controlled by the timing, mechanisms, and extent of fault activity in this common and productive tectonic regime.

Bowler, S.; Butler, R.W.H.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Formation of Kuiper-belt binaries through multiple chaotic scattering encounters with low-mass intruders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery that many trans-neptunian objects exist in pairs, or binaries, is proving invaluable for shedding light on the formation, evolution and structure of the outer Solar system. Based on recent systematic searches it has been estimated that up to 10% of Kuiper-belt objects might be binaries. However, all examples discovered to-date are unusual, as compared to near-Earth and main-belt asteroid binaries, for their mass ratios of order unity and their large, eccentric orbits. In this article we propose a common dynamical origin for these compositional and orbital properties based on four-body simulations in the Hill approximation. Our calculations suggest that binaries are produced through the following chain of events: initially, long-lived quasi-bound binaries form by two bodies getting entangled in thin layers of dynamical chaos produced by solar tides within the Hill sphere. Next, energy transfer through gravitational scattering with a low-mass intruder nudges the binary into a nearby non-chaotic, stable zone of phase space. Finally, the binary hardens (loses energy) through a series of relatively gentle gravitational scattering encounters with further intruders. This produces binary orbits that are well fitted by Kepler ellipses. Dynamically, the overall process is strongly favored if the original quasi-bound binary contains comparable masses. We propose a simplified model of chaotic scattering to explain these results. Our findings suggest that the observed preference for roughly equal mass ratio binaries is probably a real effect; that is, it is not primarily due to an observational bias for widely separated, comparably bright objects. Nevertheless, we predict that a sizeable population of very unequal mass Kuiper-belt binaries is likely awaiting discovery.

Sergey A. Astakhov; Ernestine A. Lee; David Farrelly

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

191

Passenger vehicle tire rolling resistance can be predicted from a flat-belt test rig  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rolling resistance of fifteen different types of tire was determined on-road by coastdown tests, using several vehicles variously fitted with 14 and 15 inch wheels. Corrections for tire pressure, and for external temperature, were deduced by data regression. The rolling resistance of the same tires was measured on a flat-belt tire test machine, and correction for tire pressure was determined in a like manner. In this paper, the results, in terms of the characteristic rolling resistance, are compared between rig and road. The various test procedures are discussed.

Ivens, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A single sub-km Kuiper Belt object from a stellar Occultation in archival data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kuiper belt is a remnant of the primordial Solar System. Measurements of its size distribution constrain its accretion and collisional history, and the importance of material strength of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs). Small, sub-km sized, KBOs elude direct detection, but the signature of their occultations of background stars should be detectable. Observations at both optical and X-ray wavelengths claim to have detected such occultations, but their implied KBO abundances are inconsistent with each other and far exceed theoretical expectations. Here, we report an analysis of archival data that reveals an occultation by a body with a 500 m radius at a distance of 45 AU. The probability of this event to occur due to random statistical fluctuations within our data set is about 2%. Our survey yields a surface density of KBOs with radii larger than 250 m of 2.1^{+4.8}_{-1.7} x 10^7 deg^{-2}, ruling out inferred surface densities from previous claimed detections by more than 5 sigma. The fact that we detected only ...

Schlichting, H E; Wenz, M; Sari, R; Gal-Yam, A; Livio, M; Nelan, E; Zucker, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ALICE: The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 Watt) imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to determine the relative abundances of various species in Pluto's atmosphere. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon, and it will make UV surface reflectivity measurements of all of these bodies as well. The instrument incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 angstroms spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 angstroms FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view that is 6 degrees long. Different input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane detector is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-blind opaque photocathodes (KBr and CsI) and a focal surface that matches the instrument's 15-cm diameter Rowland-circle. In what follows, we describe the instrument in greater detail, including descriptions of its ground calibration and initial in flight performance.

S. Alan Stern; David C. Slater; John Scherrer; John Stone; Greg Dirks; Maarten Versteeg; Michael Davis; G. R. Gladstone; Joel Wm. Parker; Leslie A. Young; O. H. W. Siegmund

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

ALICE: The Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph aboard the New Horizons Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons ALICE instrument is a lightweight (4.4 kg), low-power (4.4 Watt) imaging spectrograph aboard the New Horizons mission to Pluto/Charon and the Kuiper Belt. Its primary job is to determine the relative abundances of various species in Pluto's atmosphere. ALICE will also be used to search for an atmosphere around Pluto's moon, Charon, as well as the Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that New Horizons hopes to fly by after Pluto-Charon, and it will make UV surface reflectivity measurements of all of these bodies as well. The instrument incorporates an off-axis telescope feeding a Rowland-circle spectrograph with a 520-1870 angstroms spectral passband, a spectral point spread function of 3-6 angstroms FWHM, and an instantaneous spatial field-of-view that is 6 degrees long. Different input apertures that feed the telescope allow for both airglow and solar occultation observations during the mission. The focal plane detector is an imaging microchannel plate (MCP) double delay-line detector with dual solar-...

Stern, S Alan; Scherrer, John; Stone, John; Dirks, Greg; Versteeg, Maarten; Davis, Michael; Gladstone, G R; Parker, Joel Wm; Young, Leslie A; Siegmund, O H W

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western United States, I, Regional Variability And Magmatic Origin Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Helium isotope ratios in gases of thirty hot springs and geothermal wells and of five natural gas wells in the western United States show no relationship to regional conductive heat flow, but do show a correlation with magma-based thermal activity and reservoir fluid temperature (or total convective heat discharge). Gases from high-T (> 200°C) reservoirs have 3He/4He > 2 _ the atmospheric value, with high He

196

Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Rock Sampling At San Juan Volcanic Field Area (Larson & Jr, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location San Juan Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Rock Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes More than 300 samples were collected from within and adjacent to the Lake City caldera. All specimens consist of single hand samples, approximately 1 kg in size. Care was taken to avoid oxidized or weathered rocks. Twenty

197

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy In The Jemez Volcanic Field, New Mexico Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Large, young calderas possess immense geothermal potential due to the size of shallow magma bodies that underlie them. Through the example of the Valles and Toledo calderas, New Mexico, and older, more deeply eroded and exposed calderas, it is possible to reconstruct a general view of geothermal environments associated with such magmatic systems. Although a zone of anomalous heat flow extends well beyond caldera margins, high- to moderate-temperature hydrothermal systems appear to be restricted to zones

198

Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The Izu-Oshima Volcano, Central Japan Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A system is proposed for the monitoring of changes in the underground structure of an active volcano over time by applying a transient electromagnetic method. The monitoring system is named ACTIVE, which stands for Array of Controlled Transient-electromagnetics for Imaging Volcano Edifice. The system consists of a transmitter dipole used to generate a controlled transient electromagnetic (EM) field and an array of receivers used to measure the vertical component of the transient magnetic

199

Volcanic forcing improves Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model scaling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Atmosphere-Ocean Coupled General Circulation Model (AOGCM) simulations of the twentieth century climate, which account for anthropogenic and natural forcings, make it possible to study the origin of long-term temperature correlations found in the observed records. We study ensemble experiments performed with the NCAR PCM for 10 different historical scenarios, including no forcings, greenhouse gas, sulfate aerosol, ozone, solar, volcanic forcing and various combinations, such as it natural, anthropogenic and all forcings. We compare the scaling exponents characterizing the long-term correlations of the observed and simulated model data for 16 representative land stations and 16 sites in the Atlantic Ocean for these scenarios. We find that inclusion of volcanic forcing in the AOGCM considerably improves the PCM scaling behavior. The scenarios containing volcanic forcing are able to reproduce quite well the observed scaling exponents for the land with exponents around 0.65 independent of the station dista...

Vyushin, D; Havlin, S; Bunde, A; Brenner, S; Vyushin, Dmitry; Zhidkov, Igor; Havlin, Shlomo; Bunde, Armin; Brenner, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

On the generation of large amplitude spiky solitons by ultralow frequency earthquake emission in the Van Allen radiation belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The parametric coupling between earthquake emitted circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation and ponderomotively driven ion-acoustic perturbations in the Van Allen radiation belt is considered. A cubic nonlinear Schroedinger equation for the modulated radiation envelope is derived, and then solved analytically. For ultralow frequency earthquake emissions large amplitude spiky supersonic bright solitons or subsonic dark solitons are found to be generated in the Van Allen radiation belt, detection of which can be a tool for the prediction of a massive earthquake may be followed later.

Mofiz, U. A. [School of Science and Technology, Bangladesh Open University, Gazipur-1705 (Bangladesh)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Et Al., Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Magnetics Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J.

202

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Breitenmoser a,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar and volcanic fingerprints in tree-ring chronologies over the past 2000 years Petra Climate variability Tree-ring proxies DeVries solar cycle Volcanic activity Past two millennia The Sun cli- mate forcings to continuing global warming. To properly address long-term fingerprints of solar

Wehrli, Bernhard

203

INITIAL PLANETESIMAL SIZES AND THE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS  

SciTech Connect

The Kuiper Belt is a remnant from the early solar system and its size distribution contains many important constraints that can be used to test models of planet formation and collisional evolution. We show, by comparing observations with theoretical models, that the observed Kuiper Belt size distribution is well matched by coagulation models, which start with an initial planetesimal population with radii of about 1 km, and subsequent collisional evolution. We find that the observed size distribution above R {approx} 30 km is primordial, i.e., it has not been modified by collisional evolution over the age of the solar system, and that the size distribution below R {approx} 30 km has been modified by collisions and that its slope is well matched by collisional evolution models that use published strength laws. We investigate in detail the resulting size distribution of bodies ranging from 0.01 km to 30 km and find that its slope changes several times as a function of radius before approaching the expected value for an equilibrium collisional cascade of material strength dominated bodies for R {approx}< 0.1 km. Compared to a single power-law size distribution that would span the whole range from 0.01 km to 30 km, we find in general a strong deficit of bodies around R {approx} 10 km and a strong excess of bodies around 2 km in radius. This deficit and excess of bodies are caused by the planetesimal size distribution left over from the runaway growth phase, which left most of the initial mass in small planetesimals while only a small fraction of the total mass is converted into large protoplanets. This excess mass in small planetesimals leaves a permanent signature in the size distribution of small bodies that is not erased after 4.5 Gyr of collisional evolution. Observations of the small Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) size distribution can therefore test if large KBOs grew as a result of runaway growth and constrained the initial planetesimal sizes. We find that results from recent KBO occultation surveys and the observed KBO size distribution can be best matched by an initial planetesimal population that contained about equal mass per logarithmic mass bin in bodies ranging from 0.4 km to 4 km in radius. We further find that we cannot match the observed KBO size distribution if most of the planetesimal mass was contained in bodies that were 10 km in radius or larger simply because their resulting size distribution cannot be sufficiently depleted over 4.5 Gyr to match observations.

Schlichting, Hilke E. [UCLA, Department of Earth and Space Science, 595 Charles E. Young Drive East, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Fuentes, Cesar I.; Trilling, David E., E-mail: hilke@ucla.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 6010, Flagstaff, AZ 86011 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li, Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies, Colorado School of Mines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of magnetic amplitude inversion in exploration for natural gas in volcanics Yaoguo Li basins and have strong remanent magnetization. The appli- cation arises in exploration of natural gas identify the volcanic units at large depths. INTRODUCTION Exploration for natural gas hosted in volcanics

205

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part I: Climatology and potential vorticity evolution.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A global climatology of warm conveyor belts (WCBs) is presented for the years 1979-2010, based upon trajectories calculated with ERA-Interim reanalyses. WCB trajectories are identified as strongly ascending air parcels (600 hPa in 2 days) near ...

Erica Madonna; Heini Wernli; Hanna Joos; Olivia Martius

206

1Electricity from Sunlight: The RBSP Spacecraft Solar Panels NASA's twin Radiation Belts Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft will be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

satellite to the nearest hundred watts? Space Math http://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov #12;Answer Key 1 Problem 11Electricity from Sunlight: The RBSP Spacecraft Solar Panels NASA's twin Radiation Belts Storm of the 10 solar cells in square-meters? Problem 3 ­ The amount of electrical power generated by a solar

207

LANL LDRD-funded project: Test particle simulations of energetic ions in natural and artificial radiation belts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We summarize the scientific problem and work plan for the LANL LDRD-funded project to use a test particle code to study the sudden de-trapping of inner belt protons and possible cross-L transport of debris ions after a high altitude nuclear explosion (HANE). We also discuss future application of the code for other HANE-related problems.

Cowee, Misa [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Kaijun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Friedel, Reinhard H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

Dynamic Aspects of the Impact of the Use of Perfect Climate Forecasts in the Corn Belt Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general equilibrium model is linked to a decision model to determine the impact of perfect growing season forecasts for corn produced in the Corn Belt region over a 10-yr period. Five different timing scenarios are examined to determine the ...

James W. Mjelde; John B. Penson Jr.; Clair J. Nixon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

HEPPA 2011 Session 3. 3.6 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: significance to middle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEPPA 2011 Session 3. 3.6 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms, Sodankyl¨a, Finland Geomagnetic storms triggered by coronal mass ejections and high-speed solar-90 km altitudes) as a result of a single geomagnetic storm. The study condi- tions were chosen

Ulich, Thomas

210

A Pacific Moisture Conveyor Belt and Its Relationship to a Significant Precipitation Event in the Semiarid Southwestern United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the term moisture conveyor belt (MCB) is defined as an elongated band of enhanced poleward water vapor fluxes (WVFs) above the PBL that is rooted in the Tropics. This new terminology is illustrated through an exemplary detailed case ...

Peter Knippertz; Jonathan E. Martin

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

GIS-based method for the environmental vulnerability assessment to volcanic ashfall at Etna Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of environment to ashfall was evaluated aiming at defining the vulnerability in the areas surrounding Mt. Etna volcano, Sicily. The two utilized scenarios assume different thickness of ashfall, over distances comparable with those covered ... Keywords: Corine land cover, Environmental vulnerability, GIS, Volcanic risk

Silvia Rapicetta; Vittorio Zanon

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

A Daytime Complement to the Reverse Absorption Technique for Improved Automated Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated volcanic cloud detection algorithm that utilizes four spectral channels (0.65, 3.75, 11, and 12 ?m) that are common among several satellite-based instruments is presented. The new algorithm is physically based and globally applicable ...

Michael J. Pavolonis; Wayne F. Feltz; Andrew K. Heidinger; Gregory M. Gallina

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Long-Range Forecast Trajectories of Volcanic Ash from Redoubt Ash from Redoubt Volcano Eruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Redoubt Volcano in Alaska began a series of eruptions on 14 December 1989. Volcanic ash was often reported to reach heights where, as it moved with the upper-level flow, it could affect aircraft operations thousands of km from the eruption. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder; Glenn D. Rolph

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Resuspension of Relic Volcanic Ash and Dust from Katmai: Still an Aviation Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northwest winds were strong enough to continuously resuspend relic volcanic ash from the Katmai volcano cluster and the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes on 2021 September 2003. The ash cloud reached over 1600 m and extended over 230 km into the ...

David Hadley; Gary L. Hufford; James J. Simpson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Chemical evolution of a high-level magma system: the Black Mountain volcanic center, southern Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of stratigraphically controlled samples of both lavas and ash-flow tuffs from the Black Mountain volcanic center enables us to evaluate magmatic processes. The results of this study are used to: (1) determine how this high-level magma system developed; (2) compare this system with other similar systems; and (3) correlate ash-flow sheets using their chemical characteristics.

Vogel, T.A.; Noble, D.C.; Younker, L.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of volcanic eruptions on the climate of the Asian monsoon region K. J. Anchukaitis,1 B. M throughout much of monsoon Asia. Here, we use long and wellvalidated proxy reconstructions of Asian droughts on the climate of the Asian monsoon region, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L22703, doi:10.1029/ 2010GL044843. 1

Smith, Frederick

217

Comments on ``Failures in detecting volcanic ash from a satellite-based technique''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of active vol- canism (pp. 45­64). Washington, DC: American Geophysical Union. Davies, M. A., & Rose, W. I inter- national symposium on volcanic ash and aviation safety, Seattle, WA. Washington, DC: US GPO. US, causing severe restrictions to air traffic for many hours. This cloud was tracked without any split-window

Bluth, Gregg

218

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chichon volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER El Chicho´n volcano, April 4, 1982: volcanic cloud history and fine ash fallout of distal fallout samples collected soon after eruption. Although, about half of the mass of silicate from the volcano are mostly \\62 lm in diameter. The most plausible expla- nation for rapid fallout

Rose, William I.

219

GCM Simulations of Volcanic Aerosol Forcing. Part I: Climate Changes Induced by Steady-State Perturbations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used the Goddard Institute for Space Studies Climate Model II to simulate the response of the climate system to a spatially and temporally constant forcing by volcanic aerosols having an optical depth of 0.15. The climatic ...

James B. Pollack; David Rind; Andrew Lacis; James E. Hansen; Makiko Sato; Reto Ruedy

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Diffusion in the Lower Stratosphere as Determined from Lidar Measurements of Volcanic Aerosol Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lidar measurements of the stratospheric aerosol layer from the Fuego volcanic eruption in 1974 are analyzed to yield estimates of effective vertical mixing coefficients Kz. The data at 19N latitude give Kz=6.6102 cm2 s?1 for the altitude range ...

Ellis E. Remsperg

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SIMULATION OF THE ICELAND VOLCANIC ERUPTION OF APRIL 2010 USING THE ENSEMBLE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The Eyjafjallajokull volcanic eruption in Iceland in April 2010 disrupted transportation in Europe which ultimately affected travel plans for many on a global basis. The Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC) is responsible for providing guidance to the aviation industry of the transport of volcanic ash clouds. There are nine such centers located globally, and the London branch (headed by the United Kingdom Meteorological Office, or UKMet) was responsible for modeling the Iceland volcano. The guidance provided by the VAAC created some controversy due to the burdensome travel restrictions and uncertainty involved in the prediction of ash transport. The Iceland volcanic eruption provides a useful exercise of the European ENSEMBLE program, coordinated by the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy. ENSEMBLE, a decision support system for emergency response, uses transport model results from a variety of countries in an effort to better understand the uncertainty involved with a given accident scenario. Model results in the form of airborne concentration and surface deposition are required from each member of the ensemble in a prescribed format that may then be uploaded to a website for manipulation. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is the lone regular United States participant throughout the 10-year existence of ENSEMBLE. For the Iceland volcano, four separate source term estimates have been provided to ENSEMBLE participants. This paper focuses only on one of those source terms. The SRNL results in relation to other modeling agency results along with useful information obtained using an ensemble of transport results will be discussed.

Buckley, R.

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Factors Influencing Volcanic Ash Dispersal from the 1995 and 1996 Eruptions of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prediction of the dispersal of volcanic ash from events such as the Ruapehu eruptions of 1995 and 1996 is important, not only for civil-defense authorities who need to warn people in downwind areas, but for airline companies that have to ...

Richard Turner; Tony Hurst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions--What's in Yellowstone's Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam Explosions, Earthquakes, and Volcanic Eruptions-- What's in Yellowstone's Future? U. In the background, steam vigorously rises from the hot Each year, millions of visitors come to admire the hot, such as geysers. Steam and hot water carry huge quantities of thermal en- ergy to the surface from the magma cham

Fleskes, Joe

224

Fusion-based volcanic earthquake detection and timing in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volcano monitoring is of great interest to public safety and scientific explorations. However, traditional volcanic instrumentation such as broadband seismometers are expensive, power hungry, bulky, and difficult to install. Wireless sensor networks ... Keywords: Volcano monitoring, data fusion, earthquake detection, wireless sensor network

Rui Tan; Guoliang Xing; Jinzhu Chen; Wen-Zhan Song; Renjie Huang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anomalous subsidence on the rifted volcanic margin of Pakistan: No influence from Deccan plume, Clifton, Karachi 75600, Pakistan A B S T R A C TA R T I C L E I N F O Article history: Received 28 October

Clift, Peter

226

The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other young stars in the IR/optically visible cluster, and embedded protostars. Other luminous protostars are also identified by temperature rises at the 17" resolution of the ratio maps (0.02 pc assuming a distance of 250 pc for Perseus). The extensive heating raises the possibility that the radiative feedback may lead to increased masses for the next generation of stars.

Hatchell, J; Drabek, E; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D; Di Francesco, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Reuter, Dennis C; Scherrer, John; Jennings, Donald E; Baer, James; Hanley, John; Hardaway, Lisa; Lunsford, Allen; McMuldroch, Stuart; Moore, Jeffrey; Olkin, Cathy; Parizek, Robert; Reitsma, Harold; Sabatke, Derek; Spencer, John; Stone, John; Throop, Henry; Van Cleve, Jeffrey; Weigle, Gerald E; Young, Leslie A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ralph: A Visible/Infrared Imager for the New Horizons Pluto/Kuiper Belt Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The New Horizons instrument named Ralph is a visible/near infrared multi-spectral imager and a short wavelength infrared spectral imager. It is one of the core instruments on New Horizons, NASA's first mission to the Pluto/Charon system and the Kuiper Belt. Ralph combines panchromatic and color imaging capabilities with IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary purpose is to map the surface geology and composition of these objects, but it will also be used for atmospheric studies and to map the surface temperature. It is a compact, low-mass (10.5 kg), power efficient (7.1 W peak), and robust instrument with good sensitivity and excellent imaging characteristics. Other than a door opened once in flight, it has no moving parts. These characteristics and its high degree of redundancy make Ralph ideally suited to this long-duration flyby reconnaissance mission.

Dennis C. Reuter; S. Alan Stern; John Scherrer; Donald E. Jennings; James Baer; John Hanley; Lisa Hardaway; Allen Lunsford; Stuart McMuldroch; Jeffrey Moore; Cathy Olkin; Robert Parizek; Harold Reitsma; Derek Sabatke; John Spencer; John Stone; Henry Throop; Jeffrey Van Cleve; Gerald E. Weigle; Leslie A. Young

2007-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by EMIC waves, observed from ground and space  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show evidence that left-hand polarised electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) plasma waves can cause the loss of relativistic electrons into the atmosphere. Our unique set of ground and satellite observations shows coincident precipitation of ions with energies of tens of keY and of relativistic electrons into an isolated proton aurora. The coincident precipitation was produced by wave-particle interactions with EMIC waves near the plasmapause. The estimation of pitch angle diffusion coefficients supports that the observed EMIC waves caused coincident precipitation ofboth ions and relativistic electrons. This study clarifies that ions with energies of tens of ke V affect the evolution of relativistic electrons in the radiation belts via cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves, an effect that was first theoretically predicted in the early 1970's.

Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyoski, Y [NAGOYA UNIV; Sakaguchi, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Shiokawa, K [NAGOYA UNIV; Evans, D S [NOAA, BOULDER; Albert, Jay [AFRL; Connors, M [UNIV OF ATHABASCA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Non-diffusive resonant acceleration of electrons in the radiation belts  

SciTech Connect

We describe a mechanism of resonant electron acceleration by oblique high-amplitude whistler waves under conditions typical for the Earth radiation belts. We use statistics of spacecraft observations of whistlers in the Earth radiation belts to obtain the dependence of the angle {theta} between the wave-normal and the background magnetic field on magnetic latitude {lambda}. According to this statistics, the angle {theta} already approaches the resonance cone at {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign and remains close to it up to {lambda}{approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign on the dayside. The parallel component of the electrostatic field of whistler waves often increases around {lambda}{approx}15 Degree-Sign up to one hundred of mV/m. We show that due to this increase of the electric field, the whistler waves can trap electrons into the potential well via wave particle resonant interaction corresponding to Landau resonance. Trapped electrons then move with the wave to higher latitudes where they escape from the resonance. Strong acceleration is favored by adiabatic invariance along the increasing magnetic field, which continuously transfers the parallel energy gained to perpendicular energy, allowing resonance to be reached and maintained. The concomitant increase of the wave phase velocity allows for even stronger relative acceleration at low energy <50keV. Each trapping-escape event of electrons of {approx}10keV to 100 keV results in an energy gain of up to 100 keV in the inhomogeneous magnetic field of the Earth dipole. For electrons with initial energy below 100 keV, such rapid acceleration should hasten their drop into the loss-cone and their precipitation into the atmosphere. We discuss the role of the considered mechanism in the eventual formation of a trapped distribution of relativistic electrons for initial energies larger than 100 keV and in microbursts precipitations of lower energy particles.

Artemyev, A. V.; Krasnoselskikh, V. V.; Agapitov, O. V. [LPC2E/CNRS, University of Orleans, Orleans (France); Mourenas, D. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Rolland, G. [CNES, Toulouse (France)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Volcanic Eruptions, Large-Scale Modes in the Northern Hemisphere, and the El NioSouthern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author analyzes the impact of 13 major stratospheric aerosol producing volcanic eruptions since 1870 on the large-scale variability modes of sea level pressure in the Northern Hemisphere winter. The paper focuses on the Arctic Oscillation (AO)...

Bo Christiansen

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Airborne Asian dust: case study of long-range transport and implications for the detection of volcanic ash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a) 11- ? m image of the Aleutians and (b) corresponding T 4are for TOMS data over the Aleutian Islands (Figs. 9c,d). Ae.g. , the Kuril/Kamchatka/Aleutian volcanic chains, the

Simpson, James J; Hufford, G L; Servranckx, R; Berg, J; Pieri, D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part I: Most Important Bands and Implications for Future GOES Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are analyzed for volcanic ash signals using principal component image analysis. Target volcanoes included Popocatepetl volcano near Mexico ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Implementation and validation of a meteorological dispersion model applied on volcanic gas emission for studies of environmental impact.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model FLEXPART-WRF was implemented to model dispersion of volcanic gas emitted from the three volcanoes Popocatpetl in Mexico (lat: 19.02, lon: (more)

Landgren, Oskar A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

The 56 December 1991 FIRE IFO II Jet Stream Cirrus Case Study: Possible Influences of Volcanic Aerosols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In presenting an overview of the cirrus clouds comprehensively studied by ground-based and airborne sensors from Coffeyville, Kansas, during the 56 December 1992 Project FIRE IFO II case study period, evidence is provided that volcanic aerosols ...

Kenneth Sassen; David O'C. Starr; Gerald G. Mace; Michael R. Poellot; S.H. Melfi; Wynn L. Eberhard; James D. Spinhirne; E.W. Eloranta; Donald E. Hagen; John Hallett

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS OF THE PEACE-ATHABASCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STRATIGRAPHY OF COUNTER-POINT-BAR AND EDDY-ACCRETION DEPOSITS IN LOW-ENERGY MEANDER BELTS-7th Ave. SW, Nexen Inc., Calgary, AB, T2P 3P7, Canada ABSTRACT: Previously termed concave bank

238

Warm conveyor belts in the ERA-Interim data set (1979-2010). Part II: Moisture origin and relevance for precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of moisture for extratropical atmospheric dynamics is particularly pronounced within warm conveyor belts (WCBs), which are characterized by intense latent heat release and precipitation formation. Based on the WCB climatology for the ...

Stephan Pfahl; Erica Madonna; Maxi Boettcher; Hanna Joos; Heini Wernli

239

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part I: Composite Synoptic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt, the 1999 and 2000 summer seasons (15 June15 September) expressed contrasting spatial patterns and magnitudes of precipitation (1999: dry; 2000: normal to moist). Distinct from the numerical modeling approach often ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David L. Arnold; David J. Travis; Steve Curran; Jimmy O. Adegoke

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake Crater, Aso Volcano, As Inferred From Magnetotelluric Surveys Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 1st crater of Naka-dake, Aso volcano, is one of the most active craters in Japan, and known to have a characteristic cycle of activity that consists of the formation of a crater lake, drying-up of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Ground Gravity Survey At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Ground Gravity Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

242

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4) 4) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location San Francisco Volcanic Field Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Northern Arizona University has re-assessed the existing exploration data, geologically mapped the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling targets and sites. Further work may occur in 2004 or 2005. References N. R. Warpinski, A. R. Sattler, R. Fortuna, D. A. Sanchez, J. Nathwani (2004) Geothermal Resource Exploration And Definition Projects

243

Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Surface Mercury Geochemistry As A Guide To Volcanic Vent Structure And Zones Of High Heat Flow In The Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, Alaska Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A reconnaissance survey of Hg° was designed to model the 1912 Novarupta vent structure and delineate zones of near-surface high heat

244

Acoustic waves in the atmosphere and ground generated by volcanic activity  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports an interesting sequence of harmonic tremor observed in the 2011 eruption of Shinmoe-dake volcano, southern Japan. The main eruptive activity started with ashcloud forming explosive eruptions, followed by lava effusion. Harmonic tremor was transmitted into the ground and observed as seismic waves at the last stage of the effusive eruption. The tremor observed at this stage had unclear and fluctuating harmonic modes. In the atmosphere, on the other hand, many impulsive acoustic waves indicating small surface explosions were observed. When the effusion stopped and the erupted lava began explosive degassing, harmonic tremor started to be transmitted also to the atmosphere and observed as acoustic waves. Then the harmonic modes became clearer and more stable. This sequence of harmonic tremor is interpreted as a process in which volcanic degassing generates an open connection between the volcanic conduit and the atmosphere. In order to test this hypothesis, a laboratory experiment was performed and the essential features were successfully reproduced.

Ichihara, Mie; Lyons, John; Oikawa, Jun; Takeo, Minoru [Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Instituto Geofisico, Escuela Politecnica Nacional, Ladron de Guevara E11-253, Aptdo 2759, Quito (Ecuador); Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geologic and geophysical investigations of the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A positive, northeast-trending gravity anomaly, 90 km long and 30 km wide, extends southwest from the Zuni uplift, New Mexico. The Zuni-Bandera volcanic field, an alignment of 74 basaltic vents, is parallel to the eastern edge of the anomaly. Lavas display a bimodal distribution of tholeiitic and alkalic compositions, and were erupted over a period from 4 Myr to present. A residual gravity profile taken perpendicular to the major axis of the anomaly was analyzed using linear programming and ideal body theory to obtain bounds on the density contrast, depth, and minimum thickness of the gravity body. Two-dimensionality was assumed. The limiting case where the anomalous body reaches the surface gives 0.1 g/cm/sup 3/ as the greatest lower bound on the maximum density contrast. If 0.4 g/cm/sup 3/ is taken as the geologically reasonable upper limit on the maximum density contrast, the least upper bound on the depth of burial is 3.5 km and minimum thickness is 2 km. A shallow mafic intrusion, emplaced sometime before Laramide deformation, is proposed to account for the positive gravity anomaly. Analysis of a magnetotelluric survey suggests that the intrusion is not due to recent basaltic magma associated with the Zuni-Bandera volcanic field. This large basement structure has controlled the development of the volcanic field; vent orientations have changed somewhat through time, but the trend of the volcanic chain followed the edge of the basement structure. It has also exhibited some control on deformation of the sedimentary section.

Ander, M.E.; Heiken, G.; Eichelberger, J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Huestis, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Lathrop Wells volcanic center: Status of field and geochronology studies  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to describe the status of field and geochronology studies of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Our perspective is that it is critical to assess all possible methods for obtaining cross-checking data to resolve chronology and field problems. It is equally important to consider application of the range of chronology methods available in Quaternary geologic research. Such an approach seeks to increase the confidence in data interpretations through obtaining convergence among separate isotopic, radiogenic, and age-correlated methods. Finally, the assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses of each dating method need to be carefully described to facilitate an impartial evaluation of results. The paper is divided into two parts. The first part describes the status of continuing field studies for the volcanic center for this area south of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The second part presents an overview of the preliminary results of ongoing chronology studies and their constraints on the age and stratigraphy of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Along with the chronology data, the assumptions, strengths, and limitations of each methods are discussed.

Crowe, B.; Morley, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Wells, S. [California Univ., Riverside, CA (United States); Geissman, J.; McDonald, E.; McFadden, L.; Perry, F. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Murrell, M.; Poths, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Forman, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparative analysis of core drilling and rotary drilling in volcanic terrane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initially, the goal of this report is to compare and contrast penetration rates of rotary-mud drilling and core drilling in young volcanic terranes. It is widely recognized that areas containing an abundance of recent volcanic rocks are excellent targets for geothermal resources. Exploration programs depend heavily upon reliable subsurface information, because surface geophysical methods may be ineffective, inconclusive, or both. Past exploration drilling programs have mainly relied upon rotary-mud rigs for virtually all drilling activity. Core-drilling became popular several years ago, because it could deal effectively with two major problems encountered in young volcanic terranes: very hard, abrasive rock and extreme difficulty in controlling loss of circulation. In addition to overcoming these difficulties, core-drilling produced subsurface samples (core) that defined lithostratigraphy, structure and fractures far better than drill-chips. It seemed that the only negative aspect of core drilling was cost. The cost-per-foot may be two to three times higher than an ''initial quote'' for rotary drilling. In addition, penetration rates for comparable rock-types are often much lower for coring operations. This report also seeks to identify the extent of wireline core drilling (core-drilling using wireline retrieval) as a geothermal exploration tool. 25 refs., 21 figs., 13 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Trexler, D.T.; Wallace, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

HIGH-ALBEDO C-COMPLEX ASTEROIDS IN THE OUTER MAIN BELT: THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect

Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1-2.5 {mu}m) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos {>=}0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 {mu}m) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight {<=}2%. Asteroids (723) Hammonia and (936) Kunigunde are featureless and have (60%-95%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes that might explain the high albedos. Asteroid (1276) Ucclia also shows a featureless reflection spectrum with (50%-60%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes. Asteroid (1576) Fabiola shows a possible weak, broad absorption band (1.5-2.1 {mu}m). The feature can be reproduced by (80%) amorphous Mg pyroxenes or orthopyroxene (crystalline silicate), either of which is likely to cause its high albedo. We discuss the origin of high-albedo components in primitive asteroids.

Kasuga, Toshihiro [Public Relations Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara 252-5210 (Japan); Ootsubo, Takafumi [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Kuroda, Daisuke, E-mail: toshi.kasuga@nao.ac.jp [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Twin-belt continuous caster with containment and cooling of the exiting cast product for enabling high-speed casting of molten-center product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In continuously casting molten metal into cast product by a twin-belt machine, it is desirable to achieve dramatic increases in speed (linear feet per minute) at which cast product exits the machine, particularly in installations where steel cast product is intended to feed a downstream regular rolling mill (as distinct from a planetary mill) operating in tandem with the twin-belt caster. Such high-speed casting produces product with a relatively thin shell and molten interior, and the shell tends to bulge outwardly due to metallostatic head pressure of the molten center. A number of cooperative features enable high-speed, twin-belt casting: (1) Each casting belt is slidably supported adjacent to the caster exit pulley for bulge control and enhanced cooling of cast product. (2) Lateral skew steering of each belt provides an effective increase in moving mold length plus a continuity of heat transfer not obtained with prior art belt steering apparatus. (3) The exiting slab is contained and supported downstream from the casting machine to prevent bulging of the shell of the cast product, and (4) spray cooling is incorporated in the exit containment apparatus for secondary cooling of cast product.

Dykes, Charles D. (303 Shore Rd., Milton, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (303 Shore Rd., Pittsburgh, PA); Wood, J. F. Barry (303 Shore Rd., Burlington, VT 05401)

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

ON A POSSIBLE SIZE/COLOR RELATIONSHIP IN THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

Color measurements and albedo distributions introduce non-intuitive observational biases in size-color relationships among Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) that cannot be disentangled without a well characterized sample population with systematic photometry. Peixinho et al. report that the form of the KBO color distribution varies with absolute magnitude, H. However, Tegler et al. find that KBO color distributions are a property of object classification. We construct synthetic models of observed KBO colors based on two B-R color distribution scenarios: color distribution dependent on H magnitude (H-Model) and color distribution based on object classification (Class-Model). These synthetic B-R color distributions were modified to account for observational flux biases. We compare our synthetic B-R distributions to the observed ''Hot'' and ''Cold'' detected objects from the Canada-France Ecliptic Plane Survey and the Meudon Multicolor Survey. For both surveys, the Hot population color distribution rejects the H-Model, but is well described by the Class-Model. The Cold objects reject the H-Model, but the Class-Model (while not statistically rejected) also does not provide a compelling match for data. Although we formally reject models where the structure of the color distribution is a strong function of H magnitude, we also do not find that a simple dependence of color distribution on orbit classification is sufficient to describe the color distribution of classical KBOs.

Pike, R. E.; Kavelaars, J. J., E-mail: repike@uvic.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detecting heat from minor planets in the outer solar system is challenging, yet it is the most efficient means for constraining the albedos and sizes of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) and their progeny, the Centaur objects. These physical parameters are critical, e.g., for interpreting spectroscopic data, deriving densities from the masses of binary systems, and predicting occultation tracks. Here we summarize Spitzer Space Telescope observations of 47 KBOs and Centaurs at wavelengths near 24 and 70 microns. We interpret the measurements using a variation of the Standard Thermal Model (STM) to derive the physical properties (albedo and diameter) of the targets. We also summarize the results of other efforts to measure the albedos and sizes of KBOs and Centaurs. The three or four largest KBOs appear to constitute a distinct class in terms of their albedos. From our Spitzer results, we find that the geometric albedo of KBOs and Centaurs is correlated with perihelion distance (darker objects having smaller perihelia), and that the albedos of KBOs (but not Centaurs) are correlated with size (larger KBOs having higher albedos). We also find hints that albedo may be correlated with with visible color (for Centaurs). Interestingly, if the color correlation is real, redder Centaurs appear to have higher albedos. Finally, we briefly discuss the prospects for future thermal observations of these primitive outer solar system objects.

John Stansberry; Will Grundy; Mike Brown; Dale Cruikshank; John Spencer; David Trilling; Jean-Luc Margot

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

The JCMT Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: a first look at Taurus with HARP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of a JCMT Legacy Survey of star formation in the Gould Belt, we present early science results for Taurus. CO J=3-2 maps have been secured along the north-west ridge and bowl, collectively known as L 1495, along with deep 13CO and C18O J=3-2 maps in two sub-regions. With these data we search for molecular outflows, and use the distribution of flows, HH objects and shocked H2 line emission features, together with the population of young stars, protostellar cores and starless condensations to map star formation across this extensive region. In total 21 outflows are identified. It is clear that the bowl is more evolved than the ridge, harbouring a greater population of T Tauri stars and a more diffuse, more turbulent ambient medium. By comparison, the ridge contains a much younger, less widely distributed population of protostars which, in turn, is associated with a greater number of molecular outflows. We estimate the ratio of the numbers of prestellar to protostellar cores in L 1495 to be ~ 1.3-2.3, and...

Davis, C J; Hatchell, J; Wouterloot, J G A; Buckle, J V; Nutter, D; Fich, M; Brunt, C; Butner, H; Cavanagh, B; Curtis, E I; Duarte-Cabral, A; Di Francesco, J; Etxaluze, M; Friberg, P; Friesen, R; Fuller, G A; Graves, S; Greaves, J S; Hogerheijde, M R; Johnstone, D; Matthews, B; Matthews, H; Rawlings, J M C; Richer, J S; Roberts, J; Sadavoy, S; Simpson, R J; Tothill, N; Tsamis, Y; Viti, S; Ward-Thompson, D; White, Glenn J; Yates, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. The authors have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study they identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. They find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, the authors have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. They attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

Datlowe, D.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Predicting methane accumulations generated from humic Carboniferous coals in the Donbas fold belt (Ukraine)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The numerical modeling of the Ukrainian part of the Donbas fold belt indicates that the coalification pattern was controlled mainly by the maximum burial depth of coal seams and the heat flow (HF) (40-75 mW/m{sup 2}) during the Permian. The coalification pattern was overprinted by magmatic events during the Late Permian in the south syncline (150 mW/m{sup 2}) and during the Permian-Triassic in the north of the Krasnoarmeisk region (120 mW/m{sup 2}). The coalification pattern shows a strong increase in vitrinite reflectance values toward the east and southeastern parts of the study area likely caused by (1) an eastward increase in burial depth, (2) a probable eastward increase in HF, and, (3) probable magmatic activity. An increase in total erosion toward the eastern and southeastern parts was also observed with a maximum erosional amount of approximately 8 km (5 mi) in the southeastern part of the study area. The basin modeling of this area predicts that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred during the Carboniferous-Early Permian subsidence. The magmatic events that occurred during the Permian-Triassic caused renewed pulses of hydrocarbon generation. A large amount of the generated hydrocarbons was lost to the surface because of a lack of seals. However, the numerical simulation predicts accumulations of about 2 tcf (57 billion m{sup 3}) of methane generated from Carboniferous coals in the south and main synclines, where Lower Permian seal rocks are preserved. Finally, this study provides data on methane resources along the northern flank

Alsaab, D.; Elie, M.; Izart, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Privalov, V.A. [Paradigm Co., Nancy (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for Sengan region in Japan using multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories, under contract to Nuclear Waste Management Organization of Japan (NUMO), is performing research on regional classification of given sites in Japan with respect to potential volcanic disruption using multivariate statistics and geo-statistical interpolation techniques. This report provides results obtained for hierarchical probabilistic regionalization of volcanism for the Sengan region in Japan by applying multivariate statistical techniques and geostatistical interpolation techniques on the geologic data provided by NUMO. A workshop report produced in September 2003 by Sandia National Laboratories (Arnold et al., 2003) on volcanism lists a set of most important geologic variables as well as some secondary information related to volcanism. Geologic data extracted for the Sengan region in Japan from the data provided by NUMO revealed that data are not available at the same locations for all the important geologic variables. In other words, the geologic variable vectors were found to be incomplete spatially. However, it is necessary to have complete geologic variable vectors to perform multivariate statistical analyses. As a first step towards constructing complete geologic variable vectors, the Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) zone 54 projected coordinate system and a 1 km square regular grid system were selected. The data available for each geologic variable on a geographic coordinate system were transferred to the aforementioned grid system. Also the recorded data on volcanic activity for Sengan region were produced on the same grid system. Each geologic variable map was compared with the recorded volcanic activity map to determine the geologic variables that are most important for volcanism. In the regionalized classification procedure, this step is known as the variable selection step. The following variables were determined as most important for volcanism: geothermal gradient, groundwater temperature, heat discharge, groundwater pH value, presence of volcanic rocks and presence of hydrothermal alteration. Data available for each of these important geologic variables were used to perform directional variogram modeling and kriging to estimate values for each variable at 23949 centers of the chosen 1 km cell grid system that represents the Sengan region. These values formed complete geologic variable vectors at each of the 23,949 one km cell centers.

Park, Jinyong (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Balasingham, P. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); McKenna, Sean Andrew; Kulatilake, Pinnaduwa H. S. W. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

State-of-the-art for evaluating the potential impact of tectonism and volcanism on a radioactive waste repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most estimates of the time required for safe isolation of radioactive wastes from the biosphere range from 100,000 to 1,000,000 years. For such long time spans, it is necessary to assess the potential effects of geologic processes such as volcanism and tectonic activity on the integrity of geologic repositories. Predictions of geologic phenomena can be based on probabilistic models, which assume a random distribution of events. The necessary historic and geologic records are rarely available to provide an adequate data base for such predictions. The observed distribution of volcanic and tectonic activity is not random, and appears to be controlled by extremely complex deterministic processes. The advent of global plate tectonic theory in the past two decades has been a giant step toward understanding these processes. At each potential repository site, volcanic and tectonic processes should be evaluated to provide the most thorough possible understanding of those deterministic processes. Based on this knowledge, judgements will have to be made as to whether or not the volcanic and tectonic processes pose unacceptable risk to the integrity of the repository. This report describes the potential hazards associated with volcanism and tectonism, and the means for evaluating these processes.

Not Available

1980-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

257

TECTONIC VERSUS VOLCANIC ORIGIN OF THE SUMMIT DEPRESSION AT MEDICINE LAKE VOLCANO, CALIFORNIA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Tectonic versus volcanic origin of the summit depression at Medicine Lake Volcano, California  

SciTech Connect

Medicine Lake Volcano is a Quaternary shield volcano located in a tectonically complex and active zone at the transition between the Basin and Range Province and the Cascade Range of the Pacific Province. The volcano is topped by a 7x12 km elliptical depression surrounded by a discontinuous constructional ring of basaltic to rhyolitic lava flows. This thesis explores the possibility that the depression may have formed due to regional extension (rift basin) or dextral shear (pull-apart basin) rather than through caldera collapse and examines the relationship between regional tectonics and localized volcanism. Existing data consisting of temperature and magnetotelluric surveys, alteration mineral studies, and core logging were compiled and supplemented with additional core logging, field observations, and fault striae studies in paleomagnetically oriented core samples. These results were then synthesized with regional fault data from existing maps and databases. Faulting patterns near the caldera, extension directions derived from fault striae P and T axes, and three-dimensional temperature and alteration mineral models are consistent with slip across arcuate ring faults related to magma chamber deflation during flank eruptions and/or a pyroclastic eruption at about 180 ka. These results are not consistent with a rift or pull-apart basin. Limited subsidence can be attributed to the relatively small volume of ash-flow tuff released by the only known major pyroclastic eruption and is inconsistent with the observed topographic relief. The additional relief can be explained by constructional volcanism. Striae from unoriented and oriented core, augmented by striae measurements in outcrop suggest that Walker Lane dextral shear, which can be reasonably projected from the southeast, has probably propagated into the Medicine Lake area. Most volcanic vents across Medicine Lake Volcano strike north-south, suggesting they are controlled by crustal weakness related to Basin and Range extension. Interaction of dextral shear, Basin and Range extension, and the zone of crustal weakness expressed as the Mount Shasta-Medicine Lake volcanic highland controlled the location and initiation of Medicine Lake Volcano at about 500 ka.

Mark Leon Gwynn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Paleomagnetism of the Quaternary Cerro Prieto, Crater Elegante, and Salton Buttes volcanic domes in the northern part of the Gulf of California rhombochasm  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deviating thermomagnetic directions in volcanics representing the second and fifth or sixth pulse of volcanism suggest that the Cerro Prieto volcano originated about 110,000 years B.P. and continued to be active intermittently until about 10,000 years ago.

de Boer, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pattern recognition of volcanic tremor data on Mt. Etna (Italy) with KKAnalysis-A software program for unsupervised classification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous seismic monitoring plays a key role in the surveillance of the Mt. Etna volcano. Besides earthquakes, which often herald eruptive episodes, the persistent background signal, known as volcanic tremor, provides important information on the volcano ... Keywords: Cluster analysis, Fuzzy C-means, K-means, Self-organizing map, Volcano monitoring, Volcano seismology

A. Messina; H. Langer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Reproducing MEES Is Strictly Prohibited MEES 47:11 15 March 2004 The Value Of Extra-Heavy Crude Oil From The Orinoco Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be recoverable. (This figure, to give us an idea of its magnitude, is equal to the proven crude oil reserves, with the exception of a few deposits in the Machete area, the type of crude found in the Orinoco Oil Belt is mobile essentially contains extra-heavy crude: crude oil of less than 10º API (in other words crude that is heavier

O'Donnell, Tom

264

Evaluation of a Process-Based Agro-Ecosystem Model (Agro-IBIS) across the U.S. Corn Belt: Simulations of the Interannual Variability in Maize Yield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model, Agro-IBIS, was used to simulate maize yield in a 13-state region of the U.S. Corn Belt from 1958 to 1994 across a 0.5 terrestrial grid. For validation, county-level census [U.S. Department of ...

Christopher J. Kucharik

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of Surface Temperature and Emissivity Derived from ASTER Data: A Case Study Using Ground-Based Measurements at a Volcanic Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface temperature (LST) and emissivity (LSE) derived from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data were evaluated in a low spectral contrast volcanic site at an altitude of 2000 m on the island of ...

frica Barreto; Manuel Arbelo; Pedro A. Hernndez-Leal; Laia Nez-Casillas; Mara Mira; Csar Coll

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 Myr old in Arizona, New Mexico and the Trans-Pecos Area of West Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Pecos area of west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978).

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Origin of High-Enthalpy Geothermal of Non-Volcanic Environment---As a Case Study of Yangbajing Geothermal Field at Qinghai-Tibet Plateau  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among global high-enthalpy geothermal resources, geothermal fields within Tibet are located in non-volcanic environment only. Results of the PTt(pressure-temperature-time) trajectory calculation of the Plateau uplifting gave a comparatively satisfactory ...

Jin Shenghai; Yao Zujin; Yin Miying

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stratigraphy, petrology, and geochemistry of the Spurr Volcanic Complex, eastern Aleutian Arc, Alaska. [(Appendix for geothermal fluid chemistry)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Spurr Volcanic Complex (SVC) is a calcalkaline, medium-K, sequence of andesites erupted over the last quarter of a million years by the easternmost currently active volcanic center in the Aleutian Arc. The ancestral Mt. Spurr was built mostly of andesites of uniform composition (58 to 60% SiO/sub 2/), although andesite production was episodically interrupted by the introduction of new batches of more mafic magma. Near the end of the Pleistocene the ancestral Mt. Spurr underwent Bezyianny-type avalanche caldera formation, resulting in the production of a volcanic debris avalanche with overlying ashflows. Immediately afterward, a large dome (the present Mt. Spurr) was emplaced in the caldera. Both the ashflows and dome are made of acid andesite more silicic than any analyzed lavas from the ancestral Mt. Spurr (60 to 63% SiO/sub 2/), yet contain olivine and amphibole xenocrysts derived from more mafic magma. The mafic magma (53 to 57% SiO/sub 2/) erupted during and after dome emplacement, forming proto-Crater Peak and Crater Peak. Hybrid pyroclastic flows and lavas were also produced. Proto-Crater Peak underwent glacial dissection prior to the formation of Crater Peak in approximately the same location. Appendices II through VIII contain a summary of mineral compositions; Appendix I contains geochemical data. Appendix IX by R.J. Motyka and C.J. Nye describes the chemistry of geothermal fluids. 78 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Nye, C.J.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Analysis of fractures in volcanic cores from Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County, southern Nevada, was the location of 828 announced underground nuclear tests, conducted between 1951 and 1992. Approximately one-third of these tests were detonated near or below the water table. An unavoidable consequence of these testing activities was introducing radionuclides into the subsurface environment, impacting groundwater. Groundwater flows beneath the NTS almost exclusively through interconnected natural fractures in carbonate and volcanic rocks. Information about these fractures is necessary to determine hydrologic parameters for future Corrective Action Unit (CAU)-specific flow and transport models which will be used to support risk assessment calculations for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Underground Test Area (UGTA) remedial investigation. Fracture data are critical in reducing the uncertainty of the predictive capabilities of CAU-specific models because of their usefulness in generating hydraulic conductivity values and dispersion characteristics used in transport modeling. Specifically, fracture aperture and density (spacing) are needed to calculate the permeability anisotropy of the formations. Fracture mineralogy information is used qualitatively to evaluate diffusion and radionuclide retardation potential in transport modeling. All these data can best be collected through examination of core samples.

Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Prothro, L.B.; Roberson, K.E. [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Data report: resource ratings of the RARE II tracts in the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah and the central Appalachian thrust belts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The assessment forms contained in this report constitute the data used in two resource assessments described in A Systematic Method for Resource Rating with Two Applications to Potential Wilderness Areas (Voelker et al. 1979). The assessments were performed for two geologic subprovinces containing proposed wilderness areas identified in the Forest Service Roadless Area Review and Evaluation (RARE II) program. The subprovinces studied are the Idaho-Wyoming-Utah thrust belt and the central Appalachians thrust belt. Each assessment form contains location data, resource ratings, and supporting information for a single tract. A unique dual rating that reflects geologic favorability and certainty of resource occurrence is assigned to each resource category evaluated. Individual ratings are synthesized into an overall tract-importance rating. Ratings created by others are included for comparative purposes wherever available. Supporting information consists of commentary and references that explain and document the ratings listed.

Voelker, A.H.; Wedow, H.; Oakes, E.; Scheffler, P.K.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

THE TAOS PROJECT: UPPER BOUNDS ON THE POPULATION OF SMALL KUIPER BELT OBJECTS AND TESTS OF MODELS OF FORMATION AND EVOLUTION OF THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have analyzed the first 3.75 years of data from the Taiwanese American Occultation Survey (TAOS). TAOS monitors bright stars to search for occultations by Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs). This data set comprises 5 x 10{sup 5} star hours of multi-telescope photometric data taken at 4 or 5 Hz. No events consistent with KBO occultations were found in this data set. We compute the number of events expected for the Kuiper Belt formation and evolution models of Pan and Sari, Kenyon and Bromley, Benavidez and Campo Bagatin, and Fraser. A comparison with the upper limits we derive from our data constrains the parameter space of these models. This is the first detailed comparison of models of the KBO size distribution with data from an occultation survey. Our results suggest that the KBO population is composed of objects with low internal strength and that planetary migration played a role in the shaping of the size distribution.

Bianco, F. B. [Department of Physics, University of California Santa Barbara, Mail Code 9530, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-9530 (United States); Zhang, Z.-W.; King, S.-K.; Wang, J.-H.; Lee, T.; Lin, H.-C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lehner, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Mondal, S. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 129 (India); Giammarco, J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Eastern University, 1300 Eagle Road, Saint Davids, PA 19087 (United States); Holman, M. J.; Alcock, C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Coehlo, N. K. [Department of Statistics, University of California-Berkeley, 367 Evans Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Axelrod, T. [Steward Observatory, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Room N204, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Byun, Y.-I.; Kim, D.-W. [Department of Astronomy, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chen, W. P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, 300 Jhongda Road, Jhongli 32054, Taiwan (China); Cook, K. H. [Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Dave, R. [Initiative in Innovative Computing at Harvard, 60 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pater, I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California-Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lissauer, J. J. [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)], E-mail: fbianco@lcogt.net (and others)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

A Search for Occultations of Bright Stars by Small Kuiper Belt Objects using Megacam on the MMT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conducted a search for occultations of bright stars by Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) to estimate the density of sub-km KBOs in the sky. We report here the first results of this occultation survey of the outer solar system conducted in June 2007 and June/July 2008 at the MMT Observatory using Megacam, the large MMT optical imager. We used Megacam in a novel shutterless continuous--readout mode to achieve high precision photometry at 200 Hz. We present an analysis of 220 star hours at signal-to-noise ratio of 25 or greater. The survey efficiency is greater than 10% for occultations by KBOs of diameter d>=0.7 km, and we report no detections in our dataset. We set a new 95% confidence level upper limit for the surface density \\Sigma_N(d) of KBOs larger than 1 km: \\Sigma_N(d>=1 km) = 0.7 km) <= 4.8e8 deg^-2.

Bianco, Federica B; McLeod, Brian A; Alcock, Charles R; Holman, Matthew J; Lehner, Matthew J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF WISE/NEOWISE 3-BAND CRYOGENIC AND POST-CRYOGENIC OBSERVATIONS OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present preliminary diameters and albedos for 13511 Main Belt asteroids (MBAs) that were observed during the 3-Band Cryo phase of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; after the outer cryogen tank was exhausted) and as part of the NEOWISE Post-Cryo Survey (after the inner cryogen tank was exhausted). With a reduced or complete loss of sensitivity in the two long wavelength channels of WISE, the uncertainty in our fitted diameters and albedos is increased to {approx}20% for diameter and {approx}40% for albedo. Diameter fits using only the 3.4 and 4.6 {mu}m channels are shown to be dependent on the literature optical H absolute magnitudes. These data allow us to increase the number of size estimates for large MBAs which have been identified as members of dynamical families. We present thermal fits for 14 asteroids previously identified as the parents of a dynamical family that were not observed during the fully cryogenic mission.

Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Bauer, J. M.; Cabrera, M. S. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., MS 321-520, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Grav, T. [Planetary Science Institute, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Cutri, R. M. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, C., E-mail: Joseph.Masiero@jpl.nasa.gov [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A BATSE investigation of radiation belt electrons precipitated by VLF waves. Final report, 2 May 1994-24 April 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Compton Observatory commonly encounters fluxes of energetic electrons which have been scattered from the inner radiation belt to the path of the satellite by resonant interactions with VLF waves from powerful man-made transmitters. The present investigation was motivated by the fact that in the Fall of 1993, the Gamma Ray Observatory was boosted from a 650 km altitude circular orbit to a 750 km altitude circular orbit. This was an opportunity, for the first time, to make observations at two different altitudes using the same instrument. The authors have examined DISCLA data from the Burst & Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) experiment from 1 Sep. 1993 to 29 Jan. 1994. During the period of study they identified 48 instances of the satellite encountering a cloud of energetic electrons which had been scattered by VLF transmitters. They find that boosting the altitude of the circular orbit from 650 km to 750 km increased the intensity of cyclotron resonance scattered electrons by a factor of two. To search for long term changes in the cyclotron resonance precipitation, the authors have compared the approx. 750 km altitude data from 106 days at the end of 1993 with data at the same altitudes and time of year in 1991. The cyclotron resonance events in 1991 were three times more frequent and 25% of those cases were more intense than any seen in the 1993 data. The authors attribute this difference to increased level of geomagnetic activity in 1991 near the Solar Maximum.

Datlowe, D.W.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Summary of Coupled, Uncoupled, and Hybrid Tectonic Models for the Yakima Fold Belt--Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize the range of opinions and supporting information expressed by the expert community regarding whether a coupled or uncoupled model, or a combination of both, best represents structures in the Yakima Fold Belt. This issue was assessed to have a high level of contention with up to moderate potential for impact on the hazard estimate. This report defines the alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Chamness, Michele A.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Summary of Information on the Behavior of the Yakima Fold Belt as a Structural Entity -- Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

This document is one in a series of topical reports compiled by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to summarize technical information on selected topics important to the performance of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this report is to summarize available data and analyses relevant to the Yakima Fold Belt (YFB) that may bear on the question of whether or not the YFB behaves as a single seismotectonic province in which activity along one fold structure is representative of behavior along all other fold structures. This topic has met with a fairly high level of contention in the expert community and has the potential to result in significant impacts on an evaluation of seismic hazard at the Hanford Site. This report defines the relevant alternative conceptual models relevant to this technical issue and the arguments and data that support those models. It provides a brief description of the technical issue and principal uncertainties; a general overview on the nature of the technical issue, along with alternative conceptual models, supporting arguments and information, and uncertainties; and finally, it suggests some possible approaches for reducing uncertainties regarding this issue.

Last, George V.; Winsor, Kelsey; Unwin, Stephen D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

278

THE HUBBLE WIDE FIELD CAMERA 3 TEST OF SURFACES IN THE OUTER SOLAR SYSTEM: THE COMPOSITIONAL CLASSES OF THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

We present the first results of the Hubble Wide Field Camera 3 Test of Surfaces in the Outer Solar System. The purpose of this survey was to measure the surface properties of a large number of Kuiper Belt objects and attempt to infer compositional and dynamical correlations. We find that the Centaurs and the low-perihelion scattered disk and resonant objects exhibit virtually identical bifurcated optical color distributions and make up two well-defined groups of objects. Both groups have highly correlated optical and NIR colors that are well described by a pair of two-component mixture models that have different red components but share a common neutral component. The small, H{sub 606} {approx}> 5.6 high-perihelion excited objects are entirely consistent with being drawn from the two branches of the mixing model, suggesting that the color bifurcation of the Centaurs is apparent in all small excited objects. On the other hand, objects larger than H{sub 606} {approx} 5.6 are not consistent with the mixing model, suggesting some evolutionary process avoided by the smaller objects. The existence of a bifurcation amongst all excited populations argues that the two separate classes of object existed in the primordial disk before the excited Kuiper Belt was populated. The cold classical objects exhibit a different type of surface that has colors that are consistent with being drawn from the red branch of the mixing model, but with much higher albedos.

Fraser, Wesley C.; Brown, Michael E., E-mail: fraserw@gps.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

From model conception to verification and validation, a global approach to multiphase Navier-Stoke models with an emphasis on volcanic explosive phenomenology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale volcanic eruptions are hazardous events that cannot be described by detailed and accurate in situ measurement: hence, little to no real-time data exists to rigorously validate current computer models of these events. In addition, such phenomenology involves highly complex, nonlinear, and unsteady physical behaviors upon many spatial and time scales. As a result, volcanic explosive phenomenology is poorly understood in terms of its physics, and inadequately constrained in terms of initial, boundary, and inflow conditions. Nevertheless, code verification and validation become even more critical because more and more volcanologists use numerical data for assessment and mitigation of volcanic hazards. In this report, we evaluate the process of model and code development in the context of geophysical multiphase flows. We describe: (1) the conception of a theoretical, multiphase, Navier-Stokes model, (2) its implementation into a numerical code, (3) the verification of the code, and (4) the validation of such a model within the context of turbulent and underexpanded jet physics. Within the validation framework, we suggest focusing on the key physics that control the volcanic cloudsnamely, momentum-driven supersonic jet and buoyancy-driven turbulent plume. For instance, we propose to compare numerical results against a set of simple and well-constrained analog experiments, which uniquely and unambiguously represent each of the key-phenomenology. Key

Dartevelle, Sebastian

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Energetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1063, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and when equilibrium is reached between the gas and liquid phases Natural silicate melts often contain two.3. Dynamics of reversible gas-driven eruptions through a fluid medium Because buoyancy plays an important roleEnergetics of gas-driven limnic and volcanic eruptions Y. Zhang* Department of Geological Sciences

Zhang, Youxue

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses, and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. The work accomplished during Year 1 of this ongoing program is described in the present report. A brief overview of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is given. The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature, and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures. Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter. Finally, plans for future work are outlined.

Garg, S.K.; Pritchett, J.W.; Stevens, J.L.; Luu, L. [Maxwell Federal Div., Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Combs, J. [Geo-Hills Associates, Los Altos, CA (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Volcanology and volcanic activity with a primary focus on potential hazard impacts for the Hawaii geothermal project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annotated bibliography reviews published references about potential volcanic hazards on the Island of Hawaii that are pertinent to drilling and operating geothermal wells. The first two sections of this annotated bibliography list the most important publications that describe eruptions of Kilauea volcano, with special emphasis on activity in and near the designated geothermal subzones. References about historic eruptions from Mauna Loa`s northeast rift zone, as well as the most recent activity on the southern flank of dormant Mauna Kea, adjacent to the Humu`ula Saddle are described. The last section of this annotated bibliography lists the most important publications that describe and analyze deformations of the surface of Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes.

Moore, R.B. [Federal Center, Denver, CO (United States); Delaney, P.T. [2255 North Gemini Drive, Flagstaff, AZ (United States); Kauahikaua, J.P. [Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Location, age, and rock type of volcanic rocks younger than 5 million years in Arizona and New Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the assessment of the Hot Dry Rock geothermal energy potential of Arizona and New Mexico, a compilation of the locations and ages of volcanic rocks less than 5 Myr was made. The locations of those rocks less than 3 Myr are shown on a map of the region. Because the compiled information has many uses in addition to geothermal exploration, the entire compilation is presented as a tabulation. The table is organized first by state and secondly by latitude and longitude within each state. Rock type, age and error, method of dating, and original reference are also given. The K-Ar dates have not been recalculated using the most recent decay constants for /sup 40/K. A few references gave only verbal descriptions of sample location; these locations were converted to approximate latitude and longitude.

Aldrich, M.J. Jr.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Holocene surface faulting along the west flank of the Santa Rosa Range (Nevada-Oregon) and the possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 130 km long Santa Rose Range fault system extends northward from a point about 70 km north of the 1915 Pleasant Valley earthquake fault ruptures to Blue Mountain Pass, Oregon. The authors have examined 1:12,000 low-sun-angle aerial photographs and conducted surveys of scarp morphology to investigate the neotectonic evolution and paleoseismicity of this possible northern extension of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Two adjoining segments of the fault zone are separated by a right step in the range-front and apparent absence of Holocene scarps. Each segment records evidence of a Holocene faulting event. The southern 31 km segment between Frey Ranch and the Willow Creek fan shows both small scarps (Valley and larger scarps which oversteepen the base of the adjacent range-front to slopes of 20[degree] to 24[degree]. The northern 42 km segment between Flat Creek and Oregon Canyon Creek shows a recent offset which rejuvenates older (pre-Lahontan) fault scarps and also cuts Holocene terraces along the base of the piedmont pediment. Based on preliminary morphometric data, the maximum vertical displacement (3--4 m) and age of the faulting (early Holocene) are similar in both segments but it is not known whether both segments ruptured contemporaneously. Except for the lack of large historical surface faulting the main neotectonic and geomorphic features of the Santa Rose Range fault zone are similar to that of the Dixie Valley and Pleasant Valley regions of the Central Nevada Seismic Belt. Hence, the occurrence of a large earthquake rupture along this range-front in the near future should not be viewed as a surprise.

Michetti, A.M. (CNR/GNDT, Rome (Italy) Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Center for Neotectonic Studies); Wesnousky, S.G. (Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States). Center for Neotectonic Studies)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Briefing package for the Yucca Flat pre-emptive review, including overview, UZ model, SZ volcanics model and summary and conclusions sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much progress has been made in the last several years in modeling radionuclide transport from tests conducted both in the unsaturated zone and saturated volcanic rocks of Yucca Flat, Nevada. The presentations to the DOE NNSA pre-emptive review panel contained herein document the progress to date, and discuss preliminary conclusions regarding the present and future extents of contamination resulting from past nuclear tests. The presentations also discuss possible strategies for addressing uncertainty in the model results.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keating, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

Warren, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Hydrothermal systems in two areas of the Jemez volcanic field: Sulphur Springs and the Cochiti mining district  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

K/Ar dates and oxygen isotope data were obtained on 13 clay separates (<2 ..mu..m) of thermally altered mafic and silicic rocks from the Cochiti mining district (SE Jemez Mountains) and Continental Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP) core hole VC-2A (Sulphur Springs, Valles caldera). Illite with K/sub 2/O contents of 6.68%--10.04% is the dominant clay in the silicic rocks, whereas interstratified illite/smectites containing 1.4%--5.74% K/sub 2/O constitute the altered andesites. Two hydrothermal alteration events are recognized at the Cochiti area (8.07 m.y., n = 1, and 6.5--5.6 m.y., n = 6). The older event correlates with the waning stages of Paliza Canyon Formation andesite volcanism (greater than or equal to13 to less than or equal to8.5 m.y.), whereas the younger event correlates with intrusions and gold- and silver-bearing quartz veins associated with the Bearhead Rhyolite (7.54--5.8 m.y.). The majority of K/Ar dates in the hydrothermally altered, caldera-fill rocks of core hole VC-2A (0.83--0.66 m.y., n = 4) indicate that hydrothermal alteration developed contemporaneously with resurgence and ring fracture Valles Rhyolite domes (0.89--0.54 m.y.). One date of 0 +- 0.10 m.y. in acid-altered landslide debris of postcaldera tuffs from the upper 13 m of the core hole probably correlates with Holocene hydrothermal activity possibly associated with the final phases of the Valles Rhyolite (0.13 m.y.).

WoldeGabriel, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield  

SciTech Connect

The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF KUIPER BELT SURFACE ICES: TERNARY N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4}-CO MIXTURES AS A CASE STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The space weathering of icy Kuiper Belt Objects was investigated in this case study by exposing methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon monoxide (CO) doped nitrogen (N{sub 2}) ices at 10 K to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons. Online and in situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was utilized to monitor the radiation-induced chemical processing of these ices. Along with isocyanic acid (HNCO), the products could be mainly derived from those formed in irradiated binary ices of the N{sub 2}-CH{sub 4} and CO-CH{sub 4} systems: nitrogen-bearing products were found in the form of hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), diazomethane (CH{sub 2}N{sub 2}), and its radical fragment (HCN{sub 2}); oxygen-bearing products were of acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), formyl radical (HCO), and formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO). As in the pure ices, the methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were also detected, as were carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and the azide radical (N{sub 3}). Based on the temporal evolution of the newly formed products, kinetic reaction schemes were then developed to fit the temporal profiles of the newly formed species, resulting in numerical sets of rate constants. The current study highlights important constraints on the preferential formation of isocyanic acid (HNCO) over hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and hydrogen isocyanide (HNC), thus guiding the astrobiological and chemical evolution of those distant bodies.

Kim, Y. S.; Kaiser, R. I., E-mail: ralfk@hawaii.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

290

Age and location of volcanic centers less than or equal to 3. 0 m. y. old in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Peco area of West Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This map is one of a series of maps designed for hot dry rock geothermal assessment in Arizona, New Mexico, and the Trans-Peco area of the west Texas. The 3.0 m.y. cutoff age was selected because original heat has probably largely dissipated in older rocks. The location of volcanic centers is more important to geothermal resource assessment than the location of their associated volcanic rocks; however, ages have been determined for numerous flows far from their source. Therefore, the distribution of all volcanic rocks less than or equal to 3.0 m.y. old, for which there is at least one determined age, are shown. Location of the volcanic vents and rocks were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). Ages were obtained from the original literature in all cases except for McKee and others (1974), Silberman and others (1976), Ulrich and McKee (1976), and Wolfe and McKee (1976). The abstract by McKee and others (1974) lists only the ages of various rocks they dated, so locations were taken from Luedke and Smith (1978). The dates of Silberman and others (1976), Ulrich and McKee (1976), and Wolfe and McKee (1976) are taken from written communications cited by Luedke and Smith (1978); therefore, both references are shown on the map for those ages.

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Mantle helium and carbon isotopes in Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters area, Central Oregon: Evidence for renewed volcanic activity or a long term steady state system?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cold bubbling springs in the Separation Creek area, the locus of current uplift at South Sister volcano show strong mantle signatures in helium and carbon isotopes and CO{sub 2}/{sup 3}He. This suggests the presence of fresh basaltic magma in the volcanic plumbing system. Currently there is no evidence to link this system directly to the uplift, which started in 1998. To the contrary, all geochemical evidence suggests that there is a long-lived geothermal system in the Separation Creek area, which has not significantly changed since the early 1990s. There was no archived helium and carbon data, so a definite conclusion regarding the strong mantle signature observed in these tracers cannot yet be drawn. There is a distinct discrepancy between the yearly magma supply required to explain the current uplift (0.006 km{sup 3}/yr) and that required to explain the discharge of CO{sub 2} from the system (0.0005 km{sup 3}/yr). This discrepancy may imply that the chemical signal associated with the increase in magma supply has not reached the surface yet. With respect to this the small changes observed at upper Mesa Creek require further attention, due to the recent volcanic vent in that area it may be the location were the chemical signal related to the uplift can most quickly reach the surface. Occurrence of such strong mantle signals in cold/diffuse geothermal systems suggests that these systems should not be ignored during volcano monitoring or geothermal evaluation studies. Although the surface-expression of these springs in terms of heat is minimal, the chemistry carries important information concerning the size and nature of the underlying high-temperature system and any changes taking place in it.

van Soest, M.C.; Kennedy, B.M.; Evans, W.C.; Mariner, R.H.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

292

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/ja/ja1011/2010JA015599/2010JA015599.xml  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Craig J. Rodger Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory, University of Oulu, Sodankylä, Finland Geomagnetic storms triggered

Ulich, Thomas

293

Development of a geothermal resource in a fractured volcanic formation: Case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field, Japan. Final report, May 1, 1995--November 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal purpose of this case study of the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is to document and to evaluate the use of drilling logs, surface and downhole geophysical measurements, chemical analyses and pressure transient data for the assessment of a high temperature volcanic geothermal field. This comprehensive report describes the work accomplished during FY 1993-1996. A brief review of the geological and geophysical surveys at the Sumikawa Geothermal Field is presented (Section 2). Chemical data, consisting of analyses of steam and water from Sumikawa wells, are described and interpreted to indicate compositions and temperatures of reservoir fluids (Section 3). The drilling information and downhole pressure, temperature and spinner surveys are used to determine feedzone locations, pressures and temperatures (Section 4). Available injection and production data from both slim holes and large-diameter wells are analyzed to evaluate injectivity/productivity indices and to investigate the variation of discharge rate with borehole diameter (Section 5). New interpretations of pressure transient data from several wells are discussed (Section 6). The available data have been synthesized to formulate a conceptual model for the Sumikawa Geothermal Field (Section 7).

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Pritchett, J.W. [and others

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Shoshonites and Associated Rocks of Central British Columbia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The belt of Upper Triassic volcanic sequences of central British Columbia has long been recognized to contain a mixture of alkaline potassic, alkaline sodic, as well as calc-alkaline suites. A similar association is also found in the Lower Jurassic seauences that occur within this belt

Andrge Spence

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Aster's Hoity-Toity Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the little ones, and was often heard to roar with laughter when one of them particularly tickled him in the sky space. Lady Aster said that it was important that the family receive the respect and admiration of the Aster's space in the Solar System. She traveled way out to the far regions of the Aster's realm. Dawn

296

Notched V-belts Recommended Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantity Units 106 Btu $ Electric Energy 37,861 kWh 129 $1,275 Demand 11.8 kW $471 Total 129 $1. You can save additional energy by operating some applications at the same or lower speeds. Greater. #12;DescriptionQtyHP Total HP Current TotalkW Usage CurrentTotal kWhUsage Total SavingskW Total

Tullos, Desiree

297

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes inthe EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic andCrystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperativeproject initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, withparticipation of about 10 international organizations. The name DECOVALEXstands for DEvelopment of COupled models and their VALidation againstExperiments. The general goal of this project is to encouragemultidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modelingcoupled processes in geologic formations in support of the performanceassessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. Three multi-yearproject stages of DECOVALEX have been completed in the past decade,mainly focusing on coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanicalprocesses.Currently, a fourth three-year project stage of DECOVALEX isunder way, referred to as DECOVALEX-THMC. THMC stands for Thermal,Hydrological, Mechanical, and Chemical processes. The new project stageaims at expanding the traditional geomechanical scope of the previousDECOVALEX project stages by incorporating geochemical processes importantfor repository performance. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) leadsTask D of the new DECOVALEX phase, entitled "Long-termPermeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THC andTHM Processes for Volcanic and Crystalline-Bentonite Systems." In itsleadership role for Task D, DOE coordinates and sets the direction forthe cooperative research activities of the international research teamsengaged in Task D.

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Summary of recent volcanic activity - Springer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 6, 1985 ... (Aleutian Islands) on December 10. The cloud was probably mainly steam with only minor amounts of ash. The volcano has been steaming...

299

Artificial geothermal reservoirs in hot volcanic rock  

SciTech Connect

S>Some recent results from the Los Alamos program in which hydraulic fracturing is used for the recovery of geothermal energy are discussed. The location is about 4 kilometers west and south of the ring fault of the enormous Jemez Caldera in the northcentral part of New Mexico. It is shown that geothermal energy may be extracted from hot rock that does not contain circulating hot water or steam and is relatively impermeable. A fluid is pumped at high pressure into an isolated section of a wellbore. If the well is cased the pipe in this pressurized region is perforated as it is in the petroleum industry, so that the pressure may be applied to the rock, cracking it. A second well is drilled a few hundred feet away from the first. Cold water is injected through the first pipe, circulates through the crack, and hot water returns to the surface through the second pipe. Results are described and circumstances are discussed under which artiflcial geothermal reservoirs might be created in the basaltic rock of Hawaii. (MCW)

Aamodt, R.L.

1974-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbonate Mineralization of Volcanic Province Basalts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flood basalts are receiving increasing attention as possible host formations for geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2, with studies underway in the United States, India, Iceland, and Canada. As an extension of our previous experiments with Columbia River basalt, basalts from the eastern United States, India, and South Africa were reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 and aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions to study the geochemical reactions resulting from injection of CO2 in such formations. The results of these studies are consistent with cation release behavior measured in our previous experiments (in press) for basalt samples tested in single pass flow through dissolution experiments under dilute solution and mildly acidic conditions. Despite the basalt samples having similar bulk chemistry, mineralogy and apparent dissolution kinetics, long-term static experiments show significant differences in rates of mineralization as well as compositions and morphologies of precipitates that form when the basalts are reacted with CO2-saturated water. For example, basalt from the Newark Basin in the United States was by far the most reactive of any basalt tested to date. Carbonate reaction products for the Newark Basin basalt were globular in form and contained significantly more Fe than the secondary carbonates that precipitated on the other basalt samples. In comparison, the post-reacted samples associated with the Columbia River basalts from the United States contained calcite grains with classic dogtooth spar morphology and trace cation substitution (Mg and Mn). Carbonation of the other basalts produced precipitates with compositions that varied chemically throughout the entire testing period. Examination of polished cross sections of the reacted grains by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy show precipitate overgrowths with varying chemical compositions. Compositional differences in the precipitates suggest changes in fluid chemistry unique to the dissolution behavior of each basalt sample reacted with CO2-saturated water. The Karoo basalt from South Africa appeared the least reactive, with very limited mineralization occurring during the testing with CO2-saturated water. The relative reactivity of different basalt samples were unexpectedly different in the experiments conducted using aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixtures versus those reacted with aqueous dissolved CO2 mixtures. For example, the Karoo basalt was highly reactive in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S, as evident by small nodules of carbonate coating the basalt grains after 181 days of testing. However the most reactive basalt in CO2-H2O, Newark Basin, formed limited amounts of carbonate precipitates in the presence of aqueous dissolved CO2-H2S mixture. Basalt reactivity in CO2-H2O mixtures appears to be controlled by the composition of the glassy mesostasis, which is the most reactive component in the basalt rock. With the addition of H2S to the CO2-H2O system, basalt reactivity appears to be controlled by precipitation of coatings of insoluble Fe sulfides.

Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Lightweight Structural Concrete Incorporating Volcanic Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

302

Real-time volcanic earthquake localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: in-network distributed processing, multi-tier sensor network architecture, sensor networks, volcano monitoring

Geoffrey Werner-Allen; Patrick Swieskowski; Matt Welsh

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approval, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Programmable Thermostats, LED Exit Signs, Room Air Conditioners, Geothermal Heat Pumps, LED Lighting Active Incentive...

304

February 2002 Modelling The Conveyor Belt Circulation using MICOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thknss. consistent with cooling #12;Large heat loss in Antarctic winter ameliorated (Too much?) #12;Grid Project · Oceans transport about half the heat from Tropics to Polar Regions · Wind Driven ocean/Xie-Arkin: Precipitation · Model SST + Bulk Forcing (Large et al.) Surface Flux of Heat and Freshwater #12;· NO RESTORING

Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

305

Environmental Impacts of Stover Removal in the Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When considering the market for biomass from corn stover resources erosion and soil quality issues are important to consider. Removal of stover can be beneficial in some areas, especially when coordinated with other conservation practices, such as vegetative barrier strips and cover crops. However, benefits are highly dependent on several factors, namely if farmers see costs and benefits associated with erosion and the tradeoffs with the removal of biomass. This paper uses results from an integrated RUSLE2/WEPS model to incorporate six different regime choices, covering management, harvest and conservation, into simple profit maximization model to show these tradeoffs.

Alicia English; Wallace E. Tyner; Juan Sesmero; Phillip Owens; David Muth

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate economic feasibility of biomass depends on its cost of production and on the cost of competing fuels. The purpose of this research project is to evaluate the production costs of several combinations of species and management systems for producing herbaceous biomass for energy use in Iowa. Herbaceous biomass production systems have costs similar to other crop production systems, such as corn, soybean, and forages. Thus, the factors influencing the costs of producing dedicated biomass energy crops include technological factors such as the cultivation system, species, treatments, soil type, and site and economic factors such as input prices and use of fixed resources. In order to investigate how these production alternatives are influenced by soil resources, and climate conditions, two locations in Iowa, Ames and Chariton, with different soil types and slightly different weather patterns were selected for both the agronomic and economic analyses. Nine crops in thirteen cropping systems were grown at the two sites for five years, from 1988 to 1992. Some of the systems had multiple cropping or interplanting, using combinations of cool-season species and warm-season species, in order to meet multiple objectives of maximum biomass, minimal soil loss, reduced nitrogen fertilization or diminished pesticide inputs. Six of the systems use continuous monocropping of herbaceous crops with an emphasis on production. The seven other systems consist of similar crops, but with crop rotation and soil conservation considerations. While the erosion and other off-site effects of these systems is an important consideration in their overall evaluation, this report will concentrate on direct production costs only.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeling of the radiation belt megnetosphere in decisional timeframes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for calculating L* in the magnetosphere with essentially the same accuracy as with a physics based model at many times the speed by developing a surrogate trained to be a surrogate for the physics-based model. The trained model can then beneficially process input data falling within the training range of the surrogate model. The surrogate model can be a feedforward neural network and the physics-based model can be the TSK03 model. Operatively, the surrogate model can use parameters on which the physics-based model was based, and/or spatial data for the location where L* is to be calculated. Surrogate models should be provided for each of a plurality of pitch angles. Accordingly, a surrogate model having a closed drift shell can be used from the plurality of models. The feedforward neural network can have a plurality of input-layer units, there being at least one input-layer unit for each physics-based model parameter, a plurality of hidden layer units and at least one output unit for the value of L*.

Koller, Josef; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Friedel, Reiner H.W.

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Economic Effects of Precipitation Enhancement in the Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Policy formulation in weather modification requires an understanding of the economic effects from altered weather. The focus of this study is to provide insight into the beneficiaries of a functioning weather modification technology when applied ...

Philip Gapcia; Stanley Changnon; Musa Pinar

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

The Global Conveyor Belt from a Southern Ocean Perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies have proposed the Southern Ocean as the site of large water-mass transformations; other studies propose that this basin is among the main drivers for North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) circulation. A modeling contribution toward ...

Daniele Iudicone; Sabrina Speich; Gurvan Madec; Bruno Blanke

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Metalliferous lignite in North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Thin, impure, lignite beds in a belt across portions of North Dakota and South Dakota are highly enriched in U, Mo, and As. These beds contained on the order of 0.25% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, and equal amounts of Mo. The metals were leached from overlying volcanic ash, and infiltrated through the lignites with the ground water, where they were precipitated on formed metallo-organic complexes. The belt of metalliferous lignites concides with a major surface drainage divide, where water moves generally downward and laterally.

Noble, E.A.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Investigation of the geothermal potential of the UK. A preliminary assessment. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologically, Britain is an extremely stable area without active volcanism. In this situation the development of geothermal resources depends upon the occurrence of permeable rocks in deep sedimentary basins or the successful development of the hot dry rock concept. The average geothermal gradient is about 25C/km, but two belts of above average heat flow extend across northern and south-western England. In these areas the gradient can be 30C/km or more. The principal aquifers occur in the Mesozoic and the greatest geothermal potential is in sandstones of the Permo-Triassic where their occurrence at depth coincides with the high heat flow belts.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Regional geology and geophysics of the Jemez Mountains  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The western margin of the Rocky Mountain tectonic belt is the initial site for the Los Alamos Geothermal Project. lgneous activity in the area culminated with the formation of a collapsed volcanic caldera and the deposition of thick beds of tuff. Geophysical studies indicate that the region is one of relatively highterrestrial heat flow, low-crustal density, low-crustal seismic velocities, low-crustal magnetoelectric impedance, and thin crust. 34 references. (auth)

West, F.G.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Archean Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Archean Oceanic Felsic Dyke Swarm In A Nascent Arc- The Hunter Mine Group, Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Canada Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The 2730-Ma-old Hunter Mine Group (HMG), a dominantly felsic subaqueous volcanic sequence, was formed during early arc construction in the Abitibi greenstone belt (Quebec, Canada). The western part of the HMG contains a felsic dyke swarm up to 1.5 km wide and traceable up-section for 2.5 km. Five distinct generations were identified: (1) aphanitic to feldspar-phyric dykes; (2) quartz-feldspar-phyric dykes with < 5% quartz

314

Geochemistry of a volcanic hydrothermal system at Mount Spurr, Alaska.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Spurr is an ice and snow-covered andesitic volcano located at the northern extent of the Aleutian arc in south central Alaska. Previous workers have (more)

Garchar, Laura

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Applications of the VLF Induction Method For Studying Some Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Wiki Browse Latinoamrica Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy...

316

High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

magnetic lows. This implies that fractures localize the hot springs. Magnetic gradient trends reflect the mapped Basin and Range structural trends of north and northwest, as well...

317

Petrological and rheological controls on volcanism to terrestrial planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through experimental petrology and geodynamic modeling, processes of melting under thick lithospheres on the Earth and the moon are investigated. Phase equilibrium experiments were carried out on Apollo 14B and 15C picritic ...

Elkins Tanton, Linda Tarbox, 1965-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Field Mapping At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

319

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At San Francisco Volcanic Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

320

Rock Sampling At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Overview Of Electromagnetic Methods Applied In Active Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Colorado. For one example - Mt. Konocti in the Mayacamas Mountains, California - gravity, magnetic, and seismic, as well as electromagnetic methods have all been used in an...

322

Ground Magnetics At San Francisco Volcanic Field Area (Warpinski...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the target area, obtained rock samples for age dating and mineral chemistry, performed gravity and magnetic surveys, and integrated these results to identify potential drilling...

323

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl concentrations. The last sample taken...

324

Helium Isotopes In Geothermal And Volcanic Gases Of The Western...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a particular geothermal reservoir. Author(s): J. A. Welhan, R. J. Poredai, W. Rison, H. Craig Published: Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research, 1988 Document Number:...

325

Nuclear dynamics consequence analysis of SNF disposed in volcanic tuff  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuels in a geologic repository. The analyses investigated criticality potential, criticality excursion consequences, and the probability frequency for nuclear criticality. Key findings include: expected number of fissions per excursion range from 10{sup 17} to 10{sup 20}, repeated rate of criticalities range from 3 to 30 per year, and the probability frequency for criticality initiators (based on rough-order-of-magnitude calculations) is 7{times}10{sup {minus}7}. Overall results indicate that criticality consequences are a minor contribution to the biological hazards caused by the disposal of spent nuclear material.

Sanchez, L.C.; Cochrane, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rath, J.S. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Taylor, L.L. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effects of Recent Environmental Changes on Global Seismicity and Volcanism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A covariation of recent global environmental changes and seismicity on Earth is demonstrated. Presently, rising concern about anthropogenic activities and their consequences on the cryosphere and environment have always overlooked changes related ...

Evgeny A. Podolskiy

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waves (MAW) caused by air flow over topography; while man-made sources include nuclear tests, supersonic aircraft, power plants,

Matoza, Robin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $9.8\\cdot 10^{-5}$/gram is set on the monopole density in the search samples.

K. Bendtz; D. Milstead; H. -P. Hchler; A. M. Hirt; P. Mermod; P. Michael; T. Sloan; C. Tegner; S. B. Thorarinsson

2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

A Preparation Zone For Volcanic Explosions Beneath Naka-Dake...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mud eruptions, and red hot glows on the crater wall. Temporal variations in the geomagnetic field observed around the craters of Naka-dake also indicate that thermal...

330

A Miocene Island-Arc Volcanic Seamount- The Takashibiyama Formation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

lava fragments andor pyroclastic materials, and are similar in internal features to debris flow and turbidite deposits. Subaqueous block lavas and minor pillow lavas form...

331

Late Cenozoic volcanism, geochronology, and structure of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

by various geophysical anomalies that are evidently related to an active hot-water geothermal system. This system apparently is heated by a reservoir of silicic magma...

332

K-Ar dating of young volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potassium-Argon (K-Ar) age dates were determined for forty-two young geologic samples by the Laboratory of Isotope Geochemistry, Department of Geosciences, in the period February 1, 1986 to June 30, 1989. Under the terms of Department of Energy Grant No. FG07-86ID12622, The University of Arizona was to provide state-of-the-art K-Ar age dating services, including sample preparation, analytical procedures, and computations, for forty-two young geologic samples submitted by DOE geothermal researchers. We billed only for forty samples. Age dates were determined for geologic samples from five regions with geothermal potential: the Cascade Mountains (Oregon); the Cascade Mountains (Washington); Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean; Cerro Prieto, Mexico; and Las Azufres, Mexico. The ages determined varied from 5.92 m.a. to 0.62 m.a. The integration of K-Ar dates with geologic data and the interpretation in terms of geologic and geothermal significance has been reported separately by the various DOE geothermal researchers. Table 1 presents a detailed listing of all samples dated, general sample location, researcher, researcher's organization, rock type, age, and probable error (1 standard deviation). Additional details regarding the geologic samples may be obtained from the respective geothermal researcher. 1 tab.

Damon, P.E.; Shafiqullah, M.

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plants (0) Projects (0) Activities (6) NEPA(0) Geothermal Area Profile Location Arizona Exploration Region Other GEA Development Phase 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir...

334

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buildings Clean Energy Economy Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network Geothermal Incentives and Policies International Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development...

335

A Volcanologist'S Review Of Atmospheric Hazards Of Volcanic Activity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1982). Evidence based on measurements of S and Cl in erupted rocks, glass inclusions, gas samples, and atmospheric samples collected for both Mount St. Helens and Fuego...

336

1.0 Introduction Voluminous volcanic intrusive complexes are com-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes and today's landscape in the Karoo Basin and offshore Norway. The resulting multimedia art of the project corresponds to the publication of geological pamphlets and field guides of the Karoo Basin and publish popular science booklets on the geology of the Karoo Basin for distribution in Norway and South

Polteau, Stephane

337

Seismic and infrasonic source processes in volcanic fluid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) whichto eliminate explosive nuclear tests anywhere on the planetman-made sources include nuclear tests, supersonic aircraft,

Matoza, Robin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Jet Engine Coatings Resist Volcanic Ash Damage - Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 27, 2011 ... Upon cooling, the molten ash forms a brittle glass that flakes off, taking the coating with it. Like sand, ash is made mostly of silica and poses a...

339

Sensor networks for high-resolution monitoring of volcanic activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed and deployed a wireless sensor network for monitoring seismoacoustic activity at Volcn Reventador, Ecuador. Wireless sensor networks are a new technology and our group is among the first to apply them to monitoring volcanoes. The ...

Matt Welsh; Geoff Werner-Allen; Konrad Lorincz; Omar Marcillo; Jeff Johnson; Mario Ruiz; Jonathan Lees

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a plume of degassed reservoir liquid that flows southward to emerge at Growler and Morgan Hot Springs. The second cell originates SSE to SE of Lassen Peak and flows southeastward...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Banana Belt of the Coastal Regions of Southern Oregon and Northern California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coastal regions of southern Oregon and northern California can be considerably warmer than locations to the north and south when air descends the substantial mountain barrier to the east. This paper describes the event of 27 February 1985, ...

Clifford F. Mass

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Adaptive Linear Prediction of Radiation Belt Electrons Using the Kalman Filter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

development Employment of solar cells and modules for hydrogen gen- eration Analysis of pv. Movable sample table of the solar simulator developed by ISFH. Abb. 5: Ministerialrat Dr. Hans Schroeder and Nuclear Safety on the features of the solar simulator SUSI I. Abb. 7: Bürgermeister Rolf Bremeyer bei der

343

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE FOR AN IMPACT ON THE MAIN-BELT ASTEROID (596) SCHEILA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unexpected outburst was observed around (596) Scheila in 2010 December. We observed (596) Scheila soon after the impact using ground-based telescopes. We succeeded in the detection of a faint linear tail after 2011 February, which provides a clue to determine the dust ejection date. It is found that the dust particles ranging from 0.1-1 {mu}m to 100 {mu}m were ejected into the interplanetary space impulsively on December 3.5 {+-}1.0 day. The ejecta mass was estimated to be (1.5-4.9)x10{sup 8} kg, suggesting that an equivalent mass of a 500-800 m diameter crater was excavated by the event. We also found that the shape of the light curve changed after the impact event probably because fresh material was excavated around the impact site. We conclude that a decameter-sized asteroid collided with (596) Scheila only eight days before the discovery.

Ishiguro, Masateru [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hanayama, Hidekazu; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Miyaji, Takeshi; Fukushima, Hideo [Ishigakijima Astronomical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Ishigaki, Okinawa 907-0024 (Japan); Hasegawa, Sunao; Sarugaku, Yuki [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hideaki; Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Hsieh, Henry H. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Vaubaillon, Jeremie J. [Observatoire de Paris, I.M.C.C.E., Denfert Rochereau, Bat. A., FR-75014 Paris (France); Kawai, Nobuyuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Kuroda, Daisuke [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asaguchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hamanowa, Hiromi [Hamanowa Astronomical Observatory, Motomiya, Fukushima 969-1204 (Japan); Kim, Junhan [Yangcheon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Pyo, Jeonghyun [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakamura, Akiko M., E-mail: ishiguro@snu.ac.kr [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Method and apparatus for setting precise nozzle/belt and nozzle/edge dam block gaps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pair of guide pins are mounted on sideplate extensions of the caster and mating roller pairs are mounted on the nozzle assembly. The nozzle is advanced toward the caster so that the roller pairs engage the guide pins. Both guide pins are remotely adjustable in the vertical direction by hydraulic cylinders acting through eccentrics. This moves the nozzle vertically. The guide pin on the inboard side of the caster is similarly horizontally adjustable. The nozzle roller pair which engage the inboard guide pin are flanged so that the nozzle moves horizontally with the inboard guide pin.

Carmichael, Robert J. (Colchester, VT); Dykes, Charles D. (Milton, VT); Woodrow, Ronald (Saltsburgh, PA)

1989-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Formulating N recommendations for corn in the corn belt using recent data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making N rate recommendations for corn has been one of the most economically important goals of publicly funded crop production and soil fertility personnel and programs over the past five decades. Changes in cropping systems, hybrids, tillage, and other management practices, along with opportunities in site-specific inputs and awareness of the need to minimize the amount of N

Emerson D. Nafziger; John E. Sawyer; Robert G. Hoeft

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Relations between Soil Moisture and Satellite Vegetation Indices in the U.S. Corn Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite-derived vegetation indices extracted over locations representative of midwestern U.S. cropland and forest for the period 199094 are analyzed to determine the sensitivity of the indices to neutron probe soil moisture measurements of the ...

Jimmy O. Adegoke; Andrew M. Carleton

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Ingredients of conveyor belts. U.S. Bur Mines Rep Invest, (RI):8235  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cincinnati, OH, 41. Albrecht WN. 1987. Central nervous system toxicity of some common environmental residues in the mouse. J Toxicol Environ Health 21(4):405-421. *Alpert JR. 1982. Acute toxicity studies with 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Report to Shell Oil Co. OTS 0515726. [Unpublished study] *Atkinson R. 1987. A structure-activity relationship for the estimation of rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with organic compounds. J Chem Kinet 19:799-828.

unknown authors

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Toward Application of an Active Fence for Object Detection, Manipulation and Alignment on Conveyer Belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cillatory system expressed through term x2 is: mF k1 k1 +k2 +mox2 + +d gmo 2 sign_x2+ + k1 k2 k1 + k2 x2 = 0 which will hold for sti object, the equation 9 transforms in: mF +mox2+d gmo 2 sign_x2+k2 x2 = 0 10 10, the equation 9 transforms into: mox2 + d gmo 2 sign_x2+ k1 x2 = 0 11 since the ratio of mF k1 k1+k2 tends

349

New Horizons Science Photos from NASA's Pluto-Kuiper Belt Mission  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The images can be searched by keywords, by date, or by subject topic. They can also be browsed as an entire list. Each image has a detailed description.

350

ENVIRONMENTAL VARIABLES AFFECTING ANT (FORMICIDAE) COMMUNITY COMPOSITION IN MISSISSIPPI'S BLACK BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but not least, I give my thanks to my wife, Jennifer Seltzer, and daughter, Sophia, for their encouragement...................................................................... 41 Formica pallidefulva Latreille......................................... 41 Formica dolosa Buren ..................................................... 41 Formica subsericea Say................................................... 41 Polyergus lucidus

Ray, David

351

A Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Resurgent Cauldron In The Early Paleozoic Of Wales, Uk Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The paper presents a controversial interpretation of a mid-Ordovician volcano-sedimentary complex. It deals with the cyclic interdependence of intrusive, volcanic, and sedimentary processes, due to the development of a nearshore resurgent cauldron in the Caledonian fold belt of North Wales. Deformed volcanotectonic features include a resurgent dome and apical graben, surrounded by a moat and peripheral crescentic ring-fault, constituting a caldera 20 km in diameter. The resurgent Snowdon caldera developed through three cycles of ash-flow volcanism resulting from

352

North Atlantic geoid high, volcanism and glaciations Eugenio Carminati1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a regional geoid high. The upper mantle, being pumped from the deep mantle and rising to a few km shallower underlies the youngest (part of the Atlantic Ocean. This portion of the northern on various grounds [e.g., Foulger and Anderson, 2005]: the persistence of magmatism on the westerly moving

Doglioni, Carlo

353

Studies of digital seismic data obtained in geothermal and volcanic regions. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following research areas: (1) study of tremor waveforms recorded at Mount St. Helens during 1980; (2) study of seismicity recorded during 1981 at Mount St. Helens; and (3) the monitoring of seismicity accompanying hydrofracturing experiments carried out in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. (ACR)

Fehler, M.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Independent Probabilistic Volcanic Hazard Analysis (PVHA) for the Yucca Mountain Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain has been proposed for the disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) and other nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste from defense and nuclear weapons programs. On June 3, 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a license application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for repository construction. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended) directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to promulgate a Yucca ...

2008-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Volcanic and Solar Forcing of the Tropical Pacific over the Past 1000 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The response of El Nio to natural radiative forcing changes over the past 1000 yr is investigated based on numerical experiments employing the ZebiakCane model of the tropical Pacific coupled oceanatmosphere system. Previously published ...

Michael E. Mann; Mark A. Cane; Stephen E. Zebiak; Amy Clement

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tidal strain and tilt field observations were carried out during the period February 1978 to December 1979 at the Klamath Graben and Newberry Caldera in Oregon and at Krafla in Northern Iceland. Moreover, tilt observations were made at Mt. St. Helens, Washington, during the summer of 1980. Two strainmeters of the same type as now in use by the US Geological Survey were applied in the strain work. Tilts were measured by two Kinemetrics model TM-1B biaxial tilt meters. The instruments were placed at depths of approximately one to two meters below the ground surface. Both strain and tilt fields turn out to be heavily contaminated by noise that is mostly of thermoelastic origin. In spite of considerable efforts, it has not been possible to process the strain field data to obtain sufficiently clear tidal signals. The tilt data are less contaminated and rather clear tidal signals were observed at Newberry in Oregon and Krafla in Iceland. A local magnification by a factor of about 3 of the EW component of the theoretical solid earth and ocean load tilt was observed at one station at Krafla. Moreover, the tidal tilt component across the ring fault at Newberry appears to be magnified by a factor of 1.4 to 1.9. The phenomena at the Krafla may possibly be due to a local magma chamber. These results are a clear indication of a tilt field modification by local structure and indicate the possibility of using tilt data to locate subsurface magma bodies.

Bodvarsson, G.; Axelsson, G.; Johnson, A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Effects of the El Chichn Volcanic Cloud on Solar Radiation Received at Fairbanks, Alaska  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed insulation measurements have been carried out in Fairbanks for the last four years. Beginning on 15 November 1982, these measurements showed substantial changes, believed to be due to the dust cloud of El Chichn. The volcano, situated ...

Gerd Wendler

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

A GCM Study of Volcanic Eruptions as a Cause of Increased Stratospheric Water Vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent general circulation model (GCM) experiments have shown that idealized climatic perturbations that increase the temperature of the tropical tropopause region can cause larger than expected surface temperature increases. This is because the ...

Manoj M. Joshi; Keith P. Shine

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Mud volcanism: Processes and implications Mud volcanoes: generalities and proposed mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source rocks are the Jurassic ?re and Spekk Formations, the latter being the time the reservoirs are also in direct contact with mature, organic-rich source rocks. The minimum horizontal stress., 1995. Petroleum geochemistry of the Haltenbanken, Norwegian continental shelf. In: Cubitt, J

Manga, Michael

360

Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Volcanic, erosional, tectonic, and biogenic peaks on Guyot Summit Plains in the Louisville Seamount Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

became submerged due to thermal subsidence of the underlyinginception to emergence and subsidence below sea level, andis the rapid change from subsidence to uplift as the guyot

Ebuna, Daniel R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Using seafloor geodesy to monitor volcanic collapse on the south flank of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accommodat- ing subsidence in the summit caldera (Lipman etshow the amount of subsidence (in meters) measured theremagnitude seaward slip and subsidence on the south ?ank as

Phillips, Kathleen A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Red Mountain is one of several hundred cinder cones within a swath of volcanic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that extends 50 miles eastward from Williams, Arizona, through Flagstaff to the canyon of the Little Colorado RTMENT OF AGRICULT URE U S This aerial view of Red Mountain cinder cone in northern Arizona shows crystals erode out of its walls. Studies by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Northern Arizona University

Fleskes, Joe

364

Earth Planets Space, 61, 7181, 2009 Gilbert-Gauss geomagnetic reversal recorded in Pliocene volcanic sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Montpellier, Cedex 5, France 4Tbilisi State University Ivane Djavakhishvili, 3, Tshavtshavadze St., 380064 Tbilisi, Georgia 5Institute of Geology, Alexidze 9, 380009 Tbilisi, Georgia (Received October 23, 2007

Demouchy, Sylvie

365

Duration of hydrothermal activity at Steamboat Springs, Nevada, from ages of spatially associated volcanic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Steamboat Springs is a presently active equivalent of epithermal gold-silver ore-forming systems. Hot-spring sinter deposits contain small amounts of gold, silver, mercury, antimony, and arsenic. Hot-spring activity probably started before extrusion of the basaltic andesite of Steamboat Springs. Old sinter from the Steamboat Springs system occurs in gravels above and below the basaltic andesite. Intense hydrothermal alteration, including almost complete replacement by hydrothermal potassium-feldspar, has affected the basaltic andesite. Three plagioclase separates of differing potassium content from fresh basaltic andesite yielded potassium-argon ages of 2.52 to 2.55 m.y. Basaltic andesite almost completely replaced by potassium-feldspar yielded an age of 1.1 m.y. The source of energy for the thermal convection system is probably a large rhyolitic magma chamber that supplied the pumice and from which the rhyolite domes were emplaced. Sanidine and obsidian from four of the rhyolite domes yielded potassium-argon ages of 1.15 to 1.52 m.y. and obsidian from one of the northeastern domes yielded apparent ages of 2.97 and 3.03 m.y. The data indicate that hydrothermal activity has occurred at Steamboat Springs, possibly intermittently, for more than 2-1/2 m.y. These data agree with other radiogenic age studies indicating 1- and 2-m.y. lifetimes for the hydrothermal systems that generate epithermal gold-silver deposits.

Silberman, M.L.; White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Dockter, R.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Toward assessing the geothermal potential of the Jemez Mountains volcanic complex: a telluric-magnetotelluric survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Telluric-magnetotelluric studies were performed in the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico to characterize the total geothermal system of the Valles Caldera and to be integrated with an east-west regional survey supported by the United States Geological Survey. The data from the regional survey indicate that electrically the San Juan Basin to the west of the Jemez Mountains is rather homogeneous in contrast to the eastern side near Las Vegas where the presence of a broad heterogeneous structure is clearly sensed. The data from the Jemez Mountain area are strikingly similar to other Rio Grande rift data and suggest a conducting layer at a depth of approximately 15 km. The telluric data indicate that the hydrothermal system in the area is of a localized nature.

Hermance, J.F.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Increasing Resilience to Natural Hazards in Earthquake-prone and Volcanic Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Earthquakes without frontiers: a partnership for increasing resilience to seismic hazard in the continents (EwF for increasing resilience to seismic hazard in the continents (EwF): Professor James Jackson, University

Brierley, Andrew

368

The sedimentological and geotechnical characteristics of the lower continental slope and rise of the Mississippi Fan fold belt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study is based on geological and geotechnical laboratory testing data of 70 three inch diameter piston cores. Concentration is along the Sigsbee Escarpment in a grid area between 90? and 91?W and 26.7? and 27.3?N. Water depth ranges from 1,200 meters below sea level to 2,500 meters below sea level. All data were used to characterize the seafloor processes that deposited these sediments. The Sigsbee Escarpment represents a complex topographic and geologic feature involving faults, slumps and steep slopes. Most of the study area is covered by hemipelagic Holocene sediments in 0.05 to 2.9 m thickness, greatest thickness being in bathymetric lows indicating that Holocene sediments are eroded at the bathymetric highs and transported down the slope. The underlying Pleistocene sediments are mostly laminated clays in the southwestern part of the study area, indicating no mass wasting. Hemipelagic sedimentation in quiet sea bottom environment was dominant throughout the accumulation of the unit. Several generations of slumps have occurred in the northeastern part of the Sigsbee Escarpment during the Pleistocene showing that this part of the study area is an area where active mass wasting and down slope processes dominate.

Ramazanova, Rahila

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

From Minnesota to New Mexico, E85 Expands beyond the Corn Belt; State Energy Program (SEP) Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's State Energy Program published this case study in conjunction with the New Mexico Division of Energy Conservation and Management. It describes an emerging corridor of service stations selling a specific alternative fuel-E85 ethanol-along highways in New Mexico.

Not Available

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A Pacific Moisture Conveyor Belt and Its Relationship to a Significant Precipitation Event in the Semiarid Southwestern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but several lower-elevation stations also record precipitation of more than 20 mm (Trona, Daggett, Twentynine 12 107 7 79035 Trona San Bernadino 517 20 0 20 320 19 75890 Mountain Pass San Bernadino 1442 1 22 23

Martin, Jonathan E.

371

110101BenefitsNuclearFission.ppt [Read-Only]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Benefits of Nuclear Fission to Benefits of Nuclear Fission to the Civilian Space Program Gary Langford Fission Project Manager NASA MSFC NERAC Nov. 6, 2001 2 * Outer solar system exploration. * Planetary or lunar surface missions (robotic or human). * High-performance propulsion for human missions. * Advanced applications. Uses of Nuclear Fission in the Civilian Space Program Highly advanced propulsion, extremely high power surface applications. 3 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 Phase 1 * 10-500 kW NEP * 10-500 kW spacecraft & surface powerplants Phase 3 * 10-1000 MW, 0.1-1 kg/kW NEP * >2000 s Isp gas/plasma-based NTR Phase 2 * 1-100 MW, 1-10 kg/kW NEP * 900-1000 s Isp solid- core NTR * Multi-MW space & surface powerplants Kuiper Belt Exploration Triton Lander Europa Ocean Science Station Pluto Orbiter Large Asteroids Io Volcanic Observer

372

Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Application Of A Spherical-Radial Heat Transfer Model To Calculate Geothermal Gradients From Measurements In Deep Boreholes Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents estimates of the undisturbed formation temperatures in a geothermal exploration well drilled in the Ceboruco area in the western part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt. The method used assumes

373

Geothermal investigations at selected thermal systems of the northern Wasatch Front Weber and Box Elder Counties, Utah. Report of investigation No. 141  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous thermal springs are present along the Wasatch Front from Utah valley on the south to the state line on the north. These systems are just west of the Wasatch Mountains at the eastern edge of the Basin and Range physiographic province and within the active seismic zone referred to as the Intermountain Seismic Belt. This Report of Investigation is a summary of UGMS investigations at four northern Wasatch Front geothermal systems: Utah, Crystal (Madsen), and Udy hot springs; and the Little Mountain - south system. All of these resources are deep circulation systems and the water is heated by the normal heat flow of the Basin and Range Province. Heat from volcanic sources is not believed to contribute to the warming of any northern Wasatch Front springs. Data collected under the DOE/DGE state coupled program are presented for use by individuals interested in these systems.

Murphy, P.; Gwynn, J.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Oil and gas in the Junggar basin the People`s Republic of China  

SciTech Connect

The Junggar Basin, located in the north of Xinjiang, China, and with an area of 130000 km{sup 2}, is a compressional inland basin formed during the late Hercynian. Exploration and development of oil and gas in the basin has been run by Karamay Oil & Gas Corporation (KOC). The basin has two basements, Precambrian crystalline basement and Early to Middle Hercynian fold basement. Maximum sedimentary cover from Late Permian to Quaternary is above 20,000m thick. There are six source rocks developed in Carboniferous, Permian, Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous and Paleogene, respectively. Of the most important Permian and Jurassic source rocks, the former is oil-prone and the latter gas-prone. Total oil and gas resources in the basin are about 80-100x10 8t. In the mid 1950`s, Karamay oilfield, which is closely, related to the overthrust belt, was discovered in the northwest margin of the basin. Since then, the proven oil reserves in the up to 250km long overthrust belt with Karamay oilfield being the center can be compared to the Cordilleran Overthrust Belt in North America. By the end of 1993, fifteen oil and gas fields have been discovered, and the oil and gas reservoirs are found in all strata from Carboniferous to Tertiary except Cretaceous. The reservoir lithologies are mainly low mature sandstones, conglomerates as well as late Paeleozoic volcanic rocks. The proven reserves are dominantly distributed in the northwest margin, which illustrated unbalanced exploration. The exploration degree in most part of the basin is still low. Since 1961, the crude oil production has been increasing year after year.

Zhang Ji-Yi [Karamay Oil Corp., Xinjing (China)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Influence of provenance on detrital and diagenetic mineralogy of small tertiary fans in southwestern Montana  

SciTech Connect

In the North Boulder River basin in southwestern Montana, alluvial fans of the Renova (Oligocene-Miocene) and the Sixmile Creek (Miocene) Formations were deposited on the flanks of north-south-trending uplifts that also supplied the detritus. The Elkhorn Mountain volcanics (78 m.y.) overlying the Boulder batholith make up the western highlands, a small patch of Precambrian Belt Group rocks occur in the southwest and Paleozoic siliciclastic and carbonate rocks forming the eastern margin. The fan sediments thus allow adequate control for studying the influence of source rocks on detrital and diagenetic mineralogy. Modal analysis of 6228 grains in 31 thin sections shows a decrease of VRF away from the igneous sources (37% to 1% in a north-south transect; 37% to 7% in a west-east transect) along with an increase in quartz (8% to 24% and 3% to 13%) and plagioclase (2% to 16% and 2% to 10%); orthoclase abundance is low except in the southwest. Volcanic ash and glass shards are found in the younger sediments in the northern part of the basin. Their data show a positive correlation between the abundance of orthoclase and kaolinite (north-south transect); between SRF and carbonate cement (west-east transect) and between glass shards and smectite (both north-south and west-east transects). They infer that the diagenetic mineralogy of these sands was controlled essentially by the detrital particles, which were strongly controlled by source rocks in this area.

Olson, J.; Basu, A.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NATURE GEOSCIENCE | ADVANCE ONLINE PUBLICATION | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 1 antle plumes and their related hotspot volcanism constitute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

graduate school, he served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in the Philippines. He was a professor, in Kauai in 1990. LLooookkiinngg ffoorr Editor-in-Chief Our section is looking for a new Editor

Jellinek, Mark

377

Volcanic Ash Transport from Mount Asama to the Tokyo Metropolitan Area Influenced by Large-Scale Local Wind Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eruption of the Mount Asama volcano on 16 September 2004 produced an ash cloud and led to ashfall in the Tokyo metropolitan area that lies on the Kanto Plain. Satellite images showed the ash cloud drifting toward the south in the morning but ...

Nobumitsu Tsunematsu; Tomohiro Nagai; Toshiyuki Murayama; Ahoro Adachi; Yasuhiro Murayama

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. Second technical status report, June 1, 1978--September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objectives are stated. The progress, problems, and future plans are listed briefly. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Exploration of volcanic geothermal energy resources based on rheological techniques. First technical status report, April 1, 1978-June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial steps in a physical analytic and field study of the general applicability of the rheidity sensing techniques in the Oregon-Washington Cascade region are listed. (MHR)

Bodvarsson, G.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Properties of Northern Hemisphere Polar Stratospheric Clouds and Volcanic Aerosol in 1991/92 from UARS/ISAMS Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of polar stratospheric clouds by the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder (ISAMS) experiment on the Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite (UARS) have revealed new details of their global properties and behavior. These ...

F. W. Taylor; A. Lambert; R. G. Grainger; C. D. Rodgers; J. J. Remedios

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as a model in Searchmethods for discovery of ice-entrapped microorganisms inV. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as Object for Solving

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Detection and analysis of the volcanic clouds associated with the 18 and 28 August 2000 eruptions of Miyakejima volcano, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two significant eruptions occurred at Miyakejima volcano on 18 and 28 August 2000 and were detected by multiple satellite sensors. For both eruptions, the cloud can be observed with high confidence for 2 days. Using Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS), ...

E. B. Mccarthy; G. J. S. Bluth; I. M. Watson; A. Tupper

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Possible Influences of Volcanic Dust Veils or Changes in Solar Luminosity on Long-term Local Temperature Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two external forcing functions are examined in their relationship to temperature records at individual locations. Postulated changes in solar luminosity, deduced from sunspot structure, and the dust veil hypothesis are separately considered as ...

Douglas V. Hoyt; Richard A. Siquig

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Turbulent Atmospheric Plumes above Line Sources with an Application to Volcanic Fissure Eruptions on the Terrestrial Planets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of turbulent plumes maintained above steady fine sources of buoyancy is worked out in detail within the limitations of Taylor's entrainment assumption. It is applied to the structure of a pure plume injected into a stably stratified ...

Richard B. Stothers

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Airborne Asian Dust: Case Study of Long-Range Transport and Implications for the Detection of Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transport of fine-grained Asian dust from its source (e.g., the Gobi Desert, Mongolia) to North America is a common springtime phenomenon. Because of its chemical composition (silicon, iron, aluminum, and calcium) and its particle size ...

J. J. Simpson; G. L. Hufford; R. Servranckx; J. Berg; D. Pieri

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Aviation Applications for Satellite-Based Observations of Cloud Properties, Convection Initiation, In-Flight Icing, Turbulence, and Volcanic Ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Satellite Aviation Weather Products (ASAP) was jointly initiated by the NASA Applied Sciences Program and the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program in 2002. The initiative provides a valuable bridge for transitioning new and existing ...

John R. Mecikalski; Todd A. Berendes; Wayne F. Feltz; Kristopher M. Bedka; Sarah T. Bedka; John J. Murray; Anthony J. Wimmers; Pat Minnis; David B. Johnson; Julie Haggerty; Ben Bernstein; Michael Pavolonis; Earle Williams

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Errors in the Determination of the Solar Constant by the Langley Method Due to the Presence of Volcanic Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy in the determination or the solar constant by means of the Langley method is strongly influenced by the spatial inhomogeneities of the atmospheric aerosol. Volcanos frequently inject aerosol into the upper troposphere and lower ...

Richard M. Schotland; James E. Hartman

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NAME M/YEAR MASTERS THESES TITLES SCOPEL, ROBERT B Jun49 The Volcanic History of Jackson Hole, Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

projects across the west, including coal, uranium, oil, oil shale, trona, and natural gas extraction

Baskaran, Mark

390

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so even though drilling fluid is a common contaminant, itdrill fluid at high pressure during the mechanical drillingfluid, designed to match the density of ice, will be used to continue drilling

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A 39-Yr Survey of Cloud Changes from Land Stations Worldwide 19712009: Long-Term Trends, Relation to Aerosols, and Expansion of the Tropical Belt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An archive of land-based, surface-observed cloud reports has been updated and now spans 39 years from 1971 through 2009. Cloud-type information at weather stations is available in individual reports or in long-term, seasonal, and monthly averages. ...

Ryan Eastman; Stephen G. Warren

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Selection of herbaceous energy crops for the western corn belt. Final report Part 1: Agronomic aspects, March 1, 1988--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The relative high cost of energy derived from biomass is a major deterrent to greater use of biomass for energy production One of the most important methods of lowering the cost of dedicated biomass production is to increase the yield per unit of land area so that fixed costs can be applied to more tons of forage. For this study, the authors selected grass and legume crops with potential for high biomass yields and those that offer protection from soil erosion. The research reported here was conducted to identify those species and cultural practices that would result in high biomass yields for various land capabilities with acceptable and soil erosion potential. They also conducted research to determine if intercropping sorghum into alfalfa or reed canarygrass could increase biomass yields over alfalfa or reed canarygrass grown alone and still have the advantage for limiting soil erosion.

Anderson, I.C.; Buxton, D.R.; Hallam, J.A. [Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Testing the comet nature of main belt comets. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the visible spectrum of MBCs 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR, as well as three Themis family asteroids: (62) Erato, (379), Huenna and (383) Janina, obtained in 2007 using three telescopes at "El Roque de los Muchachos"' Observatory, in La Palma, Spain, and the 8m Kueyen (UT2) VLT telescope at Cerro Paranal, Chile. The spectra of 133P and 176P resemble best those of B-type asteroid and are very similar to those of Themis family members and are significantly different from the spectrum of comet 162P/Siding-Spring and most of the observed cometary nuclei. CN gas emission is not detected in the spectrum of 133P. We determine an upper limit for the CN production rate Q(CN) = $= 2.8 \\times 10^{21}$ mol/s, three orders of magnitude lower than the Q(CN) of Jupiter family comets observed at similar heliocentric distances. The spectra of 133P/Elst-Pizarro and 176P/LINEAR confirm that they are likely members of the Themis family of asteroids, fragments that probably retained volatiles, and unlikely have a c...

Licandro, J; Tozzi, G P; de Len, J; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Boehnhardt, H; Hainaut, O R; .,

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Uranium Leasing Program | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranium Leasing Program Uranium Leasing Program Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado Abandoned Mine Reclamation, Uravan Mineral Belt, Colorado LM currently...

395

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 1790 of 22,690 results. Rebate Corn Belt Energy Coop- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Corn Belt Energy, through the Wabash Valley Power Association,...

396

Au-Rich Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits of the Flin Flon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several Paleoproterozoic greenstone belts are host to Au-rich VMS systems, including the Flin Flon Belt accreted arc terranes in north-central Manitoba and...

397

Solid modeling techniques to build 3D finite element models of volcanic systems: An example from the Rabaul Caldera system, Papua New Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating the deformation of active volcanoes is challenging due to inherent mechanical complexities associated with heterogeneous distributions of rheologic properties and irregular geometries associated with the topography and bathymetry. From geologic ... Keywords: 3D geometry, Deformation, Finite Elements Models, Rabaul Caldera

Erika Ronchin, Timothy Masterlark, Joan Mart Molist, Steve Saunders, Wei Tao

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. (1986) Dissolved carbon dioxide in basaltic glasses:on degassing of carbon dioxide from Kilauea volcano.versus anthropogenic carbon dioxide. EOS. 92, 201202.

Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laboratory and field-based instrumentation developments and noble gas-stable isotope systematics of Rungwe Volcanic Province, Iceland and the Central Indian Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005 Neon. Radiogenic isotope geology. p. 303. ISBN 978-0-Geology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/chemgeo Helium and carbon isotopeosmium isotope evidence from Canary Island lavas. Geology

Barry, Peter Hagan; Barry, Peter Hagan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso volcanic field, and are coincident with the epicentral locations of recent earthquake swarms. No anomalous attenuation is seen beneath the Coso volcanic field above about...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Learning from Roman Seawater Concrete  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The ancient Romans, however, made concrete by mixing lime and volcanic rock. For underwater structures, lime and volcanic ash were mixed to form mortar, and this mortar and...

402

Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic EnergyMxico, in Uranium Deposits in Volcanic Rocks, International Atomic Energy

Dobson, P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Reconnaissance geological and mineral resource map of northern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The northern Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO) map (scale 1:500,000) comprises 305,000 km/sup 2/ in the states of Chihuahau and Sonora. The centrally-located plateau section is divided into an upper, predominantly rhyolitic sequence, overlying an andesite-rich interval, directly correlatable with Tertiary volcanic units in central and southern SMO, respectively (Clark, 1983; 1984). Precambrian rocks occur in both flanks of SMO, either in the subsurface or surface exposures. They are succeeded by Early and Late Paleozoic sedimentary strata in Sonora and by a more discontinuous sequence in western Chihuahua. Mesozoic strata are dominated by Cretaceous carbonate sequences in central Chihuahua, and by late Triassic - Early Jurassic continental and Jurassic magmatic arc deposits in Sonora. Late Mesozoic - Early Cenozoic batholiths were emplaced in numerous localities in Sonora, whereas only isolated granitoid stocks are exposed in Chihuahua. Widespread lavas of basaltic composition are Late Tertiary to Quaternary in age. Late Cenozoic unconsolidated clastic deposits fill basins and constitute the coastal plain on the west. The main mineralizing epoch occurred in Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary time, is aligned in northwesterly-trending belts and included numerous porphyry (Cu-Mo) deposits, scattered contact metasomatic (Cu-W) ores and a fissure-vein (Ag-Au) assemblage in the western margin; a (Pb-Zn-Ag) assemblage in fissure-veins and manto-chimney deposits, manganese and volcanogenic uranium ores in the eastern flank. Important industrial minerals and rocks include graphite, fluorspar and building materials.

Clark, K.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geothermal resource base of the world: a revision of the Electric Power Research Institute's estimate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Review of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI) method for calculating the geothermal resource base of a country shows that modifications are needed for several of the assumptions used in the calculation. These modifications include: (1) separating geothermal belts into volcanic types with a geothermal gradient of 50{sup 0}C/km and complex types in which 80% of the area has a temperature gradient of 30{sup 0}C/km and 20% has a gradient of 45{sup 0}C/km, (2) using the actual mean annual temperature of a country rather than an assumed 15{sup 0}C average ambient temperature, and (3) making separate calculations for the resource stored in water/brine and that stored in rock. Comparison of this method (Revised EPRI) for calculating a geothermal resource base with other resource base estimates made from a heat flow map of Europe indicates that the technique yields reasonable values. The calculated geothermal resource bases, stored in water and rock to a depth of 5 km, for each country in the world are given. Approximately five times as much energy is stored in rock as is stored in water.

Aldrich, M.J.; Laughlin, A.W.; Gambill, D.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Exploration of the Mesozoic in the eastern part of Indonesia: Its reward and risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eastern part of Indonesia principally comprises islands of Sulawesi, Halmahera, Maluku, Timor, and Irian Jaya. The region is structurally complex, encompassing an interaction of volcanic arcs, fold/thrust belts, micro-continents and deep ocean basins. Tertiary and Mesozoic offer dual reservoir targets for exploration in eastern Indonesia. The Tertiary section has been proven to produce hydrocarbons while the deeper Mesozoic section is still being examined. During the last seven years, 49 wildcat wells were drilled, 24 of them targeting Mesozoic objectives. The signs so far are encouraging with six wells penetrated Jurassic reservoirs on the Bird's Head Peninsula of Irian Jaya and one well on Seram Island, encountered significant oil and gas accumulations. These rewards and other Mesozoic exploration successes in the NW Australian Shelf and the Papuan basin have attracted more exploration drilling in the region. However, not all of them have been so successful as many geological and operational risks have yet to be overcome. Mesozoic stratigraphy and structural development in eastern Indonesia were controlled by continental breakup, collision and rapid uplift associated with folding and thrusting to arrive at the present geological framework. Severe environmental conditions, remote locations and less developed infrastructure have also made field operations difficult and expensive. To reduce these risks Pertamina is responding by granting exploration incentives and improving the profit split. To obtain a better geological database and exploration concepts, new data acquisition and studies are encouraged.

Wahab, A.; Samuel, L.; Heriyanto, N.; Astono, P. (Pertamina, Jakarta (Indonesia))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CLIENT The Nature Conservancy. Mike Laspia. Cynthia Belt TEAM G. Arnold, S. Coulter, L. Cheng, F. Dieye, R. Futrell, A. Guerrero, S. Jiang, J. Louie, E. Quigley. R. Schwarz, M. Shurtleff, M. Weiss ADVISOR Susanne DesRoches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Small wind turbines 35. Wind and solar-powered outdoor lighting 36. Solar electric energy 37. Solar Small wind turbines REO 2 Wind and solar-powered outdoor lighting REO 3 Solar electric energy REO 4 Solar thermal hot water generation REO 5 Tidal power energy REO 6 Woody biomass WATER QUALITY WATER

Qian, Ning

407

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. Corn Belt during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part II: Role of Vegetation Boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this observational study inquiring into the relative influences of top down synoptic atmospheric conditions and bottom up land surface mesoscale conditions in deep convection for the humid lowlands of the Midwest U.S. Central ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David J. Travis; Jimmy O. Adegoke; David L. Arnold; Steve Curran

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TECHBOOKS Journal: ASTR MS Code: 190R1 PIPS No: DO00005160 DISK 10-11-2004 15:47 Pages: 11 YOUNG CLOSE-BY NEUTRON STARS: THE GOULD BELT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and have been estimated 61 from available SN progenitors counts (Tammann et al., 1994; Grenier, 2000). Both around the Sun. Originally this idea has 40 been suggested by Grenier (2000) and Gehrels et al. (2000 be numerous (Grenier, 2000). 234 4. Conclusions 235 In this paper we presented results of more advance

Popov, Sergei

409

Member News August 2012_8S.indd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

dering GPS system that has directed them into more than a few tight spots. But for Belt, this ... ing gas money. The Belts plan to eventually settle on a permanent...

410

MHV Fleet Testing - Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Smart Fortwo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and replaced alternatorwater pump belt 300.00 882011 37,738 Repaired left front tire 10.00 912011 40,384 Replaced alternator belt 45.00 982011 40,948 Changed oil and...

411

Toroidal core winder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

Potthoff, Clifford M. (Livermore, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corn Belt Energy Coop - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Illinois) Illinois Agricultural Commercial Industrial Other Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling...

413

Berkeley Lab Small Business Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

services, electrical, laboratory, photographic, plumbing, vacuum system products, welding and soldering material; automotive; instrument replacement parts; v-belts, motors,...

414

Protoplanetary Migration and Creation of Scattered Planetismal Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between protoplanet migration and the formation of the Kuiper Belt (planetesimal disk scattering) is examined.

Bruce D. Lindsay; Truell W. Hyde

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

415

OE Summary 2005-14  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power lines ...1 * Improper modification results in electric arc that shatters lamp lens ... 6 * Good Practice: Use of safety belt...

416

Elmer C. Easton '31 '33G '65H ++ Edgar H. Howells '34 '68P* ++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the City Uni- versity of New York: "What the World's Rust Belts Can Learn from North America's Great Plains

Napier, Terrence

417

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Mechanical Device to Sort Market Squid, Loligo opalescens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the variable speed electric motor that drives the conveyor belt. A unit consisting of a light emitting diode

419

TMS Names 2013 Winners of TMS Technical Division Awards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Best Paper Award Professional Cynthia Belt, Consultant ... Ingo Eick, Hydro Aluminium Deutschland; Kristian Etienne Einarsrud, SINTEF Materials...

420

TMS Honors and Awards Winners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS ENERGY INITIATIVES MATERIALS .... Technology Ingo Eick Hydro Aluminium Deutschland ... LMD - Energy Best Paper Award - Professional Cynthia Belt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hydrogeochemical investigation of six geothermal sites in Honduras, Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We conducted detailed hydrogeochemical investigations at six geothermal sites in western Honduras: Azacualpa, El Olivar, Pavana, Platanares, Sambo Creek, and San Ignacio. None of the sites is associated with Quaternary silicic volcanism, although El Olivar lies adjacent to a small Quaternary basalt field and Pavana is part of a belt of hot spring activity parallel to and 35 km east of the Central American volcanic arc. None of the sites contains acid-sulfate waters indicative of vapor-dominated conditions. Thermal fluids are characterized by pH between 7 and 10, Cl<125 mg/l, HCO/sub 3/>Cl, SO/sub 4/greater than or equal toCl, Bless than or equal to17 mg/l, Liless than or equal to4 mg/l, and Asless than or equal to1.25 mg/l. Stable isotope analyses of the water show that recharge to the geothermal systems generally occurs from areas of higher elevation adjacent to the sites. Tritium contents of apparently undiluted thermal fluids range from 0 to 0.4 T.U., indicating residence times of fluids in the systems of more than 500 y. Various geochemical indicators show that mixing of hot and cold end-member fluids occurs in the system at Platanares and, to a lesser degree, in the systems at San Ignacio and Azacualpa. No mixing is apparent in the fluids discharging at Pavana, Sambo Creek, or El Olivar. Boiling is the dominant process responsible for subtle geochemical variations at Azacualpa and, possibly, San Ignacio. Our best estimates of subsurface reservoir temperatures are 225/sup 0/C at Platanares, 190/sup 0/C at San Ignacio, 185/sup 0/C at Azacualpa, 155/sup 0/C at Sambo Creek, 150/sup 0/C at Pavana, and 120/sup 0/C at El Olivar. The estimated power output of the three hottest sites is 45 thermal megawatts at Platanares, 14 thermal megawatts at San Ignacio, and 13 thermal megawatts at Azacualpa.

Goff, F.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Grigsby, C.O.; Janik, C.J.; Shevenell, L.A.; Paredes, J.R.; Gutierrez, J.W.; Trujillo, Jr.; Counce, D.A.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal conductivity and heat capacity close to the initialby increasing the volumetric heat capacity of the rock massT2. The increase in heat capacity is described by Equation (

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (evaluation 1997/2. Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

DECOVALEX-THMC Task D: Long-Term Permeability/Porosity Changes in the EDZ and Near Field due to THM and THC Processes in Volcanic and Crystaline-Bentonite Systems, Status Report October 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although convective heat transfer processes are importantmain processes considered in Task D are heat transfer, fluidmain processes considered in Task D are heat transfer, fluid

Birkholzer, J.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.; Barr, D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Subduction dynamics at the middle America trench : new constraints from swath bathymetry, multichannel seismic data, and ?Be  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cosmogenic radionuclide ?Be is a unique tracer of shallow sediment subduction in volcanic arcs. The range in ?Be enrichment in the Central American Volcanic Arc between Guatemala and Costa Rica is not controlled by ...

Kelly, Robyn K

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Predicting Tephra Dispersion with a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model and a Particle Fall Model: Application to Cerro Negro Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of volcanic ash (tephra) fallout are increasingly used to assess volcanic hazards in advance of eruptions and in nearreal time. These models often approximate the wind field using simplistic assumptions of the atmosphere that do not ...

Marc A. Byrne; Arlene G. Laing; Charles Connor

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Annual Technical Conference and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and wood. The presence of a zeolite, phillipsite, indicates alteration of volcanic glass by seawater with a high content of volcanic glass and basalt fragments. The benthic foraminiferal assemblage within Unit

Backe, Knut

428

"Leadership for Sustainable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Financial fallout from the Montserrat volcanic eruption 8 7.1 Coastal cities and small island states 92 7

Saskatchewan, University of

429

Eddy covariance mapping and quantification of surface CO2 leakage fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer model for heavy gas dispersion from natural sources:Numerical model of gas dispersion emitted from volcanic

Lewicki, J.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Metrics for Local Community Planning and Evaluation: The Case for Observational Measurement of High Risk Rural Sub-Populations in Occupant Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

+Demonstration+Projects+-+Rural+Initiatives#. Accessedalive: teen seat belt & rural teens. University of Missourimotor vehicle crashes in rural and urban areas: decomposing

Davidson, Steve; Barlament, James; Dawson, Lisa; Cotton, Carol

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Equipment and Supplies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 3   Composition of low-alloy steel solid electrodes...is intended for welds in the core belt region of nuclear

432

The importance of landslides and flooding events in harvesting and sequestering macroscopic carbon along active margins : the Eel Basin, Northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forearc basins (e.g. , Aleutian, Mexico, Peru, southernintensification of the Aleutian Low pressure system results30, 52]. The enhanced Aleutian Low and narrow belt of warm

McCullough, Justin S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement - Energy ...  

An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase ...

434

ambrosia.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Lake Mining District, near the center of the Grants Mineral Belt. Decommissioned uranium mills, abandoned underground mines, mine shafts and vents, ore piles, tailings piles, and...

435

Conference Agenda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... includes creating the US National Vulnerability Database, co-founding ... green belt and has completed the Chief Information Officer (CIO) course with ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

436

Tech Transfer  

Tech Transfer The Industrial Partnerships Office is improving tech transfer processes with our very own Yellow Belt. Several of the Lab's process ...

437

Underground conveyor engineering and design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the physical dimensions of the entry limit the size of belt conveyors, mines ramp up speed and power to meet capacity demands. 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Wen-Hsien Li () whli@phy.ncu.edu.tw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trench ManillaTrench 8.2cm/yr Okinawa Trough SlateBelt Foothills Eurasian Plate LuzonArc North 100 km

Chen, Yang-Yuan

439

Investigation of SGP Atmospheric Moisture Budget for CLASIC ?...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of a recently completed investigation of the moisture budget over the Midwestern Corn Belt (Zangvil et al. 2001, 2004) This study will be expanded with * Extended seasons...

440

IONIZING RADIATION RISKS TO SATELLITE POWER SYSTEMS (SPS) WORKERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

belt intensity caused by geomagnetic substorms may result into the large amount of geomagnetic shielding available inL, denotes roughly a geomagnetic field line. The value gives

Lyman, J.T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program: Hydrofacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Army. 1880, Michigan's Grand Rapids Electric Light and Power Company, generating electricity by dynamo, belted to a water turbine at the Wolverine Chair Factory, lit up 16...

442

Table of Contents 1 Safety Philosophy.......................................................................... 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

can be a lifesaver; use them as you would a safety belt in a car. #12;8 · Gas Hazards Compressed gases

Tang, William C

443

Colorado Springs Utilities - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Air conditioners, Heat pumps, Lighting, Lighting ControlsSensors, Motors, Windows, Evaporative Coolers, Belts and Pulleys, HE Air Conditioning, NEMA Motors, Occupancy...

444

Harry Sim  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Insead in France. He is Six-Sigma Black Belt certified, and is a member of the US Green Building Council. Cypress Envirosystems provides innovative...

445

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radius (um) Temperature (degree Celsius) Case 2 Heavy pollution Typical summer monsoon rain belt TMI Rainfall PR Rainfall Area Rainnon-Rain Discrepancy RH Cloud top T A...

446

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

HospAccute_BestPrac-3.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perform boiler tune-ups Clean filters and fans Clean air conditional evaporator and condenser coil fins Align and adjust belts www.energystar.govbenchmark E-mail:...

448

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying Jump to: navigation,...

449

Property:Editor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this property. C Cryptic Faulting and Multi-Scale Geothermal Fluid Connections in the Dixie Valley-Central Nevada Seismic Belt Area- Implications from Mt Resistivity Surveying...

450

Study Guides for Written and Hands-On Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grinder Horizontal Saw Vertical Saw Surface Grinder Crystal Cutter Vertical Milling Machine Machine Tool Hands-On Assessments Belt Sander Disk Sander Drill Press Engine...

451

Microsoft Word - ANL 2005 ESH - Volume II -FINAL FORMATTED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

described in the following three paragraphs. Dust-producing machine shop equipment (i.e., grinding wheels and belt sanders) is present in numerous laboratory office module machine...

452

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

three westernmost zones suggests that the Walker Lane Belt lithosphere is rheologically weak. However, we show that linear gradients in viscosity and gravitational potential...

453

DESTRUCTION OF BINARY MINOR PLANETS DURING NEPTUNE SCATTERING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence of extremely wide binaries in the low-inclination component of the Kuiper Belt provides a unique handle on the dynamical history of this population. Some popular frameworks of the formation of the Kuiper Belt suggest that planetesimals were moved there from lower semimajor axis orbits by scattering encounters with Neptune. We test the effects such events would have on binary systems and find that wide binaries are efficiently destroyed by the kinds of scattering events required to create the Kuiper Belt with this mechanism. This indicates that a binary-bearing component of the cold Kuiper Belt was emplaced through a gentler mechanism or was formed in situ.

Parker, Alex H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Victoria, BC (Canada); Kavelaars, J. J., E-mail: alexhp@uvic.c [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada (Canada)

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mineral Separation Techniques in Gold Recovery from Refractory Ores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au-Rich Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits of the Flin Flon Belt, Manitoba and Saskatchewan Banro Corporation: Investing in Long-Term Community...

455

Achieving Stakeholder Support for New Gold Developments that ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au-Rich Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide Deposits of the Flin Flon Belt, Manitoba and Saskatchewan Banro Corporation: Investing in Long-Term Community...

456

The trouble with the Local Bubble  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. : Astrophys. J. 658, Grenier, I. : Astron. Astrophys.stars of the Gould Belt (Grenier 2000) or the pas- sage of a

Welsh, Barry Y.; Shelton, Robin L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Late Cretaceous extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

extension in the hinterland of the Sevier thrust belt, northwestern Utah and southern Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Late...

458

Nancy Gammons: Four Sisters Farm and Watsonville Farmers' Market Manager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thing because were in a sandy belt, but underneath thatsand is a layer of sandy hardpan. Its very, very

Rabkin, Sarah

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Personal Data Address School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Belts (MIT); Pressure-Temperature-Time Evolution of Orogenic Belts (MIT); Isotope Geology (MIT of the Moon and Mars Educational History 1982 Ph.D. Geology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. (B.C. Burchfiel, advisor.) "Tectonic Evolution of the Aefjord-Sitas Area, Norway-Sweden" 1978 B.S. Geology

Rhoads, James

460

Method and apparatus for scientific analysis under low temperature vacuum conditions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for scientific analysis of a sample under low temperature vacuum conditions uses a vacuum chamber with a conveyor belt disposed therein. One end of the conveyor belt is a cool end in thermal contact with the cold stage of a refrigerator, whereas the other end of the conveyor belt is a warm end spaced from the refrigerator. A septum allows injection of a sample into the vacuum chamber on top of the conveyor belt for spectroscopic or other analysis. The sample freezes on the conveyor belt at the cold end. One or more windows in the vacuum chamber housing allow spectroscopic analysis of the sample. Following the spectroscopic analysis, the conveyor belt may be moved such that the sample moves toward the warm end of the conveyor belt where upon it evaporates, thereby cleaning the conveyor belt. Instead of injecting the sample by way of a septum and use of a syringe and needle, the present device may be used in series with capillary-column gas chromatography or micro-bore high performance liquid chromatography.

Winefordner, James D. (Gainesville, FL); Jones, Bradley T. (Gainesville, FL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Glossary Term - Van de Graaff Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uranus Uranus Previous Term (Uranus) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Vanadis) Vanadis Van de Graaff Generator A Van de Graaff generator discharges to a grounded metal sphere. A Van de Graaff generator is a device used to create a high voltage static charge. In this Van de Graaff generator, an electric motor pulls a latex belt over a felt covered pulley. Electrons are transferred from the felt to the belt as the belt pulls away from the pulley. The electrons ride the belt to the upper dome, where a pick-up wire transfers them from the belt to the dome. Each electron carries a negative charge and, since like charges repel, the electrons on the dome attempt to get as far away from each other as possible. At some point, too many electrons are placed on the dome. When this occurs the electrons attempt to reach the earth by leaping

462

Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Van Allen probes pinpoint driver of speeding electrons Los Alamos researchers believe they have solved a lingering mystery about how electrons within Earth's radiation belt can suddenly become energetic enough to kill orbiting satellites. July 25, 2013 Artist's rendering of mechanism within Van Allen radiation belts An artist's rendering of a mechanism within the Van Allen radiation belts that can accelerate electrons to satellite-killing energies. The mechanism was discovered by a group of scientists using data from NASA's Van Allen Probes (formerly known as the Radiation Belt Storm Probes). Researchers, led by Los Alamos National laboratory space physicist Geoffrey Reeves, believe that electromagnetic waves within the Van Allen belts themselves

463

Afrontsinglechap  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and stems that were dated as approximately the age of the Judith River Formation in central Montana. Garbarini (1957) mapped part of the Livingston volcanic center and...

464

Sensitivity Analysis Of Hydrological Parameters In Modeling Flow And Transport In The Unsaturated Zone Of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain Keni Zhang, Yu-Shu Wu,volcanic deposits at Yucca Mountain have been intensivelyhydraulic properties, Yucca Mountain Introduction Site

Zhang, Keni; Wu, Yu-Shu; Houseworth, James E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Assembling Dacite in a Continental Subduction Zone: A Case Study of Tauhara Volcano.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mount Tauhara is the largest dacitic volcanic complex of onshore New Zealand and comprises seven subaerial domes and associated lava and pyroclastic flows, with a (more)

Tutt, Chelsea May

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TOBI) side-scan sonar imagery, we measured the dimensions (diameter, height, slopes), shape, and texture of these volcanic edifices to further understanding of the geometric...

467

Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested by Gas- Turbine...

468

Traveling SIRCUS Tests Satellite Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... including sea level and surface temperatures, as well as phenomena such as oil spills, plankton blooms, wildfires, volcanic ash, and deforestation. ...

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

469

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemistry...

470

Geology of the southernmost Deschutes basin, Tumalo quadrangle, Deschutes County, Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Tumalo quadrangle lies approximately 30 kilometers behind the Cascade volcanic arc and marks the southernmost extent of continuously exposed Deschutes Formation rocks. Deschutes Formation (more)

[No author

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Recent Mafic Eruptions at Newberry Volcano and in the Central Oregon Cascades: Physical Volcanology and Implications for Hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mafic eruptions have been the dominant form of volcanic activity in central Oregon throughout the Holocene. These eruptions have produced cinder cones, extensive lava flows, (more)

McKay, Daniele

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Structure Of The Lower East Rift Zone Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a complex of dikes containing solidified magma from past volcanic eruptions that provide energy for the hydrothermal processes associated with the rift zone. Analysis of gravity...

473

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Investigation of the thermal...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the thermal regime and geologic history of the Cascade volcanic arc: First phase of a program for scientific drilling in the Cascade Range Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection...

474

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic Field From Seismic Tomographic Imaging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

475

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric...

476

An Integrated Mapping And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Remote Sensing Investigation Of The Structural Control For Fumarole Location In The Eburru Volcanic Complex, Kenya Rift Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

477

Erosion, Geological History, and Indigenous Agriculture: A Tale of Two Valleys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of volcanically driven subsidence of the young island ofsoil fertility; subsidence; weathering. I NTRODUCTIONprocesses of erosion and subsidence in?uenced pathways of

Vitousek, Peter M.; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Hilley, George; Kirch, Patrick V.; Ladefoged, Thegn N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

volcanic, and sedimentary processes. Detailed bathymetric, seismic reflection, and magnetic evidence reveals that rhyolitic lava flows underlie much of Yellowstone Lake and...

479

Slurry Erosion Resistance of Overlays Containing Boride Crystals ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Surface Protection for Enhanced Materials Performance: Science ... by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash...

480

Breakthrough: MFiX: Building Industry-Scale Machines in a Virtual World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This powerful virtual modeling software is making huge strides in energy efficiency in coal gasification processes, and also predicting volcanic eruptions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trans-mexican volcanic belt" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mantle Helium And Carbon Isotopes In Separation Creek Geothermal Springs, Three Sisters Area, Central Oregon- Evidence For Renewed Volcanic Activity Or A Long Term Steady State...

482

A Structure-Controlled Model For Hot Spring Exploration In Taiwan...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and sedimentary rocks, other than in volcanic environments. Local geothermal anomaly or heat of springs transfer by liquid convection other than conduction or radiation. The...

483

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 5431977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada; relationssurface phenomena and the geothermal reservoir, Chemicalapplication to volcanic- geothermal areas and landfills,

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Thermal Barrier Coatings for Resistance Against Attack by Molten Silicate Deposits from CMAS Sand, Volcanic Ash, or Coal Fly Ash Ingested...

486

Near-Surface CO2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada;volcanic system, USA Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, USAProvince system like the Dixie Valley (Nevada) geothermal

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Misinterpretation of Electrical Resistivity Data in Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Prospecting: a Case Study from the Taupo Volcanic Zone. In: Geological and Nuclear Sciences. World Geothermal Congress 2005; 20050424; Antalya, Turkey. New Zealand:...

489

TECHNICAL PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abatement of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Metallurgical & Materials Process Industry .......... ...... Hollow glass microspheres were produced using natural volcanic ...... Electrochemistry, Ekaterinburg Russia; 3University of Patras and Insti-.

490

Multi-port valve assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-port fluid valve apparatus is used to control the flow of fluids through a plurality of valves and includes a web, which preferably is a stainless steel endless belt. The belt has an aperture therethrough and is progressed, under motor drive and control, so that its aperture is moved from one valve mechanism to another. Each of the valve mechanisms comprises a pair of valve blocks which are held in fluid-tight relationship against the belt. Each valve block consists of a block having a bore through which the fluid flows, a first seal surrounding the bore and a second seal surrounding the first seal, with the distance between the first and second seals being greater than the size of the belt aperture. In order to open a valve, the motor progresses the belt aperture to where it is aligned with the two bores of a pair of valve blocks, such alignment permitting a flow of the fluid through the valve. The valve is closed by movement of the belt aperture and its replacement, within the pair of valve blocks, by a solid portion of the belt.

Guggenheim, S. Frederic (Teaneck, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Coal-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustion chamber  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to a fuel-feeding mechanism for a fluidized bed combustor. In accordance with the present invention a perforated conveyor belt is utilized in place of the fixed grid normally disposed at the lower end of the fluidized bed combustion zone. The conveyor belt is fed with fuel, e.g. coal, at one end thereof so that the air passing through the perforations dislodges the coal from the belt and feeds the coal into the fluidized zone in a substantially uniform manner.

Gall, Robert L. (Morgantown, WV)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt may be removed by cylindrical deraggers or pressurized air. The crushed materials may be fed onto the conveyor belt by a vibrating feed plate which shakes the materials so that they tend to lie flat.

Mayberry, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Municipal waste processing apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Municipal waste materials are processed by crushing the materials so that pieces of noncombustible material are smaller than a selected size and pieces of combustible material are larger than the selected size. The crushed materials are placed on a vibrating mesh screen conveyor belt having openings which pass the smaller, noncombustible pieces of material, but do not pass the larger, combustible pieces of material. Pieces of material which become lodged in the openings of the conveyor belt