National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tracking long-term finance

  1. Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd575748073739.pdf Cost:...

  2. Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI) Solar Trend Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbell, R.; Lowder, T.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

    2012-09-01

    This report is a summary of the finance trends for small-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) projects (PV <1 MW), large-scale PV projects (PV greater than or equal to 1 MW), and concentrated solar power projects as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The report presents REFTI data during the five quarterly periods from the fourth quarter of 2009 to the first half of 2011. The REFTI project relies exclusively on the voluntary participation of industry stakeholders for its data; therefore, it does not offer a comprehensive view of the technologies it tracks. Despite this limitation, REFTI is the only publicly available resource for renewable energy project financial terms. REFTI analysis offers usable inputs into the project economic evaluations of developers and investors, as well as the policy assessments of public utility commissions and others in the renewable energy industry.

  3. Long Term Innovative Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop Bryan Pivovar With Input/Feedback from Rod Borup (LANL), Debbie Myers (ANL), DOE and others as noted in presentation Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 Long Term Innovative Technologies National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Innovative/Long Term and RELEVANT Mission of DOE Mission of EERE (Applied Program) Mission of HFCT To enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells in

  4. 2012 Long Term NTSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expand Finance & Rates Involvement & Outreach Expand Involvement & Outreach Doing Business Expand Doing Business Skip navigation links Initiatives Columbia River Treaty Non...

  5. Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI): Snapshot of Recent Geothermal Financing Terms, Fourth Quarter 2009 - Second Half 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowder, T.; Hubbell, R.; Mendelsohn, M.; Cory, K.

    2012-09-01

    This report is a review of geothermal project financial terms as reported in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Renewable Energy Finance Tracking Initiative (REFTI). The data were collected over seven analysis periods from the fourth quarter (Q4) of 2009 to the second half (2H) of 2011.

  6. Long-Term Surveillance Plan...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Demonstration that licensing provisions were met. Information needed to forecast future ... Guidance for Implementing the Long-Term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title I ...

  7. Long-Term Stewardship Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study (“Study” or “Final Study”) to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources Defense...

  8. Long Term Care | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Care icon Federal employees can elect to participate in the Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) which provides long term care insurance to Federal employees,...

  9. Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  10. Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  11. Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Upcoming Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  12. Current Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  13. Current Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  14. Current Long-Term Operating Schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Long-Term Operating Schedule Print This schedule is also available as an .xls spreadsheet.

  15. Long-term Contract Information and Registrations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE/FE orders granting long-term authorization to export liquefied natural gas by vessel require authorization holders to file long-term contract information with DOE/FE for LNG exports and long...

  16. Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Long-term Stewardship

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-term Stewardship Environmental Management System Pollution Prevention Information Repository Index Long-term Stewardship About Long-term Stewardship Groundwater sampling The goal of the LTS Program is the long-term protection of human health and the environment from hazards associated with residual contamination at former Environmental Restoration Project (ER) sites, and minimization of Sandia's environmental liability by ensuring environmental compliance with the requirements provided in

  18. Long Term Innovative Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Term Innovative Technologies Long Term Innovative Technologies Presentation by Bryan Pivovar on DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies, Fuel Cell Presolicitation Workshop - Lakewood, CO March 16, 2010 fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_mar10_pivovar.pdf (1.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Resonance-Stabilized Anion Exchange Polymer Electrolytes Advanced Cathode Catalysts 2011 Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop

  19. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term ...

  20. Recommendation 188: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    88: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Recommendation 188: Long-Term Stewardship Implementation ORSSAB offers Recommendations and Comments on the Long-Term Stewardship ...

  1. Long-Term Stewardship - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Stewardship About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Hanford Cultural Resources LTS Home Page LTS Project Management LTS Transition and Timeline LTS Execution LTS Background LTS Information Management LTS Fact Sheets / Briefings LTS In The News LTS Related Links LTS Contact Us Contact Us Long-Term Stewardship Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Welcome The Hanford LTS Program is responsible for the management

  2. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report |...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report (8.41 MB) More Documents & Publications Long-Term Surveillance ...

  3. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction ...

  4. Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (943.69 KB) More Documents & Publications Site Transition Framework ...

  5. Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework ...

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    green? Click image to learn more Next Enduring Environmental Stewardship Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Long-Term Strategy for Environmental...

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory: Long-Term Environmental Stewardship...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability (pdf) From today for years to come Over the ...

  8. Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements Transition of Long-Term Response Action Management Requirements The purpose of this memorandum is to provide you ...

  9. Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-term measurements of submicrometer aerosol chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Title: Long-term measurements of ...

  10. Titanium for long-term tritium storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-12-01

    Due to the reduction of nuclear weapon stockpile, there will be an excess of tritium returned from the field. The excess tritium needs to be stored for future use, which might be several years away. A safe and cost effective means for long term storage of tritium is needed. Storing tritium in a solid metal tritide is preferred to storing tritium as a gas, because a metal tritide can store tritium in a compact form and the stored tritium will not be released until heat is applied to increase its temperature to several hundred degrees centigrade. Storing tritium as a tritide is safer and more cost effective than as a gas. Several candidate metal hydride materials have been evaluated for long term tritium storage. They include uranium, La-Ni-Al alloys, zirconium and titanium. The criteria used include material cost, radioactivity, stability to air, storage capacity, storage pressure, loading and unloading conditions, and helium retention. Titanium has the best combination of properties and is recommended for long term tritium storage.

  11. Long-Term Wind Power Variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

  12. Long-term control of root growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burton, Frederick G.; Cataldo, Dominic A.; Cline, John F.; Skiens, W. Eugene

    1992-05-26

    A method and system for long-term control of root growth without killing the plants bearing those roots involves incorporating a 2,6-dinitroaniline in a polymer and disposing the polymer in an area in which root control is desired. This results in controlled release of the substituted aniline herbicide over a period of many years. Herbicides of this class have the property of preventing root elongation without translocating into other parts of the plant. The herbicide may be encapsulated in the polymer or mixed with it. The polymer-herbicide mixture may be formed into pellets, sheets, pipe gaskets, pipes for carrying water, or various other forms. The invention may be applied to other protection of buried hazardous wastes, protection of underground pipes, prevention of root intrusion beneath slabs, the dwarfing of trees or shrubs and other applications. The preferred herbicide is 4-difluoromethyl-N,N-dipropyl-2,6-dinitro-aniline, commonly known as trifluralin.

  13. Managing Records for the Long Term - 12363

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, John V.; Gueretta, Jeanie

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for managing vast amounts of information documenting historical and current operations. This information is critical to the operations of the DOE Office of Legacy Management. Managing legacy records and information is challenging in terms of accessibility and changing technology. The Office of Legacy Management is meeting these challenges by making records and information management an organizational priority. The Office of Legacy Management mission is to manage DOE post-closure responsibilities at former Cold War weapons sites to ensure the future protection of human health and the environment. These responsibilities include environmental stewardship and long-term preservation and management of operational and environmental cleanup records associated with each site. A primary organizational goal for the Office of Legacy Management is to 'Preserve, Protect, and Share Records and Information'. Managing records for long-term preservation is an important responsibility. Adequate and dedicated resources and management support are required to perform this responsibility successfully. Records tell the story of an organization and may be required to defend an organization in court, provide historical information, identify lessons learned, or provide valuable information for researchers. Loss of records or the inability to retrieve records because of poor records management processes can have serious consequences and even lead to an organisation's downfall. Organizations must invest time and resources to establish a good records management program because of its significance to the organization as a whole. The Office of Legacy Management will continue to research and apply innovative ways of doing business to ensure that the organization stays at the forefront of effective records and information management. DOE is committed to preserving records that document our nation's Cold War legacy, and the Office of Legacy

  14. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance ... to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M). ...

  15. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ...

  16. Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume under a sloping caprock Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Numerical simulation experiments on the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume ...

  17. Why is a long-term strategy important?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Why is a long-term strategy important? Why is a long-term strategy important? Because we protect the environment. That is our practice today, and it is our commitment to a...

  18. LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LONG-TERM COLLOID MOBILIZATION AND COLLOID-FACILITATED TRANSPORT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN A SEMI-ARID VADOSE ZONE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LONG-TERM COLLOID ...

  19. Long-term Contract Information and Registrations | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Long-Term Contract Information and Registrations at U.S. LNG Export Facilities DOEFE ... contract information with DOEFE for LNG exports and long-term natural gas supply. ...

  20. Building America Case Study: Initial and Long Term Movement of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 years that examined both the system mechanics of this approach as well as long- term ... initial installation and long-term use due to expansion and contraction of materials. ...

  1. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  2. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R.

    2009-02-01

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  3. Long-Term Grout Performance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Grout Performance Long-Term Grout Performance Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance (46.57 KB) More Documents & Publications Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance Estimating Waste Inventory and Waste Tank Characterization DOE EM Project Experience & Lessons Learned for In Situ Decommissioning (Feb. 2013)

  4. Global recycling services for short and long term risk reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arslan, M.; Grygiel, J.M.; Drevon, C.; Lelievre, F.; Lesage, M.; Vincent, O.

    2013-07-01

    New schemes are being developed by AREVA in order to provide global solutions for safe and non-proliferating management of used fuels, thereby significantly contributing to overall risks reduction and sustainable nuclear development. Utilities are thereby provided with a service through which they will be able to send their used fuels and only get returned vitrified and compacted waste, the only waste remaining after reprocessing. This waste is stable, standard and has demonstrated capability for very long term interim storage. They are provided as well with associated facilities and all necessary services for storage in a demonstrated safely manner. Recycled fuels, in particular MOX, would be used either in existing LWRs or in a very limited number of full MOX reactors (like the EPR reactor), located in selected countries, that will recycle MOX so as to downgrade the isotopic quality of the Pu inventories in a significant manner. Reprocessed uranium also can be recycled. These schemes, on top of offering demonstrated operational advantages and a responsible approach, result into optimized economics for all shareholders of the scheme, as part of reactor financing (under Opex or Capex form) will be secured thanks to the value of the recycled flows. It also increases fuel cost predictability as recycled fuel is not subject to market fluctuations as much and allows, in a limited span of time, for clear risk mitigation. (authors)

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) | Department of Energy Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) Vehicle Technologies Office: Long-Term Lightweight Materials Research (Magnesium and Carbon Fiber) In the long term, advanced materials such as magnesium and carbon fiber reinforced composites could reduce the weight of some components by 50-75 percent. Magnesium Even though magnesium (Mg) can reduce component weight by more than 60 percent, its use is currently limited

  6. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Fletcher, Jerald 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT The project currently is composed of six specific tasks - three...

  7. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL...

  8. Strontium Isotopes Test Long-Term Zonal Isolation of Injected...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water after Hydraulic Fracturing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Strontium Isotopes Test Long-Term Zonal Isolation of Injected and Marcellus Formation Water after ...

  9. Long-Term Biological Monitoring of an Impaired Stream: Implications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Major components of the long-term program included testing and monitoring of invertebrate and fish toxicity, bioindicators of fish health, fish contaminant accumulation, and ...

  10. Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Strategy for Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Hawks nesting Bike rider commutes to work at LANL A bobcat walking on LANL property Weather monitoring at LANL ...

  11. Using Social Media for Long-Term Branding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Marketing and Outreach Peer Exchange Call Series: Using Social Media for Long-Term Branding, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, February 27, 2014.

  12. An Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analytical Framework for Long Term Policy for Commercial Deployment and Innovation in Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technology in the United States Jump to: navigation, search...

  13. LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF RADIONUCLIDE VERTICAL MIGRATION IN SOILS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    NUCLEAR POWER PLANT EXCLUSION ZONE Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF RADIONUCLIDE VERTICAL MIGRATION IN SOILS OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER ...

  14. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Chen; Zelinka, Mark D.; Dessler, Andrew E.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2015-12-11

    The analyses of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 simulations suggest that climate models with more positive cloud feedback in response to interannual climate fluctuations also have more positive cloud feedback in response to long-term global warming. Ensemble mean vertical profiles of cloud change in response to interannual and long-term surface warming are similar, and the ensemble mean cloud feedback is positive on both timescales. However, the average long-term cloud feedback is smaller than the interannual cloud feedback, likely due to differences in surface warming pattern on the two timescales. Low cloud cover (LCC) change in response to interannual and long-term global surface warming is found to be well correlated across models and explains over half of the covariance between interannual and long-term cloud feedback. In conclusion, the intermodel correlation of LCC across timescales likely results from model-specific sensitivities of LCC to sea surface warming.

  15. Long-Term Stewardship Baseline Report and Transition Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristofferson, Keith

    2001-11-01

    Long-term stewardship consists of those actions necessary to maintain and demonstrate continued protection of human health and the environment after facility cleanup is complete. As the Department of Energys (DOE) lead laboratory for environmental management programs, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) administers DOEs long-term stewardship science and technology efforts. The INEEL provides DOE with technical, and scientific expertise needed to oversee its long-term environmental management obligations complexwide. Long-term stewardship is administered and overseen by the Environmental Management Office of Science and Technology. The INEEL Long-Term Stewardship Program is currently developing the management structures and plans to complete INEEL-specific, long-term stewardship obligations. This guidance document (1) assists in ensuring that the program leads transition planning for the INEEL with respect to facility and site areas and (2) describes the classes and types of criteria and data required to initiate transition for areas and sites where the facility mission has ended and cleanup is complete. Additionally, this document summarizes current information on INEEL facilities, structures, and release sites likely to enter long-term stewardship at the completion of DOEs cleanup mission. This document is not intended to function as a discrete checklist or local procedure to determine readiness to transition. It is an overarching document meant as guidance in implementing specific transition procedures. Several documents formed the foundation upon which this guidance was developed. Principal among these documents was the Long-Term Stewardship Draft Technical Baseline; A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship, Volumes I and II; Infrastructure Long-Range Plan; Comprehensive Facility Land Use Plan; INEEL End-State Plan; and INEEL Institutional Plan.

  16. Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Report, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan This document constitutes the first edition of a long-term research and development (R&D) plan for nuclear technology in the United States. The federally-sponsored nuclear technology programs of the United States are almost exclusively the province of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The nuclear energy areas in DOE include, but are

  17. Long-Term Stewardship Related Information | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communication & Engagement » Long-Term Stewardship » Long-Term Stewardship Related Information Long-Term Stewardship Related Information DOE Orders & Policies DOE O 200.l - Information Management Program, 09/30/1996 DOE O 430.1B - Real Property Asset Management, 09/24/2003 DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, 11/29/2010 DOE O 458.1 Chg 2, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, 06/06/2011 DOE O 430.1B Chg 2, Real Property

  18. Update on DOE/NNSA Long Term Stewardship Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 13, 2014 Committee meeting Tom Longo DOE, Explained What the Office of Legacy Management Does and how the Sites Across the DOE Complex are Managed for Long Term Stewardship.

  19. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report LTS-O&M is at the core of LM efforts to fulfill a strategy that includes objectives ...

  20. Long-Term Stewardship Science and Technology Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, J.K.; Nickelson, R.A.

    2002-05-16

    To ensure technology developed for long-term stewardship will meet existing requirements, a review of requirements was performed. In addition to identifying existing science and technology related requirements, gaps and conflicts of requirements were identified.

  1. Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Haney R. VanHorn

    2007-07-31

    This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

  2. Long-term Stewardship Science and Technology Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Jaimee Kristen; Nickelson, Reva Anne

    2002-08-01

    To ensure technology developed for long-term stewardship will meet existing requirements, a review of requirements was performed. In addition to identifying existing science and technology related requirements, gaps and conflicts of requirements were identified.

  3. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presented at the NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop in Washington, DC, August 11-12, 2011. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach ...

  4. The relationship between interannual and long-term cloud feedbacks...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and long-term cloud feedbacks Citation Details In-Document Search This ... Publication Date: 2015-12-11 OSTI Identifier: 1240921 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL--679388 Journal ID: ISSN ...

  5. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern U.S. | Department of Energy Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern U.S. Operational Simulation Tools and Long Term Strategic Planning for High Penetrations of PV in the Southeastern U.S. EPRI logo.jpg In collaboration with the Tennessee Valley Authority Southern Company, the Sacramento Municipal Utility District, the California Independent System Operator, and other partners,

  6. Why is a long-term strategy important?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Why is a long-term strategy important? Why is a long-term strategy important? Because we protect the environment. That is our practice today, and it is our commitment to a sustainable future. Tomorrow Planning for smart power use Planning for smart power use LANL's Sanitary Effluent Reclamation Facility, key to reducing the Lab's discharge of liquid. Recycling and reusing water 1000th TRU Waste Shipment Event Celebrating green goals Today TA-03 during summer monsoon TA-03 during summer monsoon

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental sustainability Strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Los Alamos National Laboratory announces strategy for long-term environmental sustainability Provides a blueprint for protecting the environment while accomplishing the Lab's national security missions. March 1, 2013 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  8. Long-Term Stewardship Program Science and Technology Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan McDonald

    2002-09-01

    Many of the United States’ hazardous and radioactively contaminated waste sites will not be sufficiently remediated to allow unrestricted land use because funding and technology limitations preclude cleanup to pristine conditions. This means that after cleanup is completed, the Department of Energy will have long-term stewardship responsibilities to monitor and safeguard more than 100 sites that still contain residual contamination. Long-term stewardship encompasses all physical and institutional controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms required to protect human health and the environment from the hazards remaining. The Department of Energy Long-Term Stewardship National Program is in the early stages of development, so considerable planning is still required to identify all the specific roles and responsibilities, policies, and activities needed over the next few years to support the program’s mission. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory was tasked with leading the development of Science and Technology within the Long-Term Stewardship National Program. As part of that role, a task was undertaken to identify the existing science and technology related requirements, identify gaps and conflicts that exist, and make recommendations to the Department of Energy for future requirements related to science and technology requirements for long-term stewardship. This work is summarized in this document.

  9. Project Development for Long-Term Tribal Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Development and Finance Course Curriculum Terminology Guide Project Development and Finance Course Curriculum Terminology Guide This document provides definitions for terminology and acronyms used in the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Program professional courses. DOE-IE_Course_Terminology_Guide.pdf (185.64 KB) More Documents & Publications Financing and Investing in Tribal Renewable Energy Projects Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale

  10. ARM - Field Campaign - Long-Term Microwave Radiometer Intercomparison

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsLong-Term Microwave Radiometer Intercomparison ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Long-Term Microwave Radiometer Intercomparison 2001.04.01 - 2001.09.30 Lead Scientist : Richard Cederwall For data sets, see below. Summary Make the spare MWR operational. Ingest data from the spare MWR. Input the output data of the spare MWR and ingest to VAP. Provide data to IOP participants.

  11. Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan Summary, Long-Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan In 1998, DOE established the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC) to provide advice to the Secretary and to the Director, Office of Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology (NE), on the broad range of non-defense DOE nuclear technology programs. The NERAC recommended development of a long-range R&D program. This R&D

  12. Idaho National Laboratory Site Long-Term Stewardship Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. E. Olaveson

    2006-07-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established long-term stewardship programs to protect human health and the environment at sites where residual contamination remains after site cleanup. At the Idaho National Laboratory Site, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERLA) long-term stewardship activities performed under the aegis of regulatory agreements, the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order for the Idaho National Laboratory, and state and federal requirements are administered primarily under the direction of the Idaho Cleanup Project. It represents a subset of all on-going environmental activity at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. This plan provides a listing of applicable CERCLA long-term stewardship requirements and their planned and completed implementation goals. It proffers the Long-Term Stewardship Environmental Data Warehouse for Sitewide management of environmental data. This plan will be updated as needed over time, based on input from the U.S. Department of Energy, its cognizant subcontractors, and other local and regional stakeholders.

  13. Cogeneration of electricity: Cost-effective over long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, R.L.; Barham, J. )

    1991-08-01

    This article describes the determination of the cost-effectiveness of a cogeneration project five years after it became operational in 1984. The cogeneration project uses digester sludge gas from a wastewater treatment plant. The topics covered include the history of electrical cogeneration at the site, cogeneration economics in the short term and the long term, and the factors in cost-effectiveness.

  14. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  15. Long-Term Water Projections and Climate Change | U.S. DOE Office...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Water Projections and Climate Change Biological and Environmental Research (BER) ... Long-Term Water Projections and Climate Change Model scenarios predict increased scarcity ...

  16. Using Social Media for Long-Term Branding | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Using Social Media for Long-Term Branding Using Social Media for Long-Term Branding Better Buildings Residential Network Marketing and Outreach Peer Exchange Call Series: Using ...

  17. China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan AgencyCompany Organization Government of China...

  18. 2003 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-07-01

    Radioactive waste was created by the Federal Government and private industry at locations around the country in support of national defense, research, and civilian power-generation programs. If not controlled, much of this legacy waste would remain hazardous to human health and the environment indefinitely. Current technology does not allow us to render this waste harmless, so the available methods to control risk rely on consolidation, isolation, and long-term management of the waste. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has an obligation to safely control the radioactive waste and to inform and train future generations to maintain and, perhaps, improve established protections. DOE is custodian for much of the radioactive and other hazardous waste under control of the Federal Government. DOE established the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974 and the Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program and the Surplus Facilities Management Program in the 1980s. Congress passed the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) in 1978. These federal programs and legislation were established to identify, remediate, and manage legacy waste. Remedial action is considered complete at a radioactive waste site when the identified hazardous material is isolated and the selected remedial action remedy is in place and functioning. Radioactive or other hazardous materials remain in place as part of the remedy at many DOE sites. Long-term management of radioactive waste sites incorporates a set of actions necessary to maintain protection of human health and the environment. These actions include maintaining physical impoundment structures in good repair to ensure that they perform as designed, preventing exposure to the wastes by maintaining access restrictions and warnings, and recording site conditions and activities for future custodians. Any actions, therefore, that will prevent exposure to the radioactive waste now or in the future

  19. Long term prediction and the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talman, R.

    1990-09-01

    Successful operation of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will depend on the stable circulation of particles for tens of millions of turns around the rings, in the presence of small nonlinear deflecting fields. One design challenge is to set specifications for the maximum allowable field imperfections of this sort, consistent with the required. stability. Another challenge is to plan for the inclusion of field compensating elements that will ameliorate the effects of errors. The tools'' available for projecting the long term stability are theoretical, both analytic and numerical, and experimental. These aspects are reviewed. 19 refs.

  20. Corrosion of Spent Nuclear Fuel: The Long-Term Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney C. Ewing

    2004-10-07

    Spent nuclear fuel, essentially U{sub 2}, accounts for over 95% of the total radioactivity of all of the radioactive wastes in the United States that require disposal, disposition or remediation. The UO{sub 2} in SNF is not stable under oxiding conditions and may also be altered under reducing conditions. The alteration of SNF results in the formation of new uranium phases that can cause the release or retardation of actinide and fission product radionuclides. Over the long term, and depending on the extent to which the secondary uranium phases incorporate fission products and actinides, these alteration phases become the near-field source term.

  1. Interactive long-term simulation for power system restoration planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fountas, N.A.; Hatziargyriou, N.D. [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece)] [National Technical Univ., Athens (Greece); Orfanogiannis, C.; Tasoulis, A. [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)] [Public Power Corp., Athens (Greece)

    1997-02-01

    The problem of restoring a power system following a complete blackout is complex and multi-faceted. Many control actions have to be performed on time, while constraints such as power balance and system stability have to be carefully respected. In this paper, the application of long-term dynamic analysis in studying frequency and voltage responses due to load and generation mismatches in isolated systems or during extension of the existing system in the restoration phase is presented. Simulation results covering the main steps of the Hellenic power system restoration process following a recent total blackout are presented and discussed.

  2. Regulating for the long term: SMCRA and acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shea, C.W.

    1995-12-31

    With the passage of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), regulators and industry representatives expected to solve the problem of pollution of the Nation`s waterways caused by acidic discharges from coal mines. Eighteen years after the passage of SMCRA, hard issues of predicting, regulating and treating acid mine drainage remain. Acid mine drainage is most common in the coal seams of the Midwest and Appalachia: Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Illinois, and Tennessee. This article discusses regulation of coal mines and acid mine drainage for the long term.

  3. COLLOQUIUM: Long Term Energy Future for New Jersey | Princeton Plasma

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Lab November 30, 2016, 4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium, PPPL (284 cap.) COLLOQUIUM: Long Term Energy Future for New Jersey Dr. Ralph Izzo Public Service Enterprise Group (PSEG) Colloquium Committee: The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory 2016-2017 Colloquium Committee is comprised of the following people. Please feel free to contact them by e-mail regarding any possible speakers or topics for future colloquia. Carol Ann Austin, caustin@pppl.gov Soha Aslam, saslam@pppl.gov

  4. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Kendall Waterman Draka Cableteq USA. Prysmian Group Track 2 Project Officer: William Vandermeer Total Project Funding: $3,222,398 April 23, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research Geothermal energy production can be greatly aided

  5. Long-term global nuclear energy and fuel cycle strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1997-09-24

    The Global Nuclear Vision Project is examining, using scenario building techniques, a range of long-term nuclear energy futures. The exploration and assessment of optimal nuclear fuel-cycle and material strategies is an essential element of the study. To this end, an established global E{sup 3} (energy/economics/environmental) model has been adopted and modified with a simplified, but comprehensive and multi-regional, nuclear energy module. Consistent nuclear energy scenarios are constructed using this multi-regional E{sup 3} model, wherein future demands for nuclear power are projected in price competition with other energy sources under a wide range of long-term demographic (population, workforce size and productivity), economic (price-, population-, and income-determined demand for energy services, price- and population-modified GNP, resource depletion, world-market fossil energy prices), policy (taxes, tariffs, sanctions), and top-level technological (energy intensity and end-use efficiency improvements) drivers. Using the framework provided by the global E{sup 3} model, the impacts of both external and internal drivers are investigated. The ability to connect external and internal drivers through this modeling framework allows the study of impacts and tradeoffs between fossil- versus nuclear-fuel burning, that includes interactions between cost, environmental, proliferation, resource, and policy issues.

  6. Adapting Advances in Remediation Science to Long-Term Surveillance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, D.M.

    2006-07-01

    Several facets of groundwater remediation stand to gain from the advances made during recent years in disciplines that contribute to remediation science. Engineered remedies designed to aggressively remove subsurface contamination should benefit from this progress, and more passive cleanup methods and the long-term monitoring of such passive approaches may benefit equally well if not more. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) has adopted a strategic plan that is designed to take advantage of technological improvements in the monitoring and assessment of both active and passive groundwater remedies. Flexible adaptation of new technologies, as they become available, to long-term surveillance at LM sites is expected to reduce site stewardship costs while ensuring the future protection of human health and the environment. Some of the technologies are expected to come from government initiatives that focus on the needs of subsurface monitoring. Additional progress in monitoring science will likely result from continual improvements in our understanding of contaminant fate-and-transport processes in groundwater and the vadose zone. (authors)

  7. The Long-Term Inflow and Structural Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUTHERLAND,HERBERT J; JONES,PERRY L.; NEAL,BYRON A.

    2000-10-17

    The Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program is collecting long-term, continuous inflow and structural response data to characterize the extreme loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8-m blades is being used as the first test turbine for this test program. This turbine and its two sister turbines are located in Bushland, TX a test site that exposes the turbines to a wind regime that is representative of a Great Plains commercial site. The turbines and their inflow are being characterized with 60 measurements: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response, and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. These three-axis anemometers are placed approximately 2-diameters upstream of the turbine in a pattern designed to describe the inflow. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data from the various instruments are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system that features a time-synchronized continuous data stream that is telemetered from the turbine rotor. The data, taken continuously, are automatically divided into 10-minute segments and archived for analysis. Preliminary data are presented to illustrate the operation of the turbine and the data acquisition and analysis system.

  8. Long-Term Monitoring of Permeable Reactive Barriers - Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, L.

    2001-04-12

    The purpose of this project is to conduct collaborative research to evaluate and maximize the effectiveness of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) with a broad-based working group including representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) and its project partner, Battelle, are leading the DoD effort with funding from DoD's Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) and Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is coordinating the DOE effort with support from Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area (SCFA), a research program under DOEs Office of Science and Technology. The National Risk Management Research Laboratory's Subsurface Protection and Remediation Division is leading EPA's effort. The combined effort of these three agencies allows the evaluation of a large number of sites. Documents generated by this joint project will be reviewed by the participating agencies' principal investigators, the Permeable Barriers Group of the Remediation Technologies Development Forum (RTDF), and the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC). The technical objectives of this project are to collect and review existing field data at selected PRB sites, identify data gaps, conduct additional measurements, and provide recommendations to DOE users on suitable long-term monitoring strategies. The specific objectives are to (1) evaluate geochemical and hydraulic performance of PRBs, (2) develop guidelines for hydraulic and geochemical characterization/monitoring, and (3) devise and implement long-term monitoring strategies through the use of hydrological and geochemical models. Accomplishing these objectives will provide valuable information regarding the optimum configuration and lifetime of barriers at specific sites. It will also permit

  9. Demonstrating the Safety of Long-Term Dry Storage - 13468

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCullum, Rod; Brookmire, Tom; Kessler, John; Leblang, Suzanne; Levin, Adam; Martin, Zita; Nesbit, Steve; Nichol, Marc; Pickens, Terry

    2013-07-01

    Commercial nuclear plants in the United States were originally designed with the expectation that used nuclear fuel would be moved directly from the reactor pools and transported off site for either reprocessing or direct geologic disposal. However, Federal programs intended to meet this expectation were never able to develop the capability to remove used fuel from reactor sites - and these programs remain stalled to this day. Therefore, in the 1980's, with reactor pools reaching capacity limits, industry began developing dry cask storage technology to provide for additional on-site storage. Use of this technology has expanded significantly since then, and has today become a standard part of plant operations at most US nuclear sites. As this expansion was underway, Federal programs remained stalled, and it became evident that dry cask systems would be in use longer than originally envisioned. In response to this challenge, a strong technical basis supporting the long term dry storage safety has been developed. However, this is not a static situation. The technical basis must be able to address future challenges. Industry is responding to one such challenge - the increasing prevalence of high burnup (HBU) used fuel and the need to provide long term storage assurance for these fuels equivalent to that which has existed for lower burnup fuels over the past 25 years. This response includes a confirmatory demonstration program designed to address the aging characteristics of HBU fuel and set a precedent for a learning approach to aging management that will have broad applicability across the used fuel storage landscape. (authors)

  10. Zambia : long-term generation expansion study - executive summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Buehring, W.; Veselka, T.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-28

    The objective of this study is to analyze possible long-term development options of the Zambian electric power system in the period up to 2015. The analysis involved the hydro operations studies of the Zambezi river basin and the systems planning studies for the least-cost generation expansion planning. Two well-known and widely accepted computer models were used in the analysis: PC-VALORAGUA model for the hydro operations and optimization studies and the WASP-III Plus model for the optimization of long-term system development. The WASP-III Plus model is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory's Energy and Power Evaluation Model (ENPEP). The analysis was conducted in close collaboration with the Zambia Electricity Supply Corporation (ZESCO). On the initiative from The World Bank, the sponsor of the study, ZESCO formed a team of experts that participated in the analysis and were trained in the use of computer models. Both models were transferred to ZESCO free of charge and installed on several computers in the ZESCO corporate offices in Lusaka. In September-October 1995, two members of the ZESCO National Team participated in a 4-week training course at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago, U.S.A., focusing on the long-term system expansion planning using the WASP and VALORAGUA models. The hydropower operations studies were performed for the whole Zambezi river basin, including the full installation of the Kariba power station, and the Cahora Bassa hydro power station in Mozambique. The analysis also included possible future projects such as Itezhi-Tezhi, Kafue Gorge Lower, and Batoka Gorge power stations. As hydropower operations studies served to determine the operational characteristics of the existing and future hydro power plants, it was necessary to simulate the whole Zambezi river basin in order to take into account all interactions and mutual influences between the hydro power plants. In addition, it allowed for the optimization of reservoir management

  11. SULFURIC ACID REMOVAL PROCESS EVALUATION: LONG-TERM RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary M. Blythe; Richard McMillan

    2002-07-03

    longer-term (approximately 25-day) full-scale tests on two different units. The longer-term tests were conducted to confirm the effectiveness of the sorbents tested over extended operation on two different boilers, and to determine balance-of-plant impacts. The first long-term test was conducted on FirstEnergy's BMP, Unit 3, and the second test was conducted on AEP's Gavin Plant, Unit 1. The Gavin Plant testing provided an opportunity to evaluate the effects of sorbent injected into the furnace on SO{sub 3} formed across an operating SCR reactor. This report presents the results from those long-term tests. The tests determined the effectiveness of injecting commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant) and byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP) for sulfuric acid control. The results show that injecting either slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, this overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NOX control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The long-term tests also determined balance-of-plant impacts from slurry injection during the two tests. These include impacts on boiler back-end temperatures and pressure drops, SCR catalyst properties, ESP performance, removal of other flue gas species, and flue gas opacity. For the most part the balance-of-plant impacts were neutral to positive, although adverse effects on ESP performance became an issue during the BMP test.

  12. Collaboration in long-term stewardship at DOE Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moren, R. J.; Zeisloft, J. H.; Feist, E. T.; Brown, D.; Grindstaff, K. D.

    2013-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan, DOE/RL-2010-35 Rev 1. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large

  13. Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Long-term impacts of aerosols on the vertical development of clouds and precipitation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-term impacts of aerosols on ...

  14. Evalution of long-term surface-retrieved cloud-droplet number...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evalution of long-term surface-retrieved cloud-droplet number concentration with in situ aircraft observations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evalution of long-term ...

  15. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term ...

  16. Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cyclability of Li...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cyclability of Li-O2 Batteries Surface ... Identified key factors that affect the long term cycle life of Li-O2 batteries under full ...

  17. Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2014 Year-End Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance (LTS–O&M) subtask has a critical long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) role for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of...

  18. MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF ...

  19. Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from Point of View of Encapsulant Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from Point of View of ...

  20. Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term When the Missouri Agricultural Energy Savings Team-A Revolutionary ...

  1. MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED FINES DUE TO DAM-EMBANKMENT INTERFACIAL DISLOCATIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MODELING OF LONG-TERM FATE OF MOBILIZED ...

  2. LONG-TERM PERIODICITY VARIATIONS OF THE SOLAR RADIUS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Z. N.; Xie, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the long-term periodicity variations of the solar radius, daily solar radius data from 1978 February to 2000 September at the Calern Observatory are used. Continuous observations of the solar radius are difficult due to the weather, seasonal effects, and instrument characteristics. Thus, to analyze these data, we first use the Dixon criterion to reject suspect values, then we measure the cross-correlation between the solar radius and sunspot numbers. The result indicates that the solar radius is in complete antiphase with the sunspot numbers and shows lead times of 74 months relative to the sunspot numbers. The Lomb-Scargle and date compensated discrete Fourier transform methods are also used to investigate the periodicity of the solar radius. Both methods yield similar significance periodicities around {approx}1 yr, {approx}2.6 yr, {approx}3.6 yr, and {approx}11 yr. Possible mechanisms for these periods are discussed. The possible physical cause of the {approx}11 yr period is the cyclic variation of the magnetic pressure of the concentrated flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone.

  3. Long-term average performance benefits of parabolic trough improvements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, R.; Gaul, H.W.; Kearney, D.; Rabl, A.

    1980-03-01

    Improved parabolic trough concentrating collectors will result from better design, improved fabrication techniques, and the development and utilization of improved materials. The difficulty of achieving these improvements varies as does their potential for increasing parabolic trough performance. The purpose of this analysis is to quantify the relative merit of various technology advancements in improving the long-term average performance of parabolic trough concentrating collectors. The performance benefits of improvements are determined as a function of operating temperature for north-south, east-west, and polar mounted parabolic troughs. The results are presented graphically to allow a quick determination of the performance merits of particular improvements. Substantial annual energy gains are shown to be attainable. Of the improvements evaluated, the development of stable back-silvered glass reflective surfaces offers the largest performance gain for operating temperatures below 150/sup 0/C. Above 150/sup 0/C, the development of trough receivers that can maintain a vacuum is the most significant potential improvement. The reduction of concentrator slope errors also has a substantial performance benefit at high operating temperatures.

  4. Long term performance of the Waterloo denitrification barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, W.D.; Cherry, J.A.

    1997-12-31

    Beginning in 1991 a series of laboratory tests and small scale field trials were initiated to test the performance of an innovative permeable reactive barrier for treatment of nitrate from septic systems. The barrier promotes denitrification by providing an energy source in the form of solid organic carbon mixed into the porous media material. Advantages of the system for nitrate treatment are that the reaction is passive and in situ and it is possible to incorporate sufficient carbon mass in conveniently sized barriers to potentially provide treatment for long periods (decades) without the necessity for maintenance. However, longevity can only be demonstrated by careful long term monitoring of field installations. This paper documents four years of operating history at three small scale field trials; two where the denitrification barrier is installed as a horizontal layer positioned in the unsaturated zone below conventional septic system infiltration beds and one where the barrier is installed as a vertical wall intercepting a septic system plume at a downgradient location. The barriers have successfully attenuated 50-100% of NO{sup -}{sub 3}-N levels of up to 170 mg/L and treatment has remained consistent over the four year period in each case, thus considerable longevity is indicated. Other field trials have demonstrated this technology to be equally effective in treating nitrogen contamination from other sources such as landfill leachate and farm field runoff.

  5. Long-term proliferation and safeguards issues in future technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keisch, B.; Auerbach, C.; Fainberg, A.; Fiarman, S.; Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.; Lemley, J.R.; O'Brien, J.

    1986-02-01

    The purpose of the task was to assess the effect of potential new technologies, nuclear and non-nuclear, on safeguards needs and non-proliferation policies, and to explore possible solutions to some of the problems envisaged. Eight subdivisions were considered: New Enrichment Technologies; Non-Aqueous Reprocessing Technologies; Fusion; Accelerator-Driven Reactor Systems; New Reactor Types; Heavy Water and Deuterium; Long-Term Storage of Spent Fuel; and Other Future Technologies (Non-Nuclear). For each of these subdivisions, a careful review of the current world-wide effort in the field provided a means of subjectively estimating the viability and qualitative probability of fruition of promising technologies. Technologies for which safeguards and non-proliferation requirements have been thoroughly considered by others were not restudied here (e.g., the Fast Breeder Reactor). The time scale considered was 5 to 40 years for possible initial demonstration although, in some cases, a somewhat optimistic viewpoint was embraced. Conventional nuclear-material safeguards are only part of the overall non-proliferation regime. Other aspects are international agreements, export controls on sensitive technologies, classification of information, intelligence gathering, and diplomatic initiatives. The focus here is on safeguards, export controls, and classification.

  6. The economics of long-term global climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report is intended to provide an overview of economic issues and research relevant to possible, long-term global climate change. It is primarily a critical survey, not a statement of Administration or Department policy. This report should serve to indicate that economic analysis of global change is in its infancy few assertions about costs or benefits can be made with confidence. The state of the literature precludes any attempt to produce anything like a comprehensive benefit-cost analysis. Moreover, almost all the quantitative estimates regarding physical and economic effects in this report, as well as many of the qualitative assertions, are controversial. Section I provides background on greenhouse gas emissions and their likely climatic effects and on available policy instruments. Section II considers the costs of living with global change, assuming no substantial efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Section III considers costs of reducing these emissions, though the available literature does not contain estimates of the costs of policies that would, on the assumptions of current climate models, prevent climate change altogether. The individual sections are not entirely compartmentalized, but can be read independently if necessary.

  7. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites, Palos...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Role of the Department of Energy ......Long- Term Surveillance Program ......Poorly drained areas, stream side communities, and flood ...

  8. Method for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during long-term neutron dosimetry exposure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruddy, Francis H.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for detecting and correcting for isotope burn-in during-long term neutron dosimetry exposure. In one embodiment, duplicate pairs of solid state track recorder fissionable deposits are used, including a first, fissionable deposit of lower mass to quantify the number of fissions occuring during the exposure, and a second deposit of higher mass to quantify the number of atoms of for instance .sup.239 Pu by alpha counting. In a second embodiment, only one solid state track recorder fissionable deposit is used and the resulting higher track densities are counted with a scanning electron microscope. This method is also applicable to other burn-in interferences, e.g., .sup.233 U in .sup.232 Th or .sup.238 Pu in .sup.237 Np.

  9. Site transition framework for long-term surveillance and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-01

    This document provides a framework for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites where DOE may have anticipated long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTSM) responsibilities. It is a tool to help facilitate a smooth transition from remediation to LTSM, providing a systematic process for affected parties to utilize in analyzing the baseline to understand and manage the actions from EM mission completion through a site’s transition into LTSM. The framework is not meant to provide an exhaustive list of the specific requirement and information that are needed. Sites will have unique considerations that may not be adequately addressed by this tool, and it is anticipated that a team comprised of the transferring and receiving organization will use judgment in utilizing this augmenting with other DOE guidance. However the framework should be followed to the extent possible at each site; and adapted to accommodate unique site-specific requirements, needs, and documents. Since the objective of the tool is facilitate better understanding of the conditions of the site and the actions required for transfer, the transition team utilizing the checklist is expected to consult with management of both the receiving and transferring organization to verify that major concerns are addressed. Ideally, this framework should be used as early in the remediation process as possible. Subsequent applications of the Site Transition Framework (STF) to the site should be conducted periodically and used to verify that all appropriate steps have been or will be taken to close-out the site and that actions by both organization are identified to transfer the site to LTSM. The requirements are provided herein.

  10. Long Term Corrosion/Degradation Test Six Year Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. K. Adler Flitton; C. W. Bishop; M. E. Delwiche; T. S. Yoder

    2004-09-01

    The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) contains neutron-activated metals from non-fuel, nuclear reactor core components. The Long-Term Corrosion/Degradation (LTCD) Test is designed to obtain site-specific corrosion rates to support efforts to more accurately estimate the transfer of activated elements to the environment. The test is using two proven, industry-standard methodsdirect corrosion testing using metal coupons, and monitored corrosion testing using electrical/resistance probesto determine corrosion rates for various metal alloys generally representing the metals of interest buried at the SDA, including Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, Beryllium S200F, Aluminum 6061, Zircaloy-4, low-carbon steel, and Ferralium 255. In the direct testing, metal coupons are retrieved for corrosion evaluation after having been buried in SDA backfill soil and exposed to natural SDA environmental conditions for times ranging from one year to as many as 32 years, depending on research needs and funding availability. In the monitored testing, electrical/resistance probes buried in SDA backfill soil will provide corrosion data for the duration of the test or until the probes fail. This report provides an update describing the current status of the test and documents results to date. Data from the one-year and three-year results are also included, for comparison and evaluation of trends. In the six-year results, most metals being tested showed extremely low measurable rates of general corrosion. For Type 304L stainless steel, Type 316L stainless steel, Inconel 718, and Ferralium 255, corrosion rates fell in the range of no reportable to 0.0002 mils per year (MPY). Corrosion rates for Zircaloy-4 ranged from no measurable corrosion to 0.0001 MPY. These rates are two orders of magnitude lower than those specified in the

  11. Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast, Devens and Easthampton, Massachusetts | Department of Energy Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast, Devens and Easthampton, Massachusetts Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast, Devens and Easthampton, Massachusetts In this project, Building Science Corporation evaluated the long-term performance of

  12. Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research algal_biofuels_factsheet.pdf (96.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review 2015 Peer Review Presentations-Algal Feedstocks

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - DETL_long_term_inverter_testing_wcomments.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. LONG-TERM INVERTER OPERATION DEMONSTRATION SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES Department 6335 Solar Systems Sigifredo Gonzalez, Scott Kuszmaul, Abraham Ellis 34th IEEE PV Specialists Conference Philadelphia, PA 12 June, 2009 LONG-TERM INVERTER OPERATION RE-CHARACTERIZATION REQUIREMENTS Purpose Analyze the effects of long term operation and exposure on the performance of the utility interconnected PV inverter Parameters Identify the influential

  14. Summary Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Impact Statement Final LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY DOE/EIS-0423-S1 September 2013 SUMMARY AND GUIDE FOR STAKEHOLDERS U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management Washington, DC AVAILABILITY OF THIS FINAL LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT AND STORAGE OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY SUPPLEMENTAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT For additional information on this

  15. The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structural health monitoring Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The application of compressed sensing to long-term acoustic emission-based structural health monitoring ...

  16. Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  17. Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  18. Finding Long-Term Solutions for Nuclear Waste | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-Term Solutions for Nuclear Waste Finding Long-Term Solutions for Nuclear Waste December 21, 2015 - 1:00pm Addthis The Department of Energy is working toward long-term solutions for nuclear waste storage. | Photo by <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/mandj98/">James Marvin Phelps</a>. The Department of Energy is working toward long-term solutions for nuclear waste storage. | Photo by James Marvin Phelps. Franklin (Lynn) Orr Franklin (Lynn) Orr Under Secretary for

  19. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Citation ...

  20. Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... were met * Information needed to forecast future site-surveillance and monitoring ... Guidance for Implementing the Long- Term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title I ...

  1. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prev Next Title: Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's...

  2. Site Transition Summary: Clean-up Completion to Long Term Stewardship

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the August 13, 2014 Committee meeting Tom Longo DOE, Provided Information on the Long Term Stewardship Process that the Office of Legacy Management is Responsible for.

  3. Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site Mexican Hat, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Mexican Hat, Utah, disposal site. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Mexican Hat disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

  4. Financing Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A growing variety of options are available for financing an LED street lighting replacement program. One or another approach may be preferable based on the system ownership and maintenance model in...

  5. Long-term leaching tests with high ash fusion Maryland coal slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browman, M.G. )

    1991-03-01

    The main objective of this project was to investigate the potential environmental impact of the storage or disposal of coal gasification residues. In this regard, this investigation examined the quality of leachate produced during the long-term outdoor storage slag generated at the TVA 200-t/d Texaco gasifier in Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Evaluative laboratory extraction tests were also conducted on both the coarse and fine slag. Leachate quality was tracked in both the surface water and the water at depth after it percolated through the slag pile (leachate well water) by measuring pH and conductivity on a weekly basis and toxic trace elements and other chemical species quarterly or at longer intervals. The major species observed in the leachate well water were Ca and Mg cations as well as sulfate anions. The average electrical conductivity measured in the leachate well water was 2503 {mu}mhos/cm. The measured pH decreased from an initial value of 8.2 and stabilized at about 7.1 with occasional excursions to values as low as 6.3 during dry periods. Concurrently, sulfate concentrations averaged 1083 mg/l with occasional peaks as high as 2600 mg/l. Fe and Mn concentrations measured in the leachate well waters averaged 2.0 and 1.68 mg/l, respectively. Concentrations of species for which Primary Maximum Contaminant Limits (MCLs) for public drinking water supplies have been established were generally below the primary limits with the exception of Se and F which exceeded the limits occasionally. Concentrations of Fe, Mn, sulfate, and total dissolved solids were markedly above the Secondary MCLs set for these species. 35 refs., 2 figs., 21 tabs.

  6. Monitoring Climate Finance and ODA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investment finance toward low-carbon and climate-resilient solutions. In this complex landscape, keeping track of financial support for adaptation and mitigation will be a...

  7. Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury In addition to banning the export of elemental mercury from the United States as of January 1, 2013, the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (MEBA) (Public Law No. 110-414) requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a facility for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury (generated with the U.S.). DOE used the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)

  8. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of Uranium by Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria This overarching aim of this project was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed

  9. Long-Term Strategic Review (LTSR) of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Office of Long Term Stewardship LONG-TERM STEWARDSHIP STUDY Volume I - Report Prepared to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement: Natural Resources Defense Council, et al. v. Richardson, et al., Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C. Dec. 12, 1998). Final Study October 2001 - i - Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Long-term Stewardship Study ("Study" or "Final Study") to comply with the terms of a settlement agreement between DOE, the Natural Resources

  10. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells | Department of Energy Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Green version of the EERE PowerPoint template, for use with PowerPoint 97 through 2004. long_term_temp_egs_wells_peer2013.pdf (385.43 KB) More Documents &

  11. Development and Update of Long-Term Energy and GHG Emission Macroecono...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Approach: Create a Long Term Base Case Major Inputs 9 Light Vehicles (Car and Light Truck) Heavy Vehicles (GVW Class 3-8) Medium: Class 3-6 Truck Heavy:...

  12. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. ...

  13. Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline ...

  14. Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Long-Term Testing of Geothermal...

  15. Long-term surveillance plan for the Green River, Utah, disposal site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Green River, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Green River disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM). This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. The Green River, Utah, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  16. Long-term surveillance plan for the Green River, Utah disposal site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Green River, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Green River disposal cell. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM). This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. The Green River, Utah, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  17. Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research algalbiofuelsfactsheet.pdf (96.06 KB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet 2016 National ...

  18. Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Drive U.S. Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Algal Biofuels Algal Biofuels: Long-Term Energy Benefits Driv e U.S. Research Algal biofuels can help build U.S. energy security as part of a broad national strategy to cultivate ...

  19. Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Compare SCR catalyst performance with ULSD and Soy B20 through engine ...

  20. Alaska LNG Project LLC- 14-96-LNG Long Term Export

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an application filed on July 18, 2014, by, Alaska LNG Project LLC submits this application requesting long-term authorization to export 20...

  1. Long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GC-52 provides legal advice to DOE regarding the long-term management of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF). SNF is nuclear fuel that has been used as fuel in a reactor...

  2. Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long-term Decline of Aggregate Fuel Use per Cargo-ton-mile of Commercial Trucking; A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel ...

  3. Long-Term Flow Test No. 1, Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flow Test No. 1, Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Long-Term Flow Test No. 1, Roosevelt Hot Springs,...

  4. Energy Department Issues Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Energy Department Issues Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship of Nuclear Weapons Complex January 19, 2001 The Department of Energy (DOE) issues today a Report to Congress ...

  5. Guidance for implementing the long-term surveillance program for UMTRA Project Title I Disposal Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This guidance document has two purposes: it provides guidance for writing site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSP) and it describes site surveillance, monitoring, and long-term care techniques for Title I disposal sites of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.). Long-term care includes monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures needed to protect public health and safety and the environment after remedial action is completed. This document applies to the UMTRCA-designated Title I disposal sites. The requirements for long-term care of the Title I sites and the contents of the LTSPs are provided in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations (10 CFR Section 40.27) provided in Attachment 1.

  6. Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term Missouri Entices With Rebates, Lends for the Long-Term When the Missouri Agricultural Energy Savings Team-A Revolutionary Opportunity (MAESTRO) first reached out to farmers to offer loans for efficiency upgrades, they were surprised to find the farmers often declined this offer. What MAESTRO soon realized was that they needed to find another way to generate initial interest. MAESTRO decided to offer rebates for three levels of

  7. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells | Department of Energy Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Project objectives: 1. Optical fibers that resist hydrogen darkeningŽ for several months instead of hours and days at 300 deg. C and higher. 2. Tube

  8. Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long Term Environment and Economic Impacts of Coal Liquefaction in China The project currently is composed of six specific tasks - three research tasks, two outreach and training tasks, and one project management and communications task. Task 1 addresses project management and communication. Research activities focused on Task 2 (Describe

  9. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen

  10. INL-Site Idaho Completion Project Long Term Stewardship Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olaveson, B.

    2007-09-17

    This Strategic Plan provides a brief historical overview of ICP long-term stewardship at the INL Site and the major goals and strategies that will drive the continued implementation of long-term stewardship in the future. The specific activities and processes that will be required to implement these goals should be outlined within an implementation plan and within implementing procedures and work plans.

  11. DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 5: Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Technologies | Department of Energy 5: Long-Term Innovative Technologies DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 5: Long-Term Innovative Technologies Report from Breakout Group 5 of the DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop, March 16-17, 2010 fuelcell_pre-solicitation_wkshop_innovative_tech.pdf (73.87 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 4: Low Temperature Fuel Cell System BOP & FUEL Processors For

  12. 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Applications | Department of Energy 5 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2015 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by contacting the Docket Room Manager at 202-586-9478 or

  13. 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Applications | Department of Energy 6 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications 2016 - LNG Export, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Re-Exports & Long Term Natural Gas Applications Please note: To view the complete docket listing, please click the 'Docket Index' link pertaining to a particular docket. Docket Indexes and Service Lists that are not listed can be obtained by contacting the Docket Room Manager at 202-586-9478 or

  14. Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems | Department of Energy on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Impact of Biodiesel on the Near-term Performance and Long-term Durability of Advanced Aftertreatment Systems Compare SCR catalyst performance with ULSD and Soy B20 through engine testing deer09_williams.pdf (1.02 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Biofuel Impacts on Aftertreatment Devices

  15. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  16. Long-term degradation (or improvement?) of cementitious grout/concrete for waste disposal at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepho, M.G.

    1997-12-31

    If grout and/or concrete barriers and containments are considered for long-term (500 yrs to 100,000 ) waste disposal, then long-term degradation of grout/cement materials (and others) need to be studied. Long-term degradations of a cementitious grout monolith (15.4mW x 10.4mH x 37.6mL) and its containment concrete shell and asphalt shell (each 1-m thick) were analyzed. The main degradation process of the concrete shell was believed to be fractures due to construction joints, shrinkage, thermal stress, settlement, and seismic events. A scenario with fractures was modeled (flow and transport model) for long-term risk performance (out to a million yrs). Even though the concrete/grout is expected to fracture, the concrete/grout chemistry, which has high Ph value, is very beneficial in causing calcite deposits from calcium in the water precipitating in the fractures. These calcite deposits will tend to plug the fracture and keep water from entering. The effectiveness of such plugging needs to be studied more. It`s possible that the plugged fractures are more impermeable than the original concrete/grout. The long-term performance of concrete/grout barriers will be determined by its chemistry, not its mechanical properties.

  17. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  18. Financing Small Business Upgrades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: Financing Small Business Upgrades, call slides and discussion summary, October 25, 2012.

  19. High Temperature Steam Electrolysis: Demonstration of Improved Long-Term Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; R. C. O'Brien; G. Tao

    2011-11-01

    Long-term performance is an ongoing issue for hydrogen production based on high-temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE). For commercial deployment, solid-oxide electrolysis stacks must achieve high performance with long-term degradation rates of {approx}0.5%/1000 hours or lower. Significant progress has been achieved toward this goal over the past few years. This paper will provide details of progress achieved under the Idaho National Laboratory high temperature electrolysis research program. Recent long-term stack tests have achieved high initial performance with degradation rates less than 5%/khr. These tests utilize internally manifolded stacks with electrode-supported cells. The cell material sets are optimized for the electrolysis mode of operation. Details of the cells and stacks will be provided along with details of the test apparatus, procedures, and results.

  20. Long-Term Testing of Geothermal Wells in the Coso Hot Springs KGRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

    1987-01-20

    Three wells have been drilled by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power at the Coso Hot Springs KGRA. A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co’s well 71A-7). This paper presents the equipment and techniques involved and the results from the long-term test conducted between December 1985 and February 1986. 1 tab., 9 figs.

  1. LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan LWRS Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program - Joint R&D Plan To address the challenges associated with pursuing commercial nuclear power plant operations beyond 60 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs: DOE-NE's Light Water

  2. Long-term surveillance plan for the Tuba City, Arizona disposal site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Tuba City, Arizona, describes the site surveillance activities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM) (10 CFR {section}40.27).

  3. Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Savings | Department of Energy Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings Greensburg Implements High-Efficiency Building Codes to Achieve Long-Term Energy Savings The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. <em>Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952</em> The LEED Platinum K-12 school in Greensburg, Kansas. Photo from Joah Bussert, Greensburg GreenTown, NREL 19952 On May 4, 2007, a massive tornado

  4. Development of long-term performance models for radioactive waste forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Pierce, Eric M.

    2011-03-22

    The long-term performance of solid radioactive waste is measured by the release rate of radionuclides into the environment, which depends on corrosion or weathering rates of the solid waste form. The reactions involved depend on the characteristics of the solid matrix containing the radioactive waste, the radionuclides of interest, and their interaction with surrounding geologic materials. This chapter describes thermo-hydro-mechanical and reactive transport models related to the long-term performance of solid radioactive waste forms, including metal, ceramic, glass, steam reformer and cement. Future trends involving Monte-Carlo simulations and coupled/multi-scale process modeling are also discussed.

  5. DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development | Department of Energy Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development DOE Announces Up to $15.3 Million for Long-Term Hydrogen Vehicle Development August 14, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON- U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary Clarence H. "Bud" Albright, Jr. today announced the selection of 10 cost-shared hydrogen storage research and development projects, which will receive up to $15.3 million over five years, subject to annual

  6. Delamination Failures in Long-Term Field Aged PV Modules from Point of View of Encapsulant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint presentation was originally given by Tsuyoshi Shioda of Mitsui Chemicals, Inc. on Feb. 26, 2014 during the opening session of the 2013 NREL PV Module Reliability Workshop. It summarizes the study of long-term, field-aged photovoltaic modules with typical delamination failures from the point of view of the encapsulant.

  7. Challenges for Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Long-Term Energy Models: Modeling Energy Use and Energy Efficiency James Sweeney Stanford University Director, Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency Professor, Management Science and Engineering Presentation to EIA 2008 Energy Conference 34 ! Years of Energy Information and Analysis Some Modeling History * Original Federal Energy Administration Demand Models in PIES and IEES (1974) - Residential, Industrial, Commercial Sectors * Econometric models * Dynamic specification * Allowed matrix of

  8. Mixer pump long term operations plan for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, J.J.

    1994-09-07

    This document provides the general Operations Plan for performance of the mixer pump long term operations for Tank 241-SY-101 mitigation of gas retention and periodic release in Tank 101-SY. This operations plan will utilize a 112 kW (150 hp) mixing pump to agitate/suspend the particulates in the tank.

  9. Long term contracts, expansion, innovation and stability: North Dakota's lignite mines thrive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchsbaum, L.

    2009-08-15

    North Dakota's lignite coal industry is mainly located in three countries in the central part of the state. Its large surface lignite mines are tied through long-term (20-40 years) contracts to power plants. The article talks about operations at three of the most productive mines - the Freedom mine, Falkirk mine and Center Mine. 4 figs.

  10. Development of weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, R.; Martinez, D.A.; Martinez, H.E.; Nelson, T.O.; Ortega, R.E.; Rofer, C.K.; Romero, W.; Stewart, J.; Trujillo, V.L.

    1998-12-31

    Weld closure stations for plutonium long-term storage containers have been designed, fabricated, and tested for the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) at the TA-55 Plutonium Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. ARIES is a processing system used for the dismantlement of the plutonium pits from nuclear weapons. ARIES prepares the extracted-plutonium in a form which is compatible with long-term storage and disposition options and meets international inspection requirements. The processed plutonium is delivered to the canning module of the ARIES line, where it is packaged in a stainless steel container. This container is then packaged in a secondary container for long-term storage. Each of the containers is hermetically sealed with a full penetration weld closure that meets the requirements of the ASME Section IX Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Welding is performed with a gas tungsten arc process in an inert atmosphere of helium. The encapsulated helium in the nested containers allows for leak testing the weld closure and container. The storage package was designed to meet packaging requirements of DOE Standard 3013-96 for long-term storage of plutonium metal and oxides. Development of the process parameters, weld fixture, weld qualification, and the welding chambers is discussed in this paper.

  11. DOE Announces Release of Long-Term Strategic Review of Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy announced today the release of the Long-Term Strategic Review of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The congressionally-mandated study provides an overview of the SPR and addresses key challenges that will impact the Reserve’s ability to carry out its energy security mission.

  12. 3D printed cellular solid outperforms traditional stochastic foam in long-term mechanical response

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maiti, A.; Small, W.; Lewicki, J.; Weisgraber, T. H.; Duoss, E. B.; Chinn, S. C.; Pearson, M. A.; Spadaccini, C. M.; Maxwell, R. S.; Wilson, T. S.

    2016-04-27

    3D printing of polymeric foams by direct-ink-write is a recent technological breakthrough that enables the creation of versatile compressible solids with programmable microstructure, customizable shapes, and tunable mechanical response including negative elastic modulus. However, in many applications the success of these 3D printed materials as a viable replacement for traditional stochastic foams critically depends on their mechanical performance and micro-architectural stability while deployed under long-term mechanical strain. To predict the long-term performance of the two types of foams we employed multi-year-long accelerated aging studies under compressive strain followed by a time-temperature-superposition analysis using a minimum-arc-length-based algorithm. The resulting master curvesmore » predict superior long-term performance of the 3D printed foam in terms of two different metrics, i.e., compression set and load retention. To gain deeper understanding, we imaged the microstructure of both foams using X-ray computed tomography, and performed finite-element analysis of the mechanical response within these microstructures. As a result, this indicates a wider stress variation in the stochastic foam with points of more extreme local stress as compared to the 3D printed material, which might explain the latter’s improved long-term stability and mechanical performance.« less

  13. Innovative Strategy For Long Term Monitoring Of Metal And Radionuclide Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Millings, Margaret R.; Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.

    2014-01-08

    Many government and private industry sites that were once contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. The sites will require long term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality at these "legacy" sites. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site, the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. There is a need to optimize the performance and manage the cost of long term surveillance and monitoring at their sites. Currently, SRNL is initiating a pilot field test using alternative protocols for long term monitoring of metals and radionuclides. A key component of the approach is that monitoring efforts are focused on measurement of low cost metrics related to hydrologic and chemical conditions that control contaminant migration. The strategy combines careful monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions with measurement of master variables such as chemical surrogates along with a smaller number of standard well analyses. In plumes contaminated with metals, master variables control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. Significant changes in these variables will result in conditions whereby the plume may not be stable and therefore can be used to predict possible plume migration. Conversely, concentration measurements for all types of contaminants in groundwater are a lagging indicator plume movement - major changes contaminant concentrations indicate that contamination has migrated. An approach based on measurement of master variables and explicit monitoring of hydrologic boundary conditions combined with traditional metrics should lead

  14. Long-term risk stabilization of the Rocky Flats Plant residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melberg, T.A.

    1994-12-31

    The liquid and solid residues continue to be a concern at Rocky Flats, primarily due to safety aspects of long-term storage and of the need for processing them into a form for ultimate disposal. Currently, Rocky Flats is processing the low-level solutions from bottles and tanks by direct cementation for storage and disposal. Plans for actinide precipitation of the high-level solutions are being finalized with an anticipated completion date of 2 to 3 yr. The solid residues present a more difficult challenge because of the numerous forms that these exist. Rocky Flats is developing several strategies to handle these materials for safe long-term storage and eventual disposal.

  15. Long-term management of AAR-affected structures - An international perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlwood, R.G.; Solymar, Z.V.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of the paper is to review international practice and comment on progress made in the long-term management of existing AAR-affected dams and hydroelectric plants. A updated detailed worldwide listing which now includes 104 AAR-affected structures constructed since 1900 will be presented. The listing gives summary data on the year of construction, the year that significant problems were noted, aggregate and cement types, measured expansion rates, test data, time to initial deterioration, duration of reaction, damage to the structures and effects on equipment, and repairs or replacement. A comprehensive bibliography will also be given. Analysis of the database and significant case histories will be used to identify issues affecting dam safety, plant operations, remedial measures and long-term performance of AAR-affected structures. The presentation will be illustrated by several case histories where remedial measures have been implemented.

  16. Summary of the engineering analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubrin, J.W., Rahm-Crites, L.

    1997-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is reviewing ideas for the long-term management and use of its depleted uranium hexafluoride. DOE owns about 560,000 metric tons (over a billion pounds) of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This material is contained in steel cylinders located in storage yards near Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the K-25 Site) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. On November 10, 1994, DOE announced its new Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program by issuing a Request for Recommendations and an Advance Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (59 FR 56324 and 56325). The first part of this program consists of engineering, costs and environmental impact studies. Part one will conclude with the selection of a long-term management plan or strategy. Part two will carry out the selected strategy.

  17. Long-Term Spatial Data Preservation and Archiving: What Are the Issues?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLEAKLY, DENISE R.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is moving towards Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) of many environmental restoration sites that cannot be released for unrestricted use. One aspect of information management for LTS is geospatial data archiving. This report discusses the challenges facing the DOE LTS program concerning the data management and archiving of geospatial data. It discusses challenges in using electronic media for archiving, overcoming technological obsolescence, data refreshing, data migration, and emulation. It gives an overview of existing guidance and policy and discusses what the United States Geological Service (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) are doing to archive the geospatial data that their agencies are responsible for. In the conclusion, this report provides issues for further discussion around long-term spatial data archiving.

  18. Test methods for determining short and long term VOC emissions from latex paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krebs, K.; Lao, H.C.; Fortmann, R.; Tichenor, B.

    1998-09-01

    The paper discusses an evaluation of latex paint (interior, water based) as a source of indoor pollution. A major objective of the research is the development of methods for predicting emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over time. Test specimens of painted gypsumboard are placed in dynamic flow-through test chambers. Samples of the outlet air are collected on Tenax sorbents and thermally desorbed for analysis by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection. These tests produce short- and long-term data for latex paint emissions of Texanol, 2-2(-butoxyethoxy)-ethanol, and glycols. Evaluation of the data shows that most of the Texanol emissions occur within the first few days, and emissions of the glycols occur over several months. This behavior may be described by an evaporative mass transfer process that dominates the short-term emissions, while long-term emissions are limited by diffusion processes within the dry paint-gypsumboard.

  19. Resilience and Robustness in Long-Term Planning of the National Energy and Transportation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibanez, Eduardo; Lavrenz, Steven; Gkritza, Konstantina; Mejia-Giraldo, Diego A.; Krishnan, Venkat; McCalley, James D.; Somani, Arun K.

    2016-01-01

    The most significant energy consuming infrastructures and the greatest contributors to greenhouse gases for any developed nation today are electric and freight/passenger transportation systems. Technological alternatives for producing, transporting and converting energy for electric and transportation systems are numerous. Addressing costs, sustainability and resilience of electric and transportation needs requires long-term assessment since these capital-intensive infrastructures take years to build with lifetimes approaching a century. Yet, the advent of electrically driven transportation, including cars, trucks and trains, creates potential interdependencies between the two infrastructures that may be both problematic and beneficial. We are developing modelling capability to perform long-term electric and transportation infrastructure design at a national level, accounting for their interdependencies. The approach combines network flow modelling with a multi-objective solution method. We describe and compare it to the state of the art in energy planning models. An example is presented to illustrate important features of this new approach.

  20. 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE PERFORMANCE OF ALTERNATE MATERIALS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skidmore, E.; Hoffman, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2010-02-24

    The Model 9975 shipping package specifies the materials of construction for its various components. With the loss of availability of material for two components (cane fiberboard overpack and Viton{reg_sign} GLT O-rings), alternate materials of construction were identified and approved for use for transport (softwood fiberboard and Viton{reg_sign} GLT-S O-rings). As these shipping packages are part of a long-term storage configuration at the Savannah River Site, additional testing is in progress to verify satisfactory long-term performance of the alternate materials under storage conditions. The test results to date can be compared to comparable results on the original materials of construction to draw preliminary conclusions on the performance of the replacement materials.

  1. Rio Blanco, Colorado, Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site, for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 13 and 14, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  2. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Coal-Liquefaction Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1980-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of J.M. Deutch (Under Secretary of DOE), E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has studied and reviewed currently funded coal-liquefaction technologies. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term development of coal-liquefaction technologies. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  3. EIS-0480: Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Two agencies of the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Reclamation and National Park Service, are jointly preparing a Long-Term Experimental and Management Plan for the Glen Canyon Dam and an EIS for adoption of the Plan. The Glen Canyon Dam, on the Colorado River in northern, Arizona, generates hydroelectric power that is marketed by DOE's Western Area Power Administration, a cooperating agency.

  4. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  5. Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results for 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 11 and 12, 2009. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectroscopy and for tritium using the conventional and enriched methods.

  6. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Shale-Oil Recovery (FERWG-III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on shale-oil recovery. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term prospects for shale-oil availability. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  7. Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.

    2008-06-30

    On March 19, 2008, policy makers, emergency managers, and medical and Public Health officials convened in Seattle, Washington, for a workshop on Catastrophic Incident Recovery: Long-Term Recovery from an Anthrax Event. The day-long symposium was aimed at generating a dialogue about restoration and recovery through a discussion of the associated challenges that impact entire communities, including people, infrastructure, and critical systems.

  8. DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop - Breakout Group 5: Long-Term Innovative Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 2010 BREAKOUT GROUP 5: LONG TERM INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES PARTICIPANTS NAME ORGANIZATION Kateryna Artyushkova University of New Mexico Iouri Balachov 4D Power Jim Boncella Los Alamos National Laboratory Gerry DeCullo TreadStone Kevin Colbow Ballard Power Systems Chris Detjen Next Energy Don Gervasio University of Arizona Will James Savannah River National Laboratory Sridhas Kanusi UTC Power Nancy Kariuki Argonne National Laboratory John Kerr Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Lennie

  9. Physical Stability of Long-Term Surface Barriers-Assessment of Potentially Disruptive Natural Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ] a -" m HI BHI-00145 Rev. 00 Physical Stability of Long-Term Surface Barriers - Assessment of Potentially Disruptive Natural Events Authors N. R. Wing IT Hanford, Inc. F. M. Corpuz Bechtel Hanford, Inc. K. L. Petersen Pacific Northwest Laboratoy A. M. Tallman Westinghouse Hanford Company Date Published May 1995 HANFORD Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Flichland, Washington Approved for Public Release .

  10. Hydrogen Storage Technologies: Long-Term Commercialization Approach with First Products First

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Manufacturing R&D Workshop Washington, DC Glenn Rambach August 11, 2011 Potential market area for fuel cells (or other power plants). Defined by peak power vs. cost per unit power capacity (W vs. $/kW) for typical applications currently satisfied by legacy technologies. Auto Transit bus 2-cycle scooter Portable generator Wheelchair Fork lift Telecom backup Strategic portable

  11. Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012)

  12. Long-term stability of organic carbon-stimulated chromatereduction in contaminated soils, and its relation to manganese redoxstatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton,Steve R.; Newville, Matthew; Rao, William

    2007-03-13

    In-situ reduction of toxic Cr(V1) to less hazardous Cr(II1)is becoming a popular strategy for remediating contaminated soils.However, the long term stability of reduced Cr remains to be understood,especially given the common presence of MnfIIIJV) oxides that reoxidizeCr(II1). This 4.6 year laboratory study tracked Cr and Mn redoxtransformations in soils contaminated with Cr(V1) which were then treatedwith different amounts of organic carbon (OC). Changes in Cr and Mnoxidation states within soils were directly and nondestructively measuredusing micro X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. Chromatereduction was roughly lst-order, and the extent of reduction was enhancedwith higher OC additions. However, significant Cr(||1) reoxidationoccurred in soils exposed to the highest Cr(V1) concentrations (2,560 mgkg"'). Transient Cr(II1) reoxidation up to 420 mg kg1 was measured at 1.1years after OC treatment, followed by further reduction. Chromateconcentrations increased by 220 mg kgm1a t the end of the study (4.6years) in one soil. The causal role that Mn oxidation state had inreoxidizing Cr was supported by trends in Mn K-edge energies. Theseresults provide strong evidence for longterm dependence of soil Croxidation states on balances between OC availability and Mn redoxstatus.

  13. Sandia Energy - Finance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Finance Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Solar Market Transformation Finance FinanceTara Camacho-Lopez2015-03-20T19:23:33+00:00 Many...

  14. X-ray enhancement and long-term evolution of swift J1822.31606

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benli, Onur; al??kan, ?.; Ertan, .; Alpar, M. A. [Sabanc? University, Orhanl?-Tuzla, ?stanbul 34956 (Turkey); Trmper, J. E. [Max-Planck-Institut fr extraterrestrische Physik, Geissenbachstrasse, 85740 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Kylafis, N. D., E-mail: onurbenli@sabanciuniv.edu [Physics Department and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, 71003 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the X-ray enhancement and the long-term evolution of the recently discovered second 'low-B magnetar' Swift J1822.3-1606 in the frame of the fallback disk model. During a soft gamma burst episode, the inner disk matter is pushed back to larger radii, forming a density gradient at the inner disk. Subsequent relaxation of the inner disk could account for the observed X-ray enhancement light curve of Swift J1822.3-1606. We obtain model fits to the X-ray data with basic disk parameters similar to those employed to explain the X-ray outburst light curves of other anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma repeaters. The long period (8.4 s) of the neutron star can be reached by the effect of the disk torques in the long-term accretion phase ((1-3) 10{sup 5} yr). The currently ongoing X-ray enhancement could be due to a transient accretion epoch, or the source could still be in the accretion phase in quiescence. Considering these different possibilities, we determine the model curves that could represent the long-term rotational and the X-ray luminosity evolution of Swift J1822.3-1606, which constrain the strength of the magnetic dipole field to the range of (1-2) 10{sup 12} G on the surface of the neutron star.

  15. Secure Long Term Storage of Waste Products at the Karlsruhe Research Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graf, A.; Merx, H.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-27

    Due to the political situation in Germany there will presumably be no final disposal for radioactive waste in the next 30 years. This means, that the operators of nuclear facilities have to ensure a secure long term intermediate storage for radioactive waste products. The Karlsruhe Research Center operated and cooperated with different nuclear research facilities and laboratories with hot cells, which are now dismantled. During operation and decommissioning of the nuclear facilities radioactive waste was produced. The Central Decontamination Department (HDB) of the Research Center Karlsruhe has been conditioning radioactive waste into waste products for final disposal. Until the opening of a final disposal the resulting waste products will have to be stored at the HDB. To ensure secure long term storage, quality preserving measures will have to be taken. For example, the corrosion-preventing coating of the containers has to be kept intact. In case of damage the container has to be repaired or should be replaced. Another long term protection measure is the casting of drums in concrete inside the containers. This provides an additional barrier layer in case of drum corrosion. At HDB 46,500 m{sup 3} of radioactive waste products are in intermediate storage. The main project of the next few years will be the realization of the quality measures. In this paper the different methods are described in detail.

  16. Long-Term Probability Distribution of Wind Turbine Planetary Bearing Loads (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Z.; Xing, Y.; Guo, Y.; Dong, W.; Moan, T.; Gao, Z.

    2013-04-01

    Among the various causes of bearing damage and failure, metal fatigue of the rolling contact surface is the dominant failure mechanism. The fatigue life is associated with the load conditions under which wind turbines operate in the field. Therefore, it is important to understand the long-term distribution of the bearing loads under various environmental conditions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 750-kW Gearbox Reliability Collaborative wind turbine is studied in this work. A decoupled analysis using several computer codes is carried out. The global aero-elastic simulations are performed using HAWC2. The time series of the drivetrain loads and motions from the global dynamic analysis are fed to a drivetrain model in SIMPACK. The time-varying internal pressure distribution along the raceway is obtained analytically. A series of probability distribution functions are then used to fit the long-term statistical distribution at different locations along raceways. The long-term distribution of the bearing raceway loads are estimated under different environmental conditions. Finally, the bearing fatigue lives are calculated.

  17. Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Looney, Brian B.; Seaman, John; Kmetz, Thomas

    2013-01-10

    A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the

  18. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian M.; Xue, Kai; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; McGrath, Steve; Storkey, Jonathan; et al

    2015-04-07

    Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receivingmore » nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P < 0.0001). The z values also varied significantly with different functional genes involved in carbon (C), N, P, and sulfur (S) cycling and with various phylogenetic groups (archaea, bacteria, and fungi). Similarly, the plant SARs increased significantly (P < 0.0001), from 0.225 in the control plot to 0.419 in the fertilized plot. Soil fertilization, plant diversity, and spatial distance had roughly equal contributions in shaping the microbial functional community structure, while soil geochemical variables contributed less. Results indicated that long-term agricultural practice could alter the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity. Determining the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity and its response to human activities is important but challenging in microbial ecology. Most studies to date are based on different sites that may not be truly

  19. Over 150 years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian M.; Xue, Kai; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; McGrath, Steve; Storkey, Jonathan; Hirsch, Penny R.; Sun, Bo; Zhou, Jizhong

    2015-04-07

    Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receiving nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P < 0.0001). The z values also varied significantly with different functional genes involved in carbon (C), N, P, and sulfur (S) cycling and with various phylogenetic groups (archaea, bacteria, and fungi). Similarly, the plant SARs increased significantly (P < 0.0001), from 0.225 in the control plot to 0.419 in the fertilized plot. Soil fertilization, plant diversity, and spatial distance had roughly equal contributions in shaping the microbial functional community structure, while soil geochemical variables contributed less. Results indicated that long-term agricultural practice could alter the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity. Determining the spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity and its response to human activities is important but challenging in microbial ecology. Most studies to date are based on different sites that may not be truly comparable or on

  20. Project Finance and Investments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Project Finance and Investments Chris Cassidy, National Business Renewable Energy Advisor, U.S. Department of Agriculture

  1. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723).DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations:Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho;Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  2. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

  3. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  4. Gas Generation Rates as an Indicator for the Long Term Stability of Radioactive Waste Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steyer, S.; Brennecke, P.; Bandt, G.; Kroger, H.

    2007-07-01

    Pursuant to the 'Act on the Peaceful Utilization of Atomic Energy and the Protection against its Hazards' (Atomic Energy Act) the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, BfS) is legally responsible for the construction and operation of federal facilities for the disposal of radioactive waste. Within the scope of this responsibility, particular due to par. 74(1) Ordinance on Radiation Protection, BfS defines all safety-related requirements on waste packages envisaged for disposal, establishes guidelines for the conditioning of radioactive waste and approves the fulfillment of the waste acceptance requirements within the radioactive waste quality control system. BfS also provides criteria to enable the assessment of methods for the treatment and packaging of radioactive waste to produce waste packages suitable for disposal according to par. 74(2) Ordinance on Radiation Protection. Due to the present non-availability of a repository in Germany, quality control measures for all types of radioactive waste products are carried out prior to interim storage with respect to the future disposal. As a result BfS approves the demonstrated properties of the radioactive waste packages and confirms the fulfillment of the respective requirements. After several years of storage the properties of waste packages might have changed. By proving, that such changes have no significant impact on the quality of the waste product, the effort of requalification could be minimized. Therefore, data on the long-term behavior of radioactive waste products need to be acquired and indicators to prove the long-term stability have to be quantified. Preferably, such indicators can be determined easily with non-destructive methods, even for legacy waste packages. A promising parameter is the gas generation rate. The relationship between gas generation rate and long term stability is presented as first result of an ongoing study on behalf of BfS. Permissible gas

  5. RE Finance Tracking Initiative | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Website Website: financere.nrel.govfinanceREFTI Country: United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 82.014870553805, -42.046866416931 Show Map Loading...

  6. STEP Participant Financing Options

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Participant Financing Options, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  7. SWAAM-LT: The long-term, sodium/water reaction analysis method computer code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.H.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Tanabe, H.

    1993-01-01

    The SWAAM-LT Code, developed for analysis of long-term effects of sodium/water reactions, is discussed. The theoretical formulation of the code is described, including the introduction of system matrices for ease of computer programming as a general system code. Also, some typical results of the code predictions for available large scale tests are presented. Test data for the steam generator design with the cover-gas feature and without the cover-gas feature are available and analyzed. The capabilities and limitations of the code are then discussed in light of the comparison between the code prediction and the test data.

  8. RACORO long-term, systematic aircraft observations of boundary layer clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; McFarquhar, G.; Ogren, J.; Turner, D. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Feingold, G.; Long, C. N.; Jonsson, H. H.; Bucholtz, A.; Collins, D. R.; Diskin, G.; Gerber, H.; Lawson, R. P.; Woods, R. K.; Hubbe, J.; Tomlinson, J.; Schmid, B.

    2010-06-27

    Our knowledge of boundary layer cloud processes is insufficient to resolve pressing scientific problems. Boundary layer clouds often have liquid-water paths (LWPs) less than 100 gm{sup 2}, which are defined here as being 'thin' Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD). This type of cloud is common globally, and the Earth's radiative energy balance is particularly sensitive to small changes in their optical properties. However, it is difficult to retrieve accurately their cloud properties via remote sensing because they are tenuous and often occur in partly cloudy skies. This interferes with our ability to obtain the routine, long-term statistics needed to improve their representation in climate models. To address this problem, in-situ data are needed to investigate cloud processes and to evaluate and refine existing retrieval algorithms. Coordinated by the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF), the Routine AAF CLOWD Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign conducted long-term, systematic flights in boundary layer, liquid-water clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site between 22 January and 30 June 2009. This was the first time that a long-term aircraft campaign was undertaken for systematic in-situ sampling of cloud properties. Using the CIRPAS Twin Otter aircraft equipped with a comprehensive set of instruments to measure solar and thermal radiation, cloud microphysics, aerosol properties and atmospheric state, the RACORO team logged an unprecedented 59 flights and 259 research hours above the SGP site. Data gathered during the RACORO campaign will provide researchers with a statistically relevant data set of boundary-layer cloud and aerosol properties for future study. These data can be used to validate retrieval algorithms and support process studies and model simulations of boundary layer clouds and, in particular, CLOWD-type clouds. In addition to cloud observations, complementary clear-sky flight patterns were conducted to map the surface

  9. Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Gasoline Vehicles | Department of Energy Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Long-Term Changes in Gas- and Particle-Phase Emissions from On-Road Diesel and Gasoline Vehicles Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (OFCVT).

  10. Planning for Site Transition to Long-Term Stewardship: Identification of Requirements and Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banaee, Jila

    2002-08-01

    A systematic methodology is presented and applied for the identification of requirements and issues pertaining to the planning for, and transition to, long term stewardship (LTS). The method has been applied to three of the twelve identified LTS functions. The results of the application of the methodology to contaminated and uncontaminated federal real property in those three functions are presented. The issues that could be seen as impediments to the implementation of LTS are also identified for the three areas under consideration. The identified requirements are significant and in some cases complex to implement. It is clear that early and careful planning is required in all circumstances.

  11. Planning for Site Transition to Long-Term Stewardship: Identification of Requirements and Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banaee, J.

    2002-05-16

    A systematic methodology is presented and applied for the identification of requirements and issues pertaining to the planning for, and transition to, long term stewardship (LTS). The method has been applied to three of the twelve identified LTS functions. The results of the application of the methodology to contaminated and uncontaminated federal real property in those three functions are presented. The issues that could be seen as impediments to the implementation of LTS are also identified for the three areas under consideration. The identified requirements are significant and in some cases complex to implement. It is clear that early and careful planning is required in all circumstances.

  12. The long-term problems of contaminated land: Sources, impacts and countermeasures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baes, C.F. III

    1986-11-01

    This report examines the various sources of radiological land contamination; its extent; its impacts on man, agriculture, and the environment; countermeasures for mitigating exposures; radiological standards; alternatives for achieving land decontamination and cleanup; and possible alternatives for utilizing the land. The major potential sources of extensive long-term land contamination with radionuclides, in order of decreasing extent, are nuclear war, detonation of a single nuclear weapon (e.g., a terrorist act), serious reactor accidents, and nonfission nuclear weapons accidents that disperse the nuclear fuels (termed ''broken arrows'').

  13. Improvement of capabilities of the Distributed Electrochemistry Modeling Tool for investigating SOFC long term performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez Galdamez, Rinaldo A.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.

    2012-04-30

    This report provides an overview of the work performed for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) modeling during the 2012 Winter/Spring Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). A brief introduction on the concept, operation basics and applications of fuel cells is given for the general audience. Further details are given regarding the modifications and improvements of the Distributed Electrochemistry (DEC) Modeling tool developed by PNNL engineers to model SOFC long term performance. Within this analysis, a literature review on anode degradation mechanisms is explained and future plans of implementing these into the DEC modeling tool are also proposed.

  14. Evaluation of Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Modeling with ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Modeling with ARM Data Zeng, Xiping NASA/GSFC Tao, Wei-Kuo NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Zhang, Minghua State University of New York at Stony Brook Peters-Lidard, Christa Laboratory for Hydrospheric Processes, NASA-GSFC Lang, Stephen SSAI/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Simpson, Joanne Laboratory for Atmospheres, NASA GSFC Kumar, Sujay University of Maryland, NASA-GSFC Xie, Shaocheng Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Geiger, James NASA-GSFC Shie,

  15. Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6, 2008 Page 1 of 6 Summary Notes from 5 March 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Grout Performance Attendees: Representatives from Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff (NRC) met at the DOE offices in Germantown, Maryland on 5 March 2008. Representatives from Department of Energy- Savannah River (DOE-SR), Department of Energy-Idaho (DOE-ID), Department of Energy-Richland (DOE-RL), Department of Energy-River Protection

  16. An Organophosphine Oxide Redox Shuttle Additive that Delivers Long-term

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium-ion Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 4, 2015, Research Highlights An Organophosphine Oxide Redox Shuttle Additive that Delivers Long-term Overcharge Protection for 4 V Lithium-ion Batteries Organophosphine oxide groups not only can provide suitable steric protection of the generated radical cation, but also can increase the redox potential to 4.5 V, which is suitable for overcharge protection of LiMn2O4 cathode material Scientific

  17. Assessing Long-Term Wind Conditions by Combining Different Measure-Correlate-Predict Algorithms: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Messac, A.; Hodge, B. M.

    2013-08-01

    This paper significantly advances the hybrid measure-correlate-predict (MCP) methodology, enabling it to account for variations of both wind speed and direction. The advanced hybrid MCP method uses the recorded data of multiple reference stations to estimate the long-term wind condition at a target wind plant site. The results show that the accuracy of the hybrid MCP method is highly sensitive to the combination of the individual MCP algorithms and reference stations. It was also found that the best combination of MCP algorithms varies based on the length of the correlation period.

  18. LONG-TERM DEMONSTRATION OF SORBENT ENHANCEMENT ADDITIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MERCURY CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason D. Laumb; Dennis L. Laudal; Grant E. Dunham; John P. Kay; Christopher L. Martin; Jeffrey S. Thompson; Nicholas B. Lentz; Alexander Azenkeng; Kevin C. Galbreath; Lucinda L. Hamre

    2011-05-27

    Long-term demonstration tests of advanced sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) technologies have been completed at five coal-fired power plants. The targeted removal rate was 90% from baseline conditions at all five stations. The plants included Hawthorn Unit 5, Mill Creek Unit 4, San Miguel Unit 1, Centralia Unit 2, and Hoot Lake Unit 2. The materials tested included powdered activated carbon, treated carbon, scrubber additives, and SEAs. In only one case (San Miguel) was >90% removal not attainable. The reemission of mercury from the scrubber at this facility prevented >90% capture.

  19. Long-Term Global Trade-Offs Related to Nuclear Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1999-08-25

    An overall comparative assessment of different energy systems and their potential long-term role in contributing to a sustainable energy mix is examined through the use of a global, long-term Energy, Economics, Environment (E{sup 3}) model. This model is used to generate a set of surprise-free futures that encompass a range of economic potentialities. The focus of this study is nuclear energy (NE), and the range of possible futures embodies extrema of NE growth [a Basic Option (BO)] to an NE Phase Out (PO). These NE scenario extrema are expressed against a background that reflects E{sup 3} circumstances ranging from a Business-As-Usual (BAU) to one that is Ecologically Driven (ED), with the latter emphasizing price-induced reductions in greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions associate with a mix of fossil energy sources. Hence, four ''views-of-the-future'' scenarios emerge to form the framework of this study: BAU/BO, BAU/PO, ED/BO, and ED/PO. Model results ranging from (regional and temporal) primary- and nuclear-energy demands, carbon-dioxide emissions, nuclear-material (plutonium) accumulations and attendant proliferation-risk implications, Gross National Product (GNP) impacts, and a range of technology requirements provide essential input to the subject assessment.

  20. Evaluation of flow oscillation during long-term cooling experiments in the APEX integral test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessette, D.; Marzo, M. di

    1996-12-31

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation has developed a new, advanced light water reactor, the AP600, and has submitted the design for U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission certification. Westinghouse conducted supporting testing programs to provide experimental data to validate its computer codes used to analyze the performance of the AP600 design. One of these facilities was a reduced-pressure, reduced-height (1:4) integral system test facility located at Oregon State University-the Advanced Plant Experiment (APEX). The governing objective of the testing program was to evaluate system depressurization, transition to in-containment refueling water storage tank (IRWST) injection, and long-term cooling. A key feature in the long-term cooling data from some of the APEX experiments is flow oscillations that begin upon return to saturated conditions at the core exit. In this paper, the mechanism for these oscillations is explained, their relevance to the AP600 is discussed, and conclusions about their safety significance are drawn.

  1. Planning India's long-term energy shipment infrastructures for electricity and coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian H. Bowen; Devendra Canchi; Vishal Agarwal Lalit; Paul V. Precke; F.T. Sparrow; Marty W. Irwin

    2010-01-15

    The Purdue Long-Term Electricity Trading and Capacity Expansion Planning Model simultaneously optimizes both the expansion of transmission and generation capacity. Most commercial electricity system planning software is limited to only transmission planning. An application of the model to India's national power grid, for 2008-2028, indicates substantial transmission expansion is the cost-effective means of meeting the needs of the nation's growing economy. An electricity demand growth rate of 4% over the 20-year planning horizon requires more than a 50% increase in the Government's forecasted transmission capacity expansion, and 8% demand growth requires more than a six-fold increase in the planned transmission capacity expansion. The model minimizes the long-term expansion costs (operational and capital) for the nation's five existing regional power grids and suggests the need for large increases in load-carrying capability between them. Changes in coal policy affect both the location of new thermal power plants and the optimal pattern inter-regional transmission expansions. 15 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  2. LONG-TERM CORROSION TESTING OF CANDIDATE MATERIALS FOR HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE CONTAINMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Estill, J. C.; Doughty, S.; Gdowski, G. E.; Gordon, S.; King, K.; McCright, R. D.; Wang, F.

    1997-10-01

    Preliminary results are presented from the long-term corrosion test program of candidate materials for the high-level radioactive waste packages that would be emplaced in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The present waste package design is based on a multi-barrier concept having an inner container of a corrosion resistant material and an outer container of a corrosion allowance material. Test specimens have been exposed to simulated bounding environments that may credibly develop in the vicinity of the waste packages. Corrosion rates have been calculated for weight loss and crevice specimens, and U-bend specimens have been examined for evidence of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Galvanic testing has been started recently and initial results are forthcoming. Pitting characterization of test specimens will be conducted in the coming year. This test program is expected to continue for a minimum of five years so that long-term corrosion data can be determined to support corrosion model development, performance assessment, and waste package design.

  3. Barrier analogs: Long-term performance issues, preliminary studies, and recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Chatters, J.C.; Last, G.V.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Link, S.O.; Hunter, C.R.

    1994-02-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Hanford Protective Barrier Development Program is funding studies of natural analogs of the long-term performance of waste site covers. Natural-analog studies examine past environments as evidence for projecting the future performance of engineered structures. The information generated by analog studies is needed to (1) evaluate the designs and results of short term experiments and demonstrations, (2) formulate performance-modeling problems that bound expected changes in waste site environments, and (3) understand emergent system attributes that cannot be evaluated with short-term experiments or computer models. Waste site covers will be part of dynamic environmental systems with attributes that transcend the traits of engineered components. This report discusses results of the previously unreported preliminary studies conducted in 1983 and 1984. These results indicate that analogs could play an important role in predicting the long-term behavior of engineered waste covers. Layered exposures of glacial-flood-deposited gravels mantled with silt or sand that resemble contemporary barrier designs were examined. Bergmounds, another anomaly left by cataclysmic glacial floods, were also examined as analogs of surface gravel.

  4. Simulation of the long-term accumulation of radiocontaminants in crop plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreckhise, R.G.

    1980-03-01

    Most radiological dose assessment models ignore the long-term buildup of radiocontaminants in the soil. When they estimate levels in crop plants from root uptake, these models account only for the annual input from the source into the soil. Almost all of the models ignore the build-up of contaminants in the soil profile due to the accumulation in the roots and the build-up from the above-ground plant material that is buried by plowing. The model described in this report simulates the entire system involved in the cycling and accumulation of radionuclides in cultivated land. The model, named CROPRE, was developed to predict both the long-term accumulation of radionuclides and the resulting concentrations of radionuclides in vegetation. This model was designed to include: (1) the chronic input of contaminated irrigation water into both the soil compartment and directly onto the surface of the vegetation; (2) the incorporation of radiocontaminants in the soil organic matter pool and their eventual release for re-uptake by subsequent crops; (3) the removal of contaminants from the system when the crops are harvested; and (4) the downward movement of radionuclides and their loss from the system by percolation. The CROPRE model more realistically simulates the cycling of radiocontaminants in crop plants over long periods of time than does the other models. It is recommended that it be incorporated into existing radiation dose commitment models.

  5. Long Term Stewardship Challenges at the St. Louis District FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell'Orco, L.; Chambers, D.

    2002-02-27

    Non-Federally owned radioactively contaminated sites in St. Louis, Missouri are currently being remediated by the St. Louis District Corps of Engineers under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). When FUSRAP remediation is complete, inaccessible soils which have levels of contamination greater than unrestricted use standards, will remain. The purpose of this paper is to document the initial challenges facing the project team during its development of the Long Term Stewardship plan for the management of these soils. These soils are located under buildings, roads, railroads and bridges. The Long Term Stewardship plan for the majority of the sites is being developed simultaneously with the remedy selection process. A living document, it will ultimately document the remedial action end state and location of inaccessible soils and implement the plan for ensuring these soils are not a threat to human health and the environment. Although these soils are protective in their current configuration, at some point in time, when activities such as maintenance, utility or property improvement occur, the soils will become accessible and need to be addressed by the federal government. Up until that point in time they will need to be effectively managed to ensure they remain protective. The St. Louis District is in the process of collaboratively developing this plan with its regulators, affected stakeholders and interested parties.

  6. Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1996-12-31

    A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

  7. Research on long term safety of nuclear waste disposal at the research center Karlsruhe, Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gompper, Klaus; Bosbach, Dirk; Denecke, Melissa A.; Geckeis, Horst; Kienzler, Bernhard; Klenze, Reinhardt

    2007-07-01

    In Germany the safe disposal of radioactive waste is in the responsibility of the federal government. The R and D performed in the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at the Research Center Karlsruhe contributes to the German provident research in the field of long-term safety for final disposal of high level heat producing nuclear wastes. INE's research is focused on the actinide elements and long lived fission products since these dominate the radiotoxicity over a long time. The research strategy synergistically combines fundamental science of aquatic radionuclide chemistry with applied investigations of real systems (waste form, host rock, aquifer), studied on laboratory scale and in underground laboratories. Because Germany has not yet selected a site for a high-level waste repository, all host rock formations under discussion in the international community (salt, hard rock, clay/tone) are investigated. Emphasis in long-term safety R and D at INE is on the development of actinide speciation methods and techniques in the trace concentration range. (authors)

  8. Over 150years of long-term fertilization alters spatial scaling of microbial biodiversity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liang, Yuting; Wu, Liyou; Clark, Ian M.; Xue, Kai; Yang, Yunfeng; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; McGrath, Steve; Storkey, Jonathan; et al

    2015-04-07

    Spatial scaling is a critical issue in ecology, but how anthropogenic activities like fertilization affect spatial scaling is poorly understood, especially for microbial communities. Here, we determined the effects of long-term fertilization on the spatial scaling of microbial functional diversity and its relationships to plant diversity in the 150-year-old Park Grass Experiment, the oldest continuous grassland experiment in the world. Nested samples were taken from plots with contrasting inorganic fertilization regimes, and community DNAs were analyzed using the GeoChip-based functional gene array. The slopes of microbial gene-area relationships (GARs) and plant species-area relationships (SARs) were estimated in a plot receivingmorenitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) and a control plot without fertilization. Our results indicated that long-term inorganic fertilization significantly increased both microbial GARs and plant SARs. Microbial spatial turnover rates (i.e., z values) were less than 0.1 and were significantly higher in the fertilized plot (0.0583) than in the control plot (0.0449) (P z values also varied significantly with different functional genes involved in carbon (C), N, P, and sulfur (S) cycling and with various phylogenetic groups (archaea, bacteria, and fungi). Similarly, the plant SARs increased significantly (P less

  9. Effect of interconnect creep on long-term performance of SOFC of one cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2008-02-01

    Creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature is near or exceeds half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under development in the SECA program are around 1073oK. High temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and CTE compatibility with other SOFC components. Since the melting temperature of most stainless steel is around 1800oK, possible creep deformation of IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of interconnect creep behavior on stack geometry change and stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the fuel and air channel geometry changes due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel interconnect, therefore indicating possible SOFC performance change under long term operations. IC creep models were incorporated into SOFC-MP and Mentat FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long term steady state operating temperature. It is found that creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel and the air flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  10. National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Environmental Programs Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Baseline Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, D. D.; Rohde, K.

    2003-02-26

    As environmental restoration (ER) projects move toward completion, the planning, integration, and documentation of long-term environmental stewardship (LTES) activities is increasingly important for ensuring smooth transition to LTES. The Long-Term Environmental Stewardship Baseline Handbook (Handbook) prepared by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Service Center Environmental Programs Department (EPD) outlines approaches for integrating site-specific LTES planning and implementation into site ER baseline documentation. Since LTES will vary greatly from site to site, the Handbook also provides for flexibility in addressing LTES in ER Project life-cycle baselines, while clearly identifying Environmental Management (EM) requirements. It provides suggestions for enacting LTES principles and objectives through operational activities described in site-specific LTES plans and life cycle ER Project baseline scope, cost, and schedule documentation and tools for more thorough planning, better quantification, broader understanding of risk and risk management factors, and more comprehensive documentation. LTES planning applied to baselines in a phased approach will facilitate seamlessly integrating LTES into site operational activities, thereby minimizing the use of resources.

  11. Alternative windpower ownership structures: Financing terms and project costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Kahn, E.

    1996-05-01

    Most utility-scale renewable energy projects in the United States are developed and financed by private renewable energy companies. Electric output is then sold to investor-owned and public utilities under long-term contracts. Limited partnerships, sale/leaseback arrangements, and project-financing have historically been the dominant forms of finance in the windpower industry, with project-finance taking the lead more recently. Although private ownership using project-finance is still the most popular form of windpower development, alternative approaches to ownership and financing are becoming more prevalent. U.S. public and investor-owned electric utilities (IOUs) have begun to participate directly in windpower projects by owning and financing their own facilities rather than purchasing windpower from independent non-utility generators (NUGs) through power purchase agreements (PPAs). In these utility-ownership arrangements, the wind turbine equipment vendor/developer typically designs and constructs a project under a turnkey contract for the eventual project owner (the utility). The utility will also frequently sign an operations and maintenance (O&M) contract with the project developer/equipment vendor. There appear to be a number of reasons for utility involvement in recent and planned U.S. wind projects. One important claim is that utility ownership and self-finance provides substantial cost savings compared to contracting with private NUGs to supply wind-generated power. In this report, we examine that assertion.

  12. Bloomberg New Energy Finance formerly New Energy Finance Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    formerly New Energy Finance Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bloomberg New Energy Finance (formerly New Energy Finance Ltd) Place: London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip:...

  13. Gasbuggy, New Mexico Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-01

    This report summarizes an evaluation of the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) that has been conducted since 1972 at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico underground nuclear detonation site. The nuclear testing was conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission under the Plowshare program, which is discussed in greater detail in Appendix A. The detonation at Gasbuggy took place in 1967, 4,240 feet below ground surface, and was designed to fracture the host rock of a low-permeability natural gas-bearing formation in an effort to improve gas production. The site has historically been managed under the Nevada Offsites Project. These underground nuclear detonation sites are within the United States but outside of the Nevada Test Site where most of the experimental nuclear detonations conducted by the U.S. Government took place. Gasbuggy is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM ).

  14. Design and fabrication of a unique electromechanical machine for long-term fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boling, K.W.

    1984-12-01

    An electromechanical machine has been designed and fabricated for performing long-term fatigue tests under conditions that simulate those in modern plants. The machine is now commercially available. Its advantages over current electrohydraulic machines are lower initial cost, minimum maintenance requirements, and greater reliability especially when performing long tests. The machine operates in closed-loop fashion by utilizing continuous feedback signals from the specimen extensometer or load cell, it is programmable for testing in strain or load control. The maximum ram rate is 0.056 mm/s (0.134 in./min), maximum ram travel is 102 mm (4 in.) and load capacity is +-44 (+-10 kips). Induction heating controls speciment temperatures to 1000/sup 0/C.

  15. Long-term tests of dissimilar metal crevice corrosion in filtered seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maurer, J.R. . Technical Center)

    1994-04-01

    Dissimilar metal crevice (DMC) corrosion has been found in condensers in which superferritic stainless steel tubes have been expanded into type 316 stainless steel (UNS S31600) tube sheets. Low-pH corrosion products, which formed in the tube-to-tube sheet crevice, cause depassivation and attack of the superferritic alloy. Long-term tests in filtered natural seawater confirm DMC corrosion of several superferritic alloys, including one containing 2% nickel, when in contact with type 316. Superaustenitic 6% molybdenum alloys in contact with type 316 did not show DMC corrosion. As expected, type 316 corroded in these exposures. When superferritic and superaustenitic alloys were tested in contact with each other, neither was attacked.

  16. Criticality safety evaluation for long term storage of FFTF fuel in interim storage casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard, R.F.

    1995-05-11

    It has been postulated that a degradation phenomenon, referred to as ``hot cell rot``, may affect irradiated FFTF mixed plutonium-uranium oxide (MOX) fuel during dry interim storage. ``Hot cell rot`` refers to a variety of phenomena that degrade fuel pin cladding during exposure to air and inert gas environments. It is thought to be a form of caustic stress corrosion cracking or environmentally assisted cracking. Here, a criticality safety analysis was performed to address the effect of the ``hot cell rot`` phenomenon on the long term storage of irradiated FFTF fuel in core component containers. The results show that seven FFTF fuel assemblies or six Ident-69 pin containers stored in core component containers within interim storage casks will remain safely subcritical.

  17. Long-Term Monitoring of Mini-Split Ductless Heat Pumps in the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueno, K.; Loomis, H.

    2015-06-01

    Transformations, Inc. has extensive experience building their high performance housing at a variety of Massachusetts locations, in both a production and custom home setting. The majority of their construction uses mini-split heat pumps (MSHPs) for space conditioning. This research covered the long-term performance of MSHPs in Zone 5A; it is the culmination of up to 3 years' worth of monitoring in a set of eight houses. This research examined electricity use of MSHPs, distributions of interior temperatures and humidity when using simplified (two-point) heating systems in high-performance housing, and the impact of open-door/closed-door status on temperature distributions. The use of simplified space conditioning distribution (through use of MSHPs) provides significant first cost savings, which are used to offset the increased investment in the building enclosure.

  18. Long-term desorption behavior of uranium and neptunium in heterogeneous volcanic tuff materials /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, Cynthia A.

    2010-05-01

    Uranium and neptunium desorption were studied in long-term laboratory experiments using four well-characterized volcanic tuff cores collected from southeast of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The objectives of the experiments were to 1. Demonstrate a methodology aimed at characterizing distributions of sorption parameters (attributes of multiple sorption sites) that can be applied to moderately-sorbing species in heterogeneous systems to provide more realistic reactive transport parameters and a more realistic approach to modeling transport in heterogeneous systems. 2. Focus on uranium and neptunium because of their high solubility, relatively weak sorption, and high contributions to predicted dose in Yucca Mountain performance assessments. Also, uranium is a contaminant of concern at many DOE legacy sites and uranium mining sites.

  19. Durable Media for Long-Term Preservation of Geological Repository Records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, K.; Fujii, N.; Kageyama, H.; Yoshimura, K.; Ohuchi, J.; Tsuboya, T.

    2008-07-01

    Durability of selected hard materials as information preserving media has been studied, leading to some promising results. Several engraving experiments on the selected materials confirmed that characters and patterns can be expressed along with shading and gradation. Engraving experiments on durable artificial materials were carried out by applying laser technologies. By selecting appropriate materials and engraving methods, characters and patterns can be expressed along with shading and gradation. These technologies can be applied to not only documentary records but also to markers and monuments. Among the materials, silicon carbide, which has strong resistance against heat wear and chemical impacts, corrosion resistance and wear resistance, showed satisfactory results in terms of accuracy. Thus, it is expected to be a promising material for the long-term record preservation. With respect to the density of characters in written records in the case of dot printing, it was estimated that, with 2-point characters, information totaling 6 to 8 pages of A-4 size can be engraved on a 10 cm x 10 cm plate. When a document that has 500 pages of A4 size paper is engraved on sintered silicon carbide plates, the total volume of recording media is evaluated as follows: - Size of plate: 10 cm x 10 cm; - Size of character to be engraved: 2-points ({approx} 0.7 mm; of readable size by naked eye or using a magnifying glass); - Number of pages of original document to be engraved on a plate: 8; - Number of pages of original document to be engraved on both sides of a plate: 16; - Number of plates needed for a series of document package: 500 / 16 = 32; - The thickness of a plate: 1 mm; - The total thickness of recording media: 32 mm; - Bulk of recording media preserving 500 pages of document: 10 cm x 10 cm x 32 cm. The examination has shown the possibility of long-term preservation of documentation records as a permanent system. A further examination is suggested concerning the

  20. Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava – formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership recently injected 1,000 metric tons of CO2 into the Grande Ronde Basalt Formation in eastern Washington. This first-of-its kind injection is part of research meant to determine if basalt formations could provide a long-term solution for storing CO2, a potent greenhouse gas.

  1. Parametric Analysis of PWR Spent Fuel Depletion Parameters for Long-Term-Disposal Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1999-08-01

    Utilization of burnup credit in criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel allows improved design efficiency and reduced cost due to the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup-credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents (in terms of criticality potential), followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k(sub)eff) for the a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models.

  2. The Performance and Long Term Stability of the D0 Run II Forward Muon Scintillation Counters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bezzubov, V.; Denisov, D.; Evdokimov, V.; Lipaev, V.; Shchukin, A.; Vasilyev, I.

    2014-07-21

    The performance of the D0 experiment forward muon scintillation counters system during Run II of the Tevatron from 2001 to 2011 is described. The system consists of 4214 scintillation counters in six layers. The long term stability of the counters amplitude response determined using LED calibration system and muons produced in proton-antiproton collisions is presented. The average signal amplitude for counters of all layers has gradually decreased over ten years by 11%. The reference timing, determined using LED calibration, was stable within 0.26 ns. Average value of muon timing peak position was used for periodic D0 clock signal adjustments to compensate seasonal drift caused by temperature variations. Counters occupancy for different triggers in physics data collection runs and for minimum bias triggers are presented. The single muon yields versus time and the luminosity dependence of yields were stable for the forward muon system within 1% over 10 years.

  3. Site Transition Summary: Cleanup Completion to Long-Term Stewardship at Department of Energy On-going Mission Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Long-term stewardship (LTS) includes the physical controls, institutions, information, and other mechanisms needed to ensure protection of people and the environment at sites where the U.S....

  4. DOE Issues Final Mercury Storage Environmental Impact Statement: Texas Site Is Preferred for Long-Term Mercury Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy has prepared a Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement to analyze the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven locations

  5. Long-Term Assessment of Isotopic Exchange of Carbon Dioxide in a Subalpine Forest (Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux Site)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowling, David

    2014-12-31

    In 2005 we began a long-term measurement program of CO{sub 2} and its stable isotopes at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site. Measurements are ongoing.

  6. Long-Term Modeling of Solar Energy: Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) and PV Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yabei; Smith, Steven J.

    2007-08-16

    This report presents an overview of research conducted on solar energy technologies and their implementation in the ObjECTS framework. The topics covered include financing assumptions and selected issues related to the integration of concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) and photovoltaics PV technologies into the electric grid. A review of methodologies for calculating the levelized energy cost of capital-intensive technologies is presented, along with sensitivity tests illustrating how the cost of a solar plant would vary depending on financing assumptions. An analysis of the integration of a hybrid concentrating thermal solar power (CSP) system into the electric system is conducted. Finally a failure statistics analysis for PV plants illustrates the central role of solar irradiance uncertainty in determining PV grid integration characteristics.

  7. In utero and early life arsenic exposure in relation to long-term health and disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farzan, Shohreh F.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Chen, Yu

    2013-10-15

    Background: There is a growing body of evidence that prenatal and early childhood exposure to arsenic from drinking water can have serious long-term health implications. Objectives: Our goal was to understand the potential long-term health and disease risks associated with in utero and early life exposure to arsenic, as well as to examine parallels between findings from epidemiological studies with those from experimental animal models. Methods: We examined the current literature and identified relevant studies through PubMed by using combinations of the search terms “arsenic”, “in utero”, “transplacental”, “prenatal” and “fetal”. Discussion: Ecological studies have indicated associations between in utero and/or early life exposure to arsenic at high levels and increases in mortality from cancer, cardiovascular disease and respiratory disease. Additional data from epidemiologic studies suggest intermediate effects in early life that are related to risk of these and other outcomes in adulthood. Experimental animal studies largely support studies in humans, with strong evidence of transplacental carcinogenesis, atherosclerosis and respiratory disease, as well as insight into potential underlying mechanisms of arsenic's health effects. Conclusions: As millions worldwide are exposed to arsenic and evidence continues to support a role for in utero arsenic exposure in the development of a range of later life diseases, there is a need for more prospective studies examining arsenic's relation to early indicators of disease and at lower exposure levels. - Highlights: • We review in utero and early-life As exposure impacts on lifelong disease risks. • Evidence indicates that early-life As increases risks of lung disease, cancer and CVD. • Animal work largely parallels human studies and may lead to new research directions. • Prospective studies and individual exposure assessments with biomarkers are needed. • Assessing intermediary endpoints may

  8. Long-Term Outcomes of Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Cavernous Sinus Meningiomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Marcos Antonio dos; Calvo, Felipe A.; Samblas, Jose; Marsiglia, Hugo

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Patients with cavernous sinus meningiomas (CSM) have an elevated risk of surgical morbidity and mortality. Recurrence is often observed after partial resection. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), either alone or combined with surgery, represents an important advance in CSM management, but long-term results are lacking. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 CSM patients, treated from January 1991 to December 2005, were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up was 86.8 months (range, 17.1-179.4 months). Among the patients, 22 were followed for more than 10 years. There was a female predominance (84.1%). The age varied from 16 to 90 years (mean, 51.6). In all, 47 patients (53.4%) received SRS alone, and 41 patients (46.6%) had undergone surgery before SRS. A dose of 14 Gy was prescribed to isodose curves from 50% to 90%. In 25 patients (28.4%), as a result of the proximity to organs at risk, the prescribed dose did not completely cover the target. Results: After SRS, 65 (73.8%) patients presented with tumor volume reduction; 14 (15.9%) remained stable, and 9 (10.2%) had tumor progression. The progression-free survival was 92.5% at 5 years, and 82.5% at 10 years. Age, sex, maximal diameter of the treated tumor, previous surgery, and complete target coverage did not show significant associations with prognosis. Among the 88 treated patients, 17 experienced morbidity that was related to SRS, and 6 of these patients spontaneously recovered. Conclusions: SRS is an effective and safe treatment for CSM, feasible either in the primary or the postsurgical setting. Incomplete coverage of the target did not worsen outcomes. More than 80% of the patients remained free of disease progression during long-term follow-up.

  9. Long-term successional forest dynamics: species and community responses to climatic variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul; Todd Jr, Donald E; Hanson, Paul J; Mulholland, Patrick J

    2010-01-01

    Question: Are tree dynamics sensitive to climatic variability, and do tree species differ in their responses to climatic variability? Hence, is vulnerability of forest communities to climatic variability depending on stand composition? Location: Mixed young forest at Walker Branch Watershed near Oak Ridge, East-Tennessee, USA. Methods: Using a long-term data set (1967-2006), we analyzed temporal forest dynamics at the tree and species level, and we analyzed community dynamics for forest stands that different in their initial species composition (i.e., Chestnut Oak, Oak-Hickory, Pine, and Yellow poplar stands). Using summer drought and growing season temperature as defined climate drivers, we evaluated relationships between forest dynamics and climate across levels of organization. Results: Over the 4-decade studied period, forest communities underwent successional change and substantially increased their biomass. Variation in summer drought and growing season temperature contributed to temporal biomass dynamics for some tree species, but not for others. Stand-level responses to climatic variability were shown to be related to responses of specific component species; however, not for Pine stands. Pinus echinata, the dominant species in stands initially identified as Pine stands, decreased over time due to periodical outbreaks of the pine bark beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis). The outbreaks on Walker Branch could not be directly related to climatic conditions. Conclusions: Our results imply that vulnerability of developing forests to predicted climate conditions is stand-type dependent, and hence, is a function of species composition. Autogenic successional processes (or insect outbreaks) were found to prevail over climatic variability in determining long-term forest dynamics for stands dominated by sensitive species, emphasizing the importance of studying interactions between forest succession and climate change.

  10. Dispersal Limitations on Fish Community Recovery Following Long-term Water Quality Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Jett, Robert T.; Ryon, Michael G.; Gregory, Scott M.; Stratton, Sally H.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-02-22

    Holistic restoration approaches, such as water quality remediation, are likely to meet conservation objectives because they are typically implemented at watershed scales, as opposed to individual stream reaches. However, habitat fragmentation may impose constraints on the ecological effectiveness of holistic restoration strategies by limiting colonization following remediation. We questioned the importance of dispersal limitations to fish community recovery following long-term water quality remediation and species reintroductions across the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Long-term (26 years) responses in fish species richness and biomass to water quality remediation were evaluated in light of habitat fragmentation andmore » population isolation from instream barriers, which varied in their passage potential. In addition, ordination techniques were used to determine the relative importance of habitat connectivity and water quality, in explaining variation fish communities relative to environmental fluctuations, i.e. streamflow. Ecological recovery (changes in richness) at each site was negatively related to barrier index, a measure of community isolation by barriers relative to stream distance. Following species reintroductions, dispersal by fish species was consistently in the downstream direction and upstream passage above barriers was non-existent. The importance of barrier index in explaining variation in fish communities was stronger during higher flow conditions, but decreased over time an indication of increasing community stability and loss of seasonal migrants. Compared to habitat fragmentation, existing water quality concerns (i.e., outfalls, point source discharges) were unrelated to ecological recovery, but explained relatively high variation in community dynamics. Our results suggest that habitat fragmentation limited the ecological effectiveness of intensive water quality remediation efforts and fish reintroduction

  11. Mitomycin-C- or Cisplatin-Based Chemoradiotherapy for Anal Canal Carcinoma: Long-Term Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olivatto, Luis O.; Cabral, Vania; Rosa, Arthur; Bezerra, Marcos; Santarem, Erick; Fassizoli, Ana; Castro, Leonaldson; Simoes, Jose Humberto; Small, Isabele A.; Ferreira, Carlos Gil

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the long-term efficacy of concurrent radiotherapy with mitomycin-C (MMC)-based or cisplatin (CP)-based combinations in a cohort of patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1988 and 2000, 179 patients with locally advanced anal canal carcinoma were treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer with two cycles of chemotherapy during Weeks 1 and 5 of radiotherapy. 5-Fluorouracil (750 mg/m{sup 2} 120-hour infusion or 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} 96-hour infusion) plus CP (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of each cycle or MMC (10-15 mg/m{sup 2}) on the first day of Cycle 1 was administered concurrent with radiotherapy (total dose, 55-59.4 Gy). Of the 179 patients, 60% were included from a randomized trial initiated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancer in 1991 that compared concurrent chemoradiotherapy with MMC vs. CP. Results: The median follow-up for the whole chemoradiotherapy group was 83 months. The median patient age was 58 years, 57% had Stage T3-T4 tumors, and 35% had N-positive disease. The 5-year cumulative colostomy rate was not significantly different between the CP group (22%) and MMC group (29%; p = .28). The actuarial 10-year overall survival and disease-free survival rate for the CP group was 54% and 49% and for the MMC group was 52% and 53%, respectively (p = .32 and p = .92, respectively). On multivariate analysis, male gender (p = .042) and advanced Stage T3-T4 disease (p <.0001) were statistically significant for worse disease-free survival. Stage T3-T4 (p = .039) and N+ (p = .039) disease remained independently significant for overall survival. Conclusion: Long-term follow-up has confirmed the good results of chemoradiotherapy with CP plus 5-fluorouracil, which seem to provide results equivalent to those with MMC plus 5-fluorouracil.

  12. Arranging Prescription Drug Coverage for Extended Stays (Travel or Long-Term Work Assignments) When Outside the United States

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arranging Prescription Drug Coverage for Extended Stays (Travel or Long-Term Work Assignments) When Outside the United States Planning an extended vacation or working abroad? rx_lanl_override_0311 Maintaining prescription coverage and accessing care for long-term stays abroad What you need to know about override requests and obtaining Rx drugs. Your BCBSNM prescription drug coverage limits override requests to a 90-day supply. Override requests cannot be approved - and are not available -

  13. Commercial PACE Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Bill 221 of 2013 authorizes local governments to adopt Commercial* Property Assessed Clean Energy (C-PACE) financing programs. C-PACE allows property owners to finance energy efficiency and...

  14. Alternative Financing Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-03-12

    This directive provides guidance for identification, planning and approval of alternatively-financed projects. Alternative Financing ("AF") is a process whereby DOE and its operational elements obtain the use of privately-developed capital assets through lease.

  15. Energy Efficiency Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information and examples of state financing for energy efficiency programs, with descriptions on implementation methods and concerns.

  16. Evaluation of experiences in long-term radon and radon-daughter measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, J.A.; Jackson, P.O.; Thomas, V.W.

    1982-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is performing side-by-side measurements of radon and radon daughter concentrations using several instruments and techniques, and is comparing these measurements with side-by-side measurements made by other investigators at other locations. The standard deviation of the differences between the (natural) logarithms of the Terradex Track Etch radon concentrations and the logarithms of the Radon Progency Integrating Sampling Units (RPISU) radon daughter concentrations (S.D.-ln) measured in 50 buildings in Edgemont, South Dakota, was 0.37. Using this S.D.-ln, it can be calculated that if the Track Etch radon daughter concentration is 0.010 WL there should be only a 14% probability that the RPISU average would be greater than 0.015 WL, and only a 3% probability tht the RPISU average would be greater than 0.020 WL. If buildings had been cleared from remedial action when the Track Etch averages were less than 0.10 WL, then about 61% of the buildings would have been cleared from remedial action, and only a few percent of these buildings would have actually had average RPISU concentrations greater than 0.015 WL. The S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements made by ALARA at Grand Junction, the PERM radon measurements and the MOD-225 radon daughter measurements made by Mound Facility at Canonsburg and Middlesex, and the PERM and Track Etch radon measurements made by Mound Facility at Salt Lake City were similar to the S.D.-ln between the Track Etch radon measurements and the RPISU radon daughter measurements at Edgemont.

  17. Collaboration in Long-Term Stewardship at DOE's Hanford Site - 13019

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moren, Rick; Brown, David; Feist, Ella; Grindstaff, Keith; Zeisloft, Jamie

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site comprises approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) of land in southeastern Washington. The site was established in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for the nation's nuclear weapons program. As the Cold War era came to an end, the mission of the site transitioned from weapons production to environmental cleanup. As the River Corridor area of the site cleanup is completed, the mission for that portion of the site will transition from active cleanup to continued protection of environment through the Long-Term Stewardship (LTS) Program. The key to successful transition from cleanup to LTS is the unique collaboration among three (3) different DOE Programs and three (3) different prime contractors with each contractor having different contracts. The LTS Program at the site is a successful model of collaboration resulting in efficient resolution of issues and accelerated progress that supports DOE's Richland Office 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site. The 2015 Vision for the Hanford Site involves shrinking the active cleanup footprint of the surface area of the site to approximately 20 mi{sup 2} on the Central Plateau. Hanford's LTS Program is defined in DOE's planning document, Hanford Long-Term Stewardship Program Plan [1]. The Plan defines the relationship and respective responsibilities between the federal cleanup projects and the LTS Program along with their respective contractors. The LTS Program involves these different parties (cleanup program and contractors) who must work together to achieve the objective for transition of land parcels. Through the collaborative efforts with the prime contractors on site over the past two years,, 253.8 km{sup 2} (98 mi{sup 2}) of property has been successfully transitioned from the cleanup program to the LTS Program upon completion of active surface cleanup. Upcoming efforts in the near term will include transitioning another large parcel that

  18. Design of the Long-term Waste Management Facility for Historic LLRW Port Hope Project - 13322

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Don; Barton, David; Case, Glenn

    2013-07-01

    The Municipality of Port Hope is located on the northern shores of Lake Ontario approximately 100 km east of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Starting in the 1930's, radium and later uranium processing by Eldorado Gold Mines Limited (subsequently Eldorado Nuclear Limited) (Eldorado) at their refinery in Port Hope resulted in the generation of process residues and wastes that were disposed of indiscriminately throughout the Municipality until about the mid-1950's. These process residues contained radium (Ra- 226), uranium, arsenic and other contaminants. Between 1944 and 1988, Eldorado was a Federal Crown Corporation, and as such, the Canadian Federal Government has assumed responsibility for the clean-up and long-term management of the historic waste produced by Eldorado during this period. The Port Hope Project involves the construction and development of a new long-term waste management facility (LTWMF), and the remediation and transfer of the historic wastes located within the Municipality of Port Hope to the new LTWMF. The new LTWMF will consist of an engineered above-ground containment mound designed to contain and isolate the wastes from the surrounding environment for the next several hundred years. The design of the engineered containment mound consists of a primary and secondary composite base liner system and composite final cover system, made up of both natural materials (e.g., compacted clay, granular materials) and synthetic materials (e.g., geo-synthetic clay liner, geo-membrane, geo-textiles). The engineered containment mound will cover an area of approximately 13 hectares and will contain the estimated 1.2 million cubic metres of waste that will be generated from the remedial activities within Port Hope. The LTWMF will also include infrastructure and support facilities such as access roads, administrative offices, laboratory, equipment and personnel decontamination facilities, waste water treatment plant and other ancillary facilities. Preliminary

  19. Long-Term Results From the Contura Multilumen Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Phase 4 Registry Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttino, Laurie W.; Arthur, Douglas W.; Vicini, Frank; Julian, Thomas; Mukhopadhyay, Nitai

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To describe the long-term outcomes from a completed, multi-institutional phase 4 registry trial using the Contura multilumen balloon (CMLB) breast brachytherapy catheter to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in patients with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred forty-two evaluable patients were enrolled by 23 institutions between January 2008 and February 2011. All patients received 34 Gy in 10 fractions, delivered twice daily. Rigorous target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints were observed. Results: The median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 1-54 months). For the entire patient cohort of 342 patients, 10 patients experienced an ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR). Eight of these IBTR were classified as true recurrences/marginal miss (TRMM), and 2 were elsewhere failures (EF). Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. For the entire cohort, 88% of patients had good to excellent overall cosmesis. The overall incidence of infection was 8.5%. Symptomatic seroma was reported in only 4.4% of patients. A separate analysis was performed to determine whether improved outcomes would be observed for patients treated at high-volume centers with extensive brachytherapy experience. Three IBTR were observed in this cohort, only 1 of which was classified as a TRMM. Local recurrence-free survival at high-volume centers was 98.1% at 3 years. Overall cosmetic outcome and toxicity were superior in patients treated at high-volume centers. In these patients, 95% had good to excellent overall cosmesis. Infection was observed in only 2.9% of patients, and symptomatic seroma was reported in only 1.9%. Conclusion: Use of the CMLB for APBI delivery is associated with acceptable long-term local control and toxicity. Local recurrence-free survival was 97.8% at 3 years. Significant (grade 3) toxicity was uncommon, and no grade 4 toxicity was observed. Treatment at high-volume centers was associated

  20. A Perspective on Long-Term Recovery Following the Fukushima Nuclear Accident - 12075

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.Y.

    2012-07-01

    The tragic events at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station began occurring on March 11, 2011, following Japan's unprecedented earthquake and tsunami. The subsequent loss of external power and on-site cooling capacity severely compromised the plant's safety systems, and subsequently, led to core melt in the affected reactors and damage to spent nuclear fuel in the storage pools. Together with hydrogen explosions, this resulted in a substantial release of radioactive material to the environment (mostly Iodine-131 and Cesium- 137), prompting an extensive evacuation effort. The latest release estimate places the event at the highest severity level (Level 7) on the International Nuclear Event Scale, the same as the Chernobyl accident of 1986. As the utility owner endeavored to stabilize the damaged facility, environmental contamination continued to propagate and affect every aspect of daily life in the affected region of Japan. Elevated levels of radioactivity (mostly dominated by Cs-137 with the passage of time) were found in soil, drinking water, vegetation, produce, seafood, and other foodstuffs. An estimated 80,000 to 90,000 people were evacuated; more evacuations are being contemplated months after the accident, and a vast amount of land has become contaminated. Early actions were taken to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated food and drinking water, followed by later actions to ban the shipment and sale of contaminated beef, mushrooms, and seafood. As the event continues to evolve toward stabilization, the long-term recovery effort needs to commence - a process that doubtless will involve rather complex decision-making interactions between various stakeholders. Key issues that may be encountered and considered in such a process include (1) socio-political factors, (2) local economic considerations, (3) land use options, (4) remediation approaches, (5) decontamination methods, (6) radioactive waste management, (7) cleanup levels and options, and (8

  1. Long-Term Assessment of Critical Radionuclides and Associated Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, G. T.; Baker, R. A.; Lee, P. L.; Eddy, T. P.; Blount, G. C.; Whitney, G. R.

    2012-11-06

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses and risks to the public. At SRS dose and risk assessments indicate tritium oxide in air and surface water, and Cs-137 in fish and deer have been, and continue to be, the critical radionuclides and pathways. In this assessment, indepth statistical analyses of the long-term trends of tritium oxide in atmospheric and surface water releases and Cs-137 concentrations in fish and deer are provided. Correlations also are provided with 1) operational changes and improvements, 2) geopolitical events (Cold War cessation), and 3) recent environmental remediation projects and decommissioning of excess facilities. For example, environmental remediation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility have resulted in a measurable impact on the tritium oxide flux to the onsite Fourmile Branch stream. Airborne releases of tritium oxide have been greatly affected by operational improvements and the end of the Cold War in 1991. However, the effects of SRS environmental remediation activities and ongoing tritium operations on tritium concentrations in the environment are measurable and documented in this assessment. Controlled hunts of deer and feral hogs are conducted at SRS for approximately six weeks each year. Before any harvested animal is released to a hunter, SRS personnel perform a field analysis for Cs-137 concentrations to ensure the hunter's dose does not exceed the SRS administrative game limit of 0.22 millisievert (22 mrem). However, most of the Cs-137 found in SRS onsite deer is not from site operations but is from nuclear weapons testing fallout from the 1950's and early 1960's. This legacy source term is trended in the SRS deer, and an assessment of the ''effective'' half-life of Cs-137 in deer

  2. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results at Rio Blanco, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, Rick; Kautsky, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–21, 2015. This report documents the analytical results of the Rio Blanco annual monitoring event, the trip report, and the data validation package. The groundwater and surface water monitoring samples were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for conventional analysis of tritium and analysis of gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry. A subset of water samples collected from wells near the Rio Blanco site was also sent to GEL Group Inc. for enriched tritium analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were collected from a total of four onsite wells, including two that are privately owned. Samples were also collected from two additional private wells at nearby locations and from nine surface water locations. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and they were analyzed for tritium using the conventional method with a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L). Four locations (one well and three surface locations) were analyzed using the enriched tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L. The enriched locations included the well at the Brennan Windmill and surface locations at CER-1, CER-4, and Fawn Creek 500 feet upstream.

  3. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surovchak, S.; Kaiser, L.; DiSalvo, R.; Boylan, J.; Squibb, G.; Nelson, J.; Darr, B.; Hanson, M.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site was established in 1951 as part of the United States' nationwide nuclear weapons complex to manufacture nuclear weapons components. In 1992 weapons production halted, and the Rocky Flats mission changed to include environmental investigations, cleanup, and site closure. In October 2005, DOE and its contractor completed an accelerated 10-year, $7 billion cleanup of chemical and radiological contamination left from nearly 50 years of production. The cleanup required the decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and removal of more than 800 structures; removal of more than 500,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste; and remediation of more than 360 potentially contaminated environmental sites. The final remedy for the site was selected in September 2006 and included institutional controls, physical controls, and continued monitoring for the former industrial portion of the site. The remainder of the site, which served as a buffer zone surrounding the former industrial area, was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in July 2007 for a national wildlife refuge. DOE's Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of Rocky Flats, which includes remedy implementation activities and general site maintenance. Several factors have complicated the transition from closure to post-closure at Rocky Flats. The early experiences associated with the two years since the physical cleanup and closure work were completed have led to several valuable lessons learned. (authors)

  4. Heat extracted from the long term flow test in the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Paul; Robinson, Bruce

    1994-01-20

    A long-term flow test was carried out in the Fenton Hill HDR Phase-2 reservoir for 14 months during 1992-1993 to examine the potential for supplying thermal energy at a sustained rate as a commercial demonstration of HDR technology. The test was accomplished in several segments with changes in mean flowrate due to pumping conditions. Re-test estimates of the extractable heat content above a minimum useful temperature were based on physical evidence of the size of the Fenton Hill reservoir. A numerical model was used to estimate the extent of heat extracted during the individual flow segments from the database of measured production data during the test. For a reservoir volume of 6.5x10{sup 6}m{sup 3}, the total heat content above a minimum temperature of 150{degree} C was 1.5x10{sup 15}J. For the total test period at the three sustained mean flowrates, the integrated heat extracted was 0.088x10{sup 15}J, with no discernable temperature decline of the produced fluid. The fraction of energy extracted above the abandonment temperature was 5.9%. On the basis of a constant thermal energy extraction rate, the lifetime of the reservoir (without reservoir growth) to the abandonment temperature would be 13.3 years, in good agreement with the pre-test estimate of 15.0 years for the given reservoir volume.

  5. China's Building Energy Use: A Long-Term Perspective based on a Detailed Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Patel, Pralit L.

    2012-01-13

    We present here a detailed, service-based model of China's building energy use, nested in the GCAM (Global Change Assessment Model) integrated assessment framework. Using the model, we explore long-term pathways of China's building energy use and identify opportunities of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The inclusion of a structural model of building energy demands within an integrated assessment framework represents a major methodological advance. It allows for a structural understanding of the drivers of building energy consumption while simultaneously considering the other human and natural system interactions that influence changes in the global energy system and climate. We also explore a range of different scenarios to gain insights into how China's building sector might evolve and what the implications might be for improved building energy technology and carbon policies. The analysis suggests that China's building energy growth will not wane anytime soon, although technology improvement will put downward pressure on this growth. Also, regardless of the scenarios represented, the growth will involve the continued, rapid electrification of the buildings sector throughout the century, and this transition will be accelerated by the implementation of carbon policy.

  6. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  7. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume II, Site Summaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousand of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  8. Long-term materials test program. Quarterly report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1984-03-01

    Exposure of gas turbine materials to a PFBC effluent under the Long-Term Materials Test Program has reached 1507 hours. Unprotected nickel and cobalt base blade and vane alloys show susceptibility to hot corrosion at 1500/sup 0/F (gas temperature), 1300/sup 0/F, and 1100/sup 0/F (air-cooled pins). Precious metal aluminide and M (Co,Fe) CrAlY overlay coatings continue to show good resistance to corrosion above 1450/sup 0/F, but are susceptible to varying degrees of pitting attack between 1050 and 1300/sup 0/F. Significant erosion/corrosion degradation of both base alloys and protective coatings/claddings has been observed on airfoil specimens exposed at 1350/sup 0/F, 800 to 900 fps and dust loadings less than 100 ppM for 1085 hours. Corrosion predominately occurred in areas of direct particle impaction; i.e., leading edge and pressure surface, indicating an erosion/corrosion synergism. At gas velocities of 1200 to 1400 fps, a platinum-aluminide coated IN-738 pin experienced a metal recession rate of 8 mils/1000-hours. The PFBC facility continues to show excellent operational reliability, accumulating over 1100 test hours this quarter. The only concern from an operations standpoint is the gradual thinning of the in-bed heat exchanger tubing at a rate of about 5 mils/100 hours off the diameter.

  9. Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    The need for ground water monitoring at the Falls City disposal site was evaluated in accordance with NRC regulations and guidelines established by the DOE in Guidance for Implementing the Long-term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title 1 Disposal Sites (DOE, 1996). Based on evaluation of site characterization data, it has been determined that a program to monitor ground water for demonstration of disposal cell performance based on a set of concentration limits is not appropriate because ground water in the uppermost aquifer is of limited use, and a narrative supplemental standard has been applied to the site that does not include numerical concentration limits or a point of compliance. The limited use designation is based on the fact that ground water in the uppermost aquifer is not currently or potentially a source of drinking water in the area because it contains widespread ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems. Background ground water quality varies by orders of magnitude since the aquifer is in an area of redistribution of uranium mineralization derived from ore bodies. The DOE plans to perform post-closure ground water monitoring in the uppermost aquifer as a best management practice (BMP) as requested by the state of Texas.

  10. Amorphous iron–chromium oxide nanoparticles with long-term stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iacob, Mihail; Cazacu, Maria; Turta, Constantin; Doroftei, Florica; Botko, Martin; Čižmár, Erik; Zeleňáková, Adriana; Feher, Alexander

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Fe–Cr oxide nanoparticles with pre-established metals ratio were obtained. • The amorphous state and its long-term stability were highlighted by X-ray diffraction. • The average diameter of dried nanoparticles was 3.5 nm, as was estimated by TEM, AFM. • In hexane dispersion, nanoparticles with diameter in the range 2.33–4.85 nm were found. • Superparamagnetic state of NPs co-exists with diamagnetism of the organic layer. - Abstract: Iron–chromium nanoparticles (NPs) were obtained through the thermal decomposition of μ{sub 3}-oxo heterotrinuclear (FeCr{sub 2}O) acetate in the presence of sunflower oil and dodecylamine (DA) as surfactants. The average diameter of the NPs was 3.5 nm, as estimated on the basis of transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. Both techniques revealed the formation of roughly approximated spheres with some irregularities and agglomerations in larger spherical assemblies of 50–100 nm. In hexane, NPs with diameters in the 2.33–4.85 nm range are individually dispersed, as emphasized by dynamic light scattering measurements. The amorphous nature of the product was emphasized by X-ray powder diffraction. The study of the magnetic properties shows the presence of superparamagnetic state of iron–chromium oxide NPs and the diamagnetic contribution from DA layer forming a shell of NPs.

  11. A thermal control system for long-term survival of scientific instruments on lunar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogawa, K.; Iijima, Y.; Tanaka, S.; Sakatani, N.; Otake, H.

    2014-03-15

    A thermal control system is being developed for scientific instruments placed on the lunar surface. This thermal control system, Lunar Mission Survival Module (MSM), was designed for scientific instruments that are planned to be operated for over a year in the future Japanese lunar landing mission SELENE-2. For the long-term operations, the lunar surface is a severe environment because the soil (regolith) temperature varies widely from nighttime ?200 degC to daytime 100 degC approximately in which space electronics can hardly survive. The MSM has a tent of multi-layered insulators and performs a regolith mound. Temperature of internal devices is less variable just like in the lunar underground layers. The insulators retain heat in the regolith soil in the daylight, and it can keep the device warm in the night. We conducted the concept design of the lunar survival module, and estimated its potential by a thermal mathematical model on the assumption of using a lunar seismometer designed for SELENE-2. Thermal vacuum tests were also conducted by using a thermal evaluation model in order to estimate the validity of some thermal parameters assumed in the computed thermal model. The numerical and experimental results indicated a sufficient survivability potential of the concept of our thermal control system.

  12. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Knowledge Advancement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Mattie, Patrick D.; Bixler, Nathan E.; Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N; Kalinich, Donald A.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the knowledge advancements from the uncertainty analysis for the State-of- the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout accident scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. This work assessed key MELCOR and MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) modeling uncertainties in an integrated fashion to quantify the relative importance of each uncertain input on potential accident progression, radiological releases, and off-site consequences. This quantitative uncertainty analysis provides measures of the effects on consequences, of each of the selected uncertain parameters both individually and in interaction with other parameters. The results measure the model response (e.g., variance in the output) to uncertainty in the selected input. Investigation into the important uncertain parameters in turn yields insights into important phenomena for accident progression and off-site consequences. This uncertainty analysis confirmed the known importance of some parameters, such as failure rate of the Safety Relief Valve in accident progression modeling and the dry deposition velocity in off-site consequence modeling. The analysis also revealed some new insights, such as dependent effect of cesium chemical form for different accident progressions. (auth)

  13. The U.S. regulatory framework for long-term management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smythe, C.; Bierley, D.; Bradshaw, M.

    1995-03-01

    The US established the regulatory structure for the management, disposal, and long-term care of uranium mill tailings in 1978 with the passage of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (Pub. L. 95-604). This legislation has governed the cleanup and disposal of uranium tailings at both inactive and active sites. The passage of the UMTRCA established a federal regulatory program for the cleanup and disposal of uranium mill tailings in the US. This program involves the DOE, the NRC, the EPA, various states and tribal governments, private licensees, and the general public. The DOE has completed surface remediation at 14 sites, with the remaining sites either under construction or in planning. The DOE`s UMTRA Project has been very successful in dealing with public and agency demands, particularly regarding disposal site selection and transportation issues. The active sites are also being cleaned up, but at a slower pace than the inactive sites, with the first site tentatively scheduled for completion in 1996.

  14. A long-term, integrated impact assessment of alternative building energy code scenarios in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Eom, Jiyong; Evans, Meredydd; Clarke, Leon E.

    2014-04-01

    China is the second largest building energy user in the world, ranking first and third in residential and commercial energy consumption. Beginning in the early 1980s, the Chinese government has developed a variety of building energy codes to improve building energy efficiency and reduce total energy demand. This paper studies the impact of building energy codes on energy use and CO2 emissions by using a detailed building energy model that represents four distinct climate zones each with three building types, nested in a long-term integrated assessment framework GCAM. An advanced building stock module, coupled with the building energy model, is developed to reflect the characteristics of future building stock and its interaction with the development of building energy codes in China. This paper also evaluates the impacts of building codes on building energy demand in the presence of economy-wide carbon policy. We find that building energy codes would reduce Chinese building energy use by 13% - 22% depending on building code scenarios, with a similar effect preserved even under the carbon policy. The impact of building energy codes shows regional and sectoral variation due to regionally differentiated responses of heating and cooling services to shell efficiency improvement.

  15. Long-Term US Industrial Energy Use and CO2 Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Sinha, Paramita; Smith, Steven J.; Lurz, Joshua P.

    2007-12-03

    We present a description and scenario results from our recently-developed long-term model of United States industrial sector energy consumption, which we have incorporated as a module within the ObjECTS-MiniCAM integrated assessment model. This new industrial model focuses on energy technology and fuel choices over a 100 year period and allows examination of the industrial sector response to climate policies within a global modeling framework. A key challenge was to define a level of aggregation that would be able to represent the dynamics of industrial energy demand responses to prices and policies, but at a level that remains tractable over a long time frame. In our initial results, we find that electrification is an important response to a climate policy, although there are services where there are practical and economic limits to electrification, and the ability to switch to a low-carbon fuel becomes key. Cogeneration of heat and power using biomass may also play a role in reducing carbon emissions under a policy constraint.

  16. Use of non evaporable getter pumps to ensure long term performances of high quantum efficiency photocathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sertore, Daniele Michelato, Paolo; Monaco, Laura; Manini, Paolo; Siviero, Fabrizio

    2014-05-15

    High quantum efficiency photocathodes are routinely used as laser triggered emitters in the advanced high brightness electron sources based on radio frequency guns. The sensitivity of “semiconductor” type photocathodes to vacuum levels and gas composition requires special care during preparation and handling. This paper will discuss the results obtained using a novel pumping approach based on coupling a 20 l s{sup −1} sputter ion getter pump with a CapaciTorr® D100 non evaporable getter (NEG) pump. A pressure of 8⋅10{sup −8} Pa was achieved using only a sputter ion pump after a 6 day bake-out. With the addition of a NEG pump, a pressure of 2⋅10{sup −9} Pa was achieved after a 2 day bake-out. These pressure values were maintained without power due to the ability of the NEG to pump gases by chemical reaction. Long term monitoring of cathodes quantum efficiencies was also carried out at different photon wavelengths for more than two years, showing no degradation of the photoemissive film properties.

  17. Long-term stability of disposed cementitious by-products materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, G.J.; Longlet, J.J.; Parks, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    There is considerable interest in using cementitious coal combustion by-products in waste disposal applications. Among coal combustion residuals, cementitious materials include high-calcium fly ash, dry process flue gas desulfurization by-products, and {open_quotes}clean coal{close_quotes} by-products (various fluidized bed combustion and sorbent injection by-products that utilize lime or limestone for scrubbing SO{sub 2}). Hydration of almost all of these by-products results in ettringite formation. When formed, ettringite structure phases are effective at immobilizing trace elements in oxyanion speciation, particularly selenite, selenate and borate. However, the long-term stability of the matrix is in question. We have studied the stability of the ettringite-based cement matrices in laboratory tests, and through examining cores obtained from disposed materials ranging in age from one to twelve years. Results relating to the effects of carbonation on ettringite in these hydrated by-products, and to the formation of thaumasite in disposed materials will be presented.

  18. Long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste stabilized by trace elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Lei; Jahng, Deokjin

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Korean food waste was found to contain low level of trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved by adding trace elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron played an important role in anaerobic digestion of food waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt addition further enhanced the process performance in the presence of iron. - Abstract: The purpose of this study was to examine if long-term anaerobic digestion of food waste in a semi-continuous single-stage reactor could be stabilized by supplementing trace elements. Contrary to the failure of anaerobic digestion of food waste alone, stable anaerobic digestion of food waste was achieved for 368 days by supplementing trace elements. Under the conditions of OLR (organic loading rates) of 2.19-6.64 g VS (volatile solid)/L day and 20-30 days of HRT (hydraulic retention time), a high methane yield (352-450 mL CH{sub 4}/g VS{sub added}) was obtained, and no significant accumulation of volatile fatty acids was observed. The subsequent investigation on effects of individual trace elements (Co, Fe, Mo and Ni) showed that iron was essential for maintaining stable methane production. These results proved that the food waste used in this study was deficient in trace elements.

  19. Long-term, mid-term, and short-term fuel scheduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seymore, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    Since 1973, electrical utilities have gained a sharply increased awareness of the impact of fuel prices and fuel availabilities on their operations and performance. The remarkable increase in oil and gas prices, the ever-present threat of an oil embargo, and the coal strike of 1978 all highlight the instability of the current fuel supply situation. Moreover, one sees little hope of an appreciable near-term or long-term improvement. This study was undertaken to determine practical approaches by which utilities might incorporate the economics of the fuels market into their operational planning, scheduling and dispatching processes. The objective of Phase 1 was not to develop digital computer programs, but rather to determine the mathematical approaches that seem most promising. The computer program development will be done in later phases of the project. A substantial literature search and industry survey were performed. Fuel contract management was found to be of key importance, and the inherent uncertainty in the basic data (heat rate curves, fuel costs, etc.) suggested the use of simplified formulations and solution techniques. The yearly fuel planning problem and the weekly fuel scheduling problems are cast as linear network flow optimization problems, for which very efficient digital computer programs are available.

  20. Long-term leaching test of incinerator bottom ash: Evaluation of Cu partition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Cheng-Fang Wu, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Yen-Chiun

    2007-07-01

    Two types of leaching tests were performed on the bottom ash from municipal solid waste incinerators. A short-term batch test specified by the America Nuclear Society (ANS) and long-term column tests with acetic acid (pH 5.2) as leaching solution were used to evaluate copper leachability. The Cu leaching after the 5-d ANS test is about 1% of the original Cu content of 5300 mg/kg. Upon addition of a stabilizing agent, the Cu leaching quantity is reduced; the extent of reduction depends on the type of chemical used (phosphate, carbonate and sulfide). The 1.6% Na{sub 2}S addition showed negligible Cu leaching, and Na{sub 2}S was, therefore, used in subsequent column tests. The 30-d column test indicates a steady increase of Cu leaching amount with time and reaches about 1.5% of the original Cu content after 30 d. A 180-d column test further increased the Cu leaching to about 5.1% of the original Cu content, whereas no appreciable Cu leaching was found with the addition of 1.6% Na{sub 2}S. A sequential extraction was conducted on the raw ash, ash with the addition of Na{sub 2}S and the residue ash after 30 d of operation to characterize Cu affinity for different solid fractions. The data were used to evaluate the fate of Cu through these interactions.

  1. Long-Term Cyclic Oxidation Behavior of Wrought Commercial Alloys at High Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingtao Li

    2003-08-05

    The oxidation resistance of a high-temperature alloy is dependent upon sustaining the formation of a protective scale, which is strongly related to the alloying composition and the oxidation condition. The protective oxide scale only provides a finite period of oxidation resistance owing to its eventual breakdown, which is especially accelerated under thermal cycling conditions. This current study focuses on the long-term cyclic oxidation behavior of a number of commercial wrought alloys. The alloys studied were Fe- and Ni-based, containing different levels of minor elements, such as Si, Al, Mn, and Ti. Oxidation testing was conducted at 1000 and 1100 C in still air under both isothermal and thermal cycling conditions (1-day and 7-days). The specific aspects studied were the oxidation behavior of chromia-forming alloys that are used extensively in industry. The current study analyzed the effects of alloying elements, especially the effect of minor element Si, on cyclic oxidation resistance. The behavior of oxide scale growth, scale spallation, subsurface changes, and chromium interdiffusion in the alloy were analyzed in detail. A novel model was developed in the current study to predict the life-time during cyclic oxidation by simulating oxidation kinetics and chromium interdiffusion in the subsurface of chromia-forming alloys.

  2. 2015 Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program Sampling and Analysis Results Report for Project Rulison, Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, Rick; Kautsky, Mark

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management conducted annual sampling at the Rulison, Colorado, Site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP) on May 20–22 and 27, 2015. Several of the land owners were not available to allow access to their respective properties, which created the need for several sample collection trips. This report documents the analytical results of the Rulison monitoring event and includes the trip report and the data validation package (Appendix A). The groundwater and surface water monitoring were shipped to the GEL Group Inc. laboratories for analysis. All requested analyses were successfully completed. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high- resolution gamma spectrometry. Tritium was analyzed using two methods, the conventional tritium method, which has a detection limit on the order of 400 picocuries per liter (pCi/L), and the enriched method (for selected samples), which has a detection limit on the order of 3 pCi/L.

  3. Prediction of long-term erosion from landfill covers in the southwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.E.; Stormont, J.C.

    1997-12-31

    Erosion is a primary stressor of landfill covers, especially for climates with high intensity storms and low native plant density. Rills and gullies formed by discrete events can damage barrier layers and induce failure. Geomorphologic, empirical and physical modeling procedures are available to provide estimates of surface erosion, but numerical modeling requires accurate representation of the severe rainfall events that generate erosion. The National Weather Service precipitation frequency data and estimates of 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60-minute intensity can be statistically combined in a numerical model to obtain long-term erosion estimates. Physically based numerical models using the KINEROS and AHYMO programs have been utilized to predict the erosion from a southwestern landfill or waste containment site with 0.03, 0.05 and 0.08 meter per meter surface slopes. Results of AHYMO modeling were within 15 percent of average annual values computed with the empirical Universal Soil Loss Equation. However, the estimation of rill and gully formation that primarily degrades cover systems requires quantifying single events. For Southwestern conditions, a single 10-year storm can produce erosion quantifies equal to three times the average annual erosion and a 100-year storm can produce five times the average annual erosion.

  4. A Report to Congress on Long-Term Stewardship. Volume I - Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-01-01

    During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as for other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over a 100 sites in 30 States and one U.S. Territory. Hundreds of thousands of acres of residually contaminated soils, contaminated groundwater, surface water and sediment contamination, and contaminated buildings are present at many sites across the country. These sites range in size from less than one acre, containing only a single facility, to large sites spanning over 100,000 acres with huge uranium enrichment plants and plutonium processing canyons. Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) program has made significant progress in addressing this environmental legacy. Millions of cubic meters of waste have been removed, stabilized, or disposed of, resulting in significant risk and cost reduction. In addition, DOE began disposing of transuranic (i.e., plutonium-contaminated) waste in the nation’s first deep geologic repository – the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. DOE is now carrying out its long-term stewardship obligations at dozens of sites, including smaller sites where DOE has completed cleanup work for the entire site and many larger sites where DOE has remediated portions of the site.

  5. A long-term strategic plan for development of solar thermal electric technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Burch, G.; Chavez, J.M.; Mancini, T.R.; Tyner, C.E.

    1997-06-01

    Solar thermal electric (STE) technologies--parabolic troughs, power towers, and dish/engine systems--can convert sunlight into electricity efficiently and with minimum effect on the environment. These technologies currently range from developmental to early commercial stages of maturity. This paper summarizes the results of a recent strategic planning effort conducted by the US department of Energy (DOE) to develop a long-term strategy for the development of STE technologies. The planning team led by DOE included representatives from the solar thermal industry, domestic utilities, state energy offices, and Sun{center_dot}Lab (the cooperative Sandia National laboratories/National Renewable Energy Laboratory partnership that supports the STE Program) as well as project developers. The plan was aimed at identifying specific activities necessary to achieve the DOE vision of 20 gigawatts of installed STE capability by the year 2020. The planning team developed five strategies that both build on the strengths of, and opportunities for, STE technology and address weaknesses and threats. These strategies are to: support future commercial opportunities for STE technologies; demonstrate improved performance and reliability of STE components and systems; reduce STE energy costs; develop advanced STE systems and applications; and address nontechnical barriers and champion STE power. The details of each of these strategies are discussed.

  6. Observational evidence confirms modelling of the long-term integrity of CO2-reservoir caprocks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kampman, N.; Busch, A.; Bertier, P.; Snippe, J.; Hangx, S.; Pipich, V.; Di, Z.; Rother, G.; Harrington, J. F.; Evans, J. P.; et al

    2016-07-28

    Storage of anthropogenic CO2 in geological formations relies on a caprock as the primary seal preventing buoyant super-critical CO2 escaping. Although natural CO2 reservoirs demonstrate that CO2 may be stored safely for millions of years, uncertainty remains in predicting how caprocks will react with CO2-bearing brines. The resulting uncertainty poses a significant challenge to the risk assessment of geological carbon storage. We describe mineral reaction fronts in a CO2 reservoir-caprock system exposed to CO2 over a timescale comparable with that needed for geological carbon storage. Moreover, the propagation of the reaction front is retarded by redox-sensitive mineral dissolution reactions andmore » carbonate precipitation, which reduces its penetration into the caprock to ~7 cm in ~105 years. This distance is an order-of-magnitude smaller than previous predictions. The results attest to the significance of transport-limited reactions to the long-term integrity of sealing behaviour in caprocks exposed to CO2.« less

  7. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Records: Maintaining Access to the Knowledge - 13122

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, John; Gueretta, Jeanie; McKinney, Ruth; Anglim, Cliff

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is an integral part of DOE's strategy to ensure that legacy liabilities of former nuclear weapons production sites are properly managed following the completion of environmental cleanup activities. In the area of environmental legacy management, records management is crucial to the protection of health, environmental, and legal interests of the Department and the public. LM is responsible for maintaining long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) records in performance of its mission. Maintaining access to the knowledge contained in these record collections is one of LM's primary responsibilities. To fulfill this responsibility, LM established a consolidated records management facility, the LM Business Center (LMBC), to house physical media records and electronic records. A new electronic record keeping system (ERKS) was needed to replace an obsolete system while helping to ensure LM is able to meet ongoing responsibilities to maintain access to knowledge and control the life cycle management of records. (authors)

  8. Long-Term Operation Of Ground-Based Atmospheric Sensing Systems In The Tropical Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Mark; Jones, Larry J.; Porch, W. M.; Apple, Monty L.; Widener, Kevin B.

    2004-10-14

    Three semi-autonomous atmospheric sensing systems were installed in the tropical western Pacific region. The first of these Atmospheric Radiation and Cloud Stations (ARCS) began operation in 1996. Each ARCS is configured as a system-of-systems since it comprises an ensemble of independent instrument systems. The ARCS collect, process, and transmit large volumes of cloud, solar and thermal radiation, and meteorological data to support climate studies and climate-modeling improvements as part of the U.S Department of Energys Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. Data from these tropical ARCS stations have been used for satellite ground-truth data comparisons and validations, including comparisons for MTI and AQUA satellite data. Our experiences with these systems in the tropics led to modifications in their design. An ongoing international logistics effort is required to keep gigabytes per day of quality-assured data flowing to the ARM programs archives. Design criteria, performance, communications methods, and the day-to-day logistics required to support long-term operations of ground-based remote atmospheric sensing systems are discussed. End-to-end data flow from the ARCS systems to the ARM Program archives is discussed.

  9. The implications of future building scenarios for long-term building energy research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, W.T.

    1986-12-01

    This report presents a discussion of alternative future scenarios of the building environment to the year 2010 and assesses the implications these scenarios present for long-term building energy R and D. The scenarios and energy R and D implications derived from them are intended to serve as the basis from which a strategic plan can be developed for the management of R and D programs conducted by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems, US Department of Energy. The scenarios and analysis presented here have relevance not only for government R and D programs; on the contrary, it is hoped that the results of this effort will be of interest and useful to researchers in both private and public sector organizations that deal with building energy R and D. Making R and D decisions today based on an analysis that attempts to delineate the nexus of events 25 years in the future are clearly decisions made in the face of uncertainty. Yet, the effective management of R and D programs requires a future-directed understanding of markets, technological developments, and environmental factors, as well as their interactions. The analysis presented in this report is designed to serve that need. Although the probability of any particular scenario actually occurring is uncertain, the scenarios to be presented are sufficiently robust to set bounds within which to examine the interaction of forces that will shape the future building environment.

  10. The value and need for long term conservation of information regarding nuclear waste repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eng, T.; Jensen, M.

    1993-12-31

    An important question in safety assessment of all repositories where toxic waste is disposed is how long should information be available to society about the repository and its content? Future societies right to knowledge must be considered and actions must already today be taken to ensure that proper information conservation, transfer and retrieval are provided. Collection of relevant information must be planned for at the research, construction and the operational phase of a repository. One of the main areas for information conservation and transfer is to mitigate future human intrusion. A system for best possible mitigation of human intrusion should with the present knowledge comprise the following parts: (a) development of planning procedures for long-term conservation of gathered information (present and future national and international archives, markers etc.); (b) continuous follow up of the state-of-the-art of information media; (c) preparations for national rules and regulations on nuclear waste information; (d) participation in international cooperation on issues concerning nuclear waste information keeping, transfer and retrieval.

  11. Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project; Long-term Management Plan, Project Report 1993, Final Draft.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Matthew T.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted on the Hellsgate Winter Range Mitigation Project area, a 4,943 acre ranch purchased for mitigating some habitat losses associated with the original construction of Grand Coulee Dam and innundation of habitat by Lake Roosevelt. A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was used to determine habitat quality and quantity baseline data and future projections. Target species used in the study were sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemoinus), mink (Mustela vison), spotted sandpiper (Actiius colchicus), bobcat (Felis reufs), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura). From field data collected, limiting life values or HSI's (Habitat Suitability Index's) for each indicator species was determined for existing habitats on project lands. From this data a long term management plan was developed. This report is designed to provide guidance for the management of project lands in relation to the habitat cover types discussed and the indicator species used to evaluate these cover types. In addition, the plan discusses management actions, habitat enhancements, and tools that will be used to enhance, protect and restore habitats to desired conditions. Through planned management actions biodiversity and vegetative structure can be optimized over time to reduce or eliminate, limiting HSI values for selected wildlife on project lands.

  12. Intraoperative Electron-Beam Radiation Therapy for Pediatric Ewing Sarcomas and Rhabdomyosarcomas: Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Polo, Alfredo; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Gonzalez, Carmen; Desco, Manuel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To assess long-term outcomes and toxicity of intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT) in the management of pediatric patients with Ewing sarcomas (EWS) and rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventy-one sarcoma (EWS n=37, 52%; RMS n=34, 48%) patients underwent IOERT for primary (n=46, 65%) or locally recurrent sarcomas (n=25, 35%) from May 1983 to November 2012. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. For survival outcomes, potential associations were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: After a median follow-up of 72 months (range, 4-310 months), 10-year LC, disease-free survival, and OS was 74%, 57%, and 68%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, disease status (P=.04 and P=.05) and R1 margin status (P<.01 and P=.04) remained significantly associated with LC and OS. Nine patients (13%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: A multimodal IOERT-containing approach is a well-tolerated component of treatment for pediatric EWS and RMS patients, allowing reduction or substitution of external beam radiation exposure while maintaining high local control rates.

  13. A retrospective investigation of energy efficiency standards: Policies may have accelerated long term declines in appliance costs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Van Buskirk, R. D.; Kantner, C. L. S.; Gerke, B. F.; Chu, S.

    2014-11-14

    We perform a retrospective investigation of multi-decade trends in price and life-cycle cost (LCC) for home appliances in periods with and without energy efficiency (EE) standards and labeling polices. In contrast to the classical picture of the impact of efficiency standards, the introduction and updating of appliance standards is not associated with a long-term increase in purchase price; rather, quality-adjusted prices undergo a continued or accelerated long-term decline. In addition, long term trends in appliance LCCswhich include operating costsconsistently show an accelerated long term decline with EE policies. We also show that the incremental price of efficiency improvements has declinedmorefaster than the baseline product price for selected products. These observations are inconsistent with a view of EE standards that supposes a perfectly competitive market with static supply costs. These results suggest that EE policies may be associated with other forces at play, such as innovation and learning-by-doing in appliance production and design, that can affect long term trends in quality-adjusted prices and LCCs.less

  14. Coal investment and long-term supply and demand outlook for coal in the Asia-Pacific Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.J.

    1997-12-31

    The theme of this symposium to look ahead almost a quarter century to 2020 gives one the freedom to speculate more than usual in projections for coal. It is important to attempt to take a long term look into the future of coal and energy, so that one can begin to prepare for major changes on the horizon. However, it would be a mistake to believe that the crystal ball for making long term projections is accurate for 2020. Hopefully it can suggest plausible changes that have long term strategic importance to Asia`s coal sector. This paper presents the medium scenario of long term projects of coal production, consumption, imports and exports in Asia. The second part of the paper examines the two major changes in Asia that could be most important to the long term role of coal. These include: (1) the impact of strict environmental legislation on energy and technology choices in Asia, and (2) the increased role of the private sector in all aspects of coal in Asia.

  15. A retrospective investigation of energy efficiency standards: Policies may have accelerated long term declines in appliance costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buskirk, R. D.; Kantner, C. L. S.; Gerke, B. F.; Chu, S.

    2014-11-14

    We perform a retrospective investigation of multi-decade trends in price and life-cycle cost (LCC) for home appliances in periods with and without energy efficiency (EE) standards and labeling polices. In contrast to the classical picture of the impact of efficiency standards, the introduction and updating of appliance standards is not associated with a long-term increase in purchase price; rather, quality-adjusted prices undergo a continued or accelerated long-term decline. In addition, long term trends in appliance LCCswhich include operating costsconsistently show an accelerated long term decline with EE policies. We also show that the incremental price of efficiency improvements has declined faster than the baseline product price for selected products. These observations are inconsistent with a view of EE standards that supposes a perfectly competitive market with static supply costs. These results suggest that EE policies may be associated with other forces at play, such as innovation and learning-by-doing in appliance production and design, that can affect long term trends in quality-adjusted prices and LCCs.

  16. Accuracy of the European solar water heater test procedure. Part 2: Prediction of long-term performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabl, A. ); Carvalho, M.J.; Collares-Pereira, M. ); Bourges, B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper continues the evaluation of the European test procedure for solar water heaters, by considering what consequences the errors of the parameters (derived in Part 1, the companion paper) will have for the prediction of the long-term performance. A simple criterion is derived for the required length of the test period, as a function of climatic variables and desired accuracy of the long-term performance prediction. Typically a duration of 10 to 50 days will suffice. Since the actual conditions during a test cannot be foreseen, it will be more efficient to calculate the error of the long-term performance prediction on line at the end of each test day and terminate the series whenever acceptable accuracy is reached.

  17. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Thomas; Bruce Hallbert

    2013-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970’s vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE’s program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a

  18. Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

    2010-12-01

    behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

  19. Long-Term Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems (II&C) Modernization Future Vision and Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Life extension beyond 60 years for the U.S operating nuclear fleet requires that instrumentation and control (I&C) systems be upgraded to address aging and reliability concerns. It is impractical for the legacy systems based on 1970's vintage technology operate over this extended time period. Indeed, utilities have successfully engaged in such replacements when dictated by these operational concerns. However, the replacements have been approached in a like-for-like manner, meaning that they do not take advantage of the inherent capabilities of digital technology to improve business functions. And so, the improvement in I&C system performance has not translated to bottom-line performance improvement for the fleet. Therefore, wide-scale modernization of the legacy I&C systems could prove to be cost-prohibitive unless the technology is implemented in a manner to enable significant business innovation as a means of off-setting the cost of upgrades. A Future Vision of a transformed nuclear plant operating model based on an integrated digital environment has been developed as part of the Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) research pathway, under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Sustainability Program. This is a research and development program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), performed in close collaboration with the nuclear utility industry, to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe and economical operation of current nuclear power plants. DOE's program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy security and environmental security . The Advanced II&C research pathway is being conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The Future Vision is based on a digital architecture that encompasses all aspects of plant operations and support, integrating plant systems, plant work processes, and plant workers in a seamless

  20. Percutaneous Treatment of Central Venous Stenosis in Hemodialysis Patients: Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young Chul; Won, Jong Yun Choi, Sun Young; Ko, Heung-kyu; Lee, Kwang-Hun; Lee, Do Yun; Kang, Byung-Chul; Kim, Seung-Jung

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of endovascular treatment of central venous stenosis in patients with arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) for hemodialysis. Five hundred sixty-three patients with AVFs who were referred for a fistulogram were enrolled in this study. Among them, 44 patients showed stenosis (n = 35) or occlusions (n = 9) in the central vein. For the initial treatment, 26 patients underwent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and 15 patients underwent stent placements. Periods between AVF formation and first intervention ranged from 3 to 144 months. Each patient was followed for 14 to 60 months. Procedures were successful in 41 of 44 patients (93.2%). Primary patency rates for PTA at 12 and 36 months were 52.1% and 20.0%, and assisted primary patency rates were 77.8% and 33.3%, respectively. Primary patency rates for stent at 12 and 36 months were 46.7% and 6.7%, and assisted primary patency rates were 60.0% and 20.0%, respectively. Fifteen of 26 patients with PTAs underwent repeated interventions because of restenosis. Fourteen of 15 patients with a stent underwent repeated interventions because of restenosis and combined migration (n = 1) and shortening (n = 6) of the first stent. There was no significant difference in patency between PTAs and stent placement (p > 0.05). Average AVF patency duration was 61.8 months and average number of endovascular treatments was 2.12. In conclusion, endovascular treatments of central venous stenosis could lengthen the available period of AVFs. There was no significant difference in patency between PTAs and stent placement.

  1. Long-Term Degradation Testing of High-Temperature Electrolytic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.M. Stoots; J.E. O'Brien; J.S. Herring; G.K. Housley; D.G. Milobar; M.S. Sohal

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This report presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  2. Long-Term Outcomes of Vestibular Schwannomas Treated With Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy: An Institutional Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapoor, Sumit; Batra, Sachin; Carson, Kathryn; Shuck, John; Kharkar, Siddharth; Gandhi, Rahul; Jackson, Juan; Wemmer, Jan; Terezakis, Stephanie; Shokek, Ori; Kleinberg, Lawrence; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We assessed clinical outcome and long-term tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for unilateral schwannoma. Methods and Materials: Between 1995 and 2007, 496 patients were treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy at Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD); 385 patients had radiologic follow-up that met the inclusion criteria. The primary endpoint was treatment failure. Secondary endpoints were radiologic progression and clinical outcome. Logistic regression analysis assessed the association of age, race, tumor side, sex, and pretreatment symptoms. Results: In 11 patients (3%) treatment failed, and they required salvage (microsurgical) treatment. Radiologic progression was observed in 116 patients (30.0%), including 35 patients (9%) in whom the treatment volume more than doubled during the follow-up period, although none required surgical resection. Tumors with baseline volumes of less than 1 cm{sup 3} were 18.02 times more likely to progress than those with tumor volumes of 1 cm{sup 3} or greater (odds ratio, 18.02; 95% confidence interval, 4.25-76.32). Treatment-induced neurologic morbidity included 8 patients (1.6%) with new facial weakness, 12 patients (2.8%) with new trigeminal paresthesias, 4 patients (0.9%) with hydrocephalus (1 communicating and 3 obstructive), and 2 patients (0.5%) with possibly radiation-induced neoplasia. Conclusions: Although the rate of treatment failure is low (3%), careful follow-up shows that radiologic progression occurs frequently. When reporting outcome, the 'no salvage surgery needed' and 'no additional treatment needed' criteria for treatment success need to be complemented by the radiologic data.

  3. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the doseresponse relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched casecontrol study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ?5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation doseresponse relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear doseresponse relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  4. Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells "DeepTrek"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CSI Technologies

    2007-08-31

    The purpose of this project is to formulate a 'Supercement' designed for improving the long-term sealing integrity in HPHT wells. Phase I concentrated on chemistry studies and screening tests to design and evaluate Portland-based, hybrid Portland, and non-Portland-based cement systems suitable for further scale-up testing. Phase II work concentrated on additional lab and field testing to reduce the candidate materials list to two systems, as well as scaleup activities aimed at verifying performance at the field scale. Phase II was extended thorough a proposal to develop additional testing capabilities aimed at quantifying cementing material properties and performance that were previously not possible. Phase III focused on bringing the material(s) developed in previous Phases to commercialization, through Field Trials, Cost/Benefit Analysis, and Technology Transfer. Extensive development and testing work throughout the project led to Phase III commercialization of two very different materials: (1) Highly-expansive cement (Portland-based), patent pending as 'PRESTRESSED CEMENT'; and (2) Epoxy Resin (non-Portland-based), patent pending. Trade name is Ultra Seal-R. In Phase III, work concentrated on application of the Supercement materials in various increasingly-challenging wells. Previous testing revealed that PRESTRESSED CEMENT, when applied in weak or unconsolidated formations, tends to expand away from the central pipe, restricting the applicability of this material to competent formations. Tests were devised to quantify this effect so the material could be applied in appropriate wells. Additionally, the testing was needed because of industry resistance to expansive cements, due to previous marketing attempts with other materials that were less than successful. Field trials with the Epoxy Resin currently numbers in the hundreds of jobs at up to 295 deg F, with a large percentage being completely successful. Both the PRESTRESSED CEMENT as well as the Ultra Seal

  5. Supercement for Annular Seal and Long-Term Integrity in Deep, Hot Wells "Deep Trek"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin D. Edgley; Fred L. Sabins; Larry T. Watters

    2005-08-31

    The purpose of this project is to formulate a ''Supercement'' designed for improving the long-term sealing integrity in HPHT wells. Phase I concentrated on chemistry studies and screening tests to design and evaluate Portland-based, hybrid Portland, and non-Portland-based cement systems suitable for further scale-up testing. Phase II work concentrated on additional lab and field testing to reduce the candidate materials list to two systems, as well as scale up activities aimed at verifying performance at the field scale. Phase II was extended thorough a proposal to develop additional testing capabilities aimed at quantifying cementing material properties and performance that were previously not possible. Two materials are being taken into Phase III for field testing and commercialization: {lg_bullet} Highly-expansive cement (Portland-based), patent pending as ''Pre-Stressed Cement'' {lg_bullet} Epoxy Resin (non-Portland-based), patent pending In Phase II, significant effort was expended on scaling up the processes for handling resin in the field, as it is quite different than conventional Portland-based cements in mixing, personnel protection, and cleanup. Through this effort, over fifty (50) field jobs were done at a variety of temperatures and depths, most with excellent results. Large-scale field testing was less relevant with Pre-stressed Cement, because the materials and surface processes do not vary from those that have been developed for conventional Portland materials over the last eighty (80) years. The formulation is quite unique, however, and performs very differently than conventional Portland cements downhole.

  6. Lipidomic changes in rat liver after long-term exposure to ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernando, Harshica; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Shakeel Ansari, G.A.

    2011-09-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a serious health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. In this study we examined the progression of ALD along with lipidomic changes in rats fed ethanol for 2 and 3 months to understand the mechanism, and identify possible biomarkers. Male Fischer 344 rats were fed 5% ethanol or caloric equivalent of maltose-dextrin in a Lieber-DeCarli diet. Animals were killed at the end of 2 and 3 months and plasma and livers were collected. Portions of the liver were fixed for histological and immunohistological studies. Plasma and the liver lipids were extracted and analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A time dependent fatty infiltration was observed in the livers of ethanol-fed rats. Mild inflammation and oxidative stress were observed in some ethanol-fed rats at 3 months. The multivariate and principal component analysis of proton and phosphorus NMR spectroscopy data of extracted lipids from the plasma and livers showed segregation of ethanol-fed groups from the pair-fed controls. Significant hepatic lipids that were increased by ethanol exposure included fatty acids and triglycerides, whereas phosphatidylcholine (PC) decreased. However, both free fatty acids and PC decreased in the plasma. In liver lipids unsaturation of fatty acyl chains increased, contrary to plasma, where it decreased. Our studies confirm that over-accumulation of lipids in ethanol-induced liver steatosis accompanied by mild inflammation on long duration of ethanol exposure. Identified metabolic profile using NMR lipidomics could be further explored to establish biomarker signatures representing the etiopathogenesis, progression and/or severity of ALD. - Highlights: > Long term exposure to ethanol was studied. > A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy based lipidomic approach was used. > We examined the clustering pattern of the NMR data with principal component analysis. > NMR data were compared with histology and

  7. Long-term in vitro, cell-type-specific genome-wide reprogramming of gene expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakelien, Anne-Mari; Gaustad, Kristine G.; Taranger, Christel K.; Skalhegg, Bjorn S.; Kuentziger, Thomas; Collas, Philippe . E-mail: philippe.collas@medisin.uio.no

    2005-09-10

    We demonstrate a cell extract-based, genome-wide and heritable reprogramming of gene expression in vitro. Kidney epithelial 293T cells have previously been shown to take on T cell properties following a brief treatment with an extract of Jurkat T cells. We show here that 293T cells exposed for 1 h to a Jurkat cell extract undergo genome-wide, target cell-type-specific and long-lasting transcriptional changes. Microarray analyses indicate that on any given week after extract treatment, {approx}2500 genes are upregulated >3-fold, of which {approx}900 are also expressed in Jurkat cells. Concomitantly, {approx}1500 genes are downregulated or repressed, of which {approx}500 are also downregulated in Jurkat cells. Gene expression changes persist for over 30 passages ({approx}80 population doublings) in culture. Target cell-type specificity of these changes is shown by the lack of activation or repression of Jurkat-specific genes by extracts of 293T cells or carcinoma cells. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirms the long-term transcriptional activation of genes involved in key T cell functions. Additionally, growth of cells in suspended aggregates, expression of CD3 and CD28 T cell surface markers, and interleukin-2 secretion by 293T cells treated with extract of adult peripheral blood T cells illustrate a functional nuclear reprogramming. Therefore, target cell-type-specific and heritable changes in gene expression, and alterations in cell function, can be promoted by extracts derived from transformed cells as well as from adult primary cells.

  8. Study on long-term irradiation aging of electrical cables (The VEILLE program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlin, F.; Attal, M.; Gaussens, G.

    1995-04-01

    The VEILLE program (French acronym for study on long-term irradiation aging of electrical cables) was implemented in 1988 by the Institute of Protection and Nuclear Safety (IPSN) in collaboration with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a period of six years. It is intended to validate the assumptions put forward as regards aging of electrical cables and to develop criteria for early detection of degradation likely to lead to functional failures. The tests were carried out partly at the Sandia National Laboratories in the United States, partly in France in the CIS bio international Laboratories at the Saclay Nuclear Research Centre. The study focused on the radiation effects from cobalt 60 on electrical cables made up of various polymers for two temperatures and at various dose rates. Other tests were also performed using a device laid under water in the OSIRIS reactor pool at Saclay to test cables under irradiation and temperature conditions close to those found in nuclear power plant operation. Subsequently the aged cables were subjected to containment accident conditions (irradiation and thermodynamic profile) in order to show any degradation due to aging. The study showed the significant effect of radiation doses on EPR and EPDM cable insulations as well as synergy between radiation dose rates and temperature on the mechanical properties of the Hypalon sheath. Correlation between the mechanical properties and the function of cables is difficult to establish as electrical characteristics are preserved whatever the type of mechanical degradation observed. Finally, the performance of electrical cables after an accident remains a key criterion to define the materials likely to be used when manufacturing cables intended to ensure safety functions.

  9. Implementation document for northwest boundary system, long-term improvements, interim response action. Volume 1. General. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    This IRA is being conducted as part of the IRA process for the RMA. The Long-Term Improvements IRA consist of completion of the short-term improvements IRA and implementation of monitoring program for the entire Northwest Boundary System, with no modification to the existing treatment plant. The implementation of the NWB system long-term improvements IRA is intended to provide monitoring data, construction of additional monitoring wells (including revegetation of areas disturbed during construction), monitoring both treatment plant and aquifer water quality, water-table monitoring, and preparation of a report containing an evaluation of system performance based on quarterly monitoring L-R one year.

  10. Fuel Cell Financing Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UTC Power Corporation 195 Governor's Highway South Windsor, CT Fuel Cell Financing Options (CESA/DOE Webinar - August 30, 2011) Paul J. Rescsanski, Manager, Business Finance Paul J. Rescsanski, Manager, Business Finance The UTC Power Advantage Strained Utility Grid, unreliable power * Significant Energy savings through: - 80 - 90% system efficiency - Combined heat and power * Payback in 3-5 years Sustainability and carbon reduction Rising energy costs * Assured power generated on-site: -

  11. Opportunities in Bond Financing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities in Bond Financing James Dack Vice President Alternative Energy Finance Group Stern Brothers & Co. Seattle, WA 98101 Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado June 11-13, 2012 2 INTRODUCTION * Stern Brothers, founded in 1917 and headquartered in St. Louis, is an investment banking firm that is focused on project financing (taxable and tax-exempt) for renewable energy, real estate, higher education and healthcare. * Stern's Alternative

  12. Review of ESPC Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document serves as a form for use in documenting a review of project financing in an energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  13. Finance Idol Word Cloud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This word cloud represents the topics discussed during the Big and Small Ideas: How to Lower Solar Financing Costs breakout session at the SunShot Grand Challenge.

  14. State Energy Finance Programs

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Finance Programs Alaska Native Village Energy Development Workshop April 29, 2014 Energy Planning and Policy Technical and Community Assistance Investing in Alaska's ...

  15. Strategy for Long-Term Stewardship and Monitoring of Amchitka Island - 12190

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kautsky, Mark; Nguyen, Jason; Darr, Paul S.; Picel, Mary

    2012-07-01

    The Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan (LTSMP) for Amchitka details how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at and around the sites on Amchitka Island. The LTSMP calls for monitoring to be performed every 5 years, at least in the initial phase of the project. The purpose of the monitoring is to develop a baseline of activity concentrations for selected radionuclides in biota, water, and soil, both on Amchitka and at the reference location on Adak Island, approximately 322 km (200 miles) northeast of Amchitka. Data compiled by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP, 2006) are being included as part of the baseline data set. The specific biological, water, and sediment samples collected during the 2011 sampling event were developed through close coordination with the primary stakeholders, including the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, the Aleutian Pribilof Island Association, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Amchitka is managed by the USFWS as part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. Two plans were developed to address specific needs of the biological- and the terrestrial-monitoring programs. Results from these monitoring programs will help determine whether the environment is being impacted by radionuclide migration and uptake, and if subsistence and commercial-catch seafood is safe for human consumption. The RESRAD-BIOTA code is being used to evaluate ecological health relative to the radionuclide levels determined from this sampling event. The samples were sent to three laboratories for analysis. With the exception of the seawater samples, most of the samples were sent to the Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A smaller subset of rock-weed samples, Star reindeer lichen samples, and soil samples collected from beneath the lichen were sent

  16. Long-term Differences in Tillage and Land Use Affect Intra-aggregate Pore Heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravchenko, A.N.; Wang, A.N.W.; Smucker, A.J.M.; Rivers, M.L.

    2012-10-25

    Recent advances in computed tomography provide measurement tools to study internal structures of soil aggregates at micrometer resolutions and to improve our understanding of specific mechanisms of various soil processes. Fractal analysis is one of the data analysis tools that can be helpful in evaluating heterogeneity of the intra-aggregate internal structures. The goal of this study was to examine how long-term tillage and land use differences affect intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity. The specific objectives were: (i) to develop an approach to enhance utility of box-counting fractal dimension in characterizing intra-aggregate pore heterogeneity; (ii) to examine intra-aggregate pores in macro-aggregates (4-6 mm in size) using the computed tomography scanning and fractal analysis, and (iii) to compare heterogeneity of intra-aggregate pore space in aggregates from loamy Alfisol soil subjected to 20 yr of contrasting management practices, namely, conventional tillage (chisel plow) (CT), no-till (NT), and native succession vegetation (NS). Three-dimensional images of the intact aggregates were obtained with a resolution of 14.6 {micro}m at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL. Proposed box-counting fractal dimension normalization was successfully implemented to estimate heterogeneity of pore voxel distributions without bias associated with different porosities in soil aggregates. The aggregates from all three studied treatments had higher porosity associated with large (>100 {micro}m) pores present in their centers than in their exteriors. Pores 15 to 60 {micro}m were equally abundant throughout entire aggregates but their distributions were more heterogeneous in aggregate interiors. The CT aggregates had greater numbers of pores 15 to 60 {micro}m than NT and NS. Distribution of pore voxels belonging to large pores was most heterogeneous in the aggregates from NS, followed by NT and by CT. This result was consistent with presence of

  17. EIS-0423-S1: Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This SEIS supplements the January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury. It will analyze the potential environmental impact for a facility at and in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

  18. EM Publishes Federal Register Notice of Intent to Prepare Supplement to Long-Term Mercury Storage EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – EM on Tuesday published a notice of intent in the Federal Register to prepare a supplement to its January 2011 Environmental Impact Statement for the Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury to analyze additional alternatives, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act.

  19. Greenhouse gas emission impacts of alternative-fueled vehicles: Near-term vs. long-term technology options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1997-05-20

    Alternative-fueled vehicle technologies have been promoted and used for reducing petroleum use, urban air pollution, and greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, greenhouse gas emission impacts of near-term and long-term light-duty alternative-fueled vehicle technologies are evaluated. Near-term technologies, available now, include vehicles fueled with M85 (85% methanol and 15% gasoline by volume), E85 (85% ethanol that is produced from corn and 15% gasoline by volume), compressed natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas. Long-term technologies, assumed to be available around the year 2010, include battery-powered electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, vehicles fueled with E85 (ethanol produced from biomass), and fuel-cell vehicles fueled with hydrogen or methanol. The near-term technologies are found to have small to moderate effects on vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. On the other hand, the long-term technologies, especially those using renewable energy (such as biomass and solar energy), have great potential for reducing vehicle greenhouse gas emissions. In order to realize this greenhouse gas emission reduction potential, R and D efforts must continue on the long-term technology options so that they can compete successfully with conventional vehicle technology.

  20. Long-term durability testing of ceramic cross-flow filter. Final report, September 29, 1987--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    Long term durability testing of the cross flow filter is described. Two high temperature, high pressure test facilities were built and operated. The facilities were designed to simulate dirty gas environments typical of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification. Details of the design and operation of the test facilities and filter testing results are described.

  1. Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3C—Fostering Technology Adoption III: International Market Opportunities in Bioenergy Brazil’s Biofuels Scenario: What are the Main Drivers Which will Shape Investments in the Long Term? Artur Milanez, Manager of Biofuels Department, Brazilian Development Bank

  2. Geothermal Financing Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battocletti, E.C.

    1998-02-01

    This report was prepared to help small firm search for financing for geothermal energy projects. There are various financial and economics formulas. Costs of some small overseas geothermal power projects are shown. There is much discussion of possible sources of financing, especially for overseas projects. (DJE-2005)

  3. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James S. Durham; Stephen W.S. McKeever; Mark S. Akselrod

    2002-10-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measurable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma radiation using beta radiation from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source, and gamma radiation alone. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when

  4. IN-SITU, LONG-TERM MONITORING SYSTEM FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James S. Durham; Stephen W.S. McKeever; Mark S. Akselrod

    2002-10-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measureable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma and gamma radiation. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber optic cables, but it is unclear if the attenuation is due to poor alignment of the dosimeter and the cable. This issue will be investigated further when more dosimeters are available so that the dosimeters can be permanently

  5. DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

    2011-04-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall

  6. Financing Solutions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Solutions Financing Solutions Transitioning to a clean energy economy requires innovative financing solutions that enable state, local, and tribal governments to invest in clean energy technologies. However, the clean energy puzzle can be daunting, especially when it comes to financing. With that in mind this website aims to provide an overview of financing as it pertains to state, local, and tribal governments who are designing and implementing clean energy financing programs. Learn

  7. Environmental Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Environmental Finance Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: N1 6DR Product: London-based monthly magazine covering environmental issues and...

  8. Financing Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... are a few reasons that financing programs are compelling tools for encouraging clean energy improvements: Financing programs may increase the impact of limited government funds. ...

  9. REgeneration Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    REgeneration Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: REgeneration Finance Place: Harrison, New York Zip: 10528 Sector: Solar Product: New York State-based distributed solar...

  10. Long-Term Management Plan for the Former UMTRCA Title I Processing Site at Grand Junction, Colorado

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I I I I* I I I I I: I , I I I I I I I I I I I I GJQ-2002-354-TAC GJO-LGJT 1.1.3 LTSM012974 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Long-Term Management Plan for the Former UMTRCA Title I Processing Site at Grand Junction, Colorado September 2002 '* Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy - r I,- Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ~ " } T 6 0 ~ * ~ L G -:FT, /. ~ I. o6 I I I I I I .I I I I I I I I I I I I I

  11. Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) Region of Georgia

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Need for New Nuclear Workers The SRS Community Reuse Organization (SRSCRO) Region of Georgia and South Carolina has the most unique nuclear industry capabilities in the nation. This region is at the forefront of new nuclear power production, environmental stewardship, innovative technology and national security. In 2009, the SRSCRO commissioned a survey of eight area nuclear employers that concluded nearly 10,000 new workers will be needed in the next decade to support existing

  12. Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Gloval Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inter-Comparison and Synergy Between the Two Long-Term Global Aerosol Products Derived from AVHRR and TOMS M.-J. Jeong and Z. Li Department of Meteorology University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. A. Chu and S.-C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Eighteen years of satellite-based monthly aerosol products have been derived from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and total ozone mapping experiment

  13. Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Summary Notes from 22 July 2008 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Long-Term Engineered Cap Performance Attendees: Representatives from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Headquarters and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff met at the DOE offices in Germantown, Maryland on 22 July 2008. Representatives from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, DOE-Savannah River, and DOE- Office of River Protection participated in the meeting via a teleconference

  14. Assessing the Role of Iron Sulfides in the Long Term Sequestration of U by Sulfate Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittman, Bruce; Zhou, Chen; Vannela, Raveender

    2013-12-31

    This four-year projects overarching aim was to identify the role of biogenic and synthetic iron-sulfide minerals in the long-term sequestration of reduced U(IV) formed under sulfate-reducing conditions when subjected to re-oxidizing conditions. As stated in this final report, significant progress was achieved through the collaborative research effort conducted at Arizona State University (ASU) and the University of Michigan (UM).

  15. Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

    1985-04-01

    The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

  16. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R.

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  17. Long-term oxidation behavior of spinel-coated ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.

    2013-06-01

    Long-term tests (>8,000 hours) indicate that AISI 441 ferritic stainless steel coated with a Mn-Co spinel protection layer is a promising candidate material system for IT-SOFC interconnect applications. While uncoated AISI 441 showed a substantial increase in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR), spinel-coated AISI 441 exhibited much lower ASR values (11-13 mOhm-cm2). Formation of an insulating silica sublayer beneath the native chromia-based scale was not observed, and the spinel coatings reduced the oxide scale growth rate and blocked outward diffusion of Cr from the alloy substrate. The structure of the scale formed under the spinel coatings during the long term tests differed from that typically observed on ferritic stainless steels after short term oxidation tests. While short term tests typically indicate a dual layer scale structure consisting of a chromia layer covered by a layer of Mn-Cr spinel, the scale grown during the long term tests consisted of a chromia matrix with discrete regions of Mn-Cr spinel distributed throughout the matrix. The presence of Ti in the chromia scale matrix and/or the presence of regions of Mn-Cr spinel within the scale may have increased the scale electrical conductivity, which would explain the fact that the observed ASR in the tests was lower than would be expected if the scale consisted of pure chromia.

  18. Renewable Energy Finance Workshop

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Agenda - December 10 th , 2012 Renewable Energy Finance Workshop 12:00 - 12:15 WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS- Richard Kauffman 12:15 - 12:25 PRESIDENTIAL PRIORITIES - Jon Powers & Rick...

  19. Perspectives on Project Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Finance July 29 2014 Project Company (Borrower) Off-take Agreements Feedstock Agreements O&M Agreement EPC Contract (construct) Technology License Agreements Sponsor's Equity Project Level Equity Investors Senior Project Debt Providers Equity Investors Typical Project Finance Structure 2 SOUND PROJECT ECONOMICS Leads to Adequate Debt Service Coverage And Acceptable Equity Returns Market Risk Assessment Competitive positioning. Supply / demand forecasts. Competing suppliers.

  20. Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    BetterBuildings Financing Peer Exchange Kickoff Call, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 28, 2011.

  1. Fluorescent CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates for long-term, nontoxic imaging and nuclear targeting in living cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Fanqing; Gerion, Daniele

    2004-06-14

    One of the biggest challenges in cell biology is the imaging of living cells. For this purpose, the most commonly used visualization tool is fluorescent markers. However, conventional labels, such as organic fluorescent dyes or green fluorescent proteins (GFP), lack the photostability to allow the tracking of cellular events that happen over minutes to days. In addition, they are either toxic to cells (dyes), or difficult to construct and manipulate (GFP). We report here the use of a new class of fluorescent labels, silanized CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates, for imaging the nuclei of living cells. CdSe/ZnS nanocrystals, or so called quantum dots (qdots), are extremely photostable, and have been used extensively in cellular imaging of fixed cells. However, most of the studies about living cells so far have been concerned only with particle entry into the cytoplasm or the localization of receptors on the cell membrane. Specific targeting of qdots to the nucleus of living cells ha s not been reported in previous studies, due to the lack of a targeting mechanism and proper particle size. Here we demonstrate for the first time the construction of a CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugate that carries the SV40 large T antigen nuclear localization signal (NLS), and the transfection of the complex into living cells. By a novel adaptation of commonly used cell transfection techniques for qdots, we were able to introduce and retain the NLS-qdots conjugate in living cells for up to a week without detectable negative cellular effects. Moreover, we can visualize the movement of the CdSe/ZnS nanocrystal-peptide conjugates from cytoplasm to the nucleus, and the accumulation of the complex in the cell nucleus, over a long observation time period. This report opens the door for using qdots to visualize long-term biological events that happen in the cell nucleus, and provides a new nontoxic, long-term imaging platform for cell nuclear processes.

  2. Industry-backed Best Practices Guides Aim to Lower Financing Costs for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Systems - News Releases | NREL Industry-backed Best Practices Guides Aim to Lower Financing Costs for Solar Energy Systems March 31, 2015 The Solar Access to Public Capital (SAPC) working group has released new best practices guidelines for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, with the goal of increasing investor confidence in the long-term viability of PV systems. The guides - SAPC Best Practices in PV System Installation and SAPC Best Practices in PV Operations and Maintenance -

  3. Development of a long-term post-closure radiation monitor: Phase 2, Topical report, March 1994--July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, S.E.

    1995-07-01

    The long-term monitoring of a hazardous waste site for migration of radionuclides requires installation of radiation sensors at a large number of subsurface locations. The concept under development employs a passive in-ground measurement probe which contains a scintillator coupled to an optical lightguide. The overall goal of the Long-Term Post-Closure Radiation Monitor System (LPRMS) development program is to configure a long-term radiation monitor using commercially available, demonstrated components to the largest extent possible. The development program is planned as a three phase program spanning a total time of 53 months. The problems to be solved during Phase 1 were primarily those associated with selection of the most appropriate components (scintillator, coupling optics, optical fiber, and opto-electronics) to maximize the signal reaching the detectors and thereby minimizing the integration time required to obtain a reliable measure of radiation. Phase 2 (the current Phase) encompassed the fabrication and testing of the prototype LPRMS probe at a contaminated DOE site, the Fernald Environmental Management Project, in southwestern Ohio. Uranium isotopes are the primary contaminants of concern at this site. The single probe and opto-electronic device were used to made measurements in-situ at relatively shallow subsurface depths. The end objective of Phase 2 was the design of a full-scale prototype system which incorporates all the features expected to be necessary on a commercial system, including 50 meter depth of measurement, multiplexing of multiple probes, and remote transmission of data. This full-scale prototype will be fabricated and field tested for 12 months during Phase 3, and a commercial design will be developed based upon the data gathered and experience gained during the entire program.

  4. Final Long-Term Management and Storage of Elemental Mercury Environmental Impact Statement Summary and Guide for Stakeholders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    Pursuant to the Mercury Export Ban Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-414), DOE was directed to designate a facility or facilities for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury generated within the United States. Therefore, DOE has analyzed the storage of up to 10,000 metric tons (11,000 tons) of elemental mercury in a facility(ies) constructed and operated in accordance with the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (74 FR 31723). DOE prepared this Final Mercury Storage EIS in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.), the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) implementing regulations (40 CFR 1500–1508), and DOE’s NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021) to evaluate reasonable alternatives for a facility(ies) for the long-term management and storage of elemental mercury. This Final Mercury Storage EIS analyzes the potential environmental, human health, and socioeconomic impacts of elemental mercury storage at seven candidate locations: Grand Junction Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado; Hanford Site near Richland, Washington; Hawthorne Army Depot near Hawthorne, Nevada; Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; Kansas City Plant in Kansas City, Missouri; Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina; and Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas. As required by CEQ NEPA regulations, the No Action Alternative was also analyzed as a basis for comparison. DOE intends to decide (1) where to locate the elemental mercury storage facility(ies) and (2) whether to use existing buildings, new buildings, or a combination of existing and new buildings. DOE’s Preferred Alternative for the long-term management and storage of mercury is the Waste Control Specialists, LLC, site near Andrews, Texas.

  5. Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia/New Mexico's host, the City of Albuquerque, has a long-term goal of Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2030. Zero Waste is generally accepted to mean greater than 90% of waste generation is diverted for an alternate purpose. In the last five years, SNL/NM has reduced its commercial solid waste by 23% and increased its recycling and composting from 46% to 67%. Building upon this recent success in waste diversion, SNL/NM is seeking to achieve Zero Waste to the Landfill by 2025. Reduce - Reuse -

  6. Analysis of long-term flows resulting from large-scale sodium-water reactions in an LMFBR secondary system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shin, Y.W.; Chung, H.; Choi, U.S.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1984-07-01

    Leaks in LMFBR steam generators cannot entirely be prevented; thus the steam generators and the intermediate heat transport system (IHTS) of an LMFBR must be designed to withstand the effects of the leaks. A large-scale leak which might result from a sudden break of a steam generator tube, and the resulting sodium-water reaction (SWR) can generate large pressure pulses that propagate through the IHTS and exert large forces on the piping supports. This paper discusses computer programs for analyzing long-term flow and thermal effects in an LMFBR secondary system resulting from large-scale steam generator leaks, and the status of the development of the codes.

  7. Spatial distribution of HTO activity in unsaturated soil depth in the vicinity of long-term release source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golubev, A.; Golubeva, V.; Mavrin, S.

    2015-03-15

    Previous studies reported about a correlation between HTO activity distribution in unsaturated soil layer and atmospheric long-term releases of HTO in the vicinity of Savannah River Site. The Tritium Working Group of BIOMASS Programme has performed a model-model intercomparison study of HTO transport from atmosphere to unsaturated soil and has evaluated HTO activity distribution in the unsaturated soil layer in the vicinity of permanent atmospheric sources. The Tritium Working Group has also reported about such a correlation, however the conclusion was that experimental data sets are needed to confirm this conclusion and also to validate appropriate computer models. (authors)

  8. Evaluating, Migrating, and Consolidating Databases and Applications for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Rocky Flats Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surovchak, S.; Marutzky, S.; Thompson, B.; Miller, K.; Labonte, E.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is assuming responsibilities for long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS and M) activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during fiscal year 2006. During the transition, LM is consolidating databases and applications that support these various functions into a few applications which will streamline future management and retrieval of data. This paper discussed the process of evaluating, migrating, and consolidating these databases and applications for LTS and M activities and provides lessons learned that will benefit future transitions. (authors)

  9. Guidebook to Geothermal Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmon, J. P.; Meurice, J.; Wobus, N.; Stern, F.; Duaime, M.

    2011-03-01

    This guidebook is intended to facilitate further investment in conventional geothermal projects in the United States. It includes a brief primer on geothermal technology and the most relevant policies related to geothermal project development. The trends in geothermal project finance are the focus of this tool, relying heavily on interviews with leaders in the field of geothermal project finance. Using the information provided, developers and investors may innovate in new ways, developing partnerships that match investors' risk tolerance with the capital requirements of geothermal projects in this dynamic and evolving marketplace.

  10. Midwest Wind Finance LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Midwest Wind Finance LLC Place: Minnesota Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind project equity finance provider. References: Midwest Wind Finance...

  11. Green Solar Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Solar Finance Place: Connecticut Sector: Solar Product: Connecticut-based arranger of financing for clients of solar project...

  12. Alternative Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ways of Financing Infrastructure Investment: Potential for 'Novel' Financing Models Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Ways of Financing...

  13. Project Development and Finance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Finance Project Development and Finance Below are general resources for Tribes on energy project development and finance. Find additional resources on project ...

  14. Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs Tools for Designing & Implementing Better Finance Programs Clean energy finance programs PDF icon Presentation Microsoft ...

  15. Plutonium Isotopes in the Terrestrial Environment at the Savannah River Site, USA. A Long-Term Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Armstrong, Christopher R.; Nuessle, Patterson R.; Brant, Heather A.; Hall, Gregory; Halverson, Justin E.; Cadieux, James R.

    2015-01-16

    This work presents the findings of a long term plutonium study at Savannah River Site (SRS) conducted between 2003 and 2013. Terrestrial environmental samples were obtained at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in A-area. Plutonium content and isotopic abundances were measured over this time period by alpha spectrometry and three stage thermal ionization mass spectrometry (3STIMS). Here we detail the complete sample collection, radiochemical separation, and measurement procedure specifically targeted to trace plutonium in bulk environmental samples. Total plutonium activities were determined to be not significantly above atmospheric global fallout. However, the 238Pu/239+240Pu activity ratios attributed to SRS are abovemore » atmospheric global fallout ranges. The 240Pu/239Pu atom ratios are reasonably consistent from year to year and are lower than fallout, while the 242Pu/239Pu atom ratios are higher than fallout values. Overall, the plutonium signatures obtained in this study reflect a mixture of weapons-grade, higher burn-up, and fallout material. This study provides a blue print for long term low level monitoring of plutonium in the environment.« less

  16. PROBCON-HDW: A probability and consequence system of codes for long-term analysis of Hanford defense wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piepho, M.G.; Nguyen, T.H.

    1988-12-01

    The PROBCON-HDW (PROBability and CONsequence analysis for Hanford defense waste) computer code system calculates the long-term cumulative releases of radionuclides from the Hanford defense wastes (HDW) to the accessible environment and compares the releases to environmental release limits as defined in 40 CFR 191. PROBCON-HDW takes into account the variability of input parameter values used in models to calculate HDW release and transport in the vadose zone to the accessible environment (taken here as groundwater). A human intrusion scenario, which consists of drilling boreholes into the waste beneath the waste sites and bringing waste to the surface, is also included in PROBCON-HDW. PROBCON-HDW also includes the capability to combine the cumulative releases according to various long-term (10,000 year) scenarios into a composite risk curve or complementary cumulative distribution function (CCDF). The system structure of the PROBCON-HDW codes, the mathematical models in PROBCON-HDW, the input files, the input formats, the command files, and the graphical output results of several HDW release scenarios are described in the report. 3 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. Development of a novel ultrasonic temperature probe for long-term monitoring of dry cask storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakhtiari, S.; Wang, K.; Elmer, T. W.; Koehl, E.; Raptis, A. C.

    2013-01-25

    With the recent cancellation of the Yucca Mountain repository and the limited availability of wet storage utilities for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), more attention has been directed toward dry cask storage systems (DCSSs) for long-term storage of SNF. Consequently, more stringent guidelines have been issued for the aging management of dry storage facilities that necessitate monitoring of the conditions of DCSSs. Continuous health monitoring of DCSSs based on temperature variations is one viable method for assessing the integrity of the system. In the present work, a novel ultrasonic temperature probe (UTP) is being tested for long-term online temperature monitoring of DCSSs. Its performance was evaluated and compared with type N thermocouple (NTC) and resistance temperature detector (RTD) using a small-scale dry storage canister mockup. Our preliminary results demonstrate that the UTP system developed at Argonne is able to achieve better than 0.8 Degree-Sign C accuracy, tested at temperatures of up to 400 Degree-Sign C. The temperature resolution is limited only by the sampling rate of the current system. The flexibility of the probe allows conforming to complex geometries thus making the sensor particularly suited to measurement scenarios where access is limited.

  18. Evaluation of the long-term energy analysis program used for the 1978 EIA Administrator's Report to Congress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peelle, R. W.; Weisbin, C. R.; Alsmiller, Jr., R. G.

    1981-10-01

    An evaluation of the Long-Term Energy Analysis Program (LEAP), a computer model of the energy portion of the US economy that was used for the 1995-2020 projections in its 1978 Annual Report to Congress, is presented. An overview of the 1978 version, LEAP Model 22C, is followed by an analysis of the important results needed by its users. The model is then evaluated on the basis of: (1) the adequacy of its documentation; (2) the local experience in operating the model; (3) the adequacy of the numerical techniques used; (4) the soundness of the economic and technical foundations of the model equations; and (5) the degree to which the computer program has been verified. To show which parameters strongly influence the results and to approach the question of whether the model can project important results with sufficient accuracy to support qualitative conclusions, the numerical sensitivities of some important results to model input parameters are described. The input data are categorized and discussed, and uncertainties are given for some parameters as examples. From this background and from the relation of LEAP to other available approaches for long-term energy modeling, an overall evaluation is given of the model's suitability for use by the EIA.

  19. Characterization of options and their analysis requirements for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubrin, J.W.; Rosen, R.S.; Zoller, J.N.; Harri, J.W.; Schwertz, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is examining alternative strategies for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) currently stored at the gaseous diffusion plants at Portsmouth, Ohio, and Paducah, Kentucky, and on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This paper describes the methodology for the comprehensive and ongoing technical analysis of the options being considered. An overview of these options, along with several of the suboptions being considered, is presented. The long-term management strategy alternatives fall into three broad categories: use, storage, or disposal. Conversion of the depleted UF6 to another form such as oxide or metal is needed to implement most of these alternatives. Likewise, transportation of materials is an integral part of constructing the complete pathway between the current storage condition and ultimate disposition. The analysis of options includes development of pre-conceptual designs; estimates of effluents, wastes, and emissions; specification of resource requirements; and preliminary hazards assessments. The results of this analysis will assist DOE in selecting a strategy by providing the engineering information necessary to evaluate the environmental impacts and costs of implementing the management strategy alternatives.

  20. Enhancement of cancer stem-like and epithelial?mesenchymal transdifferentiation property in oral epithelial cells with long-term nicotine exposure: Reversal by targeting SNAIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Cheng-Chia; School of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan ; Chang, Yu-Chao; Department of Dentistry, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan

    2013-02-01

    Cigarette smoking is one of the major risk factors in the development and further progression of tumorigenesis, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Recent studies suggest that interplay cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and epithelial?mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) properties are responsible for the tumor maintenance and metastasis in OSCC. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of long-term exposure with nicotine, a major component in cigarette, on CSCs and EMT characteristics. The possible reversal regulators were further explored in nicotine-induced CSCs and EMT properties in human oral epithelial (OE) cells. Long-term exposure with nicotine was demonstrated to up-regulate ALDH1 population in normal gingival and primary OSCC OE cells dose-dependently. Moreover, long-term nicotine treatment was found to enhance the self-renewal sphere-forming ability and stemness gene signatures expression and EMT regulators in OE cells. The migration/cell invasiveness/anchorage independent growth and in vivo tumor growth by nude mice xenotransplantation assay was enhanced in long-term nicotine-stimulated OE cells. Knockdown of Snail in long-term nicotine-treated OE cells was found to reduce their CSCs properties. Therapeutic delivery of Si-Snail significantly blocked the xenograft tumorigenesis of long-term nicotine-treated OSCC cells and largely significantly improved the recipient survival. The present study demonstrated that the enrichment of CSCs coupled EMT property in oral epithelial cells induced by nicotine is critical for the development of OSCC tumorigenesis. Targeting Snail might offer a new strategy for the treatment of OSCC patients with smoking habit. -- Highlights: ? Sustained nicotine treatment induced CSCs properties of oral epithelial cells. ? Long-term nicotine treatment enhance EMT properties of oral epithelial cells. ? Long-term nicotine exposure increased tumorigenicity of oral epithelial cells. ? Si-Snail blocked

  1. Financing Structures | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A general introduction to finance programs-including ... If your financing approach includes, or may include, U.S. ... as the Davis-Bacon Act and National Environmental Policy Act

  2. Financing Program Pitfalls to Avoid

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Clean energy financing programs are not a new concept; however, many programs launched over the years have not had the impact intended. Financing program pitfalls to avoid are listed below.

  3. Managing Financing Programs- Spreadsheet Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Jan. 24, 2011, provides a tutorial for managing financing programs through excel spreadsheets.

  4. Long-term storage facility for reactor compartments in Sayda Bay - German support for utilization of nuclear submarines in Russia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Dietmar; Voelzke, Holger; Weber, Wolfgang; Noack, Volker; Baeuerle, Guenther

    2007-07-01

    The German-Russian project that is part of the G8 initiative on Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction focuses on the speedy construction of a land-based interim storage facility for nuclear submarine reactor compartments at Sayda Bay near Murmansk. This project includes the required infrastructure facilities for long-term storage of about 150 reactor compartments for a period of about 70 years. The interim storage facility is a precondition for effective activities of decommissioning and dismantlement of almost all nuclear-powered submarines of the Russian Northern Fleet. The project also includes the establishment of a computer-assisted waste monitoring system. In addition, the project involves clearing Sayda Bay of other shipwrecks of the Russian navy. On the German side the project is carried out by the Energiewerke Nord GmbH (EWN) on behalf of the Federal Ministry of Economics and Labour (BMWi). On the Russian side the Kurchatov Institute holds the project management of the long-term interim storage facility in Sayda Bay, whilst the Nerpa Shipyard, which is about 25 km away from the storage facility, is dismantling the submarines and preparing the reactor compartments for long-term interim storage. The technical monitoring of the German part of this project, being implemented by BMWi, is the responsibility of the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM). This paper gives an overview of the German-Russian project and a brief description of solutions for nuclear submarine disposal in other countries. At Nerpa shipyard, being refurbished with logistic and technical support from Germany, the reactor compartments are sealed by welding, provided with biological shielding, subjected to surface treatment and conservation measures. Using floating docks, a tugboat tows the reactor compartments from Nerpa shipyard to the interim storage facility at Sayda Bay where they will be left on the on-shore concrete

  5. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site. https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack

  6. Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 29, 2012. During this webinar participants discussed how programs have adapted and refined their financing strategies based on initial implementation experience and learning.

  7. Long-Term Surveillance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    objectives published in the 2011-2020 Strategic Plan (DOE 2011): * Ensure that sound engineering and scientific principles are used to conduct LTS&M. * Evaluate and improve...

  8. Long-Term Surveillance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    proven technology. The subtask objectives are summarized as follows: * Ensure that sound engineering and scientific principles are used to conduct LTS&M. * Evaluate and improve...

  9. The spinodal decomposition in 17-4PH stainless steel subjected to long-term aging at 350 deg. C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Jun Zou Hong; Li Cong; Qiu Shaoyu; Shen Baoluo

    2008-05-15

    The influence of aging time on the microstructure evolution of 17-4 PH martensitic stainless steel was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results showed that the martensite decomposed by a spinodal decomposition mechanism after the alloy was subjected to long-term aging at 350 deg. C. The fine scale spinodal decomposition of {alpha}-ferrite brought about a Cr-enriched bright stripe and a Fe-enriched dark stripe, i.e., {alpha}' and {alpha} phases, separately, which were perpendicular to the grain boundary. The spinodal decomposition started at the grain boundary. Then with prolonged aging time, the decomposition microstructure expanded from the grain boundary to interior. The wavelength of the spinodally decomposed microstructure changed little with extended aging time.

  10. Long-term Testing Results for the 2008 Installation of LED Luminaires at the I-35 West Bridge in Minneapolis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Davis, Robert G.

    2014-09-30

    This document reports the long-term testing results from an extended GATEWAY project that was first reported in “Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Roadway Lighting at the I-35W Bridge, in Minneapolis, MN,” August 2009. That original report presented the results of lighting the newly reconstructed I 35W Bridge using LEDs in place of conventional high-pressure sodium (HPS) roadway luminaires, comparing energy use and illuminance levels with a simulated baseline condition. That installation was an early stage implementation of LED lighting and remains one of the oldest installations in continued operation today. This document provides an update of the LED system’s performance since its installation in September 2008.

  11. Long-term Operation of an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser-based Trace-gas Sensor for Building Air Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.

    2013-11-03

    We analyze the long-term performance and stability of a trace-gas sensor based on an external cavity quantum cascade laser using data collected over a one-year period in a building air monitoring application.

  12. EIS-0226: Decommissioning and/or Long-Term Stewardship at the West Valley Demonstration Project and Western New York Nuclear Service Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the range of reasonable alternatives to decommission and/or maintain long-term stewardship at WNYNSC. The alternatives analyzed in the EIS...

  13. NEW ENGLAND NG SUPPLY LIMITED- FE Dkt. 16-103-NG- FOR LONG TERM AUTHORIZATION TO EXPORT NATURAL GAS TO CANADA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy gives notice of receipt of an Application filed August 3, 2016 by New England NG Supply Limited (New England), requesting long-term authorization to export natural gas...

  14. Experimental investigations of long-term interactions of molten UO/sub 2/ with MgO and concrete at Argonne National Laboratory. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, R.P.; Farhadieh, R.; Pedersen, D.R.; Gunther, W.H.; Purviance, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental work at Argonne is being performed to investigate the long-term molten-core-debris retention capability of the ex-vessel cavity following a postulated meltdown accident. The eventual objective of the work is to determine if normal structural material (concrete) or a specifically selected sacrificial material (MgO) located in the ex-vessel cavity region can effectively contain molten core debris. The materials under investigation at ANL are various types of concrete (limestone, basalt and magnetite) and commercially-available MgO brick. Results are presented of the status of real material experimental investigation at ANL into (1) molten UO/sub 2/ pool heat transfer, (2) long-term molten UO/sub 2/ penetration into concrete and (3) long-term molten UO/sub 2/ penetration into refractory substrates. The decay heating in the fuel has been simulated by direct electrical heating permitting the study of the long-term interaction.

  15. Climate Financing Options | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidemanual, Training materials Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.orgcfo Language: English References: Climate Finance Options1 New climate finance tool for...

  16. Financing Multifamily Energy Efficiency Upgrades | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multifamily Energy Efficiency Upgrades Financing Multifamily Energy Efficiency Upgrades Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Financing Multifamily Energy ...

  17. Long-term stability and mechanical characteristics of kV digital imaging system for proton radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Mingyao Botticello, Thomas; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Winey, Brian

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the long-term image panel positioning stability and gantry angle dependence for gantry-mounted kV imaging systems. Methods: For patient setup digital imaging systems in isocentric rotating proton beam delivery facilities, physical crosshairs are commonly inserted into the snout to define the kV x-ray beam isocenter. Utilizing an automatic detection algorithm, the authors analyzed the crosshair center positions in 2744 patient setup kV images acquired with the four imagers in two treatment rooms from January 2012 to January 2013. The crosshair position was used as a surrogate for imaging panel position, and its long-term stability at the four cardinal angles and the panel flex dependency on gantry angle was investigated. Results: The standard deviation of the panel position distributions was within 0.32 mm (with the range of variation less than ± 1.4 mm) in both the X-Z plane and Y direction. The mean panel inplane rotations were not more than 0.51° for the four panels at the cardinal angles, with standard deviations ≤0.26°. The panel position variations with gantry rotation due to gravity (flex) were within ±4 mm, and were panel-specific. Conclusions: The authors demonstrated that the kV image panel positions in our proton treatment system were highly reproducible at the cardinal angles over 13 months and also that the panel positions can be correlated to gantry angles. This result indicates that the kV image panel positions are stable over time; the amount of panel sag is predictable during gantry rotation and the physical crosshair for kV imaging may eventually be removed, with the imaging beam isocenter position routinely verified by adequate quality assurance procedures and measurements.

  18. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  19. Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Amchitka, Alaska, Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-09-01

    This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan describes how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at the Amchitka, Alaska, Site1. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. The U.S. Department of Defense, in conjunction with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), conducted the first nuclear test (Long Shot) to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. The final nuclear test (Cannikin), the largest United States underground test, was a weapons-related test. Surface disturbances associated with these tests have been remediated. However, radioactivity remains deep below the surface, contained in and around the test cavities, for which no feasible remediation technology has been identified. In 2006, the groundwater model (Hassan et al. 2002) was updated using 2005 data collected by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Model simulation results indicate there is no breakthrough or seepage of radionuclides into the marine environment within 2,000 years. The Amchitka conceptual model is reasonable; the flow and transport simulation is based on the best available information and data. The simulation results are a quantitative prediction supported by the best available science and technology. This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan is an additional step intended for the protection of human health and the environment. This plan may be modified from time to time in the future consistent with the mission to protect human health

  20. Biochemical Response to Androgen Deprivation Therapy Before External Beam Radiation Therapy Predicts Long-term Prostate Cancer Survival Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Polkinghorn, William R.; Pei, Xin; Kollmeier, Marisa

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the response to neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) defined by a decline in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to nadir values is associated with improved survival outcomes after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: One thousand forty-five patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive EBRT in conjunction with neoadjuvant and concurrent ADT. A 6-month course of ADT was used (3 months during the neoadjuvant phase and 2 to 3 months concurrently with EBRT). The median EBRT prescription dose was 81 Gy using a conformal-based technique. The median follow-up time was 8.5 years. Results: The 10-year PSA relapse-free survival outcome among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of ?0.3 ng/mL was 74.3%, compared with 57.7% for patients with higher PSA nadir values (P<.001). The 10-year distant metastases-free survival outcome among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of ?0.3 ng/mL was 86.1%, compared with 78.6% for patients with higher PSA nadir values (P=.004). In a competing-risk analysis, prostate cancer-related deaths were also significantly reduced among patients with pre-radiation therapy PSA nadirs of <0.3 ng/mL compared with higher values (7.8% compared with 13.7%; P=.009). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that the pre-EBRT PSA nadir value was a significant predictor of long-term biochemical tumor control, distant metastases-free survival, and cause-specific survival outcomes. Conclusions: Pre-radiation therapy nadir PSA values of ?0.3 ng/mL after neoadjuvant ADT were associated with improved long-term biochemical tumor control, reduction in distant metastases, and prostate cancer-related death. Patients with higher nadir values may require alternative adjuvant therapies to improve outcomes.

  1. Experimentally validated long-term energy production prediction model for solar dish/Stirling electric generating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stine, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Dish/Stirling solar electric systems are currently being tested for performance and longevity in order to bring them to the electric power generation market. Studies both in Germany and the United States indicate that a significant market exists for these systems if they perform in actual installations according to tested conditions, and if, when produced in large numbers their cost will drop to goals currently being projected. In the 1980`s, considerable experience was gained operating eight dish/Stirling systems of three different designs. One of these recorded the world`s record for converting solar energy into electricity of 29.4%. The approach to system performance prediction taken in this presentation results from lessons learned in testing these early systems, and those currently being tested. Recently the IEA through the SolarPACES working group, has embarked on a program to develop uniform guidelines for measuring and presenting performance data. These guidelines are to help potential buyers who want to evaluate a specific system relative to other dish/Stirling systems, or relative to other technologies such as photovoltaic, parabolic trough or central receiver systems. In this paper, a procedure is described that permits modeling of long-term energy production using only a few experimentally determined parameters. The benefit of using this technique is that relatively simple tests performed over a period of a few months can provide performance parameters that can be used in a computer model requiring only the input of insolation and ambient temperature data to determine long-term energy production information. A portion of this analytical procedure has been tested on the three 9-kW(e) systems in operation in Almeria, Spain. Further evaluation of these concepts is planned on a 7.5-kW(e) system currently undergoing testing at Cal Poly University in Pomona, California and later on the 25 kW(e) USJVP systems currently under development.

  2. Effect of Creep of Ferritic Interconnect on Long-Term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-08-01

    High-temperature ferritic alloys are potential candidates as interconnect (IC) materials and spacers due to their low cost and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) compatibility with other components for most of the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) . However, creep deformation becomes relevant for a material when the operating temperature exceeds or even is less than half of its melting temperature (in degrees of Kelvin). The operating temperatures for most of the SOFCs under development are around 1,073 K. With around 1,800 K of the melting temperature for most stainless steel, possible creep deformation of ferritic IC under the typical cell operating temperature should not be neglected. In this paper, the effects of IC creep behavior on stack geometry change and the stress redistribution of different cell components are predicted and summarized. The goal of the study is to investigate the performance of the fuel cell stack by obtaining the changes in fuel- and air-channel geometry due to creep of the ferritic stainless steel IC, therefore indicating possible changes in SOFC performance under long-term operations. The ferritic IC creep model was incorporated into software SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC, and finite element analyses were performed to quantify the deformed configuration of the SOFC stack under the long-term steady-state operating temperature. It was found that the creep behavior of the ferritic stainless steel IC contributes to narrowing of both the fuel- and the air-flow channels. In addition, stress re-distribution of the cell components suggests the need for a compliant sealing material that also relaxes at operating temperature.

  3. Long-term Outcome of Peripherally Implanted Venous Access Ports in the Forearm in Female Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klösges, Laura Meyer, Carsten Boschewitz, Jack Andersson, Magnus; Rudlowski, Christian; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2015-06-15

    PurposeThe aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the long-term outcome of peripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm at our institution in a female patient collective.MethodsBetween June 2002 and May 2011, a total of 293 female patients with an underlying malignancy had 299 forearm ports implanted in our interventional radiology suite. The mean age of the cohort was 55 ± 12 years (range 26–81 years). The majority of women suffered from breast (59.5 %) or ovarian cancer (28.1 %). Complications were classified as infectious complications, thrombotic and nonthrombotic catheter dysfunction (dislocation of the catheter or port chamber, fracture with/without embolization or kinking of the catheter, port occlusion), and others.ResultsWe analyzed a total of 90,276 catheter days in 248 port systems (47 patients were lost to follow-up). The mean device service interval was 364 days per catheter (range 8–2,132, median 223 days, CI 311–415, SD 404). Sixty-seven early (≤30 days from implantation) or late complications (>30 days) occurred during the observation period (0.74/1,000 catheter days). Common complications were port infection (0.18/1,000 days), thrombotic dysfunction (0.12/1,000 days), and skin dehiscence (0.12/1,000 days). Nonthrombotic dysfunction occurred in a total of 21 cases (0.23/1,000 days) and seemed to cumulate on the venous catheter entry site on the distal upper arm.ConclusionPeripherally implanted venous access ports in the forearm are a safe alternative to chest or upper-arm ports in female oncology patients. Special attention should be paid to signs of skin dehiscence and nonthrombotic dysfunction, especially when used for long-term treatment.

  4. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastouret, Alan; Gooijer, Frans; Overton, Bob; Jonker, Jan; Curley, Jim; Constantine, Walter; Waterman, Kendall Miller

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  5. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out

  6. Sandia National Laboratories performance assessment methodology for long-term environmental programs : the history of nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marietta, Melvin Gary; Anderson, D. Richard; Bonano, Evaristo J.; Meacham, Paul Gregory

    2011-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is the world leader in the development of the detailed science underpinning the application of a probabilistic risk assessment methodology, referred to in this report as performance assessment (PA), for (1) understanding and forecasting the long-term behavior of a radioactive waste disposal system, (2) estimating the ability of the disposal system and its various components to isolate the waste, (3) developing regulations, (4) implementing programs to estimate the safety that the system can afford to individuals and to the environment, and (5) demonstrating compliance with the attendant regulatory requirements. This report documents the evolution of the SNL PA methodology from inception in the mid-1970s, summarizing major SNL PA applications including: the Subseabed Disposal Project PAs for high-level radioactive waste; the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant PAs for disposal of defense transuranic waste; the Yucca Mountain Project total system PAs for deep geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; PAs for the Greater Confinement Borehole Disposal boreholes at the Nevada National Security Site; and PA evaluations for disposal of high-level wastes and Department of Energy spent nuclear fuels stored at Idaho National Laboratory. In addition, the report summarizes smaller PA programs for long-term cover systems implemented for the Monticello, Utah, mill-tailings repository; a PA for the SNL Mixed Waste Landfill in support of environmental restoration; PA support for radioactive waste management efforts in Egypt, Iraq, and Taiwan; and, most recently, PAs for analysis of alternative high-level radioactive waste disposal strategies including repositories deep borehole disposal and geologic repositories in shale and granite. Finally, this report summarizes the extension of the PA methodology for radioactive waste disposal toward development of an enhanced PA system for carbon sequestration and storage systems

  7. Long-Term Assessment of Critical Radionuclides and Associated Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site - 13038

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, G.T.; Baker, R.A.; Lee, P.L.; Eddy, T.P.; Blount, G.C.; Whitney, G.R.

    2013-07-01

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses and risks to the public. At SRS dose and risk assessments indicate tritium oxide in air and surface water, and Cs-137 in fish and deer have been, and continue to be, the critical radionuclides and pathways. In this assessment, statistical analyses of the long-term trends of tritium oxide in atmospheric and surface water releases and Cs-137 concentrations in fish and deer are provided. Correlations also are provided with 1) operational changes and improvements, 2) geopolitical events (Cold War cessation), and 3) recent environmental remediation projects and decommissioning of excess facilities. For example, environmental remediation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility have resulted in a measurable impact on the tritium oxide flux to the onsite Fourmile Branch stream. Airborne releases of tritium oxide have been greatly affected by operational improvements and the end of the Cold War in 1991. However, the effects of SRS environmental remediation activities and ongoing tritium operations on tritium concentrations in the environment are measurable and documented in this assessment. Controlled hunts of deer and feral hogs are conducted at SRS for approximately six weeks each year. Before any harvested animal is released to a hunter, SRS personnel perform a field analysis for Cs-137 concentrations to ensure the Hunter's dose does not exceed the SRS administrative game limit of 0.22 milli-sievert (22 mrem). However, most of the Cs-137 found in SRS onsite deer is not from site operations but is from nuclear weapons testing fallout from the 1950's and early 1960's. This legacy source term is trended in the SRS deer, and an assessment of the 'effective' half-life of Cs-137 in deer (including

  8. From Climate Finance to Financing Green Growth | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    green growth and the importance of developing the right policies to support a transition towards the low carbon economy. It assesses the financing needs of green growth in...

  9. Long-term methanol vehicle test program. Final subcontract report, 1 November 1992--1 February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, J.C.; Maxwell, T.T.

    1995-09-01

    Work was sperformed to determine effects of methanol fuel on engine performance and exhaust emissions during long-term use in a 1988 Chevrolet Corsica. Engine wear, gasket performance, fuel economy, emissions level, oil consumption, and overall vehicle performance were monitored over 22,000 miles. Baselines were established at the beginning for comparison: engine was disassembled, bearing/ring clearances and cam profiles were measured. Higher flow rate fuel injectors from AC Rochester were installed and the computer system calibrated for M100 fuel. The vehicle durability test increased oil consumption by 26% under cold-start conditions, 9% under hot start. Oil consumption under hot start was higher than under cold start by as much as 56%; effect of component temperatures on oil viscosity appears to be the cause. It is recommended that oil consumption of a gasoline-fueled vehicle be measured in order to normalize the effect of methanol operation on oil consumption, and to study the effect of steady-state and transient conditions on oil consumption.

  10. Effect of soil erosion on the long-term stability of FUSRAP near-surface waste-burial sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Decontamination of FUSRAP sites could result in the generation of large volumes (in excess of 400,000 m/sup 3/) of low-activity radioactive wastes (primarily contaminated soil and building materials) requiring subsequent disposal. It is likely that near-surface burial will be seriously considered as an option for disposal of these materials. A number of factors - including soil erosion - could adversely affect the long-term stability of a near-surface waste-burial site. The majority of FUSRAP sites are located in the humid eastern United States, where the principal cause of erosion is the action of water. This report examines the effect of soil erosion by water on burial-site stability based on analysis of four hypothetical near-surface burial sites. The Universal Soil Loss Equation was employed to estimate average annual soil loss from burial sites and the 1000-year effects of soil loss on the soil barrier (burial trench cap) placed over low-activity wastes. Results suggest that the land use of the burial site and the slope gradient of the burial trench cap significantly affect the rate of soil erosion. The development of measures limiting the potential land use of a burial site (e.g., mixing large rocks into the burial trench cap) may be required to preserve the integrity of a burial trench for long periods of time.

  11. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in ’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing ’, typical in intermediate ’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing ’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450˚F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  12. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Lake Elsinore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the long-term evaluation results from a hot-dry climate project that examines the room-to-room temperature conditions that exist in a high performance envelope, the performance of a simplified air distribution system, and a comparison of modeled energy performance with measured energy use. The project, a prototype house built by K. Hovnanian Homes' Ontario Group, is located in Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, California, and achieves a 50% level of whole house source energy savings with respect to the Building America (BA) Benchmark Definition 2009 (Hendron and Engebrecht 2010). Temperature measurements in three rooms indicate that the temperature difference between the measured locations and the thermostat were within recommendations 90.3% of the time in heating mode and 99.3% of the time in cooling mode. The air distribution system is operating efficiently with average delivered temperatures adequate to facilitate proper heating and cooling and only minor average temperature differences observed between the system's plenum and farthest register. Monitored energy use results for the house indicate that it is using less energy than predicted from modeling. A breakdown of energy use according to end use determined little agreement between comparable values.

  13. LONG-TERM PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE STACKS WITH ELECTRODE-SUPPORTED CELLS OPERATING IN THE STEAM ELECTROLYSIS MODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. O'Brien; R. C. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. Tao; B. J. Butler

    2011-11-01

    Performance characterization and durability testing have been completed on two five-cell high-temperature electrolysis stacks constructed with advanced cell and stack technologies. The solid oxide cells incorporate a negative-electrode-supported multi-layer design with nickel-zirconia cermet negative electrodes, thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolytes, and multi-layer lanthanum ferrite-based positive electrodes. The per-cell active area is 100 cm2. The stack is internally manifolded with compliant mica-glass seals. Treated metallic interconnects with integral flow channels separate the cells. Stack compression is accomplished by means of a custom spring-loaded test fixture. Initial stack performance characterization was determined through a series of DC potential sweeps in both fuel cell and electrolysis modes of operation. Results of these sweeps indicated very good initial performance, with area-specific resistance values less than 0.5 ?.cm2. Long-term durability testing was performed with A test duration of 1000 hours. Overall performance degradation was less than 10% over the 1000-hour period. Final stack performance characterization was again determined by a series of DC potential sweeps at the same flow conditions as the initial sweeps in both electrolysis and fuel cell modes of operation. A final sweep in the fuel cell mode indicated a power density of 0.356 W/cm2, with average per-cell voltage of 0.71 V at a current of 50 A.

  14. Long-Term, Autonomous Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using an Ormosil Nanocomposite-Based Optical Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kisholoy Goswami

    2005-10-11

    The goal of this project is to construct a prototype carbon dioxide sensor that can be commercialized to offer a low-cost, autonomous instrument for long-term, unattended measurements. Currently, a cost-effective CO2 sensor system is not available that can perform cross-platform measurements (ground-based or airborne platforms such as balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)) for understanding the carbon sequestration phenomenon. The CO2 sensor would support the research objectives of DOE-sponsored programs such as AmeriFlux and the North American Carbon Program (NACP). Global energy consumption is projected to rise 60% over the next 20 years and use of oil is projected to increase by approximately 40%. The combustion of coal, oil, and natural gas has increased carbon emissions globally from 1.6 billion tons in 1950 to 6.3 billion tons in 2000. This figure is expected to reach 10 billon tons by 2020. It is important to understand the fate of this excess CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The overall goal of the project is to develop an accurate and reliable optical sensor for monitoring carbon dioxide autonomously at least for one year at a point remote from the actual CO2 release site. In Phase I of this project, InnoSense LLC (ISL) demonstrated the feasibility of an ormosil-monolith based Autonomous Sensor for Atmospheric CO2 (ASAC) device. All of the Phase I objectives were successfully met.

  15. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 1: Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  16. Long-term assessment of the oil spill at Bahia Las Minas, Panama. Interim report. Volume 2: Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, B.D.; Jackson, J.B.C.

    1991-10-01

    On April 27, 1986, at least 8 million liters of medium-weight crude oil spilled from a ruptured storage tank into the Bahia Las Minas on the Caribbean Coast of Panama. Coral reefs, seagrass communities, and mangroves were affected. The area of the spill was also the location of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Galeta Laboratory where resident and visiting scientists have been studying the ecology of the Bahia Las Minas and the adjacent areas for over 15 years. Because this was a unique opportunity to assess the immediate biological effects following a major spill in the Caribbean region and to monitor the subsequent recovery, the U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service supported a 5-year environmental study. The objectives of the study are to identify any long-term changes in the marine environment that may have resulted from the spill and to understand the ecological processes causing such changes. This is the first report from the study and addresses the effects observed during the first two years of the effort.

  17. A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

    2010-11-10

    A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

  18. Improvement of the long term stability in the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell using functional layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brueckner, B.; Guenther, C.; Ruckdaeschel, R.

    1996-12-31

    In the planar Siemens design of the solid oxide fuel cell a metallic interconnector is used to seperate the ceramic single cells. A disadvantage of the metallic bipolar plate which consists of a chromium alloy is the formation of high volatile Cr-oxides and hydroxides at the surface at the cathode side. The reaction products evaporate and are reduced at the cathode/electrolyte interface to form new crystalline phases. This process gives rise to long term cell degradation. Protective coatings might be successful in preventing the chromium oxide evaporation. The required properties of the protective layers are (I) high electrical conductivity, (II) similar coefficients of thermal expansion to the bipolar plate (III), chemical compatibility to the bipolar plate and cathode material, (IV) a low diffusion coefficient of Cr and (V) chemical stability up to 1223K under oxygen atmosphere. Furthermore, during operation at 1223K an electrical contact between the metallic plate and the electrodes has to be maintained. This problem could be solved using ceramic layer between the metallic plate and the single cells.

  19. Wholesale electricity market design with increasing levels of renewable generation: Revenue sufficiency and long-term reliability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Milligan, Michael; Frew, Bethany A.; Bloom, Aaron; Ela, Erik; Botterud, Audun; Townsend, Aaron; Levin, Todd

    2016-03-22

    This paper discusses challenges that relate to assessing and properly incentivizing the resources necessary to ensure a reliable electricity system with growing penetrations of variable generation (VG). The output of VG (primarily wind and solar generation) varies over time and cannot be predicted precisely. Therefore, the energy from VG is not always guaranteed to be available at times when it is most needed. This means that its contribution towards resource adequacy can be significantly less than the contribution from traditional resources. Variable renewable resources also have near-zero variable costs, and with production-based subsidies they may even have negative offer costs.more » Because variable costs drive the spot price of energy, this can lead to reduced prices, sales, and therefore revenue for all resources within the energy market. The characteristics of VG can also result in increased price volatility as well as the need for more flexibility in the resource fleet in order to maintain system reliability. Furthermore, we explore both traditional and evolving electricity market designs in the United States that aim to ensure resource adequacy and sufficient revenues to recover costs when those resources are needed for long-term reliability. We also investigate how reliability needs may be evolving and discuss how VG may affect future electricity market designs.« less

  20. Long-term effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on Mediterranean forest vegetation of Northern-Central Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkson, C.L.; Oechel, W.C.; Miglietta, F.

    1995-06-01

    Carbon dioxide springs offer a unique opportunity to study the effects of long-term CO{sub 2} enrichment on natural ecosystems. A CO{sub 2} spring near Laiatico (Pisa), Italy vents approximately 25 to 40% of pure CO{sub 2} and enriches about one hectare of a 30-35 year-old coppiced forest, forming a CO{sub 2} gradient with distance from the emission. A:Ci curves were measured on the upper canopy leaves of mature trees of Quercus ilex before bud-break and after new leaf production between April and July 1994. Photosynthetic rates of trees under elevated CO{sub 2} (490 to 1190 ppm) reflect 30-56% downward adjustment in April and no downward adjustment in July. Photosynthetic rates measured at respective growth CO{sub 2} concentrations were reduced in April by 41.8% and enhanced in July by 12.8% as growth CO{sub 2} concentration increased. Leaf nitrogen concentrations under higher CO{sub 2} levels were significantly less than those at ambient CO{sub 2} concentration in April (1.17 and 1.44% N {+-} 0.04%, respectively; P = 0.001). The results from this study indicate that new leaves of mature Quercus ilex may provide a metabolically active carbon sink for enhanced photosynthesis under elevated CO{sub 2}, but after one year, the strength of this sink decreases, resulting in reduced photosynthetic rates and leaf nitrogen concentrations.

  1. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Lake Elsinore, Californi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the long-term evaluation results from a hot-dry climate project that examines the room-to-room temperature conditions that exist in a high performance envelope, the performance of a simplified air distribution system, and a comparison of modeled energy performance with measured energy use. The project, a prototype house built by K. Hovnanian Homes’ Ontario Group, is located in Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, California, and achieves a 50% level of whole house source energy savings with respect to the Building America (BA) Benchmark Definition 2009 (Hendron and Engebrecht 2010). Temperature measurements in three rooms indicate that the temperature difference between the measured locations and the thermostat were within recommendations 90.3% of the time in heating mode and 99.3% of the time in cooling mode. The air distribution system is operating efficiently with average delivered temperatures adequate to facilitate proper heating and cooling and only minor average temperature differences observed between the system’s plenum and farthest register. Monitored energy use results for the house indicate that it is using less energy than predicted from modeling. A breakdown of energy use according to end use determined little agreement between comparable values.

  2. Creep Behavior of Glass/Ceramic Sealant and its Effect on Long-term Performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Koeppel, Brian J.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-14

    The creep behavior of glass or glass-ceramic sealant materials used in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) becomes relevant under SOFC operating temperatures. In this paper, the creep of glass-ceramic sealants was experimentally examined, and a standard linear solid model was applied to capture the creep behavior of glass ceramic sealant materials developed for planar SOFCs at high temperatures. The parameters of this model were determined based on the creep test results. Furthermore, the creep model was incorporated into finite-element software programs SOFC-MP and Mentat-FC developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for multi-physics simulation of SOFCs. The effect of creep of glass ceramic sealant materials on the long-term performance of SOFC stacks was investigated by studying the stability of the flow channels and the stress redistribution in the glass seal and on the various interfaces of the glass seal with other layers. Finite element analyses were performed to quantify the stresses in various parts. The stresses in glass seals were released because of creep behavior during operations.

  3. Initial comparison of leach behavior between fully radioactive and simulated nuclear waste glasses through long-term testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of glass reactivity between radioactive sludge based and simulated nuclear waste glasses has been made through long-term testing of both glass types for SRL 165, SRL 131, and SRL 200 frit compositions. The data demonstrate that for time periods through 280 days, differences in elemental release to solution up to 400% are observed. However, in general, differences in glass reactivity as measured by the release of boron, lithium, and sodium are less than a factor of two. The differences in reactivity are not large enough to alter the order of glass durability for the different compositions or to change the controlling glass dissolution mechanism. A radiation effect exists, mainly in the influence on the leachate pH, which in turn affects the glass reaction mechanism and rate. The differences in reactivity between fully radioactive and the simulated glasses can be reasonably explained if the controlling reaction mechanism is accounted for. Those differences are glass composition and leaching mechanism dependent. Lithium is found to have the highest elemental release in an ion-exchange dominated glass reaction process, while lithium has a lower release than boron and sodium in a matrix dissolution dominated process, where boron and sodium are usually among the most concentrated solution species.

  4. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  5. Characterization of representative materials in support of safe, long term storage of surplus plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Paul H; Narlesky, Joshua E; Worl, Laura A; Gillispie, Obie W

    2010-01-01

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program (SMP) is a joint LANL/SRS effort funded by DOE/EM to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. The chlorides (NaCl, KCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) range from less than half of the impurities present to nearly all the impurities. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on over 60 samples of plutonium chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper will summarize the characterization data, including the origin and process history, particle size, surface area, density, calorimetry, chemical analysis, moisture analysis, prompt gamma, gas generation and corrosion behavior.

  6. Long-term Observations of the Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Radar Returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, A S; Kollias, P; Giangrande, S E; Klein, S A

    2009-08-20

    A long-term study of the turbulent structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL) at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) Climate Research Facility is presented. Doppler velocity measurements from insects occupying the lowest 2 km of the boundary layer during summer months are used to map the vertical velocity component in the CBL. The observations cover four summer periods (2004-08) and are classified into cloudy and clear boundary layer conditions. Profiles of vertical velocity variance, skewness, and mass flux are estimated to study the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer during these conditions. A conditional sampling method is applied to the original Doppler velocity dataset to extract coherent vertical velocity structures and to examine plume dimension and contribution to the turbulent transport. Overall, the derived turbulent statistics are consistent with previous aircraft and lidar observations. The observations provide unique insight into the daytime evolution of the convective boundary layer and the role of increased cloudiness in the turbulent budget of the subcloud layer. Coherent structures (plumes-thermals) are found to be responsible for more than 80% of the total turbulent transport resolved by the cloud radar system. The extended dataset is suitable for evaluating boundary layer parameterizations and testing large-eddy simulations (LESs) for a variety of surface and cloud conditions.

  7. A Cross-model Comparison of Global Long-term Technology Diffusion under a 2?C Climate Change Control Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van der Zwaan, Bob; Rosler, Hilke; Kober, Tom; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; Gernaat, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; McCollum, David

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the long-term global energy technology diffusion patterns required to reach a stringent climate change target with a maximum average atmospheric temperature increase of 2C. If the anthropogenic temperature increase is to be limited to 2C, total CO2 emissions have to be reduced massively, so as to reach substantial negative values during the second half of the century. Particularly power sector CO2 emissions should become negative from around 2050 onwards according to most models used for this analysis in order to compensate for GHG emissions in other sectors where abatement is more costly. The annual additional capacity deployment intensity (expressed in GW/yr) for solar and wind energy until 2030 needs to be around that recently observed for coal-based power plants, and will have to be several times higher in the period 20302050. Relatively high agreement exists across models in terms of the aggregated low-carbon energy system cost requirements on the supply side until 2050, which amount to about 50 trillion US$.

  8. Venture Capital Finance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venture Capital Finance DOE Biomass Conference July 2014 Priced Out of Oil ... Into What? Energy Source Commodity Price Sun: $0 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $10/bbl = $1.6 / GJ (late 1990s) Coal: $3 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (N America) $3 - 4 / GJ Biomass (15 GJ/dt) $60-100/dt = $4 - 6 / GJ Natural Gas (ex N America) $10 - 15 / GJ Oil (6.2 GJ/bbl) $100/bbl = $16 / GJ Corn $4-7/bu= $10 - 20 / GJ 2 * Higher oil prices create a disruptive opportunity for lower cost feedstocks * North American shale gas is a

  9. ACEEE Energy Efficiency Finance Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ACEEE Energy Efficiency Finance Forum brings together practitioners, researchers, energy producers, and consumers to explore innovative models for deploying capital in efficiency markets.

  10. Local Option- Clean Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, directed these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes...

  11. Financing Program Implementation Process Flow

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The implementation process flow for financing with two models: a generic option for primary markets and a conceptual option for secondary markets.

  12. Local Option- Clean Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing effectively allows property owners to borrow money through their local government to pay for energy improvements. The amount borrowed is typically...

  13. Financing Multifamily Energy Efficiency Upgrades

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Financing Multifamily Energy Efficiency Upgrades, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, February 12, 2015.

  14. Local Option- Commercial PACE Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: In 2010, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), which has authority over mortgage underwriters Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, directed these enterprises against purchasing mortgages of homes...

  15. Alaska Energy Efficiency Finance Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Energy Authority (AEA) is hosting an Alaska Energy Efficiency Finance Seminar to cover community- and commercial-scale energy efficiency in Alaska.

  16. PACE Financing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water Heat Wind Energy Storage Dehumidifiers Yes Miami-Dade County - Voluntary Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Program (Florida) PACE Financing Florida Commercial...

  17. Innovative Financing for Green Infrastructure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Topic OverviewFinancing green infrastructure is critical to taking projects from planning to implementation and beyond, including sustaining operations and maintenance. This 90-minute webcast will...

  18. Financing Basics for RE Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Findings * Introduction to Project Finance * The Role of the Players * Structure and Negotiation of Key Documents * Conclusions 2 Overview & Summary Findings 3 Renewable Energy...

  19. Perspectives on Project Finance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives on Project Finance Perspectives on Project Finance Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Perspectives on Project Finance John May, Managing Partner, Stern Brothers & Co. may_biomass_2014.pdf (476.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Opportunities in Bond Financing Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Community Scale Project Development Tribal Renewable Energy Advanced Course: Commercial Scale Project Development

  20. Focus Series: OREGON-On Bill Financing Program: On-Bill Financing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Series: OREGON-On Bill Financing Program: On-Bill Financing Brings Lenders and Homeowners On Board Focus Series: OREGON-On Bill Financing Program: On-Bill Financing Brings ...

  1. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S. . Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. ); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. ); Eischeid, J.K. . Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  2. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vose, R.S.; Schmoyer, R.L.; Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R.; Eischeid, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  3. SOARCA Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Long-Term Station Blackout Uncertainty Analysis: Convergence of the Uncertainty Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, Nathan E.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Sallaberry, Cedric Jean-Marie; Eckert-Gallup, Aubrey Celia; Mattie, Patrick D.; Ghosh, S. Tina

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes the convergence of MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2) probabilistic results of offsite consequences for the uncertainty analysis of the State-of-the-Art Reactor Consequence Analyses (SOARCA) unmitigated long-term station blackout scenario at the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station. The consequence metrics evaluated are individual latent-cancer fatality (LCF) risk and individual early fatality risk. Consequence results are presented as conditional risk (i.e., assuming the accident occurs, risk per event) to individuals of the public as a result of the accident. In order to verify convergence for this uncertainty analysis, as recommended by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, a ‘high’ source term from the original population of Monte Carlo runs has been selected to be used for: (1) a study of the distribution of consequence results stemming solely from epistemic uncertainty in the MACCS2 parameters (i.e., separating the effect from the source term uncertainty), and (2) a comparison between Simple Random Sampling (SRS) and Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) in order to validate the original results obtained with LHS. Three replicates (each using a different random seed) of size 1,000 each using LHS and another set of three replicates of size 1,000 using SRS are analyzed. The results show that the LCF risk results are well converged with either LHS or SRS sampling. The early fatality risk results are less well converged at radial distances beyond 2 miles, and this is expected due to the sparse data (predominance of “zero” results).

  4. Long-Term Results of Brachytherapy With Temporary Iodine-125 Seeds in Children With Low-Grade Gliomas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinthenberg, Rudolf, E-mail: rudolf.korinthenberg@uniklinik-freiburg.d [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Neuburger, Daniela [Division of Neuropaediatrics and Muscular Disorders, Department of Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Trippel, Michael; Ostertag, Christoph; Nikkhah, Guido [Department of Stereotactic Neurosurgery, Neurocentre, University Hospital, Albert-Ludwigs University, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively review the results of temporary I-125 brachytherapy in 94 children and adolescents with low-grade glioma. Methods and Materials: Treatment was performed in progressive tumors roughly spherical in shape with a diameter of up to 5 cm, including 79 astrocytomas, 5 oligodendrogliomas, 4 oligoastrocytomas, 1 ependymoma, and 5 other tumors. Location was suprasellar/chiasmal in 44, thalamic/basal ganglia in 18, hemispheric in 15, midbrain/pineal region in 13, and lower brainstem in 3. Initially, 8% of patients were free of symptoms, 47% were symptomatic but not disabled, and 30% were slightly, 6% moderately, and 3% severely disabled. Results: 5- and 10-year survival was 97% and 92%. The response to I-125 brachytherapy over the long term was estimated after a median observation period of 38.4 (range, 6.4-171.0) months. At that time, 4 patients were in complete, 27 in partial, and 18 in objective remission; 15 showed stable and 30 progressive tumors. Treatment results did not correlate with age, sex, histology, tumor size, location, or demarcation of the tumor. Secondary treatment became necessary in 36 patients, including 19 who underwent repeated I-125 brachytherapy. At final follow-up, the number of symptom-free patients had risen to 21%. Thirty-eight percent showed symptoms without functional impairment, 19% were slightly and 11% moderately disabled, and only 4% were severely disabled. Conclusions: Response rates similar to those of conventional radiotherapy or chemotherapy can be anticipated with I-125 brachytherapy in tumors of the appropriate size and shape. We believe it to be a useful contribution to the treatment of low-grade gliomas in children.

  5. Long-term elemental dry deposition fluxes measured around Lake Michigan with an automated dry deposition sampler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahin, U. Yi, S.M.; Paode, R.D.; Holsen, T.M.

    2000-05-15

    Long-term measurements of mass and elemental dry deposition (MG, Al, V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Sr, Mo, Cd, Sb, Ba, and Pb) were made with an automated dry deposition sampler (Eagle II) containing knife-edge surrogate surfaces during the Lake Michigan Mass Balance/Mass Budget Study. Measurements were made over a roughly 700-day period in Chicago, IL; in South Haven and Sleeping Bear Dunes, MI; and over Lake Michigan on the 68th Street drinking water intake cribs from December 1993 to October 1995. Average mass fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 65, 10, 3.6, and 12 mg m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Primarily crustal elemental fluxes were significantly smaller than the mass fluxes but higher than primarily anthropogenic elemental fluxes. For example, the average elemental flux of Al in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 1.0, 0.34, 0.074, and 0.34 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The average Pb fluxes in Chicago, South Haven, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and the 68th Street crib were 0.038, 0.023, 0.035, and 0.032 mg m{sup {minus}2}day{sup {minus}1}, respectively. The measured fluxes at the various sites were used to calculate the dry deposition loadings to the lake. These estimated fluxes were highest for Mg and lowest for Cd.

  6. Long-Term Climate Change Assessment Task for the Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program: Status through FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L.; Chatters, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Hanford Site Permanent Isolation Barrier Development Program (Barrier Development Program) was organized (Adams and Wing 1986) to develop the technology needed to provide an in-place disposal capability for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The goals of the Barrier Development Program are to provide defensible evidence that final barrier design(s) will adequately control water infiltration, plant and animal intrusion, and wind and water erosion for a minimum of 1,000 years; to isolate wastes from the accessible environment; and to use markers to warn inadvertent human intruders. Evidence for barrier performance will be obtained by conducting laboratory experiments, field tests, computer modeling, and other studies that establish confidence in the barrier`s ability to meet its 1,000-year design life. The performance and stability of natural barrier analogs that have existed for several millennia and the reconstruction of climate changes during the past 10,000 to 125,000 years also will provide insight into bounding conditions of possible future changes and increase confidence in the barriers design. In the following discussion the term {open_quotes}long-term{close_quotes} references periods of time up to 1000`s of years, distinguishing it from {open_quotes}short-term{close_quotes} weather patterns covering a decade or less. Specific activities focus on planning and conducting a series of studies and tests required to confirm key aspects of the barrier design. The effort is a collaborative one between scientists and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to design barriers to limit movement of radionuclides and other contaminants to the accessible environment for at least 1,000 years. These activities have been divided into 14 groups of tasks that aid in the complete development of protective barrier and warning marker system.

  7. Characterization of the Wymark CO2 Reservoir: A Natural Analog to Long-Term CO2 Storage at Weyburn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryerson, F; Johnson, J

    2010-11-22

    Natural accumulations of CO{sub 2} occur in the Duperow and other Devonian strata on the western flank of the Williston Basin in lithologies very similar to those into which anthropogenic CO{sub 2} is being injected as part of an EOR program in the Weyburn-Midale pool. Previous workers have established the stratgraphic and petrographic similarities between the Duperow and Midale beds (Lake and Whittaker, 2004 and 2006). As the CO{sub 2} accumulations in the Devonian strata may be as old as 50 Ma, this similarity provides confidence in the efficacy of long-term geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the Midale-Weyburn pool. Here we attempt to extend this comparison with whole rock and mineral chemistry using the same sample suite used by Lake and Whittaker. We provide XRD, XRF, and electron microprobe analysis of major constituent minerals along with extensive backscattered electron and x-ray imaging to identify trace phases and silicate minerals. LPNORM analysis is used to quantify modal concentrations of minerals species. Samples from depth intervals where CO{sub 2} has been observed are compared to those where CO{sub 2} was absent, with no systematic differences in mineral composition observed. Gas accumulation can be correlated with sample porosity. In particular gas-bearing samples from the Eastend region are more porous than the overlying gas-free samples. Silicate minerals are rare in the Duperow carbonates, never exceeding 3 wt%. As such, mineral trapping is precluded in these lithologies. The geochemical data presented here will be used for comparison with a similar geochemical-mineralogical study of the Midale (Durocher et al., 2003) in a subsequent report.

  8. Long-term affected energy production of waste to energy technologies identified by use of energy system analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenster, M.; Meibom, P.

    2010-12-15

    Affected energy production is often decisive for the outcome of consequential life-cycle assessments when comparing the potential environmental impact of products or services. Affected energy production is however difficult to determine. In this article the future long-term affected energy production is identified by use of energy system analysis. The focus is on different uses of waste for energy production. The Waste-to-Energy technologies analysed include co-combustion of coal and waste, anaerobic digestion and thermal gasification. The analysis is based on optimization of both investments and production of electricity, district heating and bio-fuel in a future possible energy system in 2025 in the countries of the Northern European electricity market (Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Finland and Germany). Scenarios with different CO{sub 2} quota costs are analysed. It is demonstrated that the waste incineration continues to treat the largest amount of waste. Investments in new waste incineration capacity may, however, be superseded by investments in new Waste-to-Energy technologies, particularly those utilising sorted fractions such as organic waste and refuse derived fuel. The changed use of waste proves to always affect a combination of technologies. What is affected varies among the different Waste-to-Energy technologies and is furthermore dependent on the CO{sub 2} quota costs and on the geographical scope. The necessity for investments in flexibility measures varies with the different technologies such as storage of heat and waste as well as expansion of district heating networks. Finally, inflexible technologies such as nuclear power plants are shown to be affected.

  9. Long-Term Regional Climate Simulations Driven by Two Global Reanalyses and a GCM for the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, Lai R.; Bian, Xindi; Qian, Yun

    2002-01-01

    To take advantage of recent development in the NCAR/Penn State Mesoscale Model (MM5), an effort has been organized to develop and evaluate an MM5-based community regional climate model. Several modifications such as the implementation of the PNNL subgrid parameterization of orographic precipitation, representation of cloud-radiation interaction, and additional output capabilities have been made to the recently released MM5 Version 3.4. To evaluate the model, several long-term simulations have been performed over the western U.S. These simulations were driven by the NCEP/NCAR and ECMWF reanalyses respectively for 20 and 13 years beginning at 1980. The western U.S. is marked by diverse topographic features and varied climate conditions such as the maritime climate in the coastal area and the semi-arid climate in the southwest. We will present results based on two domain configurations: a nested domain with a fine domain covering the western U.S. at 40 km resolution, and a single domain at 60 km resolution with the subgrid orographic precipitation scheme applied in the western U.S. Analyses are being performed to evaluate the simulations of the averaged climate and interannual variability and examine the model sensitivity to different boundary conditions. Our analyses focus on the relationships between large-scale circulation and regional climate features, surface energy and water budgets, orographic precipitation, and hydrologic conditions within selected river basins. Regional simulations are also being performed using large-scale conditions simulated by the NCAR/DOE Parallel Climate Model (PCM). The regional model was used to downscale the ensemble PCM climate change scenarios for periods of 10-20 years in the current and future climate. Results will be analyzed to study the impacts of greenhouse warming on regional water resources in the western U.S.

  10. Predictive Factors for Acute and Late Urinary Toxicity After Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy: Long-Term Outcome in 712 Consecutive Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, Mira Miller, Stacy; Moravan, Veronika; Pickles, Tom; McKenzie, Michael; Pai, Howard; Liu, Mitchell; Kwan, Winkle; Agranovich, Alexander; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Halperin, Ross; Morris, W. James

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To describe the frequency of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) urinary toxicity, associated predictive factors, and resolution of International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) in 712 consecutive prostate brachytherapy patients. Methods and Materials: Patients underwent implantation between 1998 and 2003 (median follow-up, 57 months). The IPSS and RTOG toxicity data were prospectively collected. The patient, treatment, and implant factors were examined for an association with urinary toxicity. The time to IPSS resolution was examined using Kaplan-Meier curves, and multivariate modeling of IPSS resolution was done using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. Results: The IPSS returned to baseline at a median of 12.6 months. On multivariate analysis, patients with a high baseline IPSS had a quicker resolution of their IPSS. Higher prostate D90 (dose covering 90% of the prostate), maximal postimplant IPSS, and urinary retention slowed the IPSS resolution time. The rate of the actuarial 5-year late urinary (>12 months) RTOG Grade 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 32%, 36%, 24%, 6.2%, and 0.1%, respectively. At 7 years, the prevalence of RTOG Grade 0-1 was 92.5%. Patients with a larger prostate volume, greater number of needles, greater baseline IPSS, and use of hormonal therapy had more acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, the significant predictors for late greater than or equal to RTOG toxicity 2 were a greater baseline IPSS, maximal postimplant IPSS, presence of acute toxicity, and higher prostate V150 (volume of the prostate covered by 150% of the dose). More recently implanted patients had less acute urinary toxicity and patients given hormonal therapy had less late urinary toxicity (all p < 0.02). Conclusion: Most urinary symptoms resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy, and significant long-term urinary toxicity was very low

  11. Analysis of long-term impacts of TRU waste remaining at generator/storage sites for No Action Alternative 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, J.W.; Bagaasen, L.M.; Bergeron, M.P.; Streile, G.P.

    1997-09-01

    This report is a supplement to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal-Phase Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS-II). Described herein are the underlying information, data, and assumptions used to estimate the long-term human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in transuranic (TRU) waste remaining at major generator/storage sites after loss of institutional control under No Action Alternative 2. Under No Action Alternative 2, TRU wastes would not be emplaced at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) but would remain at generator/storage sites in surface or near-surface storage. Waste generated at smaller sites would be consolidated at the major generator/storage sites. Current TRU waste management practices would continue, but newly generated waste would be treated to meet the WIPP waste acceptance criteria. For this alternative, institutional control was assumed to be lost 100 years after the end of the waste generation period, with exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in the TRU waste possible from direct intrusion and release to the surrounding environment. The potential human-health impacts from exposure to radionuclides and hazardous chemicals in TRU waste were analyzed for two different types of scenarios. Both analyses estimated site-specific, human-health impacts at seven major generator/storage sites: the Hanford Site (Hanford), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The analysis focused on these seven sites because 99 % of the estimated TRU waste volume and inventory would remain there under the assumptions of No Action Alternative 2.

  12. DOE-NE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program and EPRI Long-Term Operations Program. Joint Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Don

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has contributed almost 20% of the total amount of electricity generated in the United States over the past two decades. High capacity factors and low operating costs make nuclear power plants (NPPs) some of the most economical power generators available. Further, nuclear power remains the single largest contributor (nearly 70%) of non-greenhouse gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Even when major refurbishments are performed to extend operating life, these plants continue to represent cost-effective, low-carbon assets to the nation’s electrical generation capability. By the end of 2014, about one-third of the existing domestic fleet will have passed their 40th anniversary of power operations, and about one-half of the fleet will reach the same 40-year mark within this decade. Recognizing the challenges associated with pursuing extended service life of commercial nuclear power plants, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have established separate but complementary research and development programs (DOE-NE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability [LWRS] Program and EPRI’s Long-Term Operations [LTO] Program) to address these challenges. To ensure that a proper linkage is maintained between the programs, DOE-NE and EPRI executed a memorandum of understanding in late 2010 to “establish guiding principles under which research activities (between LWRS and LTO) could be coordinated to the benefit of both parties.” This document represents the third annual revision to the initial version (March 2011) of the plan as called for in the memorandum of understanding.

  13. Project Finance and Investments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finance and Investments Biomass 2014 Growing The Future Bioeconomy Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chain Year Number of Projects Grant Amount Loan Guarantee Amount Leverage Total Project Cost 2003 114 $21,707,373 $0 $545,381,487 $567,088,860 2004 167 $22,812,049 $0 $136,984,587 $159,796,636 2005 156 $22,237,268 $10,100,000 $193,511,453 $225,848,721 2006 395 $21,209,435 $24,158,862 $190,332,768 $235,701,065 2007 436 $19,123,191 $57,270,743 $243,396,339 $319,790,273 2008 764 $34,239,666 $15,566,169

  14. FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS for CLEAN ENERGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS for CLEAN ENERGY FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY * 2016 | INSIDE COVER THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK FOR PRINTING CONTENTS Foreword 3 Acknowledgements 5 Indexes of Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy 6 * Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy by Administering Agency * Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy by Program Type Profiles of Federal Financing Programs 11 for Clean Energy by Agency * United States Department of Energy (DOE) *

  15. Funding & Financing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Funding & Financing Funding & Financing Pinpointing Clean Energy Financing Programs Just Got Easier Pinpointing Clean Energy Financing Programs Just Got Easier The Energy Department's updated clean energy finance guide makes it fast and efficient to locate federal financing opportunities in the U.S. and abroad. Read more Advancing Private Sector Investment in Clean Energy Advancing Private Sector Investment in Clean Energy The Energy Department is working to leverage private and public

  16. Long-Term Performance of Transuranic Waste Inadvertently Disposed in a Shallow Land Burial Trench at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory J. Shott; Vefa Yucel

    2009-07-16

    In 1986, 21 m3 of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently disposed in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste must be disposed in accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191, Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is the only facility meeting these requirements. The National Research Council, however, has found that exhumation of buried TRU waste for disposal in a deep geologic repository may not be warranted when the effort, exposures, and expense of retrieval are not commensurate with the risk reduction achieved. The long-term risks of leaving the TRU waste in-place are evaluated in two probabilistic performance assessments. A composite analysis, assessing the dose from all disposed waste and interacting sources of residual contamination, estimates an annual total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of 0.01 mSv, or 3 percent of the dose constraint. A 40 CFR 191 performance assessment also indicates there is reasonable assurance of meeting all requirements. The 40 CFR 191.15 annual mean TEDE for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.055 mSv at 10,000 years, or approximately 37 percent of the 0.15 mSv individual protection requirement. In both assessments greater than 99 percent of the dose is from co-disposed low-level waste. The simulated probability of the 40 CFR 191.13 cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the release limit is estimated to be 0.0093 and less than 0.0001, respectively. Site characterization data and hydrologic process modeling support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis indicates that there is reasonable assurance of meeting all regulatory requirements. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the results

  17. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO

  18. An Evaluation of Long-Term Performance of Liner Systems for Low-Level Waste Disposal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur S. Rood; Annette L. Schafer; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-03-01

    Traditional liner systems consisting of a geosynthetic membrane underlying a waste disposal facility coupled with a leachate collection system have been proposed as a means of containing releases of low-level radioactive waste within the confines of the disposal facility and thereby eliminating migration of radionuclides into the vadose zone and groundwater. However, this type of hydraulic containment liner system is only effective as long as the leachate collection system remains functional or an overlying cover limits the total infiltration to the volumetric pore space of the disposal system. If either the leachate collection system fails, or the overlying cover becomes less effective during the 1,000s of years of facility lifetime, the liner may fill with water and release contaminated water in a preferential or focused manner. If the height of the liner extends above the waste, the waste will become submerged which could increase the release rate and concentration of the leachate. If the liner extends near land surface, there is the potential for contamination reaching land surface creating a direct exposure pathway. Alternative protective liner systems can be engineered that eliminate radionuclide releases to the vadose zone during operations and minimizing long term migration of radionuclides from the disposal facility into the vadose zone and aquifer. Non-traditional systems include waste containerization in steel or composite materials. This type of system would promote drainage of clean infiltrating water through the facility without contacting the waste. Other alternatives include geochemical barriers designed to transmit water while adsorbing radionuclides beneath the facility. Facility performance for a hypothetical disposal facility has been compared for the hydraulic and steel containerization liner alternatives. Results were compared in terms of meeting the DOE Order 435.1 low-level waste performance objective of 25 mrem/yr all-pathways dose during

  19. Long-term Outcomes in Treatment of Invasive Bladder Cancer With Concomitant Boost and Accelerated Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canyilmaz, Emine; Yavuz, Melek Nur; Serdar, Lasif; Uslu, Gonca Hanedan; Zengin, Ahmet Yasar; Aynaci, Ozlem; Haciislamoglu, Emel; Bahat, Zumrut; Yoney, Adnan

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical efficacy and toxicity of concomitant boost and accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (CBAHRT) in patients with invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Between October 1997 and September 2012, 334 patients with diagnoses of invasive bladder cancer were selected. These patients received CBAHRT as a bladder-conserving approach. The treatment consisted of a dose of 45Gy/1.8Gy to the whole pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 1.5Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 67.5Gy in 5weeks. A total of 32 patients (10.3%) had a diagnosis of stage T1, 202 (64.3%) were at stage T2, 46 (14.6%) were at stage T3a, 22 (7%) were at stage T3b, and 12 (3.8%) were at stage T4a. Results: The follow-up period was 33.1months (range, 4.3-223.3months). Grade 3 late intestinal toxicity was observed in 9 patients (2.9%), whereas grade 3 late urinary toxicity was observed in 8 patients (2.5%). The median overall survival (OS) was 26.3months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 21.4-31.2). The 5-, 10, and 15-year OS rates were 32.1% (standard error [SE], 0.027), 17.9% (SE, 0.025) and 12.5% (SE, 0.028), respectively. The median cause-specific survival (CSS) was 42.1months (95% CI: 28.7-55.5). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year CSS rates were 43.2% (SE, 0.03), 30.3% (SE, 0.03), and 28% (SE, 0.04), respectively. The median relapse-free survival (RFS) was 111.8months (95% CI: 99.6-124). The 5-, 10-, and 15-year RFS rates were 61.9% (SE, 0.03), 57.6% (SE, 0.04), and 48.2% (SE, 0.07), respectively. Conclusions: The CBAHRT technique demonstrated acceptable toxicity and local control rates in patients with invasive bladder cancer, and this therapy facilitated bladder conservation. In selected patients, the CBAHRT technique is a practical alternative treatment option with acceptable5-, 10-, and 15-year results in patients undergoing cystectomy as well as concurrent chemoradiation therapy.

  20. Propensity-Weighted Comparison of Long-Term Risk of Urinary Adverse Events in Elderly Women Treated For Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Sean P.; Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Chu, Haitao; Downs, Levi; Dusenbery, Kathryn; Geller, Melissa A.; Virnig, Beth A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Cervical cancer treatment is associated with a risk of urinary adverse events (UAEs) such as ureteral stricture and vesicovaginal fistula. We sought to measure the long-term UAE risk after surgery and radiation therapy (RT), with confounding controlled through propensity-weighted models. Methods and Materials: From the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare database, we identified women ≥66 years old with nonmetastatic cervical cancer treated with simple surgery (SS), radical hysterectomy (RH), external beam RT plus brachytherapy (EBRT+BT), or RT+surgery. We matched them to noncancer controls 1:3. Differences in demographic and cancer characteristics were balanced by propensity weighting. Grade 3 to 4 UAEs were identified by diagnosis codes plus treatment codes. Cumulative incidence was measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. The hazard associated with different cancer treatments was compared using Cox models. Results: UAEs occurred in 272 of 1808 cases (17%) and 222 of 5424 (4%) controls; most (62%) were ureteral strictures. The raw cumulative incidence of UAEs was highest in advanced cancers. UAEs occurred in 31% of patients after EBRT+BT, 25% of patients after RT+surgery, and 15% of patients after RH; however, after propensity weighting, the incidence was similar. In adjusted Cox models (reference = controls), the UAE risk was highest after RT+surgery (hazard ratio [HR], 5.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.32-11.07), followed by EBRT+BT (HR, 3.33; 95% CI, 1.45-7.65), RH (HR, 3.65; 95% CI, 1.41-9.46) and SS (HR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.32-3.01). The higher risk after RT+surgery versus EBRT+BT was statistically significant, whereas, EBRT+BT and RH were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions: UAEs are common after cervical cancer treatment, particularly in patients with advanced cancers. UAEs are more common after RT, but these women tend to have the advanced cancers. After propensity weighting, the risk after RT was similar

  1. Clean Power Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Clean Power Finance Place: San Francisco, California Zip: 94103-4004 Sector: Services, Solar Product: A San Francisco-based consultancy...

  2. NREL: Technology Deployment - Project Development and Finance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Development and Finance Group, Integrated Applications Center The Project Development & Finance (PD&F) team works with federal agencies, utilities, universities, ...

  3. Global Capital Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Capital Finance Place: Purchase, New York Zip: 10577 Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: New York-based international...

  4. Comprehensive Energy Projects (CEP) and Innovative Financing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Financing Comprehensive Energy Projects (CEP) and Innovative Financing Presented at the Technology Transition Corporation and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: The Top 5 Fuel...

  5. Alternative Energy Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: Alternative Energy Finance Place: London, United Kingdom Zip: NW11 8BU Sector: Renewable Energy Product: String representation...

  6. Energy Financing Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Texas-based firm providing project and vendor financing, with a preference for alternative energy projects. References: Energy Financing Inc.1 This article is a stub....

  7. Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financial Model (RET Finance) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Technologies Financial Model (RET Finance) Focus Area: Renewable Energy...

  8. Project Development and Finance Course Curriculum Terminology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development and Finance Course Curriculum Terminology Guide Project Development and Finance Course Curriculum Terminology Guide This document provides definitions for terminology ...

  9. Project Financing Glossary | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    terms. PDF icon ProjectFinancingGlossary.pdf More Documents & Publications Tribal Leader Training Session: NCAI Conference Presentation: Developing and Financing Renewable...

  10. Energize NY Finance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Corporation (EIC). The property that is being financed should be current on property tax payments, and must not have any involuntary liens or defaults. Financing...

  11. Sustainable Development Fund Financing Program (PECO Territory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The SDF provides financial assistance to eligible projects in the form of commercial loans, subordinated debt, royalty financing, and equity financing. The Sustainable Development Fund provides...

  12. Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets (2.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Questions ...

  13. Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector Deployment ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date March 2009 Topic Financing, Incentives & Market Analysis Subprogram Soft Costs Author National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Photovoltaic Financing: Residential Sector ...

  14. Commercial Solar Hot Water Financing Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A variety of financing options will be available depending on the project, including power purchase agreements or energy service agreements. A third party will finance the construction, maintenan...

  15. Financing Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells Financing Fuel Cells Presented at the Clean Energy States Alliance and U.S. Department of Energy Webinar: Financing Fuel Cell Installations, August 30, 2011. ...

  16. FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS for CLEAN ENERGY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS for CLEAN ENERGY FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY * 2016 | INSIDE COVER THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK FOR PRINTING CONTENTS Foreword 3 ...

  17. Financing Program Design and Implementation Considerations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Designing and implementing clean energy financing programs takes more than simply identifying applicable financing structures and implementing them. State and local governments should also take...

  18. China Carbon Finance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Finance Jump to: navigation, search Name: China Carbon Finance Place: Auburn, Washington State Zip: 98002 Product: Project developer focused on CDM projects in China References:...

  19. Energy Financing Team | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Financing Team Jump to: navigation, search Name: Energy Financing Team Place: United Kingdom Product: London-based investment and trading group which specialises in the central and...

  20. Evolution of carbide precipitates in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel during long-term service in a power plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y.; Chen, Y.; Sridharan, K.; Allen, T. R.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison

    2010-06-01

    Carbide precipitation from the steel matrix during long-term high-temperature exposure can adversely affect the fracture toughness and high-temperature creep resistance of materials with implications on the performance of power plant components. In the present work, carbide evolution in 2.25Cr-1Mo steel after long-term aging during service was investigated. Boiler pipe samples of this steel were removed from a supercritical water-cooled coal-fired power plant after service times of 17 and 28 years and a mean operational temperature of 810 K (537C). The carbide precipitation and coarsening effects were studied using the carbon extraction replica technique followed by analysis using transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The carbides extracted using an electrolytic technique were also analyzed using X-ray diffraction to evaluate phase transformations of the carbides during long-term service. Small ball punch and Vickers hardness were used to evaluate the changes in mechanical performance after long-term aging during service.

  1. May 16, 2016- Predicting the Service Life of Geomembranes in Low-Level and Mixed-Waste Disposal Facilities: Findings from a Long-Term Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Performance & RIsk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Webinar - May 16, 2016 - Predicting the Service Life of Geomembranes in Low-Level and Mixed-Waste Disposal Facilities: Findings from a Long-Term Study. Presented by Dr. Craig Benson (Dean of School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Janet Scott Hamilton and John Downman Hamilton Professor, Univ. of Virginia).

  2. Long-Term Mechanical Behavior of Yucca Mountain Tuff and its Variability, Final Technical Report for Task ORD-FY04-021

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daemen, Jaak J.K.; Ma, Lumin; Zhao, Guohua

    2006-03-20

    The study of the long term mechanical behavior of Yucca Mountain tuffs is important for several reasons. Long term stability of excavations will affect accessibility (e.g. for inspection purposes), and retrievability. Long term instabilities may induce loading of drip shields and/or emplaced waste, thus affecting drip shield and/or waste package corrosion. Failure of excavations will affect airflow, may affect water flow, and may affect temperature distributions. The long term mechanical behavior of rocks remains an elusive topic, loaded with uncertainties. A variety of approaches have been used to improve the understanding of this complex subject, but it is doubtful that it has reached a stage where firm predictions can be considered feasible. The long term mechanical behavior of "soft" rocks, especially evaporites, and in particular rock salt, has been the subject of numerous investigations (e.g. Cristescu and Hunsche, 1998, Cristescu et al, 2002), and basic approaches towards engineering taking into account the long term behavior of such materials have long been well established (e.g. Dreyer, 1972, 1982). The same is certainly not true of "hard" rocks. While it long has been recognized that the long term strength of ?hard? rocks almost certainly is significantly less than that measured during "short", i.e. standard (ASTM D 2938), ISRM suggested (Bieniawski et al, 1978) and conventionally used test procedures (e.g. Bieniawski, 1970, Wawersik, 1972, Hoek and Brown, 1980, p. 150), what limited approaches have been taken to develop strategies toward determining the long term mechanical behavior of "hard" rock remain in the early research and investigation stage, at best. One early model developed specifically for time dependent analysis of underground "hard" rock structures is the phenomenological model by Kaiser and Morgenstern (1981). Brady and Brown (1985, p. 93) state that over a wide range of strain rates, from 10^-8 to 10^2/s the difference in strength is only

  3. Good Fences Make Good Financing: Project Finance Explained

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    How does EERE support research? We fund projects--and one way of doing so is through "project finance." This method helps minimize corporate risk, which promotes investment in diverse research and development efforts.

  4. Computing for Finance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained

  5. Computing for Finance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained

  6. Computing for Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-24

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing – from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has

  7. HOMEOWNERS GUIDE TO SOLAR FINANCING

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Clean Energy States Alliance has released a guide to help homeowners navigate the complex landscape of residential solar PV system financing. The free online publication helps help homeowners make sound decisions and select the best financing option for their needs. The guide describes leases, loans, and power purchase agreements (PPAs) and explains the advantages and disadvantages of each, as well as how they compare to a direct cash purchase. It clarifies key solar financing terms and provides a list of questions homeowners should ask before deciding if and how to proceed with installing a solar system.

  8. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Dhanesh; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra.

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH  LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255oC; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen

  9. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    irradiation. This project will focus on modeling microstructural and microchemical evolution of irradiated alloys by performing detailed modeling of such microstructure evolution processes coupled with well-designed in situ experiments that can provide validation and benchmarking to the computer codes. The broad scientific and technical objectives of this proposal are to evaluate the microstructure and microchemical evolution in advanced ferritic/martensitic and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys for cladding and duct reactor materials under long-term and elevated temperature irradiation, leading to improved ability to model structural materials performance and lifetime. Specifically, we propose four research thrusts, namely Thrust 1: Identify the formation mechanism and evolution for dislocation loops with Burgers vector of a<100> and determine whether the defect microstructure (predominately dislocation loop/dislocation density) saturates at high dose. Thrust 2: Identify whether a threshold irradiation temperature or dose exists for the nucleation of growing voids that mark the beginning of irradiation-induced swelling, and begin to probe the limits of thermal stability of the tempered Martensitic structure under irradiation. Thrust 3: Evaluate the stability of nanometer sized Y- Ti-O based oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) particles at high fluence/temperature. Thrust 4: Evaluate the extent to which precipitates form and/or dissolve as a function of irradiation temperature and dose, and how these changes are driven by radiation induced segregation and microchemical evolutions and determined by the initial microstructure.

  10. Project Financing Catalog of Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document details the Federal Energy Management Program's catalog of technical assistance services it offers for federal agencies that want to use project funding mechanisms to finance energy efficiency and renewable energy projects.

  11. Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elizabeth Battocletti

    2006-04-06

    The ?Geothermal Outreach and Project Financing? project substantially added to the understanding of geothermal resources, technology, and small business development by both the general public as well as those in the geothermal community.

  12. Property Assessed Clean Energy Financing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The District of Columbia offers a commercial Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) program. PACE financing allows commercial and mulitfamily property owners in the district to borrow money to pay...

  13. ACEEE Energy Efficiency Finance Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) is hosting an Energy Efficiency Finance Forum is dedicated to catalyzing investment in and scaling the market for energy efficiency.

  14. Venture Capital Finance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Venture Capital Finance Venture Capital Finance Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Venture Capital Finance Brian Baynes, Partner, Flagship Ventures baynes_biomass_2014.pdf (1.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda U.S. Biofuels Industry: Mind the Gap Review of Recent Pilot Scale Cellulosic Ethanol Demonstration

  15. Enabling Legislation for Clean Energy Finance Approaches

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legislative and executive efforts required to implement energy efficiency and renewable energy finance approaches.

  16. Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

  17. Influence of long-term thermal aging on the microstructural evolution of nuclear reactor pressure vessel materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareige, P.; Russell, K.F.; Stoller, R.E.; Miller, M.K.

    1998-03-01

    Atom probe field ion microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of unaged (as-fabricated) and long-term thermally aged ({approximately} 100,000 h at 280 C) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed. This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal-aging effects. This microstructural study focused on the quantification of the compositions of the matrix and carbides. The APFIM results indicate that there was no significant microstructural evolution after a long-term thermal exposure in weld, plate, or forging materials. The matrix depletion of copper that was observed in weld materials was consistent with the copper concentration in the matrix after the stress-relief heat treatment. The compositions of cementite carbides aged for 100,000 h were compared with the Thermocalc{trademark} prediction. The APFIM comparisons of materials under these conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties such as the Charpy transition temperature.

  18. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO₂ sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO₂ storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO₂ sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO₂ and brine leakage. The simulation results are alsomore » used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.« less

  19. Quantification of key long-term risks at CO? sequestration sites: Latest results from US DOE's National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh; Bromhal, Grant; Carroll, Susan; Chu, Shaoping; Dilmore, Robert; Gastelum, Jason; Oldenburg, Curt; Stauffer, Philip; Zhang, Yingqi; Guthrie, George

    2014-12-31

    Risk assessment for geologic CO? storage including quantification of risks is an area of active investigation. The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is a US-Department of Energy (US-DOE) effort focused on developing a defensible, science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at geologic CO? sequestration sites. NRAP has been developing a methodology that centers round development of an integrated assessment model (IAM) using system modeling approach to quantify risks and risk profiles. The IAM has been used to calculate risk profiles with a few key potential impacts due to potential CO? and brine leakage. The simulation results are also used to determine long-term storage security relationships and compare the long-term storage effectiveness to IPCC storage permanence goal. Additionally, we also demonstrate application of IAM for uncertainty quantification in order to determine parameters to which the uncertainty in model results is most sensitive.

  20. Clean Cities Now, Vol. 18, No. 2, Winter 2014/2015: Past, Present, Future: Propane Proves Dependable Over the Long Term (Newsletter), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    8, No. 2 Winter 2014/2015 Inside: 2013: One Year-One Billion and Beyond Northern Colorado Cements Success With Partnerships Braun's Express Celebrates Petroleum Reduction Past, Present, Future: Propane proves dependable over the long term Carl Lisek, left, South Shore Clean Cities Coor- dinator, and Lorrie Lisek, Wisconsin Clean Cities Coordinator, were selected by the Society of Innovators of Northwest Indiana as the September 2014 innovators of the month. In This Issue Events Spur EV Adoption

  1. EIS-0074: Long-Term Management of Defense High-Level Radioactive Wastes Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Idaho National Engineering Lab, Idaho

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this statement to analyze the environmental implications of the proposed selection of a strategy for long-term management of the high-level radioactive wastes generated as part of the national defense effort at the Department's Idaho Chemical Processing Plant at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The project was cancelled after the Draft Environmental Impact Statement was produced.

  2. Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest ¬タモ July 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Long-term Drought on Power Systems in the U.S. Southwest Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electric Delivery and Energy Reliability Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Division OFFICIAL USE ONLY Outline of Presentation 2 1. Background, Objectives, and Assumptions 2. Methodology and Data 3. Analysis and Results OFFICIAL USE ONLY  DOE-OE has a responsibility to promote a resilient energy infrastructure in which continuity of business and services are

  3. Berkeley Program Offers New Option for Financing Residential PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2008-07-06

    -traditional credit vehicle, to recover both system and administrative costs. This approach has a number of features that should appeal to PV owners, including long-term, fixed-cost, attractive financing; loans that are tied to the tax capacity of the property rather than to the owner's credit standing; a repayment obligation that transfers along with the sale of the property; and a potential ability to deduct the repayment obligation from federal taxable income as part of the local property tax deduction. For these reasons, Berkeley's program, which was first announced on October 23, 2007, has received considerable nationwide attention in both the trade and general press. Since the announcement, cities from throughout California and the broader U.S. have expressed keen interest in the possibility of replicating this type of program. In California alone, the cities of Santa Cruz, Santa Monica and Palm Desert are all reportedly considering similar programs, while the city of San Francisco has recently announced its own program, portions of which closely parallel Berkeley's approach. In addition, a bill (AB 811) that would authorize all cities in California, not just charter cities like Berkeley, to create this type of program was approved by the California General Assembly on January 29 and is currently under consideration in the State Senate. A similar bill in Colorado (HB 1350) was signed into law on May 28. Elsewhere, the city of Tucson, Arizona has also considered this financing approach.

  4. FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy.pdf (2.55 MB) More Documents & Publications FEDERAL FINANCING PROGRAMS FOR CLEAN ENERGY Federal Financing Programs for Clean Energy Guide to Federal Financing for Energy Efficiency and Clean Energy Deployment Federal Finance Facilities Available for Energy Efficiency Upgrades and Clean Energy Deployment

  5. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term Irradiation at Elevated Temperature: Critical Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, Gary; Jiao, Zhijie; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-20

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, dislocation loop formation and growth, radiation induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, as well as the possibility for void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiation-induced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses to 200 dpa and beyond). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible, as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. This project builds upon joint work at the proposing institutions, under a NERI-C program that is scheduled to end in September, to understand the effects of

  6. Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly...

  7. Ex-Im Bank Environmental Export Finance Program | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Export Financing Webpage 1 "Ex-Im Bank's financing helps mitigate risk for U.S. environmental companies and also offers competitive financing terms to...

  8. UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Topics: Finance Website: www.climatefinanceoptions.orgcfo Cost: Free UNDP-Climate Finance Options Platform Screenshot References: UNDP-Climate Finance...

  9. Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call Finance Peer Exchange Kickoff Call BetterBuildings Financing Peer Exchange Kickoff Call, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, April 28, 2011. Call ...

  10. Computing for Finance

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The finance sector is one of the driving forces for the use of distributed or Grid computing for business purposes. The speakers will review the state-of-the-art of high performance computing in the financial sector, and provide insight into how different types of Grid computing ? from local clusters to global networks - are being applied to financial applications. They will also describe the use of software and techniques from physics, such as Monte Carlo simulations, in the financial world. There will be four talks of 20min each. The talk abstracts and speaker bios are listed below. This will be followed by a Q&A; panel session with the speakers. From 19:00 onwards there will be a networking cocktail for audience and speakers. This is an EGEE / CERN openlab event organized in collaboration with the regional business network rezonance.ch. A webcast of the event will be made available for subsequent viewing, along with powerpoint material presented by the speakers. Attendance is free and open to all. Registration is mandatory via www.rezonance.ch, including for CERN staff. 1. Overview of High Performance Computing in the Financial Industry Michael Yoo, Managing Director, Head of the Technical Council, UBS Presentation will describe the key business challenges driving the need for HPC solutions, describe the means in which those challenges are being addressed within UBS (such as GRID) as well as the limitations of some of these solutions, and assess some of the newer HPC technologies which may also play a role in the Financial Industry in the future. Speaker Bio: Michael originally joined the former Swiss Bank Corporation in 1994 in New York as a developer on a large data warehouse project. In 1996 he left SBC and took a role with Fidelity Investments in Boston. Unable to stay away for long, he returned to SBC in 1997 while working for Perot Systems in Singapore. Finally, in 1998 he formally returned to UBS in Stamford following the merger with SBC and has remained

  11. Platform/foreslope facies and buildup geometry resulting from short-term and long-term eustatic sea level fluctuations: latemar buildup (Middle Triassic), Dolomites, northern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, M.T.; Goldhammer, R.

    1987-05-01

    Superimposed short-term and long-term eustatic sea level fluctuations directly controlled Latemar platform stratigraphy and indirectly influenced the deeper water facies and overall buildup geometry. Deeper water facies, the foreslope and toe of slope, are a function of platform submergence (highstand shedding) and subaerial exposure (lowstand lithification and erosion) and thus only indirectly reflect eustatic fluctuations. The Latemar consists of a platform core (3-4 km wide, 700 m thick) with a narrow margin, flanked by foreslope (30-35/sup 0/ dips), toe of slope, and basin deposits. The shallowing-upward platform sequence records a long-term (about 10 m.y.) eustatic sea level oscillation with an amplitude of about 150 m. The lower 250 m marks an initial catch-up phase (subtidal carbonates); the upper 450 m marks the sequential keep-up phase (meter-scale cyclic carbonates). These cycles record platform submergence and exposure caused by short-term (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/ years) Milankovitch eustatic oscillations superimposed on the long-term trend. Platform submergence and exposure conditions result in contrasting foreslope deposits. During highstands, platform-derived sands bypass the foreslope, accumulating as toe-of-slope graded beds and basin turbidites. During lowstands, sand supply ceases, producing basin hard-grounds. Foreslope megabreccias contain margin-derived boundstone clasts, with only minor platform-derived sands (highstands) and lithified clasts (lowstands). As the platform margin/foreslope contact is nearly vertical, a progressively increasing volume of foreslope megabreccia was needed to maintain the depositional geometry. This coincides with the most commonly exposed platform interval, suggesting that platform exposure determines buildup flank geometry by controlling megabreccia clast production.

  12. Energy Efficiency Financing Incentives Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State and/or local financial incentives and programs help building owners execute energy efficiency projects by lowering cost burdens through public benefits funds, grants, loans, or property-assessed clean energy financing; personal, corporate, property, and sales tax incentives; or assistance with permitting fee reduction or elimination.

  13. Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar: Advanced Financing Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will provide details about renewable project financing, presenters will cover federal and state incentives, local resources, and partnerships that can help develop creative project financing terms and structures.

  14. Energy conversion with solid oxide fuel cell systems: A review of concepts amd outlooks for the short- and long-term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, II, Thomas A.; Nease, Jake; Tucker, David; Barton, Paul I.

    2013-01-01

    A review of energy conversion systems which use solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) as their primary electricity generation component is presented. The systems reviewed are largely geared for development and use in the short- and long-term future. These include systems for bulk power generation, distributed power generation, and systems integrated with other forms of energy conversion such as fuel production. The potential incorporation of CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration technologies and the influences of potential government policies are also discussed.

  15. Radiolysis of Salts and Long-Term Storage Issues for Both Pure and Impure PuO{sub 2} Materials in Plutonium Storage Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lav Tandon

    2000-05-01

    The Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) project sponsored a literature search on the effects of radiation on salts, with focus on alkali chlorides. The goal of the survey was to provide a basis for estimating the magnitude of {alpha} radiation effects on alkali chlorides that can accompany plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) into storage. Chloride radiolysis can yield potentially corrosive gases in plutonium storage containers that can adversely affect long-term stability. This literature search was primarily done to provide a tutorial on this topic, especially for personnel with nonradiation chemistry backgrounds.

  16. Financing Program Market Segments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Segments Financing Program Market Segments Financing programs are not one-size-fits-all-different financial products will work better for different market segments. Markets to consider include: Public Sector Residential Commercial and Industrial Select a financing structure in the table for more information. Financing Structures Market Segment Public Sector Residential Commercial Small Business Bonds X X X Clean Renewable Energy Bonds X Energy Efficient Mortgages X Energy Savings

  17. Introduction to Renewable Energy Project Finance Structures

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Introduction to Renewable Energy Project Finance Structures Jason Coughlin Jason.Coughlin@nrel.gov October 3rd, 2012 2 | FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM femp.energy.gov Project Finance Structures * Why is this topic relevant? - Increase your understanding of the project finance process with a "behind the scenes" look at common structures used when financing renewable energy projects with a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA). - Introduce terminology. -

  18. Career Map: Finance Manager | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finance Manager Career Map: Finance Manager A financial manager sitting at table in a conference room, gesturing to accompany his presentation. Finance Manager Position Title Finance Manager Alternate Title(s) Senior Financial Analyst Education & Training Level Advanced, Bachelors required, graduate degree often required Education & Training Level Description Financial managers must usually have a bachelor's degree and more than 5-10 years of experience in another business or financial

  19. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A.

    1995-06-30

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation.

  20. Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The technology assessment report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoller, J.N.; Rosen, R.S.; Holliday, M.A.

    1995-06-30

    With the publication of a Request for Recommendations and Advance Notice of Intent in the November 10, 1994 Federal Register, the Department of Energy initiated a program to assess alternative strategies for the long-term management or use of depleted uranium hexafluoride. This Request was made to help ensure that, by seeking as many recommendations as possible, Department management considers reasonable options in the long-range management strategy. The Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program consists of three major program elements: Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and an Environmental Impact Statement. This Technology Assessment Report is the first part of the Engineering Analysis Project, and assesses recommendations from interested persons, industry, and Government agencies for potential uses for the depleted uranium hexafluoride stored at the gaseous diffusion plants in Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, and at the Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee. Technologies that could facilitate the long-term management of this material are also assessed. The purpose of the Technology Assessment Report is to present the results of the evaluation of these recommendations. Department management will decide which recommendations will receive further study and evaluation. These Appendices contain the Federal Register Notice, comments on evaluation factors, independent technical reviewers resumes, independent technical reviewers manual, and technology information packages.