National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tracking anomalous groundwater

  1. Anomalous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    impurity ion heating from Alfvénic cascade in the reversed field pinch Varun Tangri, P. W. Terry, and Gennady Fiksel Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA ͑Received 15 January 2008; accepted 19 September 2008; published online 3 November 2008͒ Anomalous ion and impurity heating in reversed field pinch plasmas is addressed. Previous work ͓N.

  2. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  3. Groundwater Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater Monitoring Groundwater Monitoring LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge

  4. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  5. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  6. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator ...

  7. Groundwater Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has one of the largest ground water contamination problems and subsequent cleanup responsibilities for a single entity in the world, in terms of the sheer volume of affected groundwater, number...

  8. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  9. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site. https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack

  10. NNSS Groundwater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for a Cure NNSS Groundwater NvE employees Race for the Cure. NSTec designer turns student project into space quest. Devils Hole meeting puts focus on NNSS groundwater. See page 8. See page 7. Moniz Confirmed Energy Secretary; Replaces Chu Dr. Ernest Moniz was officially sworn in as the 13th Department of Energy Secretary on May 21. He replaces Dr. Steven Chu. "Today is a big day for the DOE family," said Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman during opening remarks at the ceremony. "This

  11. Groundwater Screen

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-11-09

    GWSCREEN was developed for assessment of the groundwater pathway from leaching of radioactive and non radioactive substances from surface or buried sources and release to percolation ponds. The code calculates the limiting soil concentration or effluent release concentration such that, after leaching and transport to the aquifer, regulatory contaminant levels in groundwater are not exceeded. The code uses a mass conservation approach to model three processes: Contaminant release from a source volume, contaminant transport inmore » the unsaturated zone, and contaminant transport in the saturated zone. The source model considers the sorptive properties and solubility of the contaminant. Transport in the unsaturated zone is described by a plug flow model. Transport in the saturated zone is calculated with a semi-analytical solution to the advection dispersion equation in groundwater. Concentration as a function of time at a user specified receptor point and maximum concentration averaged over the exposure interval are also calculated. In addition, the code calculates transport and impacts of radioactive progeny. Input to GWSCREEN is through one, free format ASCII file. This code was designed for assessment and screening of the groundwater pathway when field data is limited. It was not intended to be a predictive tool.« less

  12. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  13. Appendix K Disposal Cell Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Disposal Cell Groundwater Monitoring Plan

  14. Groundwater Monitoring Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater Monitoring Network Groundwater Monitoring Network The network includes 92 natural sources, 102 regional aquifer wells, 41 intermediate-depth wells and springs, and 67 wells in alluvium in canyons. August 1, 2013 Map of LANL's groundwater monitoring network Map of LANL's groundwater monitoring network

  15. Soil & Groundwater Home - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil & Groundwater Home Soil & Groundwater Home Annual Reports Environmental Data Access Administrative Record Soil & Groundwater Home Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text...

  16. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider We ...

  17. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators ...

  18. Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Title: Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Authors: Bi, ...

  19. The Hanford Story: Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

  20. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P.

    1995-08-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

  1. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  2. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    junctions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Authors: Ren, Jie ; Zhu, Jian-Xin Publication Date: 2013-04-15 OSTI Identifier: 1102080 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN

  3. Groundwater Monitoring Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    92 natural sources, 102 regional aquifer wells, 41 intermediate-depth wells and springs, and 67 wells in alluvium in canyons. August 1, 2013 Map of LANL's groundwater...

  4. Soil and Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legacy soil and groundwater remediation activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements, DOE regulations, and other applicable environmental laws.

  5. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  6. Electromechanical solar tracking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stromberg, Robert P.

    1981-01-01

    The invention relates to an electromechanical solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded bimetallic elements.

  7. Electromechanical solar tracking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stromberg, R.P.

    The invention relates to an electromechanical solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded bimetallic elements.

  8. Implementation of ORR Groundwater Strategy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Manager Steve Haase, Ph.D., RSI Senior Geohydrologist June 10, 2015 www.energy.govEM 2 AGENDA: * Groundwater Strategy overview * Groundwater Strategy implementation status -...

  9. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1,...

  10. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V.

    1997-02-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

  11. Track 2: Worker Engagement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 2: Worker Engagement

  12. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  13. Track 9: Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 9: Quality Assurance

  14. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with ...

  15. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  16. EPA's groundwater protection strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J. )

    1992-06-01

    What the EPA, working jointly with the states, hopes to accomplish over the next ten years in order to integrate and coordinate all the groundwater programs within the agency is discussed. Although many other EPA programs such as Superfund, Clean Air Act, and Wetlands Management are often highlighted in the media, EPA does not down rate the importance of groundwater protection. Indeed as a resource, it is one of the most important commodities. Groundwater is the basis for life in this country. Recharge rates are no where near what the withdrawal rates are in many areas of the country. Twenty-five percent of all the potable water comes from groundwater. Groundwater supplies 50 percent of the needs for all the US population. If you include strictly rural areas, it supplies 95 percent of all the use. Something that most people who are not groundwater hydrologists would not think about is the fact that groundwater is a recharge mechanism that provides over 30 percent of the flow in streams and major rivers.

  17. Groundwater monitoring plan for the proposed state-approved land disposal structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.

    1993-10-13

    This document outlines a detection-level groundwater monitoring program for the state-approved land disposal structure (SALDS). The SALDS is an infiltration basin proposed for disposal of treated effluent from the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this plan is to present a groundwater monitoring program that is capable of determining the impact of effluent disposal at the SALDS on the quality of groundwater in the uppermost aquifer. This groundwater monitoring plan presents an overview of the SALDS, the geology and hydrology of the area, the background and indicator evaluation (detection) groundwater monitoring program, and an outline of a groundwater quality assessment (compliance) program. This plan does not provide a plan for institutional controls to track tritium beyond the SALDS.

  18. Natural radionuclides in groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The U-234 and Th-230 radionuclides are highly retarded by factors of 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 5} in basalt groundwater (Hanford) and briny groundwaters from Texas and geothermal brine from the Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). In basalt groundwaters (low ionic strength), Ra is highly sorbed, while in brines (high ionic strength), Ra is soluble. This is probably because the sorption sites are saturated with Na{sup +} and Cl{sup {minus}} ions and RaCl{sub 2} is soluble in brines. Pb-210 is soluble in SSGF brine, probably as a chloride complex. The U-234/Th-230 ratios in basalt groundwaters and brines from Texas and SSGF are nearly unity, indicating that U is in the +4 state, suggesting a reducing environment for these aquifers. 19 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Groundwater - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Size 200WPumpandTreat 200 West Pump and Treat The groundwater treatment project includes a number of injection and extraction wells feeding five pump and treat facilities in the ...

  20. RDX in Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the July 8, 2015 Committee meeting Tim Goering LANL, Provided Information on the RDX Groundwater Plume that is Located Under Technical Area 16 at Los Alamos. Information on Monitoring and Possible Clean-up Solutions was Given.

  1. Soil & Groundwater Remediation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages one of the largest groundwater and soil remediation efforts in the world.  The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated...

  2. Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Maybell - Maybell...

  3. Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Amchitka -...

  4. Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Ashtabula -...

  5. Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Shiprock -...

  6. Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C.

    1994-09-01

    This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

  7. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  8. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-03-30

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  9. Solar tracking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammons, Burrell E.

    1980-01-01

    The invention relates to a solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded photocells. Auxiliary photocells are used for initial acquisition of the sun and for the suppression of false tracking when the sun is obscured by clouds.

  10. Solar tracking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammons, B.E.

    The invention relates to a solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded photocells. Auxilliary photocells are used for initial acquisition of the sun and for the suppression of false tracking when the sun is obscured by clouds.

  11. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports ...

  12. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald ...

  13. Protection of the Groundwater Resource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection of the Groundwater Resource Protection of the Groundwater Resource Monitoring wells act as sentinels between suspected LANL contamination and the water supply. August 1, 2013 Where to place a sentinel well Where

  14. Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Hildebrand, R. Douglas; Schatz, Aaron L.; Conley, S. F.; Brown, W. L.

    2013-01-22

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

  15. In situ groundwater bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2009-02-01

    In situ groundwater bioremediation of hydrocarbons has been used for more than 40 years. Most strategies involve biostimulation; however, recently bioaugmentation have been used for dehalorespiration. Aquifer and contaminant profiles are critical to determining the feasibility and strategy for in situ groundwater bioremediation. Hydraulic conductivity and redox conditions, including concentrations of terminal electron acceptors are critical to determine the feasibility and strategy for potential bioremediation applications. Conceptual models followed by characterization and subsequent numerical models are critical for efficient and cost effective bioremediation. Critical research needs in this area include better modeling and integration of remediation strategies with natural attenuation.

  16. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Title: Anomalous Zeeman response of ... s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Authors: Ghaemi, Pouyan ; Vishwanath, ...

  17. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron ...

  18. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The...

  19. Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering quantum anomalousvalley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering quantum anomalous...

  20. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Authors: Fleming, Sean ; Leibovich, Adam K. ; Mehen, Thomas ; Rothstein, Ira Z. Publication Date: ...

  1. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  2. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the...

  3. Sun tracking controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menser, H.K.; Newcomb, R.D.

    1981-11-24

    An apparatus is described which controls the electric tracking motors of solar energy collectors and other solar devices which are adapted to be aimed at the sun.

  4. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for April, May, and June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-08-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring near the K Basins during April, May, and June 2007. Conditions remained similar to those reported in the previous quarters report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of shielding water from either basin to the ground. During the current quarter, the first results from two new wells installed between KE Basin and the river became available. Groundwater conditions at each new well are reasonably consistent with adjacent wells and expectations, with the exception of anomalously high chromium concentrations at one of the new wells. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified for FY 2008 to take advantage of new wells recently installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and also the new wells recently installed between the KE Basin and the river, which augment long-term monitoring capability in that area.

  5. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  6. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded beyond ICF-related laser-plasma interactions to encompass closely related technical areas including laser particle acceleration, high-intensity laser effects, short­ pulse laser interactions, PIC and Vlasov/rad-hydro modeling, inertial and magnetic fusion plasmas, advanced plasma diagnostics, alternate ignition schemes, EOS/transport/opacity, and this year, x­ ray free-electron lasers and their applications. The conference continues to be a showcase for the presentation and discussion of the latest developments in these areas. II. Meeting Report The conference was extremely successful with more than one hundred participants. There were ninety-nine (99) abstracts submitted. There were forty-four (44) presentations including eleven (11) invited talks. The following topics were covered: a) Radiation Hydrodynamics b) Implosion Plasma Kinetic Effects c) Alternate Ignition Schemes d) Astrophysical Phenomena e) Opacity/Transport/EOS f) High Power Lasers and Facilities g) High-Intensity Laser-Matter Interactions h) Hydrodynamics and Hydro-instabilities i) Hot Dense Plasma Atomic Processes j) High Energy Density Physics k) Laser Particle Acceleration Physics l) Advanced Plasma Diagnostics m) Advanced light sources and applications Despite significant advertising, there were two students who applied for the travel grants: Charlie Jarrott and Joohwan Kim. The total funds expended were $3,216.14.

  7. Groundwater monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R.; Doesburg, James M.; Eschbach, Eugene A.; Kelley, Roy C.; Myers, David A.

    1987-01-01

    A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

  8. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  9. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raby, Eric Y.

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parameters of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.

  10. TRACKED VEHICLE Rev 75

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-05-08

    Revision 75 of the Tracked Vehicle software is a soft real-time simulation of a differentially steered, tracked mobile robot, which, because of the track flippers, resembles the iRobot PackBot (http://www.irobot.com/). Open source libraries are used for the physics engine (http://www.ode.org/), the display and user interface (http://www.mathies.com/cpw/), and the program command line and configuration file parameters (http://www.boost.org/). The simulation can be controlled by a USB joystick or the keyboard. The configuration file contains demonstration model parametersmore » of no particular vehicle. This simulation can be used as a starting point for those doing tracked vehicle simulations. This simulation software is essentially a research tool which can be modified and adapted for certain types of tracked vehicle research. An open source license allows an individual researchers to tailor the code to their specific research needs.« less

  11. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-02-28

    This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  12. Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public

  13. Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in supercondu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxy...

  14. Energy Tracking Software Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan Davis; Nathan Bird; Rebecca Birx; Hal Knowles

    2011-04-04

    Acceleration has created an interactive energy tracking and visualization platform that supports decreasing electric, water, and gas usage. Homeowners have access to tools that allow them to gauge their use and track progress toward a smaller energy footprint. Real estate agents have access to consumption data, allowing for sharing a comparison with potential home buyers. Home builders have the opportunity to compare their neighborhood's energy efficiency with competitors. Home energy raters have a tool for gauging the progress of their clients after efficiency changes. And, social groups are able to help encourage members to reduce their energy bills and help their environment. EnergyIT.com is the business umbrella for all energy tracking solutions and is designed to provide information about our energy tracking software and promote sales. CompareAndConserve.com (Gainesville-Green.com) helps homeowners conserve energy through education and competition. ToolsForTenants.com helps renters factor energy usage into their housing decisions.

  15. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  16. Addressing Chromium in Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Chromium in Groundwater Addressing Chromium in Groundwater From 1956 to 1972, a non-nuclear power plant at Los Alamos National Laboratory periodically flushed water out ...

  17. Groundwater Periodic Monitoring Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Groundwater Periodic Monitoring Reports Groundwater Periodic Monitoring Reports Topic: David Rhodes DOE, Provided Information on the Watersheds at LANL and the Monitoring Schedule ...

  18. California Groundwater Management Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groundwater Management Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Groundwater Management PlansLegal Published...

  19. Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater containing legacy contaminants (pollutants that remain after their sources have been controlled) moves through aquifers in response to the hydraulic gradient. As the groundwater moves,...

  20. 300 Area Process Trenches Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2001-08-13

    This document is a proposed groundwater monitoring plan for the 300 Area process trenches to comply with RCRA final status, corrective action groundwater monitoring.

  1. TWDB Groundwater Conservation Districts website | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TWDB Groundwater Conservation Districts website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: TWDB Groundwater Conservation...

  2. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; BFKL representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; DGLAP representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  3. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  4. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  5. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B.; Ballard, Sanford

    1994-01-01

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  6. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  7. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Authors: Qiao, Zhenhua ; Jiang, Hua ; Li, Xiao ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2012-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1098600 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121

  8. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Authors: Fleming, Sean ; Leibovich, Adam K. ; Mehen, Thomas ; Rothstein, Ira Z. Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1102128 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN

  9. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 5, 2017 Title: Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Authors: Qian,

  10. CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Valencia, G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the T odd correlations induced by CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at both production and decay level in the process gg{yields}tt{yields}(b{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}})(b{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). We consider several counting asymmetries at the parton level and find the ones with the most sensitivity to each of these anomalous couplings at the LHC.

  11. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  12. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  13. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  14. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Authors: Devetak, Erik ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Peskin, Michael Publication Date: 2011-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 1100572 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher:

  15. Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

  16. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Origins of Anomalous Particle Size Distributions in Supported Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Genc, Arda; Agrawal, Nitin; Larsson, Elin M.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2012-10-31

    In this Environmental TEM (ETEM) study of supported Pt and Pd model catalysts, individual nanoparticles were tracked during heat treatments at temperatures up to 600C in H2, O2, and vacuum. We found anomalous growth of nanoparticles occurred during the early stages of catalyst sintering wherein some particles started to grow significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a broadening of the particle size distribution. We can rule out sample non-uniformity as a cause for the growth of these large particles, since images were recorded prior to heat treatments. The anomalous growth of these particles may help explain particle size distributions in heterogeneous catalysts which often show particles that are significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a long tail to the right. It has been suggested that particle migration and coalescence could be the likely cause for the broad size distributions. This study shows that anomalous growth of nanoparticles can occur under conditions where Ostwald ripening is the primary sintering mechanism.

  17. Controlled Document Tracking Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-08-24

    MANTRACK is an automated, controlled document tracking system which does the following and reduces staff time required to perform these tasks: generates transmittal letters/receipts for every controlled copy issued (merged from a current distribution list), tracks the return of transmittal receipts, facilitates the check-in of the large number of transmittal receipts returned (using a barcode reader), generates a reminder list which prompts the cyclic review and evaluation of existing documents, generates overdue reminders for themore » return of past-due transmittal receipts, tracks the number of Procedure Change Directives (PCD) currently in effect for each procedure, generates and maintains current distribution lists for each document, generates a current table of contents when updates to the document (usually a procedure manual) are made.« less

  18. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1995-01-24

    An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

  19. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

  20. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.; Fliermans, Carl B.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

  1. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume IV Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  2. Kauai Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Kauai. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume IV – Island of Kauai Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2015.

  3. Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer Groundwater in the Regional Aquifer LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory Conceptual model of water movement and geology at Los Alamos National Laboratory RELATED IMAGES http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3749/9827580556_473a91fd78_t.jpg Enlarge http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2856/9804364405_b25f74cbb2_t.jpg En

  4. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2004-04-12

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

  5. Solar tracking device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyland, R.R.

    1981-01-20

    A solar tracking device having a plurality of reflector banks for reflecting the sun rays onto collector tubes and heating a fluid circulated therethrough. The reflector banks synchronized to follow the sun during the daily and yearly cycle of the earth as the earth orbits around the sun. The device by accurately following the sun provides a more efficient means of collecting solar energy.

  6. RES Energy Track

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ​The Office of Indian Energy is hosting an Energy Track featuring breakout sessions on a variety of topics, including workforce development, energy technology, and capacity building, to help tribal energy leaders and professionals make informed decisions about energy projects.

  7. Ground-water in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward-McLemore, E.

    1985-01-01

    Amount 61% of the water used by Texans is ground-water. Some areas, both municipal and rural, depend entirely on ground-water. In many areas long term withdrawal is lowering the water levels, causing surface land subsidence, salt-water encroachment, and reducing future reservoir availability. The increasing probability of seepage from radioactive and toxic wastes, herbicide residues, septic systems, and oilfield brines is threatening dangerous contamination of fresh ground-water reservoirs. The Texas Department of Water Resources, the Texas Department of Health, State and private colleges and universities, the US Geological Survey, the Environmental Protection Agency, various underground water districts, among others, are cooperating with concerned hydrologists in a concentrated program to increase the efficiency of ground-water use and development, preserve the aquifer reservoirs, and decrease the pollution potential. 88 references.

  8. Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application.

  9. groundwater | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples

  10. NNSS Hosts Groundwater Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Survey of the Bay Area NNSS Hosts Groundwater Open House A RSL helicopter spent part of August conducting aerial radiation flyovers in the California Bay Area. The team rocked the competition and chiseled out an impressive second place finish recently in the Security Protection Officer competition. Groundwater was the topic of discussion at a recent open house. See page 12. See page 5. See page 8. Enterprise Publication "ONEVOICE" Replaces Spotlight and SiteLines The Nevada National

  11. Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Groundwater contamination from stormwater infiltration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, R.; Clark, S.; Parmer, K.

    1995-10-01

    The research summarized here was conducted during the first year of a 3-yr cooperative agreement (CR819573) to identify and control stormwater toxicants, especially those adversely affecting groundwater. The purpose of this research effort was to review the groundwater contamination literature as it relates to stormwater. Prior to urbanization groundwater is recharged by rainfall-runoff and snowmelt infiltrating through pervious surfaces including grasslands and woods. This infiltrating water is relatively uncontaminated. Urbanization, however, reduces the permeable soil surface area through which recharge by infiltration occurs. This results in much less groundwater recharge and greatly increased surface runoff. In addition the waters available for recharge carry increased quantities of pollutants. With urbanization, waters having elevated contaminant concentrations also recharge groundwater including effluent from domestic septic tanks, wastewater from percolation basins and industrial waste injection wells, infiltrating stormwater, and infiltrating water from agricultural irrigation. The areas of main concern that are covered by this paper are: the source of the pollutants, stormwater constituents having a high potential to contaminate groundwater, and the treatment necessary for stormwater.

  13. EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports Brookhaven National Laboratory - HFBR Tritium Groundwater Database Report - Brookhaven National ...

  14. Turkey Track Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Track Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Turkey Track Wind Farm Facility Turkey Track Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  15. Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2006-03-01

    This is a summary booklet of the main report: Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005. It is the summary section of the main report with a CD of the entire report included. The main report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

  16. Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO Neutron powder diraction has been used to investigate the structural and magnetic behavior of the isoelectronically doped Fe pnictide material PrFe1-xRuxAsO. Substitution of

  17. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider We present a study of the experimental determination of the forward-backward asymmetry in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} t{bar t} and in the subsequent t {yields} Wb decay, studied in the context of the International Linear Collider. This process probes the elementary couplings of the top

  18. PARTICLE BEAM TRACKING CIRCUIT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, O.A.

    1959-05-01

    >A particle-beam tracking and correcting circuit is described. Beam induction electrodes are placed on either side of the beam, and potentials induced by the beam are compared in a voltage comparator or discriminator. This comparison produces an error signal which modifies the fm curve at the voltage applied to the drift tube, thereby returning the orbit to the preferred position. The arrangement serves also to synchronize accelerating frequency and magnetic field growth. (T.R.H.)

  19. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test ...

  20. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene ...

  1. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.

    1999-03-24

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

  2. South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon South Valley - South Valley Plume More Documents & Publications Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Tuba City Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports

  3. Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Spook - Spook More Documents & Publications Tuba City Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports

  4. Hanford Story: Groundwater - Questions - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Groundwater - Questions The Hanford Story Hanford Story: Groundwater - Questions Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size How did contamination get into the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site? What has caused the level of contamination to decrease over the years? What is the 2015 vision for Hanford? What is the goal of the water treatment systems and facilities? What is being done to treat groundwater to remove

  5. Final_Groundwater_flowchart_June07.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMEDIATE AND RESTORE GROUNDWATER TO HIGHEST BENEFICIAL USE ■ Groundwater is to be cleaned up and restored to the highest bene cial use.* ■ Restoration should be within a reasonable time frame, commensurate with risk and Tri-Party Agreement timelines. ■ Ongoing groundwater remediation activities and review processes should be fully funded. ■ Technology development should continually be pursued to remediate and restore groundwater to highest bene cial use.* ■ The public and tribes must

  6. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

    2000-10-18

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

  7. Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

    1999-10-06

    Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

  8. Integrated Management Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-03-30

    The Integrated Management Tracking System (IMTS) is a "Web Enabled" Client/Server Business application that provides for the Identification and Resolution of commitments, situations, events and problems. The IMTS engine is written with Microsoft Active Server Pages (ASP) for IIS4. The system provides for reporting, entering, editing, closing and administration over a Intranet, Extranet or Internet. This Application facilitates: Electronic assignment, acceptance and tracking to completion. Email notifications of assigned action. Establishment of Due Dates. Electronicmore » search and retrieval based on keywords in combination with user specified database parameters (Document Type, Date Ranges, etc.). Coded for Trending and Reporting. User selected reports. Various levels of access for reports and administration. The "Server" side of this application consists of a Microsoft Access database running on a NT Server with Internet Information Server (IIS). As the "Client" side of the application runs on any Web browser, this solution is a cost effective, user friendly application that lends itself to organizations not physically colocated in one location providing information immediately available to everyone at once.« less

  9. Tritium monitoring in groundwater and evaluation of model predictions for the Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.; Bergeron, M.P.; Cole, C.R.; Freshley, M.D.; Wurstner, S.K.

    1997-08-01

    The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) disposal site, also known as the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS), receives treated effluent containing tritium, which is allowed to infiltrate through the soil column to the water table. Tritium was first detected in groundwater monitoring wells around the facility in July 1996. The SALDS groundwater monitoring plan requires revision of a predictive groundwater model and reevaluation of the monitoring well network one year from the first detection of tritium in groundwater. This document is written primarily to satisfy these requirements and to report on analytical results for tritium in the SALDS groundwater monitoring network through April 1997. The document also recommends an approach to continued groundwater monitoring for tritium at the SALDS. Comparison of numerical groundwater models applied over the last several years indicate that earlier predictions, which show tritium from the SALDS approaching the Columbia River, were too simplified or overly robust in source assumptions. The most recent modeling indicates that concentrations of tritium above 500 pCi/L will extend, at most, no further than {approximately}1.5 km from the facility, using the most reasonable projections of ETF operation. This extent encompasses only the wells in the current SALDS tritium-tracking network.

  10. REC Tracking Systems Design Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meredith Wingate

    2004-02-03

    OAK-B135 The Design Guide is presented in three parts. Section II describes the need for REC tracking, the two principal tracking methods available, and, in simple terms, the operation of certificate-based systems. Section III presents the major issues in the design of certificate-based tracking systems and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of alternative solutions. Finally, Section IV offers design principles or recommendations for most of these issues.

  11. Removing High Explosives from Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

  12. Sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, C.Y.

    1992-05-01

    This report for first quarter 1992 contains sanitary landfill groundwater monitoring data for the Savannah River Plant. The data tables presented in this report are copies of draft analytical results and therefore do contain errors. These errors will be corrected when the finalized data is received from the laboratory.

  13. Solar Array Tracking Control

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-22

    SolarTrak used in conjunction with various versions of 68HC11-based SolarTrack hardware boards provides control system for one or two axis solar tracking arrays. Sun position is computed from stored position data and time from an on-board clock/calendar chip. Position feedback can be by one or two offset motor turn counter square wave signals per axis, or by a position potentiometer. A limit of 256 counts resolution is imposed by the on-board analog to digital (A/D)more » convertor. Control is provided for one or two motors. Numerous options are provided to customize the controller for specific applications. Some options are imposed at compile time, some are setable during operation. Software and hardware board designs are provided for Control Board and separate User Interface Board that accesses and displays variables from Control Board. Controller can be used with range of sensor options ranging from a single turn count sensor per motor to systems using dual turn-count sensors, limit sensors, and a zero reference sensor. Dual axis trackers oriented azimuth elevation, east west, north south, or polar declination can be controlled. Misalignments from these orientations can also be accommodated. The software performs a coordinate transformation using six parameters to compute sun position in misaligned coordinates of the tracker. Parameters account for tilt of tracker in two directions, rotation about each axis, and gear ration errors in each axis. The software can even measure and compute these prameters during an initial setup period if current from a sun position sensor or output from photovoltaic array is available as an anlog voltage to the control board''s A/D port. Wind or emergency stow to aj present position is available triggered by digital or analog signals. Night stow is also available. Tracking dead band is adjustable from narrow to wide. Numerous features of the hardware and software conserve energy for use with battery powered systems.« less

  14. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

    2000-05-10

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

  15. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over timemore » can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.« less

  16. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Cline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik, Fhringer Ring 6, 80805 Mnchen ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  17. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  2. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. BIA Providers Conference Energy Track

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is offering an energy track at the 25th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference Dec. 2-3, 2015. The track will feature breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help tribal energy leaders and professionals make informed decisions about energy projects.

  4. Development of a Groundwater Transport Simulation Tool for Remedial Process Optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivarson, Kristine A.; Hanson, James P.; Tonkin, M.; Miller, Charles W.; Baker, S.

    2015-01-14

    The groundwater remedy for hexavalent chromium at the Hanford Site includes operation of five large pump-and-treat systems along the Columbia River. The systems at the 100-HR-3 and 100-KR-4 groundwater operable units treat a total of about 9,840 liters per minute (2,600 gallons per minute) of groundwater to remove hexavalent chromium, and cover an area of nearly 26 square kilometers (10 square miles). The pump-and-treat systems result in large scale manipulation of groundwater flow direction, velocities, and most importantly, the contaminant plumes. Tracking of the plumes and predicting needed system modifications is part of the remedial process optimization, and is a continual process with the goal of reducing costs and shortening the timeframe to achieve the cleanup goals. While most of the initial system evaluations are conducted by assessing performance (e.g., reduction in contaminant concentration in groundwater and changes in inferred plume size), changes to the well field are often recommended. To determine the placement for new wells, well realignments, and modifications to pumping rates, it is important to be able to predict resultant plume changes. In smaller systems, it may be effective to make small scale changes periodically and adjust modifications based on groundwater monitoring results. Due to the expansive nature of the remediation systems at Hanford, however, additional tools were needed to predict the plume reactions to system changes. A computer simulation tool was developed to support pumping rate recommendations for optimization of large pump-and-treat groundwater remedy systems. This tool, called the Pumping Optimization Model, or POM, is based on a 1-layer derivation of a multi-layer contaminant transport model using MODFLOW and MT3D.

  5. Work plan for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory groundwater program: Continuous groundwater collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The continuous collection of groundwater data is a basic and necessary part of Lockeheed Martin Energy Systems` ORNL Environmental Restoration Area-Wide Groundwater Program. Continuous groundwater data consist primarily of continually recorded groundwater levels, and in some instances, specific conductivity, pH, and/or temperature measurements. These data will be collected throughout the ORNL site. This Work Plan (WP) addresses technical objectives, equipment requirements, procedures, documentation requirements, and technical instructions for the acquisition of the continuous groundwater data. Intent of this WP is to provide an approved document that meets all the necessary requirements while retaining the flexibility necessary to effectively address ORNL`s groundwater problems.

  6. Groundwater Under Review Marathon Man

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Under Review Marathon Man NNSS team welcomes peer review of groundwater program. Nevada Teams compete in the National Science Bowl in Washington. NSTec runner finishes first Boston Marathon. See page 7. See page 6. NNSS Roads Getting a Fresh Makeover Highways, roads, parking lots - any place that has seen at least 60 years of traffic like the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) has - will experience some normal wear and tear. That is why National Security Technologies (NSTec) is doing some

  7. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates massmore » balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.« less

  8. Particle tracking approach for transport in three-dimensional discrete fracture networks: Particle tracking in 3-D DFNs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makedonska, Nataliia; Painter, Scott L.; Bui, Quan M.; Gable, Carl W.; Karra, Satish

    2015-09-16

    The discrete fracture network (DFN) model is a method to mimic discrete pathways for fluid flow through a fractured low-permeable rock mass, and may be combined with particle tracking simulations to address solute transport. However, experience has shown that it is challenging to obtain accurate transport results in three-dimensional DFNs because of the high computational burden and difficulty in constructing a high-quality unstructured computational mesh on simulated fractures. We present a new particle tracking capability, which is adapted to control volume (Voronoi polygons) flow solutions on unstructured grids (Delaunay triangulations) on three-dimensional DFNs. The locally mass-conserving finite-volume approach eliminates mass balance-related problems during particle tracking. The scalar fluxes calculated for each control volume face by the flow solver are used to reconstruct a Darcy velocity at each control volume centroid. The groundwater velocities can then be continuously interpolated to any point in the domain of interest. The control volumes at fracture intersections are split into four pieces, and the velocity is reconstructed independently on each piece, which results in multiple groundwater velocities at the intersection, one for each fracture on each side of the intersection line. This technique enables detailed particle transport representation through a complex DFN structure. Verified for small DFNs, the new simulation capability enables numerical experiments on advective transport in large DFNs to be performed. As a result, we demonstrate this particle transport approach on a DFN model using parameters similar to those of crystalline rock at a proposed geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden.

  9. Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W.; Ruiz, Roberto; Pico, Tristan M.

    2001-01-01

    A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

  10. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  11. L-Area Reactor - 1993 annual - groundwater monitoring report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.A.

    1994-09-01

    Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in L Area: the L-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (four LAC wells), L-Area Research Wells in the southern portion of the area (outside the fence; three LAW wells), the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (four LCO wells), the L-Area Disassembly Basin (two LDB wells), the L-Area Burning/Rubble Pit (four LRP wells), and the L-Area Seepage Basin (four LSB wells). During 1993, tetrachloroethylene was detected above its drinking water standard (DWS) in the LAC, LAW, LCO, and LDB well series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in the LAW, LDB, and LRP series, and tritium was above its DWS in the LAW, LCO, and LSB series. Apparently anomalous elevated levels of the common laboratory contaminant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were reported during first quarter in one well each in the LAC series and LCO series, and during third quarter in a different LCO well. Extensive radionuclide analyses were performed during 1993 in the LAC, LAW, and LCO well series. No radionuclides other than tritium were reported above DWS or Flag 2 criteria.

  12. Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

    2013-04-23

    A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

  13. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Solares, G.; Zamenhof, R.G.

    1994-12-27

    A detector assembly is disclosed for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns. 13 figures.

  14. High resolution track etch autoradiography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Solares, Guido (Arlington, MA); Zamenhof, Robert G. (Brookline, MA)

    1994-01-01

    A detector assembly for use in obtaining alpha-track autoradiographs, the detector assembly including a substantially boron-free substrate; a detector layer deposited on the substantially boron-free substrate, the detector layer being capable of recording alpha particle tracks and exhibiting evidence of the alpha tracks in response to being exposed to an etchant, the detector layer being less than about 2 microns thick; and a protective layer deposited on the detector layer, the protective layer being resistant to the etchant and having a thickness of about 0.5 to 1 microns.

  15. NNSS Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 18, 2014 NNSS Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. From April 7th to 11th, 2014, five peer

  16. Groundwater Update K. Michael Thompson Soil and Groundwater Division Richland Operations Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update Jon Peschong Richland Operations Office May 2015 2 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater treated tons of contaminants removed in all pump and treat systems since the facilities began operating 12 171 HANFORD SITE GROUNDWATER NUMBERS billion of gallons of groundwater treated in 2014 1.95 tons of contaminants removed in 2014 62 3 Groundwater Key Focus Areas * Expand pump and treat systems - Continue pump and treat operations - Install and connect new and existing wells to maximize

  17. Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Assistance Better Plants Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance The Energy Intensity Baselining and ...

  18. Tracking Individual Gold Nanoparticles | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Individual Gold Nanoparticles Researchers have developed a new way to track gold nanorods as they move around and re-orient themselves on metal surfaces, with...

  19. Groundwater Withdrawal Permit Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Withdrawal Permit ApplicationLegal Abstract This application initiates the Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division's, a division of the Department of Environmental...

  20. DEQ Groundwater Permitting Guidebook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: DEQ Groundwater Permitting GuidebookPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuide...

  1. Montana Groundwater Information Center Webpage | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Groundwater Information Center Webpage Abstract Provides access to...

  2. Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River,"

  3. Compendium of ordinances for groundwater protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    Groundwater is an extremely important resource in the Tennessee Valley. Nearly two-thirds of the Tennessee Valley's residents rely, at least in part, on groundwater supplies for drinking water. In rural areas, approximately ninety-five percent of residents rely on groundwater for domestic supplies. Population growth and economic development increase the volume and kinds of wastes requiring disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal problems associated with increases in conventional wastewater and solid waste, technological advancements in recent decades have resulted in new chemicals and increased usage in agriculture, industry, and the home. Unfortunately, there has not been comparable progress in identifying the potential long-term effects of these chemicals, in managing them to prevent contamination of groundwater, or in developing treatment technologies for removing them from water once contamination has occurred. The challenge facing residence of the Tennessee Valley is to manage growth and economic and technological development in ways that will avoid polluting the groundwater resource. Once groundwater has been contaminated, cleanup is almost always very costly and is sometimes impractical or technically infeasible. Therefore, prevention of contamination -- not remedial treatment--is the key to continued availability of usable groundwater. This document discusses regulations to aid in this prevention.

  4. Vermont Groundwater Withdrawal Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Groundwater Withdrawal Report Citation Vermont Agency of Natural...

  5. FFTF Asbestos Location Tracking Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.A.

    1994-09-15

    An Asbestos Location Tracking Program was prepared to list, locate, and determine Asbestos content and to provide baseline {open_quotes}good faith{close_quotes} for yearly condition inspections for the FFTF Plant and buildings and grounds.

  6. Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-14

    An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity ?{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of ?{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing ?{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  8. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a

  9. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    photon at the Tevatron (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton ({ell}, either e or {mu}) and photon ({gamma}),

  10. Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an Electrode–Ionic Liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an ElectrodeIonic Liquid Interface Observed Using Operando X-ray Scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crowding and ...

  11. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measuring anomalous couplings in HWW* decays at the International Linear Collider Authors: Takubo, Yosuke ; Hodgkinson, Robert N. ; Ikematsu, Katsumasa ; Fujii, Keisuke ; ...

  12. Hanford Treats Groundwater Ahead of Schedule | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Treats Groundwater Ahead of Schedule Hanford Treats Groundwater Ahead of Schedule September 30, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis A team of drillers installs a well to support groundwater treatment operations at the Hanford site. A team of drillers installs a well to support groundwater treatment operations at the Hanford site. Shown here is the exterior of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility, DOE’s largest system for treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford site. Contractor CH2M HILL

  13. Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 million gallons of groundwater at the site. PDF icon Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater More Documents & Publications Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater

  14. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

  15. Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars Passive Groundwater Cleanup Measures Save Savannah River Site Millions of Dollars November 25, ...

  16. Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L-Area Southern Groundwater Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater January 1, ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  17. Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - R-Area Groundwater Operable Unit ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  18. Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells Evaluation of Pre- and Post-Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM ...

  19. http://www.lvvwd.com/about/wr_groundwater.html

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Water Resources Groundwater About 10 percent of the Las Vegas Valley's water comes from groundwater, which is a water supply under the Earth's surface. In some areas, water...

  20. Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman Wellfield Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman...

  1. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends...

  2. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program.

  3. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  4. Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Print Monday, 29 June 2015 00:00 Ignition chemistry involves a complex web of reactions. By studying the reaction products-looking at this web from its perimeter inward-researchers have gradually deduced the nature of the "reactive intermediate" molecules that must lie at the center. Decades of research worldwide have shown that hydroperoxyalkyl radicals-a class of reactive molecules denoted as "QOOH"-must be

  5. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  6. Sensor fusion and nonlinear prediction for anomalous event detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Moore, K.R.; Elphic, R.C.

    1995-03-07

    The authors consider the problem of using the information from various time series, each one characterizing a different physical quantity, to predict the future state of the system and, based on that information, to detect and classify anomalous events. They stress the application of principal components analysis (PCA) to analyze and combine data from different sensors. They construct both linear and nonlinear predictors. In particular, for linear prediction the authors use the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm and for nonlinear prediction they use both backpropagation (BP) networks and fuzzy predictors (FP). As an application, they consider the prediction of gamma counts from past values of electron and gamma counts recorded by the instruments of a high altitude satellite.

  7. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O. E.

    2007-02-15

    The physical basis for the Lorenz equations for convective cells in stratified fluids, and for magnetized plasmas imbedded in curved magnetic fields, are reexamined with emphasis on anomalous transport. It is shown that the Galerkin truncation leading to the Lorenz equations for the closed boundary problem is incompatible with finite fluxes through the system in the limit of vanishing diffusion. An alternative formulation leading to the Lorenz equations is proposed, invoking open boundaries and the notion of convective streamers and their back-reaction on the profile gradient, giving rise to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension-reducing approximations are discussed.

  8. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report Volume V Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  9. East Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for East Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  10. Hawaii Island Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for Hawaii Island. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume II – Island of Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014.

  11. West Maui Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for West Maui. Data is from the following sources: Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2014. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems For the Hawaiian Islands of Kauai, Molokai, Maui, and Hawaii – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. September 2014; and Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume V – Island of Maui Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.

  12. DOE Responds to Advisory Board Recommendation on Groundwater Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management responds to an ORSSAB recommendation on additional groundwater studies.

  13. Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Groundwater and Wastewater Remediation Using Agricultural Oils Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Soybean oil used for groundwater and wastewater remediation Soybean oil used for groundwater and wastewater remediation Technology Marketing Summary Scientists have developed a groundwater treatment technique that employs agricultural oils to stimulate endogenous microbes which accelerates the cleanup. The oils tested include canola oil,

  14. Audit of groundwater monitoring at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-15

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations is responsible for ensuring that its contractors` tasks are mission oriented and are completed at the least cost to the DOE. The objective of this audit was to determine whether Richland was effectively managing its groundwater monitoring activities so that unnecessary duplication would not occur. The audit`s objective was accomplished by: reviewing laws and regulations; interviewing DOE and contractor personnel; examining procurement and accounting procedures; reviewing plans, budgets, and actual expenditures; reviewing utilization of the DOE drilling equipment; observing well drilling activities; comparing drilling cost to other DOE sites; analyzing groundwater monitoring activities; and, reviewing and comparing groundwater reports.

  15. Groundwater Data Package for Hanford Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, Paul D.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Williams, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky L.

    2006-01-31

    This report presents data and interpreted information that supports the groundwater module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) used in Hanford Assessments. The objective of the groundwater module is to predict movement of radioactive and chemical contaminants through the aquifer to the Columbia River or other potential discharge locations. This data package is being revised as part of the deliverables under the Characterization of Systems Project (#49139) aimed at providing documentation for assessments being conducted under the Hanford Assessments Project (#47042). Both of these projects are components of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessments Projects, managed by the Management and Integration Project (#47043).

  16. Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-07-24

    A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

  17. Groundwater Makes a Splash NNSS Groundwater Experts Meet at Devils Hole

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Livermore, CA Secretary Pena participates in the ground breaking ceremony for the National Ignition Facility, a centerpiece of the stockpile stewardship program, at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    May 15, 2013 Groundwater Makes a Splash NNSS Groundwater Experts Meet at Devils Hole Groundwater was a major topic at this year's Devils Hole Workshop at the Furnace Creek Ranch

  18. Soil & Groundwater Remediation News | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soil & Groundwater Remediation News Soil & Groundwater Remediation News February 25, 2016 New groundwater contamination treatment equipment sits outside the C-612 Northwest Pump-and-Treat facility. Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater Contamination PADUCAH, Ky. - EM recently completed upgrades to modernize a key facility that reduces off-site groundwater contamination at the former Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant site. December 29, 2015 Tour participants are

  19. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28

    From 1951 to 1992, the Unites States government conducted 828 underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site. About one-third of these tests occurred near, below or within the water table - the very top portion of the groundwater layer where rock and soil are completely saturated with water. As a result, some groundwater was contaminated. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began exploring the effects of groundwater contamination in the 1970s. Though contamination from underground testing has never been detected on public land, the DOE was committed to developing an advanced, reliable monitoring network that ensures the long-term protection of the public. An intensive groundwater investigation program was launched in 1989.

  20. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  1. Agency of Natural Resources Groundwater Withdrawal Reporting...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groundwater Withdrawal Reporting and Permitting RulesLegal Abstract This rule and strategy is adopted under the authority of 10 Vermont Statutes Annotated (V.S.A.) 1390-1394.10...

  2. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

  3. Appendix IGP: Individual and Groundwater Protection Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IGP-2014 Individual and Groundwater Protection Requirements United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix IGP-2014 Individual and Groundwater Protection Requirements Table of Contents IGP-1.0 Introduction IGP-2.0 Individual Protection Requirements IGP-2.1 Compliance Assessment of Undisturbed Performance IGP-2.2 Dose Calculation IGP-2.2.1 Transport Pathway IGP-2.2.2 Bounding Analysis

  4. Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants (data update 12132010) January 14, 2011 b National ... Office of Strategic Energy Analysis & Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired ...

  5. PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PIA - Correspondence and Action Tracking System (CATS) PDF icon PIA - ...

  6. PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PIA - Foreign Access Central Tracking System (FACTS) PDF icon PIA - Foreign Access ...

  7. Track 6: Integrating Safety Into Security Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 6: Integrating Safety Into Security Operations

  8. Track 5: Integration of Safety Into Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 5: Integration of Safety Into Design

  9. Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Print Ignition chemistry involves a complex web of reactions. By studying the reaction products-looking at this web from its perimeter inward-researchers have gradually deduced the nature of the "reactive intermediate" molecules that must lie at the center. Decades of research worldwide have shown that hydroperoxyalkyl radicals-a class of reactive molecules denoted as "QOOH"-must be a central connection in this network. At the ALS,

  10. Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Print Ignition chemistry involves a complex web of reactions. By studying the reaction products-looking at this web from its perimeter inward-researchers have gradually deduced the nature of the "reactive intermediate" molecules that must lie at the center. Decades of research worldwide have shown that hydroperoxyalkyl radicals-a class of reactive molecules denoted as "QOOH"-must be a central connection in this network. At the ALS,

  11. Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Print Ignition chemistry involves a complex web of reactions. By studying the reaction products-looking at this web from its perimeter inward-researchers have gradually deduced the nature of the "reactive intermediate" molecules that must lie at the center. Decades of research worldwide have shown that hydroperoxyalkyl radicals-a class of reactive molecules denoted as "QOOH"-must be a central connection in this network. At the ALS,

  12. Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking the Elusive QOOH Radical Print Ignition chemistry involves a complex web of reactions. By studying the reaction products-looking at this web from its perimeter inward-researchers have gradually deduced the nature of the "reactive intermediate" molecules that must lie at the center. Decades of research worldwide have shown that hydroperoxyalkyl radicals-a class of reactive molecules denoted as "QOOH"-must be a central connection in this network. At the ALS,

  13. Single nanoparticle tracking spectroscopic microscope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Haw; Cang, Hu; Xu, Cangshan; Wong, Chung M.

    2011-07-19

    A system that can maintain and track the position of a single nanoparticle in three dimensions for a prolonged period has been disclosed. The system allows for continuously imaging the particle to observe any interactions it may have. The system also enables the acquisition of real-time sequential spectroscopic information from the particle. The apparatus holds great promise in performing single molecule spectroscopy and imaging on a non-stationary target.

  14. Infrared tag and track technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Slater, John (Albuquerque, NM); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-12-04

    A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

  15. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; et al

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through themore » angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.« less

  16. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through the angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.

  17. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    down rift. The anomalously high b-values at the center of the South Flank, several kilometers away from the rift, may be explained by unusually high pore pressure throughout the...

  18. Violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector: an improved analysis of anomalous threshold constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maccione, Luca; Liberati, Stefano; Mattingly, David M. E-mail: liberati@sissa.it

    2013-03-01

    Recently there has been a renewed activity in the physics of violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector. Flavor dependent Lorentz violation, which generically changes the pattern of neutrino oscillations, is extremely tightly constrained by oscillation experiments. Flavor independent Lorentz violation, which does not introduce new oscillation phenomena, is much more weakly constrained with constraints coming from time of flight and anomalous threshold analyses. We use a simplified rotationally invariant model to investigate the effects of finite baselines and energy dependent dispersion on anomalous reaction rates in long baseline experiments and show numerically that anomalous reactions do not necessarily cut off the spectrum quite as sharply as currently assumed. We also present a revised analysis of how anomalous reactions can be used to cast constraints from the observed atmospheric high energy neutrinos and the expected cosmogenic ones.

  19. Ground-water geochemistry and radionuclide activity in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of Dodge and Fond du Lac counties, Wisconsin. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, T.R.; Bahr, J.M.; Anderson, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyses of groundwater from wells in the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer of eastern Wisconsin indicate that regions of the aquifer contain elevated concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride and sulfate. Groundwater from several wells in the area also approach or exceed the current drinking water standard for combined radium activity. Significant changes in groundwater chemistry occur where the aquifer becomes confined by the Maquoketa shale. Concentrations of Cl(-), SO4(2-) and Na(+) increase in the confined region, and the highest combined radium activities are typically observed in the area. Geochemical modeling implies that the observed changes in major ion groundwater chemistry occur in response to the presence of the confining unit which may act as a source of SO4(2-), through gypsum dissolution, and Na(+), through cation exchange. A finite difference groundwater flow model was linked to a particle tracking routine to determine groundwater flow paths and residence times in the aquifer near the boundary between unconfined and confined conditions. Results suggest that the presence of the confining unit produces a vertically stratified flow regime in the confined region.

  20. Groundwater Level Status Report for 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Allen; R.J. Koch

    2006-05-15

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in 2005 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 137 monitoring wells, including 41 regional aquifer wells, 22 intermediate wells, and 74 alluvial wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 118 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  1. Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    adsorption: An ab-initio study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Authors: Ding, Jun ; Qiao, Zhenhua ; Feng, Wanxiang ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-11-15 OSTI Identifier: 1101181 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

  2. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave

  3. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collider (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear Collider Authors: Takubo, Yosuke ; Hodgkinson, Robert N. ; Ikematsu, Katsumasa ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Okada, Nobuchika ; Yamamoto, Hitoshi Publication Date: 2013-07-18 OSTI Identifier: 1103733 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  4. Structure solution with weak anomalous data (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Structure solution with weak anomalous data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure solution with weak anomalous data Authors: Terwilliger, Thomas C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-10-21 OSTI Identifier: 1133759 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-24209 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: NIH Country of Publication: United

  5. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, Matthew ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; Zaldarriaga, Matias Publication Date: 2013-02-21 OSTI Identifier: 1063787 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15334 arXiv:1301.2630 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: arXiv:1301.2630 Research Org: SLAC National

  6. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Authors: Wang, Z. F. ; Liu, Zheng ; Liu, Feng Publication Date: 2013-05-06 OSTI Identifier: 1102216 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007 Publisher:

  7. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Authors: Tse, Wang-Kong ; Qiao, Zhenhua ; Yao, Yugui ; MacDonald, A. H. ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-04-26 OSTI Identifier: 1100329 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID:

  8. Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Authors: Yang, Shengyuan A. ; Pan, Hui ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-03-31 OSTI Identifier: 1100161 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 12; Journal

  9. Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegrist, Robert L.; Murdoch, Lawrence C.

    2000-01-01

    The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

  10. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  11. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTMLmoreJavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Serverless

  12. Tracking system for solar collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, B.

    1980-10-01

    A tracking system is provided for pivotally mounted spaced-apart solar collectors. A pair of cables is connected to spaced-apart portions of each collector, and a driver displaces the cables, thereby causing the collectors to pivot about their mounting, so as to assume the desired orientation. The collectors may be of the cylindrical type as well as the flat-plate type. Rigid spar-like linkages may be substituted for the cables. Releasable attachments of the cables to the collectors is also described, as is a fine tuning mechanism for precisely aligning each individual collector.

  13. Tracking system for solar collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, Barry L.

    1984-01-01

    A tracking system is provided for pivotally mounted spaced-apart solar collectors. A pair of cables is connected to spaced-apart portions of each collector, and a driver displaces the cables, thereby causing the collectors to pivot about their mounting, so as to assume the desired orientation. The collectors may be of the cylindrical type as well as the flat-plate type. Rigid spar-like linkages may be substituted for the cables. Releasable attachments of the cables to the collectors is also described, as is a fine tuning mechanism for precisely aligning each individual collector.

  14. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Robert A.; Childs, Teresa A.; Miller, Michael A.; Sellars, Kevin J.

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTML JavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Server

  15. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTMLmore » JavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Server« less

  16. Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

    2004-07-27

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  17. Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2014 | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groundwater Management Act of 2014 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- BillBill: Sustainable Groundwater Management Act of 2014Legal...

  18. Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison, Stanley

    2004-07-27

    A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

  19. Microsoft Word - HAB Adv #145 Groundwater.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Subject: Groundwater Strategy and Groundwater Protection Adopted: April 4, 2003 Page 1 Apr. 4, 2003 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box...

  20. TCEQ - Map of Texas Groundwater Conservation Districts | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map of Texas Groundwater Conservation Districts Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: TCEQ - Map of Texas Groundwater Conservation DistrictsInfo...

  1. Groundwater Data Package for the 2004 Composite Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorne, Paul D.

    2004-08-11

    This report presents data and information that supports the groundwater module. The conceptual model of groundwater flow and transport at the Hanford Site is described and specific information applied in the numerical implementation module is provided.

  2. ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahn, L. S.

    2007-08-09

    This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  3. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Wylie, Allan H.

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  4. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  5. Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contamination | Department of Energy Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank

  6. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2002-02-28

    This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

  7. Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2008 | Department of Energy 8 Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites - 2008 The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and remedial approaches across the DOE Complex. PDF icon Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites - 2008 More Documents & Publications Groundwater Contamination

  8. Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2009 | Department of Energy 9 Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites - 2009 This document provides DOE Program/Project Managers, senior management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and remedial approaches across the DOE Complex. PDF icon Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites - 2009 More Documents & Publications Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at

  9. Source Water and Groundwater Withdrawal Permit Application Process...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permit Application Process Guidance Citation Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation. 2015. Source Water and Groundwater Withdrawal Permit Application Process...

  10. Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contamination | Department of Energy Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater Contamination Paducah Site Modernizes Equipment to Treat Off-Site Groundwater Contamination February 25, 2016 - 12:15pm Addthis New groundwater contamination treatment equipment sits outside the C-612 Northwest Pump-and-Treat facility. New groundwater contamination treatment equipment sits outside the C-612 Northwest Pump-and-Treat facility. A computer-modeled illustration shows the off-site movement

  11. REMEDIATE AND RESTORE GROUNDWATER TO HIGHEST BENEFICIAL USE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REMEDIATE AND RESTORE GROUNDWATER TO HIGHEST BENEFICIAL USE ■ Groundwater is to be cleaned up and restored to the highest bene cial use.* ■ Restoration should be within a reasonable time frame, commensurate with risk and Tri-Party Agreement timelines. ■ Ongoing groundwater remediation activities and review processes should be fully funded. ■ Technology development should continually be pursued to remediate and restore groundwater to highest bene cial use.* ■ The public and tribes must

  12. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic

  13. Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion.

  14. Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion.

  15. Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-12-08

    This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion. 16 figs.

  16. Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Ashtabula Fernald Environmental Management Project Maybell Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Shiprock Slick Rock South Valley Spook Tuba City Weldon Spring Miscellaneous

  17. Building the RHIC tracking lattice model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-01-27

    In this note we outline the procedure to build a realistic lattice model for the RHIC beam-beam tracking simulation. We will install multipole field errors in the arc main dipoles, arc main quadrupols and interaction region magnets (DX, D0, and triplets) and introduce a residual closed orbit, tune ripples, and physical apertures in the tracking lattice model. Nonlinearities such as local IR multipoles, second order chromaticies and third order resonance driving terms are also corrected before tracking.

  18. Decontamination and Decommisioning Equipment Tracking System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-08-26

    DDETS is Relational Data Base Management System (RDBMS) which incorporates 1-D (code 39) and 2-D (PDF417) bar codes into its equipment tracking capabilities. DDETS is compatible with the Reportable Excess Automated Property System (REAPS), and has add, edit, delete and query capabilities for tracking equipment being decontaminated and decommissioned. In addition, bar code technology is utilized in the inventory tracking and shipping of equipment.

  19. WIPP Satellite Tracking System Relocates to Carlsbad

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release WIPP Satellite Tracking System Relocates to Carlsbad Carlsbad, N.M., December 7, 2005 - The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carlsbad Field Office has announced that effective December 2, the DOE Transportation Tracking and Communication System (TRANSCOM) is fully staffed and operational in Carlsbad, N.M. The TRANSCOM system, previously based in Albuquerque, N.M, is used to track transuranic waste shipments to the Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad and other DOE

  20. Library and Compiler Tracking | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documentation Feedback Please provide feedback to help guide us as we continue to build documentation for our new computing resource. Feedback Form Library and Compiler Tracking...

  1. Internal Labeling Technique Tracks Nanoparticle Transport - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find More Like This Return to Search Internal Labeling Technique Tracks Nanoparticle Transport Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL ...

  2. Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Welcome to the Department of Energy's Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System (PPTRS). DOE uses this system to collect information about, and assess the performance of, the Department's...

  3. ETrans Federal Permitting Transmission Tracking System | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    More recently, the Rapid Response Team for Transmission (RRTT) was created, which extends activity outside of federal lands. This website hosts a tracking system and search feature...

  4. MicroBooNE First Cosmic Tracks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Tracks in MicroBooNE (August 6, 2015) On August 6, 2015, we started to turn on the drift high voltage in the MicroBooNE detector for the very first time. We paused at 58 kV (this is about 1/2 of our design voltage) and immediately started to see tracks across the entire TPC. Below are some of our first images of cosmic rays and UV laser tracks (last picture) recorded by the TPC! Collection plane images: And here is one of the first images of a UV laser track in the TPC. You can tell which

  5. Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 8, 2010 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Systems Analyses and Planning Erik Shuster 2 Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants This report is intended to...

  6. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  7. Chromium Groundwater Cleanup in Mortandad Canyon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the September 24, 2014 Board meeting Cheryl Rodriguez DOE and Danny Katzman LANL, Provided Information on the Status of the Characterization of the Chromium Groundwater Plume in Mortandad Canyon. Possible Clean-up Strategies were also covered in the Information Provided.

  8. Paddy field, groundwater and land subsidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, L.J.

    1995-12-31

    Through many years of research and technical interchange both at home and abroad, it is commonly recognized that paddy fields possess the functions of micro-climate adjustment, flood detection and prevention, soil and water conservation, river-flow stabilization, soil salinization prevention, water purification, groundwater recharge, rural area beautification and environmental protection which are all beneficial to the public. In recent years, the global environmental problems have become a series concern throughout the world. These include the broken ozone layer, green house effects, acid rain, land desertion, tropical rain forest disappearing etc. Among them, rain forest disappearing draws great attention. Both rain forests and paddy fields are in tropical areas. They have similar functions and are disappearing because of economic pressure. This paper describes the special functions of paddy fields on water purification, ground water recharge and prevention of land subsidence, and reiterates groundwater utilization and land subsidence prevention measures. In view of the importance of groundwater resources, paddy fields, which can not be replaced by any other artificial groundwater recharge facilities, should not be reduced in acreage, nor can they be left idle. Paddy fields shall be properly maintained and managed in order to strengthen their special functions in the years to come even under heavy pressure from foreign countries.

  9. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-03

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  10. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Muller, R.C.; Gee, T.F.

    1998-05-05

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning apparatus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle. 14 figs.

  11. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, Barry L.; DePiero, Fred W.; Armstrong, Gary A.; Jansen, John F.; Muller, Richard C.; Gee, Timothy F.

    1998-01-01

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning appaus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle.

  12. Colloid characterization and quantification in groundwater samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Stephen Kung

    2000-06-01

    This report describes the work conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory for studying the groundwater colloids for the Yucca Mountain Project in conjunction with the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. Colloidal particle size distributions and total particle concentration in groundwater samples are quantified and characterized. Colloid materials from cavity waters collected near underground nuclear explosion sites by HRMP field sampling personnel at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were quantified. Selected colloid samples were further characterized by electron microscope to evaluate the colloid shapes, elemental compositions, and mineral phases. The authors have evaluated the colloid size and concentration in the natural groundwater sample that was collected from the ER-20-5 well and stored in a 50-gallon (about 200-liter) barrel for several months. This groundwater sample was studied because HRMP personnel have identified trace levels of radionuclides in the water sample. Colloid results show that even though the water sample had filtered through a series of Millipore filters, high-colloid concentrations were identified in all unfiltered and filtered samples. They had studied the samples that were diluted with distilled water and found that diluted samples contained more colloids than the undiluted ones. These results imply that colloids are probably not stable during the storage conditions. Furthermore, results demonstrate that undesired colloids have been introduced into the samples during the storage, filtration, and dilution processes. They have evaluated possible sources of colloid contamination associated with sample collection, filtrating, storage, and analyses of natural groundwaters. The effects of container types and sample storage time on colloid size distribution and total concentration were studied to evaluate colloid stability by using J13 groundwater. The data suggests that groundwater samples should be analyzed for colloid size and concentration shortly after they have been collected. A prolonged waiting period after sampling will affect the colloid size distribution as well as colloid concentration resulting from the changes of water chemical properties. The data also shows that sample containers, filter materials, and labware that are used for colloid analyses should be cleaned by specially treated low-colloid-containing water. Water used for sample dilution should be verified for total colloidal particle concentration. They then analyzed freshly collected groundwater from NTS wells ER-20-5{number_sign}1 and {number_sign}3. Results show that these groundwater samples have similar colloid concentrations and particle size distributions. For the particle size range between 50- and 200-nm, about ten trillion (1E10) colloidal particles per liter are present in these water samples. Most of these colloidal particles are less than 100 mm in size. For example, more than 98% of the colloids are smaller than 100 nm in size in the ER-20-5 {number_sign}1 sample. Furthermore, it was found that the smaller the sizes of colloid, the higher the colloid concentration present in the water. For another site at NTS, Cheshire, they had analyzed two zones of groundwater samples. For water samples collected from the lower water zone (near the underground detonation cavity about 3,700 feet of slanted depth from the surface), the colloid concentration was about 5E12 particles per liter. About 20 times less than the lower zone of total colloids was found in water samples collected from the upper aquifer (around 2,511 feet of slanted depth), although colloid size distributions from these two zones appear to be rather similar.

  13. GPU COMPUTING FOR PARTICLE TRACKING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Sun, Changchun; James, Susan; Qin, Yong

    2011-03-25

    This is a feasibility study of using a modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to parallelize the accelerator particle tracking code. To demonstrate the massive parallelization features provided by GPU computing, a simplified TracyGPU program is developed for dynamic aperture calculation. Performances, issues, and challenges from introducing GPU are also discussed. General purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) bring massive parallel computing capabilities to numerical calculation. However, the unique architecture of GPU requires a comprehensive understanding of the hardware and programming model to be able to well optimize existing applications. In the field of accelerator physics, the dynamic aperture calculation of a storage ring, which is often the most time consuming part of the accelerator modeling and simulation, can benefit from GPU due to its embarrassingly parallel feature, which fits well with the GPU programming model. In this paper, we use the Tesla C2050 GPU which consists of 14 multi-processois (MP) with 32 cores on each MP, therefore a total of 448 cores, to host thousands ot threads dynamically. Thread is a logical execution unit of the program on GPU. In the GPU programming model, threads are grouped into a collection of blocks Within each block, multiple threads share the same code, and up to 48 KB of shared memory. Multiple thread blocks form a grid, which is executed as a GPU kernel. A simplified code that is a subset of Tracy++ [2] is developed to demonstrate the possibility of using GPU to speed up the dynamic aperture calculation by having each thread track a particle.

  14. Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

    2006-03-17

    The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

  15. Limited Conditions of Operations Tracking Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-12-17

    The Lco tracking program is a computer based solution for tracking time limited action items for Limited Conditions of Operation (LCO) for nuclear and industrial processes. This use is not limited to any process except those not requiring specific action steps and times. The visual and audible assistance the LCO Tracking Program provides significantly reduces the chance of missing crucial actions required for safe operation of any facility in time of limited operations. The LCOmore » Tracking Program maintains all applicable action steps and times for each limited condition for the facility in its data base. The LCO Tracking Program is used to enter that condition by number, and the data base provides the applicble action steps and starts tracking their times based on the time the LCO was entered. The LCO display graphically displays, by colored bar charts, the time expired/time remaining of each specific action item. At 60% time expired, the bar chart turns yellow to caution personnel and then turns red at 90% time expired. Then an audible alarm is sounded at 95% as a warning, to finish or accomplish the required actions to satisfy the requirements. These warning and alarm limits are modifiable by the user and can be set at different values for each action. The display file is dynamic in function, checking every minute, and responds in real time to changes to the LCO Tracking Form file, providing the visual and audible warnings as to the status of the action steps chosen for display. The LCO Tracking Program efficiently tracks action times in minutes or days, up to 2 years. All current LCO''s are easily documentated using the LCO Tracking Form file with ease of printing and disposition. The Lco Tracking Program is designed as a user friendly program with navigational buttons to simplify use.« less

  16. Results of groundwater monitoring and vegetation sampling at Everest, Kansas, in 2009 .

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-05-13

    In April 2008, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the existing network of monitoring points at Everest, Kansas (Argonne 2008). The objective of the 2008 investigation was to monitor the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater previously identified in CCC/USDA site characterization and groundwater sampling studies at Everest in 2000-2006 (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The work at Everest is being undertaken on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The findings of the 2008 investigation were as follows: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders demonstrated a consistent pattern of groundwater flow - and inferred contaminant migration - to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) The range of concentrations and the areal distribution of carbon tetrachloride identified in the groundwater at Everest in April 2008 were generally consistent with previous results. The results of the 2008 sampling (reflecting the period from 2006 to 2008) and the earlier investigations at Everest (representing the period from 2000 to 2006) show that no significant downgradient extension of the carbon tetrachloride plume occurred from 2000 to 2008. (3) The slow contaminant migration indicated by the monitoring data is qualitatively consistent with the low groundwater flow rates in the Everest aquifer unit estimated previously on the basis of site-specific hydraulic testing (Argonne 2006a,b). (4) The April 2008 and earlier sampling results demonstrate that the limits of the plume have been effectively, identified by the existing network of monitoring points and have not changed significantly during the CCC/USDA investigation program. The carbon tetrachloride distribution within the plume has continued to evolve, however, with relatively constant or apparently decreasing contaminant levels at most sampling locations. In response to these findings, the KDHE requested that the CCC/USDA develop a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water at Everest, to facilitate continued tracking of the carbon tetrachloride plume at this site (KDHE 2009a). A recommendation for annual sampling (for analyses of VOCs) of 16 existing groundwater monitoring points within and near the identified contaminant migration pathway and surface water sampling at 5 locations along the intermittent creek west (downgradient) of the identified plume was presented by the CCC/USDA (Appendix A) and approved by the KDHE (2009b) for implementation. The monitoring wells will be sampled according to the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities will be consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. This report summarizes the results of sampling and monitoring activities conducted at the Everest site since completion of the April 2008 groundwater sampling event (Argonne 2008). The investigations performed during the current review period (May 2008 to October 2009) were as follows: (1) With one exception, the KDHE-approved groundwater and surface water monitoring points were sampled on April 24-27, 2009. In this event, well PT1 was inadvertently sampled instead of the adjacent well MW04. This investigation represents the first groundwater and surface water sampling event performed under the current plan for annual monitoring approved by the KDHE. (2) Ongoing monitoring of the groundwater levels at Everest is performed with KDHE approval. The levels in selected monitoring wells are recorded continuously, by using downhole pressure sensors equipped with automatic data loggers, and periodically are also measured manually. Groundwater level data were recovered during the current review period on September 19, 2008, and on March 25, April 25-27, and October 20, 2009. (3) Argonne experience has demonstrated that the sampling and analysis (for VOCs) of native vegetation, and particularly tree tissues, often provides a sensitive indicator of possible carbon tetrachloride contamination in the surface water or shallow groundwater within the plant rooting zone. With the approval of the CCC/USDA, on August 28, 2009, samples of tree branch tissues were therefore collected for analyses at 18 locations along the intermittent creek west (downgradient) of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property.

  17. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-TcSuperconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor We report the discovery of a self-doped multilayer high Tcsuperconductor Ba2Ca3Cu4O8F2 (F0234) which contains distinctly differentsuperconducting gap magnitudes along its two Fermi-surface sheets. Whileformal valence counting would

  18. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha; Dash, P.; Singh, C.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-03-28

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  19. Tracking formulas and strategies for a receiver oriented dual-axis tracking toroidal heliostat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiliang; Zang, Chuncheng; Lu, Zhenwu; Wei, Xiudong

    2010-06-15

    A 4 m x 4 m toroidal heliostat with receiver oriented dual-axis tracking, also called spinning-elevation tracking, was developed as an auxiliary heat source for a hydrogen production system. A series of spinning-elevation tracking formulas have been derived for this heliostat. This included basic tracking formulas, a formula for the elevation angle for heliostat with a mirror-pivot offset, and a more general formula for the biased elevation angle. This paper presents the new tracking formulas in detail and analyzes the accuracy of applying a simplifying approximation. The numerical results show these receiver oriented dual-axis tracking formula approximations are accurate to within 2.5 x 10{sup -6} m in image plane. Some practical tracking strategies are discussed briefly. Solar images from the toroidal heliostat at selected times are also presented. (author)

  20. Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, Ralph L.; Widdowson, Mark A.; Mullinex, Harry; Orne, William H.; Looney, Brian B.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

  1. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  2. Procedures for ground-water investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water investigations are carried out to fulfill the requirements for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet the requirements of DOE Orders. Investigations are also performed for various clients to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). National standards including procedures published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) and the US Geological Survey were utilized in developing the procedures contained in this manual.

  3. GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT GENERATION TOOLS - 12005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.

    2011-11-21

    Compliance with National and State environmental regulations (e.g. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) aka SuperFund) requires Savannah River Site (SRS) to extensively collect and report groundwater monitoring data, with potential fines for missed reporting deadlines. Several utilities have been developed at SRS to facilitate production of the regulatory reports which include maps, data tables, charts and statistics. Components of each report are generated in accordance with complex sets of regulatory requirements specific to each site monitored. SRS developed a relational database to incorporate the detailed reporting rules with the groundwater data, and created a set of automation tools to interface with the information and generate the report components. These process improvements enhanced quality and consistency by centralizing the information, and have reduced manpower and production time through automated efficiencies.

  4. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  5. Potassium ferrate treatment of RFETS` contaminated groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    The potassium ferrate treatment study of Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) groundwater was performed under the Sitewide Treatability Studies Program (STSP). This study was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of potassium ferrate in a water treatment system to remove the contaminants of concern (COCS) from groundwater at the RFETS. Potassium ferrate is a simple salt where the iron is in the plus six valence state. It is the iron at the plus six valence state (Fe {sup +6}) that makes it an unique water treatment chemical, especially in waters where the pH is greater than seven. In basic solutions where the solubility of the oxides/hydroxides of many of the COCs is low, solids are formed as the pH is raised. By using ferrate these solids are agglomerated so they can be effectively removed by sedimentation in conventional water treatment equipment. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of water after treatment with potassium ferrate and to determine if the Colorado Water Quality Control Commission (CWQCC) discharge limits for the COCs listed in Table 1.0-1 could be met. Radionuclides in the groundwater were of special concern.

  6. Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multiple Users | Department of Energy Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments Benefit Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access transportation information on mobile devices. Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of

  7. TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, L.

    2011-03-28

    Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

  8. Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: ...

  9. Tracking and Using Data to Support Revenue Streams | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracking and Using Data to Support Revenue Streams Tracking and Using Data to Support Revenue Streams Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: ...

  10. Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program Requirements (Rev. 03) Version Tracking Document for DOE Challenge Homes, National Program Requirements (Rev. ...

  11. Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean Application Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean ...

  12. Adaptive Wavenumber Estimation for Mode Tracking in a Shallow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tracking in a Shallow Ocean Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adaptive Wavenumber Estimation for Mode Tracking in a Shallow Ocean Environment You are ...

  13. SunShot Award Helps Solar Tracking Company Expand Internationally...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    is working to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) tracking technology by ... is working to reduce the cost of photovoltaic (PV) tracking technology by ...

  14. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Thursday, 27 September 2012 00:00 Protein phosphorylation ...

  15. Integrated monitoring plan for the Hanford groundwater monitoring project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; McDonald, J.P.; Mercer, R.B.; Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.

    1998-09-01

    Groundwater is monitored in hundreds of wells at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of requirements. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy (DOE) manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project (groundwater project), which is the responsibility of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The groundwater project does not include all of the monitoring to assess performance of groundwater remediation or all monitoring associated with active facilities. This document is the first integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

  16. Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations Two major remedial campaigns have been applied to a plume of trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated groundwater near the former

  17. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a science-based toolset for the analysis of potential impacts to groundwater

  18. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2007-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

  19. Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Program Document: Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evapotranspiration Dynamics and Effects on Groundwater Recharge and Discharge at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating groundwater flow and contaminant

  20. Central Plateau Groundwater and Deep Vadose Zone Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vadose Zone Executive Council Hanford Advisory Board River and Plateau Committee Briant L. Charboneau DOE-RL, Soil and Groundwater Federal Project Director October 9, 2012 1 Discussion Topics * Purpose of the Executive Council - Why was this established? * Who participates? * What are the integration topics of interest to the Council? * Examples of groundwater and vadose zone integration - Deep Vadose Zone treatability testing leading to evaluation of measures to protect groundwater - B complex

  1. A Fresh Take on Groundwater at Amargosa Valley Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 25, 2012 A Fresh Take on Groundwater at Amargosa Valley Open House From drilling to sampling, groundwater was the topic on everyone's mind at a recent open house in Amargosa Valley, Nevada. On September 18, 2012, residents of Beatty, Amargosa Valley, Pahrump and other neighboring communities gathered at the Amargosa Community Center for the 4th Annual Groundwater Open House. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office conducts the annual

  2. Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Migration Studies | Department of Energy 2: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies Recommendation 222: Recommendations on Additional Off-site Groundwater Migration Studies ORSSAB recommends that DOE proceed with an off-site groundwater quality assessment project and that DOE secure additional baseline funding for analysis to further understanding of potential migration and effects on off-site receptors. PDF icon Recommendation 222 PDF icon Response to

  3. Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Rosemary; Giroux, Brian; Pohll, Greg; Hershey, Ronald; Russell, Charles; Howcroft, William

    2004-01-28

    Alternative uses of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) may require large amounts of water to construct and/or operate. The only abundant source of water at the NTS is groundwater. This report describes preliminary modeling to quantify the amount of groundwater available for development from three hydrographic areas at the NTS. Modeling was conducted with a three-dimensional transient numerical groundwater flow model.

  4. Laminated track design for inductrack maglev systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F.

    2004-07-06

    A magnet configuration comprising a pair of Halbach arrays magnetically and structurally connected together are positioned with respect to each other so that a first component of their fields substantially cancels at a first plane between them, and a second component of their fields substantially adds at this first plane. A track is located between the pair of Halbach arrays and a propulsion mechanism is provided for moving the pair of Halbach arrays along the track. When the pair of Halbach arrays move along the track and the track is not located at the first plane, a current is induced in the windings and a restoring force is exerted on the pair of Halbach arrays.

  5. Track NERSC Outages in Google Calendar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Outages in Google Calendar Track NERSC Outages in Google Calendar March 22, 2013 by Jack Deslippe Outages are now available in Google calendar form. You can subscribe to this...

  6. Alaska Rural Energy Conference- Federal Energy Track

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On the first day of the Alaska Rural Energy Conference, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy is hosting a federal energy track to cover federal programs and opportunities for Alaska Native villages.

  7. Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    192002 Yun (Helen) He, SC2002 1 MPI and OpenMP Paradigms on Cluster of SMP Architectures: the Vacancy Tracking Algorithm for Multi- Dimensional Array Transposition Yun (Helen) He...

  8. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    No. 09-791 Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction F l C l R&D Fuel Cycle R&D Dr. James Glimm Stony Brook University In collaboration with: In collaboration with: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Borough of Manhattan Community College Kevin Felker, Technical POC James Bresee, Federal POC FINAL REPORT and QUARTERLY PROGRESS REPORT Project Title: Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction Covering Period: Oc t.1 2009 through Sept. 30,

  9. A Fresh Take on Groundwater at Amargosa Valley Open House

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 25, 2012 A Fresh Take on Groundwater at Amargosa Valley Open House From drilling ... Interactive stations on Monitoring, Drilling, Sampling, Modeling, Protection and ...

  10. Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Author Government of Western Australia Organization Department of Mines and Petroleum Published NA, 2002 DOI Not Provided...

  11. Trace rare earth element analysis in briny groundwaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, J.C.; Lepel, E.A.; Smith, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    A rare-earth element (REE) group separation scheme has been developed. REE data for two briny groundwaters representing Granite Wash and Wolfcamp Carbonate formations are reported. (DLC)

  12. X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Portsmouth Integration Director's Final Findings and Order Building C-400 Thermal Treatment 90% Remedial Design Report and Site Investigation Groundwater Contamination and ...

  13. Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Environmental Indicators (EIs) Groundwater Migration Under Control? No Current Human Exposure Acceptable? Yes Confirmed by Lead Regulator? Yes Confirmed by Lead Regulator? Yes...

  14. Hanford’s Groundwater Treatment System Expands Already Impressive Capabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Construction was completed earlier this month on an expansion of Hanford’s 200 West Pump and Treat Facility to remove uranium from groundwater.

  15. Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1974-1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River...

  16. Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant East Plume PDF icon Weldon Spring Site - Chemical Plant Quarry PDF icon ...

  17. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. ...

  18. Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under...

  19. Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, R. L.; Lawrence, B. L.

    2011-06-09

    The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD2 and the ERDF Amended ROD (EPA 1999). The overall objective of the groundwater monitoring program is to determine whether ERDF has impacted the groundwater. This objective is complicated by the fact that the ERDF is situated downgradient of the numerous groundwater contamination plumes originating from the 200 West Area.

  20. Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    southeast Washington state. The material, an ion exchange resin, is used in groundwater treatment systems to strip contaminants from the water-in this case, hexavalent...

  1. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. ...

  2. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, USA Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  3. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Journal Article: Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters- Lessons Learned From Mammoth Mountain, Usa Abstract A major campaign to quantify the...

  4. Vermont Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division Permit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2015 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Drinking Water and Groundwater Protection Division Permit Fees...

  5. Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Vermont Minor Amendment Application for Groundwater Citation Vermont...

  6. Groundwater Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groundwater can be a useful geochemical indicator for geothermal exploration when other water chemistry techniques are ambiguous. This research was useful for locating some areas...

  7. Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Key factors for determining groundwater impacts due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration reservoirs The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) is developing a ...

  8. Idaho Site Enlists Whey-Eating Microbes in Groundwater Cleanup

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Workers at the Idaho site have enlisted microbes to help remediate previously contaminated groundwater and advance the protection of the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

  9. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-09-01

    This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

  10. PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System | Department of Energy Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System PDF icon PIA - Savannah River Operations Office Executive Commitment Action Tracking System More Documents & Publications PIA - GovTrip (DOE data) PIA - Bonneville Power Adminstration Ethics Helpline

  11. PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Work Tracking and Budget System PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System PDF icon PIA - Security Clearance Work Tracking and Budget System More Documents & Publications Freedom of Information and Privacy Act Database PIA, Idaho Operations Office PIA - INL Education Programs Business Enclave Integrated Safety Management Workshop Registration, PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  12. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-12-01

    This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

  13. Procedures for ground-water investigations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This manual was developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to document the procedures used to carry out and control the technical aspects of ground-water investigations at the PNL. Ground-water monitoring procedures are developed and used in accordance with the PNL Quality Assurance Program.

  14. In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  15. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater.

  16. Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Prepares for Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LAS VEGAS – The historic underground test area known as Yucca Flat is the focus of an upcoming independent peer review. In preparation, groundwater specialists working for the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) groundwater program have scheduled a week-long dry run in February.

  17. Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater: A turnkey approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shivjiani, D.M.; Rudy, R.J.; Burns, B.; Heuler, G.

    1994-12-31

    The Silvex Corporation Site is a Florida state funded remedial action site in St. Augustine, Florida, that, prior to 1980, was a silver smelting facility that accepted waste materials from the Naval Air Station-Jacksonville. Fuels, reportedly consisting of waste paint, cold carbon removers, and solvent degreasers that were stored in a 25,000-gallon tank, spilled onto the property. The assessment concluded that the surficial aquifer in the spill area and the area hydrologically down-gradient of the spill were contaminated by elevated levels of ketones (acetone, methyl-ethyl ketone, and methyl-isobutyl ketone), phenols, and toluene. Subsequently, a risk assessment/feasibility study and groundwater bench-scale and pilot-scale studies were performed to determine the technical feasibility/cost-effectiveness of the recommended alternative, submerged fixed-film bioremediation. The on-site pilot study, which was conducted at three flow rates (0.5, 1, and 2 gallons per minute [gpm]), demonstrated a greater than 99% contaminant removal efficiency from the three-stage bioreactor. Due to the impact of site contamination on a nearby creek that flows into the St. Johns River, an interim remedial deign was developed and implemented to reduce the potential for migration of contaminated groundwater into the creek.

  18. Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nichols, R.L.; Widdowson, M.A.; Mullinex, H.; Orne, W.H.; Looney, B.B.

    1994-03-15

    An apparatus is described for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations. 3 figures.

  19. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture,more »physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.« less

  20. SimTrack: A compact c++ library for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-06-24

    SimTrack is a compact c++ library of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam-beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam-beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam-beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  1. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture, physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.

  2. SimTrack: A compact c++ code for particle orbit and spin tracking in accelerators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yun

    2015-08-29

    SimTrack is a compact c++ code of 6-d symplectic element-by-element particle tracking in accelerators originally designed for head-on beam–beam compensation simulation studies in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It provides a 6-d symplectic orbit tracking with the 4th order symplectic integration for magnet elements and the 6-d symplectic synchro-beam map for beam–beam interaction. Since its inception in 2009, SimTrack has been intensively used for dynamic aperture calculations with beam–beam interaction for RHIC. Recently, proton spin tracking and electron energy loss due to synchrotron radiation were added. In this article, I will present the code architecture,more » physics models, and some selected examples of its applications to RHIC and a future electron-ion collider design eRHIC.« less

  3. Determination of the polarization state of x rays with the help of anomalous transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, K. S. Uschmann, I.; Frster, E.; Marx, B.; Paulus, G. G.; Sthlker, T.

    2014-04-14

    Besides intensity and direction, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave provides characteristic information on the crossed medium. Here, we present two methods for the determination of the polarization state of x rays by polarizers based on anomalous transmission (Borrmann effect). Using a polarizer-analyzer setup, we have measured a polarization purity of less than 1.5??10{sup ?5}, three orders of magnitude better than obtained in earlier work. Using the analyzer crystal in multiple-beam case with slightly detuned azimuth, we show how the first three Stokes parameters can be determined with a single angular scan. Thus, polarization analyzers based on anomalous transmission make it possible to detect changes of the polarization in a range from degrees down to arcseconds.

  4. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb? of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.7870.172(stat)0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  5. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-12-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  6. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2010-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  7. Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

  8. Hanford Site groundwater monitoring: Setting, sources and methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. Hartman

    2000-04-11

    Groundwater monitoring is conducted on the Hanford Site to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders; and the Washington Administrative Code. Results of monitoring are published annually (e.g., PNNL-11989). To reduce the redundancy of these annual reports, background information that does not change significantly from year to year has been extracted from the annual report and published in this companion volume. This report includes a description of groundwater monitoring requirements, site hydrogeology, and waste sites that have affected groundwater quality or that require groundwater monitoring. Monitoring networks and methods for sampling, analysis, and interpretation are summarized. Vadose zone monitoring methods and statistical methods also are described. Whenever necessary, updates to information contained in this document will be published in future groundwater annual reports.

  9. A spin-filter made of quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jiansheng

    2014-07-28

    Topological end states (TES) in quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires can induce tunneling within the gap. Such TES are spin polarized, thus the induced current is spin polarized as well, which can be used to construct a spin-filter applied in spintronics. An interferometry device is designed to control the polarized current as well. The advantage and finite size effect on this system are discussed.

  10. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  11. COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-10-01

    In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

  12. Critical review of theoretical models for anomalous effects in deuterated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chechin, V.A.; Tsarev, V.A. ); Rabinowitz, M. ); Kim, Y.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature commonly known as [open quotes]cold fusion[close quotes] (CF) with an emphasis on the latest experiments, as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then they critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. They conclude that they do not explain the data.

  13. The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon at Fermilab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Logashenko, I.

    2015-06-17

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Furthermore, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  14. Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1993-01-12

    An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

  15. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A}<0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for MM{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  16. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Scovel, James C

    2008-01-01

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  17. The apparent anomalous, weak, long-range acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Turyshev, S.G.; Laing, P.A.; Liu, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    Recently the authors reported that radio Doppler data generated by NASA`s Deep Space Network (DSN) with the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft indicate an apparent anomalous, constant, spacecraft acceleration with a magnitude {approximately}8.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}, directed towards the Sun. Analysis of similar Doppler and ranging data from the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft yielded ambiguous results for the anomalous acceleration, but the analysis was useful in that it ruled out the possibility of a systematic error in the DSN Doppler system that could easily be mistaken as a spacecraft acceleration. Here they present some new results, including a critique of the suggestion that the anomalous acceleration could be caused by collimated thermal emission. Based on upgraded JPL software for the Pioneer 10 orbit determination, and on a new data interval from January 1987 to July 1998, their best estimate of the average Pioneer 10 acceleration directed towards the Sun is 7.20 {sup {minus}} 0.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}.

  18. Tracking Provenance in ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensley, Zachary P; Sanyal, Jibonananda; New, Joshua Ryan

    2013-08-01

    Provenance is dened as information about the origin of objects, a concept that applies to both physical and digital objects and often overlaps both. The use of provenance in systems designed for research is an important but forgotten feature. Provenance allows for proper and exact tracking of information, its use, its lineage, its derivations and other metadata that are important for correctly adhering to the scien- tic method. In our project's prescribed use of provenance, researchers can determine detailed information about the use of sensor data in their experiments on ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). Our project's provenance system, Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS), tracks information starting with the creation of information by an FRP sensor. The system determines station information, sensor information, and sensor channel information. The system allows researchers to derive generations of experiments from the sensor data and tracks their hierarchical flow. Key points can be seen in the history of the information as part of the information's workflow. The concept of provenance and its usage in science is relatively new and while used in other cases around the world, our project's provenance diers in a key area. To keep track of provenance, most systems must be designed or redesigned around the new provenance system. Our system is designed as a cohesive but sepa- rate entity and allows for researchers to continue using their own methods of analysis without being constrained in their ways in order to track the provenance. We have designed ProvDMS using a lightweight provenance library, Core Provenance Library (CPL) v.6 In addition to keeping track of sensor data experiments and its provenance, ProvDMS also provides a web-enabled visualization of the inheritance.

  19. Chemical tracking at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costain, D.B.

    1994-04-01

    EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., has developed a chemical tracking system to support compliance with the Emergency Planning and community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at the Rocky Flats Plant. This system, referred to as the EPCRA Chemical Control system (ECCS), uses bar code technology to uniquely identify and track the receipt, distribution, and use of chemicals. Chemical inventories are conducted using hand-held electronic scanners to update a site wide chemical database on a VAX 6000 computer. Information from the ECCS supports preparation of the EPCRA Tier II and Form R reports on chemical storage and use.

  20. Real-Time Tumor Tracking in the Lung Using an Electromagnetic Tracking System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Waghorn, Benjamin J.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Rineer, Justin M.; Maon, Rafael R.; Vollenweider, Mark A.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To describe the first use of the commercially available Calypso 4D Localization System in the lung. Methods and Materials: Under an institutional review board-approved protocol and an investigational device exemption from the US Food and Drug Administration, the Calypso system was used with nonclinical methods to acquire real-time 4-dimensional lung tumor tracks for 7 lung cancer patients. The aims of the study were to investigate (1) the potential for bronchoscopic implantation; (2) the stability of smooth-surface beacon transponders (transponders) after implantation; and (3) the ability to acquire tracking information within the lung. Electromagnetic tracking was not used for any clinical decision making and could only be performed before any radiation delivery in a research setting. All motion tracks for each patient were reviewed, and values of the average displacement, amplitude of motion, period, and associated correlation to a sinusoidal model (R{sup 2}) were tabulated for all 42 tracks. Results: For all 7 patients at least 1 transponder was successfully implanted. To assist in securing the transponder at the tumor site, it was necessary to implant a secondary fiducial for most transponders owing to the transponder's smooth surface. For 3 patients, insertion into the lung proved difficult, with only 1 transponder remaining fixed during implantation. One patient developed a pneumothorax after implantation of the secondary fiducial. Once implanted, 13 of 14 transponders remained stable within the lung and were successfully tracked with the tracking system. Conclusions: Our initial experience with electromagnetic guidance within the lung demonstrates that transponder implantation and tracking is achievable though not clinically available. This research investigation proved that lung tumor motion exhibits large variations from fraction to fraction within a single patient and that improvements to both transponder and tracking system are still necessary to create a clinical daily-use system to assist with actual lung radiation therapy.

  1. Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-A-29 Ditch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, M.D.

    1999-10-07

    This document presents a groundwater monitoring plan, under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) regulatory requirements found in WAC 173-303-400, and by reference, requirements in 40 CFR 265.93 (d)(6) for the 216-A-29 Ditch (A-29 Ditch) in the Hanford Site's 200 East Area. The objectives of this monitoring plan are to determine whether any hazardous constituents are detectable in the groundwater beneath the ditch. The groundwater monitoring network described in this plan includes 10 RCRA-compliant wells to monitor the aquifer in the immediate vicinity of the A-29 Ditch. Groundwater assessment activities have been conducted at the A-29 Ditch, the result of elevated specific conductivity and total organic halogens (TOX). A groundwater assessment report (Votava 1995) found that no hazardous constituents had impacted groundwater and the site returned to interim-status indicator-parameter/detection monitoring. This plan describes the process and quality objectives for conducting the indicator-parameter program. The site will be sampled semiannually for indicator parameters including pH, specific conductance, TOX, and total organic carbon. Site-specific parameters include tritium and ICP metals. These constituents, as well as anions, alkalinity, and turbidity will be sampled annually. Groundwater elevations will be recorded semiannually.

  2. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-10

    The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

  3. Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05&

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    09 This page intentionally left blank Alluvial Groundwater -- Upgradient -- 92-05 a,b ______________________________________________________________ Analyte Unit 10/30/00 04/11/01 07/20/01 10/10/01 ______________________________________________________________ Field Measurements Alkalinity mg/L -- 270 321 303 Conductivity c μmhos/cm 1520 1250 1366 1350 DO c mg/L -- 7.7 -- -- ORP c mV 84 71 -- 38 pH c s.u. 7.05 7.66 6.42 6.99 Temperature c C 9.4 7.7 9.7 10 Turbidity c NTU 42.6 4.05 60.3 70.5

  4. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  5. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  6. Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fingersh, L. J.

    2006-01-01

    The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.

  7. A technical approach to groundwater contamination problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, J.C.; Leser, C.; Rose, C.M.

    1993-06-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has been performing technical investigations at sites in Nebraska and Kansas that have identified groundwater contamination by carbon tetrachloride. This comprehensive program will ultimately provide the affected communities with safe drinking water. The first step in the program is to evaluate the available data and identify sites that will require an Alternate Water Supply Study (AWSS). The objective of the AWSS is to identify options for providing a safe drinking water supply to all users, in compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act. The AWSS consists of an engineering and cost evaluation followed by implementation of the selected alternative. For sites with contamination less than a specific concentration, the AWSS is regarded as a satisfactory long term solution, and no further action is taken. For those sites with concentrations above that specific limit, the AWSS implementation is regarded as only a stopgap measure, and the site is selected for additional remedial action. The first step of the remedial action is an Expedited Site Characterization (ESC). The ESC was developed at Argonne to decrease the cost and time of the remedial investigation and feasibility study while producing a high-quality technical investigation. The ESC is designed to characterize the contaminant plume configuration and movement, which requires an understanding of the geological and hydrogeologic controls on groundwater movement as well as the nature and extent of any remaining carbon tetrachloride source in the soils. The ESC program uses a multidisciplinary technical approach that incorporates geology, geochemistry, geohydrology, and geophysics. Field activities include sampling, chemical analysis, and borehole and surface geophysical surveys.

  8. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-07-01

    The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

  9. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Early, T.O.

    1994-05-01

    The purpose of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Management Plan is to define the function, organizational structure (including associated matrix organizations), interfaces, roles and responsibilities, authority, and relationship to the Department of Energy for the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO). GWPO is charged with the responsibility of coordinating all components of the groundwater program for Energy Systems. This mandate includes activities at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

  10. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

  11. Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: P-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  12. Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Savannah River Site - C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River Site Plume Name: C-Area Groundwater Operable Unit Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCs/SVOCs Present?: Yes VOC

  13. Tracking the Sun VIII. The Installed Price of Residential and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tracking the Sun VIII. The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tracking the Sun ...

  14. Tracking the Sun VIII (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Tracking the Sun VIII Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Tracking the Sun VIII Funded by the SunShot Initiative, this report summarizes trends in the ...

  15. Policy Flash 2013-26 Guidance for tracking inquiries related...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Guidance for tracking inquiries related to the licensing of inventions developed at DOE facilities Policy Flash 2013-26 Guidance for tracking inquiries related to the licensing of ...

  16. Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool February 27, 2014 - 5:59pm Addthis The Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library aims to help...

  17. Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Keeping Climate Change Solutions on Track: The Role of Rail...

  18. FreshTracks Capital LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FreshTracks Capital LP Jump to: navigation, search Name: FreshTracks Capital LP Address: 29 Harbor Road, Suite 200 Place: Shelburne, New Hampshire Zip: 05482 Product: Venture...

  19. Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah’s 2013 Accomplishments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    PADUCAH, Ky. – Work to remove two aging, inactive structures and clean up a leading source of groundwater contamination marked the top 2013 accomplishments for the EM program at the Paducah site.

  20. Groundwater Quantity Regulation in Vermont: A Path Forward |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Groundwater Quantity Regulation in Vermont: A Path Forward Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- Secondary Legal SourceSecondary Legal...

  1. Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

  2. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2005-03-01

    This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

  3. Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanfords largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is ...

  4. Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented at Fernald Preserve

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uranium contamination in the Great Miami Aquifer—at the Fernald Preserve, Ohio, Site—is being removed from the groundwater through a pump-and-treatment operation, which until this year, involved...

  5. Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently added a 6 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system to provide power to operate an enhanced treatment system that removes volatile organic compounds (VOC) from contaminated groundwater at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site.

  6. Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    OAK RIDGE, Tenn. – The Oak Ridge EM program has joined state and federal regulators in a series of workshops to address contaminated groundwater on the Oak Ridge Reservation.

  7. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were unaffected by the presence of injected 137Cs contamination.

  8. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (''first echo''). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and

  9. BIA Providers Conference Energy Track | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BIA Providers Conference Energy Track BIA Providers Conference Energy Track December 2, 2015 - 10:00am Addthis Dec. 2-3, 2015 Anchorage, Alaska Dena'ina Center The DOE Office of Indian Energy offered an energy track at the 25th Annual BIA Tribal Providers Conference Dec. 2-3, 2015. The track featured breakout sessions on a variety of topics to help tribal energy leaders and professionals make informed decisions about energy projects. Download agenda and presentations. Addthis Related Articles

  10. Waste Shipment Tracking Technology Lowers Costs, Increases Efficiency |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Waste Shipment Tracking Technology Lowers Costs, Increases Efficiency Waste Shipment Tracking Technology Lowers Costs, Increases Efficiency February 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis This graphic shows how the radiofrequency identification technology tracks and monitors packages in transport, in-transit stops and storage. This graphic shows how the radiofrequency identification technology tracks and monitors packages in transport, in-transit stops and storage. The technology

  11. Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC PDF icon Employee Concerns Tracking System, PIA, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC More Documents & Publications Electronic Document Management System PIA, BechtelJacobs Company, LLC Dosimetry Records System PIA, bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Pension Estimate System PIA, Bechtel

  12. ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office | Department of Energy Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office PDF icon ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking

  13. AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2011-08-12

    Django app for tracking individual state’s progress in their contributions to the National Geothermal Data System.

  14. Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

  15. Track 7: Environmental Protection, Environmental Management System (EMS), "Greening Initiatives"

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 7: Environmental Protection, Environmental Management System (EMS), "Greening Initiatives"

  16. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office. Annual report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-30

    This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO`s staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater).

  17. New Wells Provide Information on Groundwater at Pahute Mesa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 28, 2012 New Wells Provide Information on Groundwater at Pahute Mesa New wells drilled near historic underground test areas in Nevada are helping scientists get a clearer understanding of the groundwater in these areas while contributing to the design of a long-term monitoring system. Drilled from September to October 2012, these two wells will supplement a network of more than 20 existing characterization wells in an area called Pahute Mesa, which extends from the northwestern portion

  18. Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods Paducah Site Undergoing Steady Groundwater Cleanup with Variety of Methods June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The yellow outline depicts an area southeast of the C-400 Cleaning Building, background, where electrical resistance heating will be used to remove trichloroethene (TCE) down to 60 feet below ground. Electrodes will heat the chemical into a vapor that can be pumped to the surface and treated in the white

  19. Nye County Community Groundwater Program - Signed Determination.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NEPA Compliance Officer Rationale Office of Acquisition and Project Management APM 15-001 Application of DOE NEPA Procedure: Categorical Exclusions B3.1, Site characterization and environmental monitoring (10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D, Appendix B). Rationale: The proposed action in the attached checklist (APM 15-001, Nye County Preemptive Review and Community-Based Groundwater Sampling Program) describes development and implementation of a groundwater monitoring program involving Nye County's

  20. Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite The long-term success of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium (U) depends on the stability of U(IV) precipitates (e.g., uraninite) under oxic

  1. Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite Authors: Bi, Yuqiang ; Hyuna, Sung Pil ; Kukkadapu, Ravi K. ; Hayes, Kim F. ; , Publication Date: 2014-03-18 OSTI Identifier: 1124154 Report Number(s):

  2. Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah. Implications for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah. Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah. Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by scarcity, and where most water resources are fully

  3. Decaying neutralino dark matter in anomalous U(1){sub H} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Restrepo, D.; Zapata, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    In supersymmetric models extended with an anomalous U(1){sub H} different R-parity violating couplings can yield an unstable neutralino. We show that in this context astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutralino decaying dark matter forbid bilinear R-parity breaking neutralino decays and lead to a class of purely trilinear R-parity violating scenarios in which the neutralino is stable on cosmological scales. We have found that among the resulting models some of them become suitable to explain the observed anomalies in cosmic-ray electron/positron fluxes.

  4. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  5. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  6. Anomalous deflection of a charged-particle beam by bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taratin, A.M.; Vorobev, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    Using computer simulations of particle trajectory, a deflection of part of the beam in the direction opposite to the curvature is discovered for charged particles passing through a bent crystal. The passage of a proton beam of energy E(0) = 1 GeV through a curved silicon single crystal is considered, and only particles that move through the single crystal in a quasi-channel mode are deflected. It is suggested that the observed anomalous deflection can be used to deflect beams of high energy charged particles through angles that are tens of times greater than the critical angle for channeling, with application to experimental nuclear physics. 6 references.

  7. Photon equation of motion with application to the electron's anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, A B

    2007-12-06

    The photon equation of motion previously applied to the Lamb shift is here applied to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Exact agreement is obtained with the QED result of Schwinger. The photon theory treats the radiative correction to the photon in the presence of the electron rather than its inverse as in standard QED. The result is found to be first-order in the photon-electron interaction rather than second-order as in standard QED, introducing an ease of calculation hitherto unavailable.

  8. Anomalous complete opaqueness in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Benfeng; Li Xiaowei; Vartiainen, Ismo; Lehmuskero, Anni; Turunen, Jari; Kuittinen, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Kang Guoguo

    2011-08-22

    We report on an anomalous polarization-switching extinction effect in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains: under normal incidence of light, the array is almost transparent for one polarization; whereas it is fully opaque (with nearly zero transmittance) for the orthogonal polarization within a narrow band, even though the nanoparticles cover only a tiny fraction (say, 3.5%) of the transparent substrate surface. We reveal that the strong polarization-dependent short-range dipolar coupling and long-range radiative coupling of gold nanoparticles in this highly asymmetric array is responsible for this extraordinary effect.

  9. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  10. Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment in Basis Light-Front Quantization Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We apply the Basis Light-Front Quantization (BLFQ) approach to the Hamiltonian field theory of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in free space. We solve for the mass eigenstates corresponding to an electron interacting with a single photon in light-front gauge. Based on the resulting non-perturbative ground state light-front amplitude we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The numerical results from extrapolating to the infinite basis limit reproduce the perturbative Schwinger result with relative deviation less than 1.2%. We report significant improvements over previous works including the development of analytic methods for evaluating the vertex matrix elements of QED.

  11. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  12. Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation under anomalous dispersion in fused silica. Part 1. Numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanina, E O; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Kandidov, V P

    2012-10-31

    We report the results of investigation of femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in fused silica by varying the wavelength in the range from 800 to 2300 nm. It is shown that in the case of the anomalous group-velocity dispersion, a sequence of 'light bullets' with a high spatial and temporal localisation of the light field is formed along the filament. The relation of the formation and propagation of light bullets with the formation of an isolated anti-Stokes wing of the supercontinuum spectrum is established. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  13. Teapot Tracking Engine for INTEL IPSC/860 Hypercube

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-30

    Written for particle orbit tracking using TEAPOT formalism. Useful for tracking the behaviour of a large number of particles for a short to intermediate term. The lattice to be tracked must first be pre-processed by TEAPOT, all corrections applied and analyses performed. Vectrack is then used to investigate how particles or ensembles of particles will behave.

  14. Radioiodine Biogeochemistry and Prevalence in Groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Denham, Miles E.; Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Xu, Chen; Schwehr, Kathy; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

    2014-08-03

    129I is commonly either the top or among the top risk drivers, along with 99Tc, at radiological waste disposal sites and contaminated groundwater sites where nuclear material fabrication or reprocessing has occurred. The risk stems largely from 129I having a high toxicity, a high bioaccumulation factor (90% of all the bodys iodine concentrates in the thyroid), a high inventory at source terms (due to its high fission yield), an extremely long half-life (16M yr), and rapid mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that 129I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define 129I mass balance and flux at sites, but cannot predict accurately its response to changes in the environment. As a consequence of some of these characteristics, 129I has a very low Drinking Water Standard, DWS, which is set at 1 pCi/L, the lowest of all radionuclides in the Federal Register. Recently, significant advancements have been made in detecting iodine species at ambient groundwater concentrations, defining the nature of the organic matter and iodine bond, and quantifying the role of naturally occurring sediment microbes to promote iodine oxidation and reduction. These recent studies have led to a more mechanistic understanding of radioiodine biogeochemistry. The objective of this review is to describe these advances and to provide a state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport in the terrestrial environment and provide information useful for making decisions regarding the stewardship and remediation of 129I contaminated sites. As part of this review, knowledge gaps were identified that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating 129I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of 129I waste. Together the information gained from addressing these knowledge gaps will not alter the observation that 129I is primarily mobile, but it will likely permit demonstration that the entire 129I pool in the source term is not moving at the same rate and some may be tightly bound to the sediment, thereby smearing the modeled 129I peak and reducing maximum calculated risk.

  15. Improvements to mixture level tracking model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, W.L.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the results of the testing of the recent improvements made to the two-phase level tracking model in RELAP5/MOD3.2. The level model was originally developed during the development of the TRAC-BWR computer code and was subsequently modified by the Pennsylvania State University (PSU). The modifications developed at PSU concern the way in which the two-phase level is moved from volume to volume as the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the system being simulated change during the course of a transients. The other components in the level tracking model remain as described in the original implementation of the model.

  16. Geologic mapping for groundwater resource protection and assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, J.M. . Earth Sciences and Resources Inst.); Berg, R.C. )

    1993-03-01

    Groundwater is a vital natural resource in the US and around the world. In order to manage and protect this often threatened resource one must better understand its occurrence, extent, and susceptibility to contamination. Geologic mapping is a fundamental approach to developing more detailed and accurate assessments of groundwater resources. The stratigraphy and lithology of earth materials provide the framework for groundwater systems, whether they are deep confined aquifers or shallow, water table environments. These same earth materials control, in large part, the rates of migration of water and contaminants into and through groundwater systems thus establishing the potential yields of the systems and their vulnerability to contamination. Geologic mapping is used to delineate and display the vertical sequencing of earth materials either in cross-section or over lateral areas as in the stack-unit geologic map. These geologic maps, along with supportive hydrogeologic information, are used to identify the three-dimensional positioning and continuity of aquifer and non-aquifer earth materials. For example, detailed stack-unit mapping to a depth of 30 meters has been completed for a portion of a northern Illinois county. Groundwater contamination potentials were assigned to various vertical sequences of materials. Where aquifers are unconfined, groundwater contamination potentials are greatest. Conversely, other considerations being equal, the thicker the confining unit, the lower the contamination potential. This information is invaluable for land use decision-making; water supply assessment, development, and management; and environmental protection planning.

  17. Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forstrom, J.M.; Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L.; McMaster, W.M.

    1994-07-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

  18. Commitment Tracking System Version 3.5

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-06-01

    The Commitment Tracking System (CTS) was developed to standardize data input and report output. A CTS administrator is responsible for data entry, updating, reporting, and record keeping. The administrator will produce reports as required for actionee/manager information and update. In addition, the administrator will process uploads to the Office Vision Company Action Log (CAL) of all required issues addressed in the Company Procedure.

  19. New tracking system of the SND detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avdeeva, E. G. Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Botov, A. A.; Bukin, D. A.; Vasiljev, A. V.; Vesenev, V. M.; Golubev, V.B.; Dimova, T.V.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Korol, A. A.; Koshuba, S. V.; Obrazovsky, A. E.; Pakhtusova, E. V.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Sirotkin, A. A.; Surin, I.K.; Usov, Yu.V.; Filatov, P.V.; Kharlamov, A.G.

    2010-11-15

    A new tracking system (TS) of the Spherical Neutral Detector (SND) for experiments at the VEPP-2000 e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described. The TS is completely assembled, mounted on the detector, and ready for collecting data from the VEPP-2000. Test experiments with cosmic-ray events and VEPP-2000 beams showed a stable operation of the system. The simulation, calibration, and reconstruction procedures were debugged by using available data.

  20. An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

    2013-09-01

    This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

  1. Lab scientists track Santa's magical journey

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Santa's magical journey Lab scientists track Santa's magical journey Los Alamos trackers will use state-of-the-art technology to mark the course taken by Old St. Nick and his reindeer. December 20, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory

  2. TRACKING STREAMER BLOBS INTO THE HELIOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheeley, N. R.; Rouillard, A.P. E-mail: alexisrouillard@yahoo.co.u

    2010-05-20

    In this paper, we use coronal and heliospheric images from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) spacecraft to track streamer blobs into the heliosphere and to observe them being swept up and compressed by the fast wind from low-latitude coronal holes. From an analysis of their elongation/time tracks, we discover a 'locus of enhanced visibility' where neighboring blobs pass each other along the line of sight and their corotating spiral is seen edge-on. The detailed shape of this locus accounts for a variety of east-west asymmetries and allows us to recognize the spiral of blobs by its signatures in the STEREO images: in the eastern view from STEREO-A, the leading edge of the spiral is visible as a moving wavefront where foreground ejections overtake background ejections against the sky and then fade. In the western view from STEREO-B, the leading edge is only visible close to the Sun-spacecraft line where the radial path of ejections nearly coincides with the line of sight. In this case, we can track large-scale waves continuously back to the lower corona and see that they originate as face-on blobs.

  3. Upgrading railroad test track, Pueblo, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, K. III; Chamberlain, K.

    1997-01-01

    The railroad test track (RTT) at the Transportation Technology Center (TTC) in Pueblo, Colo., was constructed in the early 1970s to support high-speed testing of new railroad rolling stock. Through the years it has been used to test a wide range of railroad passenger and freight cars and locomotives. Now, 20 years later, a new high-speed train set is being procured by Amtrak for service in the improved Northeast Corridor. The test facilities at Pueblo will play an important role in acceptance and safety testing of new high-speed train sets in the US. The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) commissioned a study to review the existing condition of the test track and to make recommendations as to possible improvement options so that the facility would be able to test current and future generations of high-speed rail equipment. This paper describes the condition of the test track and explores ways in which it may be modified to accommodate the testing of high-speed train technologies in the near future and into the next century.

  4. Unsaturated Groundwater and Heat Transport Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-05-15

    TOUGH2-MP is a massive parallel version of the TOUGH2 Code, designed for computationally efficient parallel simulation of isothermal and nonisothermal flows of multicomponent, multiphase fluids in one, two, and three-dimensional porous and fractured media. The code runs on computers with parallel architecture or clusters and can be used for applications, such as radioactive waste disposal, CO2 geological sequestration, environmental assessment and remediation, reservoir engineering, and groundwater hydrology. The parallel simulator has achieved orders-of-the-magnitude improvement inmore » computational time and/or modeling problem size. The parallel simulator uses fully implicit time differencing and solves large, sparse linear systems arising from discretization of the partial differential equations for mass and energy balance. A domain decomposition approach is adopted for multiphase flow simulations with coarse- granularity parallel computation. Current version of TOUGH2-MP includes following modules: EOS1, EOS2, EOS3, EOS4, EOS5, EOS7, EOS7R, E0S8, EOS9, ECO2N, EWASG, and T2R3D.« less

  5. Tracking single particle rotation: Probing dynamics in four dimensions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anthony, Stephen Michael; Yu, Yan

    2015-04-29

    Direct visualization and tracking of small particles at high spatial and temporal resolution provides a powerful approach to probing complex dynamics and interactions in chemical and biological processes. Analysis of the rotational dynamics of particles adds a new dimension of information that is otherwise impossible to obtain with conventional 3-D particle tracking. In this review, we survey recent advances in single-particle rotational tracking, with highlights on the rotational tracking of optically anisotropic Janus particles. Furthermore, strengths and weaknesses of the various particle tracking methods, and their applications are discussed.

  6. Proton spin tracking with symplectic integration of orbit motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.; Dutheil, Y.; Huang, H.; Meot, F.; Ranjbar, V.

    2015-05-03

    Symplectic integration had been adopted for orbital motion tracking in code SimTrack. SimTrack has been extensively used for dynamic aperture calculation with beam-beam interaction for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Recently proton spin tracking has been implemented on top of symplectic orbital motion in this code. In this article, we will explain the implementation of spin motion based on Thomas-BMT equation, and the benchmarking with other spin tracking codes currently used for RHIC. Examples to calculate spin closed orbit and spin tunes are presented too.

  7. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between the standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.

  8. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between themore » standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.« less

  9. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; White, R.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes experiments carried out on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] to investigate the dependence of β-limiting disruption characteristics on toroidal field strength. The hard disruptions found at the β-limit in high field plasmas were not found at low field, even for β's 50% higher than the empirical β-limit of β{sub n} ≈ 2 at high field. Comparisons of experimentally measured β's to TRANSP simulations suggest anomalous loss of up to half of the beam fast ions in the highest β, low field shots. The anomalous transport responsible for the fast ion losses may at the same time broaden the pressure profile. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes, fishbone instabilities, and Geodesic Acoustic Modes are investigated as possible causes of the enhanced losses. Here, we present the first observations of high frequency fishbones [F. Zonca et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 085009 (2009)] on TFTR. The interpretation of Axi-symmetric Beam-driven Modes as Geodesic Acoustic Modes and their possible correlation with transport barrier formation are also presented.

  10. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realisticmore » high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.« less

  11. PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC PDF icon PIA - eTrack, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC

  12. Classification of groundwater at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, J.B.

    1994-08-01

    Groundwater occurring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been classified according to the ``Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ground-Water Protection Strategy`` (June 1988). All of the groundwater units at the NTS are Class II, groundwater currently (IIA) or potentially (IIB) a source of drinking water. The Classification Review Area (CRA) for the NTS is defined as the standard two-mile distance from the facility boundary recommended by EPA. The possibility of expanding the CRA was evaluated, but the two-mile distance encompasses the area expected to be impacted by contaminant transport during a 10-year period (EPA,s suggested limit), should a release occur. The CRA is very large as a consequence of the large size of the NTS and the decision to classify the entire site, not individual areas of activity. Because most activities are located many miles hydraulically upgradient of the NTS boundary, the CRA generally provides much more than the usual two-mile buffer required by EPA. The CRA is considered sufficiently large to allow confident determination of the use and value of groundwater and identification of potentially affected users. The size and complex hydrogeology of the NTS are inconsistent with the EPA guideline assumption of a high degree of hydrologic interconnection throughout the review area. To more realistically depict the site hydrogeology, the CRA is subdivided into eight groundwater units. Two main aquifer systems are recognized: the lower carbonate aquifer system and the Cenozoic aquifer system (consisting of aquifers in Quaternary valley fill and Tertiary volcanics). These aquifer systems are further divided geographically based on the location of low permeability boundaries.

  13. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederick, W.T.; Keil, K.G.; Rhodes, M.C.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District is evaluating environmental radioactive contamination at several Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites throughout New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Indiana. The investigations follow the process defined in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). Groundwater data from the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York were evaluated for isotopic uranium ratios, specifically uranium-234 versus uranium-238 (U- 234 and U-238, respectively), and the results were presented at Waste Management 2006. Since uranium naturally occurs in all groundwater, it can be difficult to distinguish where low-concentration impacts from past releases differ from the high end of a site-specific natural background range. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 (unity) due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow and may take hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable increase is seen in the natural isotopic ratio. If site releases are the source of uranium being measured in groundwater, the U-234 to U-238 ratio is commonly closer to 1, which normally reflects FUSRAP-related, uranium-contaminated wastes and soils. This lower ratio occurs because not enough residence time has elapsed since the 1940's and 1950's for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered the contamination-derived ratio. An evaluation of NFSS-specific and regional groundwater data indicate that an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a signature value to help distinguish natural groundwater, which may have a broad background range, from zones impacted by past releases. (authors)

  14. A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

    2006-05-16

    This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

  15. Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface Authors: Cheng, Guanglei ; Veazey, Joshua P. ; Irvin, Patrick ; Cen, Cheng ; Bogorin, Daniela F. ; Bi, Feng ; Huang, Mengchen ; Lu, Shicheng ; Bark, Chung-Wung ; Ryu, Sangwoo ; Cho, Kwang-Hwan ; Eom, Chang-Beom ; Levy, Jeremy Publication Date:

  16. Groundwater Level Status Report for Fiscal Year 2007 - Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon P. Allen, Richard J. Koch

    2008-03-17

    The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Fiscal Year 2007 is provided in this report. The Groundwater Level Monitoring Project was instituted in 2005 to provide a framework for the collection and processing of quality controlled groundwater level data. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 166 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 25 intermediate wells, and 96 alluvial wells, and 11 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 133 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well.

  17. Utilizing Isotopic Uranium Ratios in Groundwater Evaluations at NFSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, M.C.; Keil, K.G.; Frederick, W.T.; Papura, T.R.; Leithner, J.S.; Peterson, J.M.; MacDonell, M.M.

    2006-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Buffalo District is currently evaluating environmental contamination at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) as part of its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The NFSS is located in the Town of Lewiston in western New York and has been used to store uranium-contaminated materials since 1944. Most of the radioactive materials are currently contained in an on-site structure, but past contamination remains in soil and groundwater. As a naturally occurring radionuclide, uranium is present in all groundwater. Because contamination levels at the site are quite low, it can be difficult to distinguish zones that have been impacted by the past releases from those at the high end of the natural background range. The differences in the isotopic ratio of uranium-234 (U-234) to uranium-238 (U-238) between natural groundwater systems and affected areas are being used in an innovative way to better define the nature and extent of groundwater contamination at NFSS. In natural groundwater, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 exceeds 1 due to the alpha particle recoil effect, in which U-234 is preferentially mobilized to groundwater from adjacent rock or soil. This process is very slow, and it can be hundreds to thousands of years before a measurable impact is seen in the isotopic ratio. Thus, as a result of the recoil effect, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 will be higher in natural groundwater than in contaminated groundwater. This means that if site releases were the source of the uranium being measured in groundwater at NFSS, the ratio of U-234 to U-238 would be expected to be very close to 1 (the same ratio that exists in wastes and soil at the site), because not enough time has elapsed for the alpha particle recoil effect to have significantly altered that ratio. From an evaluation of site and regional groundwater data, an isotopic ratio of 1.2 has been identified as a site-specific signature to help distinguish natural groundwater (e.g., at the high end of the background range) from zones impacted by past releases. This information is crucial for focusing the ongoing CERCLA evaluation and decision making process. This signature value is not applied as a bright line, e.g., to define samples with ratios of U-234 to U-238 above 1.2 as representing background and those with ratios below 1.2 as being affected by site releases. Rather, this ratio serves as a weight of evidence for use in conjunction with other site information, including historical activities, to form science-based decisions regarding contaminated groundwater. This novel approach for developing a groundwater signature from the isotopic uranium ratio has proven to be a very useful tool for NFSS, and it is now being considered for broader application. (authors)

  18. Marine asset security and tracking (MAST) system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gregory Richard; Smith, Stephen Fulton; Moore, Michael Roy; Dobson, Eric Lesley; Blair, Jeffrey Scott; Duncan, Christopher Allen; Lenarduzzi, Roberto

    2008-07-01

    Methods and apparatus are described for marine asset security and tracking (MAST). A method includes transmitting identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data from a radio frequency tag. An apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits identification data, location data and environmental state sensor data. Another method includes transmitting identification data and location data from a radio frequency tag using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation. Another apparatus includes a radio frequency tag that transmits both identification data and location data using hybrid spread-spectrum modulation.

  19. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume tracking methodology helped the USACE Buffalo District track soil quantity changes from projected excavation work over time and across space, providing the basis for an explanation of some of the project cost and schedule variances.

  20. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

    2001-03-01

    This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

  1. Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

    1996-09-01

    In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

  2. Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

    2008-01-11

    It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specifically consider two categories of information that comprise, are pertinent to, or facilitate such a groundwater assessment. The first category includes the vast assortment of descriptive geologic, hydrologic, chemical, and climatic data related to the regional groundwater aquifers in the Salton Sea area and the occurrence, movement, production, and quality of groundwater. We will refer to these as Hard Data. They may include, for example, spatially distributed geologic or lithologic information, operational wells, water level monitoring data, and well production reports, groundwater quality information, other land use information, historical precipitation and climatic records, and so forth. The second category includes more interpretive or analytic information based upon, or derived from these data and knowledge of related geologic, hydrologic, chemical, or climatic processes.

  3. FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2008-07-18

    The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the NCP. This FS conforms to the conditions set forth in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 2003) and amendments, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). This also includes Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-00C for completing all 200 Area non-tank farm OU pre-Record of Decision (ROD) documents on or before December 31, 2011. This FS supports the final remedy selection for the 200-ZP-1 OU, as described in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI/FS work plan) (DOE/RL-2003-55), as agreed upon by RL and EPA. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-48B required Draft A of the 200-ZP-1 OU FS and proposed plan to be transmitted to EPA by September 30, 2007. As agreed to with EPA in the 200 Area Unit Managers Meeting Groundwater Operable Unit Status (FH-0503130), the baseline risk assessment (BRA) was delayed from inclusion in the remedial investigation (RI) report and is completed and documented in this FS. The Remedial Investigation Report for 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI report) (DOE/RL-2006-24) included an evaluation of human health and ecological risks and hazards. The RI report identified the radiological and chemical contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that represent the primary risks to human health and the environment. The complete risk assessment in this FS incorporates additional analytical data from the unconfined aquifer that were obtained during or after preparation of the RI report, particularly for carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99. This FS also includes the initial results from an ongoing study of technetium-99 contamination near WMA-T, the sampling of new wells near the 216-W-LC laundry waste crib and T Plant, updated Hanford vadose zone fate and transport modeling, and groundwater particle-tracking analysis. The purpose of this FS is to develop and evaluate alternatives for remediation of the groundwater in the 200-ZP-1 OU. The alternatives considered provide a range of potential response actions (i.e., no action; institutional controls and monitored natural attenuation [MNA]; and pump-and-treat with MNA, flow-path control, and institutional controls) that are appropriate to address site-specific conditions. The alternatives are evaluated against seven of the nine CERCLA evaluation criteria defined in Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (EPA/540/G-891004). The remaining two CERCLA criteria will be formally assessed during the public comment period. The FS evaluation serves as the basis for identifying a remedy to mitigate potential risks to human health and the environment. A preferred alternative (or alternatives) will be presented to the public for review and comment in the proposed plan.

  4. Alignment of the ALICE Inner Tracking System with Cosmic-Ray Tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aamodt, K.; Awes, Terry C; Enokizono, Akitomo; Silvermyr, David O; ALICE, Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiment devoted to investigating the strongly interacting matter created in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC energies. The ALICE ITS, Inner Tracking System, consists of six cylindrical layers of silicon detectors with three different technologies; in the outward direction: two layers of pixel detectors, two layers each of drift, and strip detectors. The number of parameters to be determined in the spatial alignment of the 2198 sensor modules of the ITS is about 13,000. The target alignment precision is well below 10 {micro}m in some cases (pixels). The sources of alignment information include survey measurements, and the reconstructed tracks from cosmic rays and from proton-proton collisions. The main track-based alignment method uses the Millepede global approach. An iterative local method was developed and used as well. We present the results obtained for the ITS alignment using about 10{sup 5} charged tracks from cosmic rays that have been collected during summer 2008, with the ALICE solenoidal magnet switched off.

  5. Subtitle D: Groundwater monitoring and corrective action requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.G.; McDaniel, L. )

    1993-01-01

    The newly promulgated Subtitle-D landfill regulations (40 CFR 258) require that landfill owners and operators adhere to certain design or performance standards for the location, design, operation and closure of municipal solid waste landfill facilities. This paper addresses the groundwater monitoring requirements and corrective action requirements of those regulations. The section of the regulations addressing groundwater monitoring and corrective action, Subpart-E, is the most comprehensive section of the regulations. As with other parts of the regulation, Subpart-E also contains inherent flexibility. This paper addresses the compliance schedules, exemptions to Subpart-E, and groundwater monitoring systems which include: background determination, multi-unit systems, hydrogeologic investigations, and monitoring well installation. The paper further addresses sampling and analysis requirements for detection and assessment monitoring, and the requirements for corrective action such as remedy assessment, selection, and implementation.

  6. Tracer advection by steady groundwater flow in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sposito, Garrison; Weeks, Scott W.

    1997-01-02

    The perfectly stratified aquifer has often been investigated as a simple, tractable model for exploring new theoretical issues in subsurface hydrology. Adopting this approach, we show that steady groundwater flows in the perfectly stratified aquifer are always confined to a set of nonintersecting permanent surfaces, on which both streamlines and vorticity lines lie. This foliation of the flow domain exists as well for steady groundwater flows in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer. In the present model example it is a direct consequence of the existence of a stream function, we then demonstrate that tracer plume advection by steady groundwater flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer is never ergodic, regardless of the initial size of the tracer plume. This nonergodicity, which holds also for tracer advection in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer, implies that stochastic theories of purely advective tracer plume movement err in assuming ergodic behavior to simplify probabilistic calculations of plume spatial concentration moments.

  7. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  8. Anomalous behavior of the Pd/D system. Final report, June 1989-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpak, S.J.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    In a news conference on 23 March 1989, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that nuclear events could be initiated by the electrochemical compression of deuterium into a palladium lattice. When researchers around the world tried to reproduce the effects described by Pons and Fleischmann in their laboratories, the results were mixed. The nature of the announcement and the Irreproducibility of the effect divided the scientific community into believers and skeptics, indicating religious fervor rather than scientific reasoning. Shortly after the Fleischmann-Pons announcement, a program at NRaD investigated anomalous effects in the Pd/D system. The NRaD program investigated the Pd/D system using standard electrochemical techniques to determine conditions for achieving high Pd/D loadings. Metallurgical aspects of the Pd/D system and the effect of additives were also examined. Tritium content in the gas/liquid phases and radiation emissions were monitored during electrolysis. This report summarizes the investigation results.

  9. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?hvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of a ?hvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty a?hvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.

  10. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  11. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμhvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of amore » μhvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty aμhvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.« less

  12. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  13. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small massmore » ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  14. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  15. Selected ground-water data for Yucca Mountain Region, Southern Nevada and Eastern California, through December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Camera, Richard J.; Locke, Glenn L.; Munson, Rodney H.

    1999-07-30

    Data on ground-water levels, discharges, and withdrawals from a variety of ground-water sources in the study area are reported for calendar year 1997.

  16. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  17. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  18. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  19. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  1. Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

    2003-09-29

    This plan provides updates the ongoing RCRA interim status groundwater monitoring program for the U-12 crib and provides a proposed RCRA final status post-closure groundwater monitoring program.

  2. Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Philip, J.

    1995-04-01

    The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

  3. Reaching Site Closure for Groundwater under Multiple Regulatory Agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glucksberg, N.; Shephard, Gene; Peters, Jay; Couture, B.

    2008-01-15

    Groundwater at the Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company (CYAPCO) Haddam Neck Plant (HNP) requires investigation of both radionuclides and chemical constituents in order to achieve closure. Cleanup criteria for groundwater are regulated both by federal and state agencies. These requirements vary in both numerical values as well as the duration of post remediation monitoring. The only consistent requirement is the development of a site conceptual model and an understanding of the hydrogeologic conditions that will govern contaminant transport and identify potential receptors. To successfully reach closure under each agency, it is paramount to understand the different requirements during the planning stages of the investigation. Therefore, the conceptual site model, groundwater transport mechanisms, and potential receptors must be defined. Once the hydrogeology is understood, a long term groundwater program can then be coordinated to meet each regulatory agency requirement to both terminate the NRC license and reach site closure under RCRA. Based on the different criteria, the CTDEP-LR (or RSR criteria) are not only bounding, but also requires the longest duration. As with most decommissioning efforts, regulatory attention is focused on the NRC, however, with the recent industry initiatives based on concern of tritium releases to groundwater at other plants, it is likely that the USEPA and state agencies may continue to drive site investigations. By recognizing these differences, data quality objectives can include all agency requirements, thus minimizing rework or duplicative efforts. CYAPCO intends to complete groundwater monitoring for the NRC and CTDEP-RD by July 2007. However, because shallow remediations are still being conducted, site closure under USEPA and CTDEP-LR is projected to be late 2011.

  4. Sim Track User's Manual (v 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Y.

    2010-01-27

    SimTrack is a simple c++ library designed for the numeric particle tracking in the high energy accelerators. It adopts the 4th order symplectic integrator for the optical transport in the magnetic elements. The 4-D and 6-D weak-strong beam-beam treatments are integrated in it for the beam-beam studies. SimTrack is written with c++ class and standard template library. It provides versatile functions to manage elements and lines. It supports a large range of types of elements. New type of element can be easily created in the library. SimTrack calculates Twiss, coupling and fits tunes, chromaticities and corrects closed orbits. AC dipole and AC multipole are available in this library. SimTrack allows change of element parameters during tracking.

  5. Groundwater protection for the NuMI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wehmann, A.; Smart, W.; Menary, S.; Hylen, J.; Childress, S.

    1997-10-01

    The physics requirements for the long base line neutrino oscillation experiment MINOS dictate that the NuMI beamline be located in the aquifer at Fermilab. A methodology is described for calculating the level of radioactivation of groundwater caused by operation of this beamline. A conceptual shielding design for the 750 meter long decay pipe is investigated which would reduce radioactivation of the groundwater to below government standards. More economical shielding designs to meet these requirements are being explored. Also, information on local geology, hydrogeology, government standards, and a glossary have been included.

  6. Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

  7. Track A - Energy Systems Innovations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A - Energy Systems Innovations Track A - Energy Systems Innovations Presentations from Track A, Energy Systems Innovations, of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Space Conditioning and Hot Water Systems; Options for Insulating Foundations; Mini-split Systems; Heat Pump Water Heaters; Hydronic Heating Control

  8. Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Presentations from Track C, Market-Driven Research Solutions of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Outreach Initiatives; Case Studies; Technical Approach to Home Energy Management; Valuing Energy Efficiency; Software Accuracy Issues in

  9. Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool Track Bioenergy Legislation with New Web Tool February 27, 2014 - 5:59pm Addthis The Bioenergy KDF Legislative Library aims to help the public, industry, and decision makers quickly and easily find legislation related to the production and use of biofuels. Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs With thousands of proposed bills floating through Congress every session, it's difficult to keep track of legislation

  10. Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States | Department of Energy Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Now in its eighth edition, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)'s Tracking the Sun report series is dedicated to summarizing trends in the installed price of

  11. Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call: Extracting and Using Data from Tracking Systems, call slides and discussion summary, October 11, 2012. PDF icon Call Slides and Discussion Summary More Documents & Publications Data and Evaluation Kickoff Call Data Aggregation Strategies for Evaluation and Reporting Calculating and Communicating Program Results

  12. Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sharp Interface Tracking in Rotating Microflows of Solvent Extraction The objective of this project is to develop a specialized sharp interface tracking simulation capability for predicting interaction of micron-sized drops and bubbles in rotating flows relevant to optimized design of contactor devices used in solvent

  13. End-to-End Supply Chain Tracking - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Find More Like This Return to Search End-to-End Supply Chain Tracking Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryORNL researchers have developed a method for tracking sensitive or hazardous materials through a supply chain across loosely coupled networks. This system enables tracking from manufacturing, distribution, and warehousing to transportation. As international trade and off-shore sourcing continues to

  14. Tracking Santa: An Interview with the Head Researcher | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A - Energy Systems Innovations Track A - Energy Systems Innovations Presentations from Track A, Energy Systems Innovations, of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Space Conditioning and Hot Water Systems; Options for Insulating Foundations; Mini-split Systems; Heat Pump Water Heaters; Hydronic Heating Control

  15. DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Waste Tracking Contract | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Waste Tracking Contract DOE Seeks Small Businesses for Waste Tracking Contract July 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, 803-952-8564 bill.taylor@srs.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Proposal (RFP) seeking Small Business Administration certified (8(a)) small business firms to provide DOE Transportation Tracking and Communications (TRANSCOM) Technical Support Services. A Requirements Contract will be awarded as a result of

  16. Uranium Track Team | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Track Team Uranium Track Team Posted: July 22, 2013 - 3:31pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 10, Issue 1 | 2013 Y-12's inventory and accounting processes for enriched uranium are more meticulous than for any other metal. "We have to track every gram of uranium-235," said Amy Wilson of Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability. Accordingly, even the smallest byproducts from the manufacturing processes, as well as piece parts from disassembly and dismantlement activities, are collected and

  17. WIPP Installs Underground Personnel Notification and Tracking System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2016 WIPP Installs Underground Personnel Notification and Tracking System A new underground Wireless Notification and Tracking System (WNTS) has been installed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) that allows for two-way communication for both talk and text, audible and flashing alarms and allows personnel to immediately signal the Central Monitoring Room (CMR) in the event of an emergency. It also provides real-time tracking of all personnel entering the WIPP underground. "I'm

  18. WIPP Selected Charter Member of National Environmental Performance Track Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selected Charter Member of National Environmental Performance Track Program CARLSBAD, N.M., December 14, 2000 - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has selected the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as a charter member of the National Environmental Performance Track Program. EPA designed the performance track program to recognize and encourage facilities that go beyond compliance with regulatory requirements. These top performers attain levels of

  19. DOE Awards Nye County Grant for Community-Based Groundwater Monitoring |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Nye County Grant for Community-Based Groundwater Monitoring DOE Awards Nye County Grant for Community-Based Groundwater Monitoring December 29, 2015 - 12:25pm Addthis Tour participants are briefed on the Nye County Community-Based Groundwater Monitoring Program before observing sampling at the Amargosa Valley RV Park. Tour participants are briefed on the Nye County Community-Based Groundwater Monitoring Program before observing sampling at the Amargosa Valley RV Park.

  20. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  1. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, Spent Nuclear Fuels Project: Report for April, May, and June 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2006-08-30

    This report provides a summary of groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during April, May, and June 2006

  2. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

  3. ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office Integrated Safety Management ...

  4. Dominican Republic-Fast-Track Development of TransformativeClimate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fast-Track Development of Transformative Climate-Compatible Development Plans and Building of Regional and Local Capacities Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Dominican...

  5. ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office Occupational Medicine - ...

  6. ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Bradner, H.; Solmitz...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ON THE ANALYSIS OF BUBBLE CHAMBER TRACKS Bradner, H.; Solmitz, F. 08 HYDROGEN; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; BEVATRON; BUBBLE CHAMBERS; DETECTION; HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN; INVENTIONS;...

  7. Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United States Tracking the Sun VIII: The Installed Price of Residential and Non-Residential Photovoltaic Systems in the United ...

  8. Add RES 2016 Energy Track Sessions to Your Calendar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download calendar invitations for the four energy track sessions being hosted by the Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy at the 2016 National Reservation Economic Summit.

  9. Corrective Action Tracking System User's Guide | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 07, 2004 Corrective Action Tracking System (CATS) User's Guide for Direct Web Access The Department of Energy (DOE) Corrective Action Management Program (CAMP) prescribes...

  10. Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells Citation Details In-Document ... B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International ...

  11. track 4: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review track 4: enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review The Energy Department pursues research ...

  12. Los Alamos scientists detect and track single molecules with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecules with nanoscale carbon cylinders Researchers have now shown that semiconducting carbon nanotubes have the potential to detect and track single molecules in water. January...

  13. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation ... cells, enabling them to follow cellular chemical changes in real time, without bias. ...

  14. ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory ORO Verification of Employment Tracking...

  15. Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tracking Living Cells as They Differentiate in Real Time Print Protein phosphorylation regulates protein function in a cell, either activating or inactivating the proteins...

  16. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of ... Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and ...

  17. A Comparison of Library Tracking Methods in High Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Library Tracking Methods in High Performance Computing Computer System Cluster and Networking Summer Institute 2013 Poster Seminar William Rosenberger (New Mexico Tech), Dennis...

  18. Application Of ERT For Tracking CO2 Plume Growth And Movement At The SECARB Cranfield Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, C R; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Aines, R; Friedmann, S J

    2009-04-27

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) installed to track the development of an injected subsurface CO{sub 2} plume at the SECARB Cranfield, MS. sequestration site will be the deepest subsurface application of this method to date. ERT utilizes vertical arrays of electrodes, usually in a cross-well arrangement, to perform four-electrode measurements of changes in the spatial distribution of electrical resistance within a subsurface formation. Because a formation containing super-critical CO{sub 2} is approximately five times as resistive as its surroundings, significant resistance changes are anticipated during plume growth and movement within a brine-filled formation. ERT has also been shown to be quite sensitive to CO{sub 2} saturation changes. The Cranfield ERT electrode arrays will be emplaced at a depth exceeding 10,000 ft. (3280 m); the system design and installation must address significant challenges associated with both the depth and borehole conditions including temperatures of 258 F (126 C), pressures exceeding 5000 psi and a groundwater pH of 3. In addition, the system must allow co-located emplacement and concurrent operation with other monitoring techniques that utilize the same boreholes. ERT electrode and cabling will be attached to the outside of the well casing, allowing free access to the interior of the well, which is required by some of the other monitoring techniques being fielded. We will highlight these design challenges along with preliminary simulations indicating the anticipated level of imaging and the advantages of applying the technique in conjunction with other methods (such as cross-well seismics) to more accurately track the properties, location and movement of CO{sub 2} plumes.

  19. Graph facilitates tracking water and gas influx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruy, H.J. )

    1990-03-26

    Graphing the vertical distribution of reservoir volume is an easy method for estimating the acre-ft remaining to be exploited in reservoirs with water or gas encroachment. To evaluate reservoir performance and estimate oil and gas reserves in water-drive reservoirs or oil reservoirs with a gas cap, it is necessary to determine the magnitude of the movement of oil-water and gas-oil contact surfaces. In reviewing reserve estimates and reservoir studies done by others, the authors have found that very few reservoir engineers or geologists have an easy method for tracking the movement of these surfaces and estimating the volumes of oil displaced water encroachment, gas cap expansion, or the volumes of oil lost by wetting the gas cap. The following method evolved from the author's studies of the East Texas field starting in 1942, and it took this form in the early 1950s.

  20. Muon Tracking to Detect Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwellenbach, D.; Dreesen, W.; Green, J. A.; Tibbitts, A.; Schotik, G.; Borozdin, K.; Bacon, J.; Midera, H.; Milner, C.; Morris, C.; Perry, J.; Barrett, S.; Perry, K.; Scott, A.; Wright, C.; Aberle, D.

    2013-03-18

    Previous experiments have proven that nuclear assemblies can be imaged and identified inside of shipping containers using vertical trajectory cosmic-ray muons with two-sided imaging. These experiments have further demonstrated that nuclear assemblies can be identified by detecting fission products in coincidence with tracked muons. By developing these technologies, advanced sensors can be designed for a variety of warhead monitoring and detection applications. The focus of this project is to develop tomographic-mode imaging using near-horizontal trajectory muons in conjunction with secondary particle detectors. This will allow imaging in-situ without the need to relocate the objects and will enable differentiation of special nuclear material (SNM) from other high-Z materials.