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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C.T. Hamik, and O. Steinbock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking Waves and Vortex Nucleation in Excitable Systems with Anomalous Dispersion N. Manz, C obtained from a chemical reaction-diffusion system in which wave propagation is limited to a finite band of wavelengths and in which no solitary pulses exist. Wave patterns increase their size through repeated

Steinbock, Oliver

2

Results of Tritium Tracking and Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site 200 Area State-Approved Land Disposal Site-FY1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) processes contaminated liquids derived from Hanford Site facilities. The clean water generated by these processes is occasionally enriched in tritium and is discharged to the 200 Area State Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). Groundwater monitoring for tritium and other constituents is required by the state-issued permit at 21 wells surrounding the facility. During FY 1999, average tritium activities in most wells declined from average activities in 1998. The exception was deep well 69948-77C, where tritium results were at an all-time high (77,000 pCi/L) as a result of the delayed penetration of effluent deeper into the aquifer. Of the 12 constituents with permit enforcement limits, which are monitored in SALDS proximal wells, all were within limits during FY 1999. Water level measurements in nearby wells indicate that a small hydraulic mound exists around the SALDS facility as a result of discharges. This feature is directing groundwater flow radially outward a short distance before the regional northeasterly flow predominates. Evaluation of this condition indicates that the network is currently adequate for tracking potential effects of the SALDS on the groundwater. Recommendations include the discontinuation of ammonia, benzene, tetrahydrofuran, and acetone from the regular groundwater constituent list; designating background well 299-W8-1 as a tritium-tracking well only, and the use of quadruplicate averages of field pH, instead of a single laboratory measurement, as a permit compliance parameter.

Barnett, D.B.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

3

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as decision variables. Groundwater flow and particle-tracking models MODFLOW and MODPATH and a GO tool GLOBE; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem, the simulation is carried out with available groundwater models for flow and transport, and the op- timization

Neumaier, Arnold

4

TRACKING SITE  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

5

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

Anomalous Microwave Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improved knowledge of diffuse Galactic emission is important to maximize the scientific return from scheduled CMB anisotropy missions. Cross-correlation of microwave maps with maps of the far-IR dust continuum show a ubiquitous microwave emission component whose spatial distribution is traced by far-IR dust emission. The spectral index of this emission, beta_{radio} = -2.2 (+0.5 -0.7) is suggestive of free-free emission but does not preclude other candidates. Comparison of H-alpha and microwave results show that both data sets have positive correlations with the far-IR dust emission. Microwave data, however, are consistently brighter than can be explained solely from free-free emission traced by H-alpha. This ``anomalous'' microwave emission can be explained as electric dipole radiation from small spinning dust grains. The anomalous component at 53 GHz is 2.5 times as bright as the free-free emission traced by H-alpha, providing an approximate normalization for models with significant spinning dust emission.

A. Kogut

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files are solved. A simple file is made of Brownian hard spheres that diffuse stochastically in an effective 1D channel. Generally, Brownian files are heterogeneous: the spheres' diffusion coefficients are distributed and the initial spheres' density is non-uniform. In renewal-anomalous files, the distribution of waiting times for individual jumps is exponential as in Brownian files, yet obeys: {\\psi}_{\\alpha} (t)~t^(-1-{\\alpha}), 0renewal as all the particles attempt to jump at the same time. It is shown that the mean square displacement (MSD) in a renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous file, , obeys, ~[_{nrml}]^{\\alpha}, where _{nrml} is the MSD in the corresponding Brownian file. This scaling is an outcome of an exact relation (derived here) connecting probability density functions of Brownian files and renewal-anomalous files. It is also shown that non-renewal-anomalous files are slower than the corresponding renewal ones.

Ophir Flomenbom

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Hanford Story: Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

9

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to determine a general groundwater protection strategy and groundwater quality standards for the state, to be approved by...

10

Accelerating and Retarding Anomalous Diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper Gaussian models of retarded and accelerated anomalous diffusion are considered. Stochastic differential equations of fractional order driven by single or multiple fractional Gaussian noise terms are introduced to describe retarding and accelerating subdiffusion and superdiffusion. Short and long time asymptotic limits of the mean squared displacement of the stochastic processes associated with the solutions of these equations are studied. Specific cases of these equations are shown to provide possible descriptions of retarding or accelerating anomalous diffusion.

Chai Hok Eab; S. C. Lim

2012-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation,...

13

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

14

Anomalous-viscosity current drive  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Bioaugmentation of Groundwater ............................ 2589 5 Intrinsic Bioremediation and Modeling attenuation. 1 Introduction A patent for in situ bioremediation of groundwater contaminated with gasoline13 In Situ: Groundwater Bioremediation T. C. Hazen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley

Hazen, Terry

16

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are “preventive maintenance” documents that cover all processes and materials at...

17

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Groundwater monitoring plan for the proposed state-approved land disposal structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document outlines a detection-level groundwater monitoring program for the state-approved land disposal structure (SALDS). The SALDS is an infiltration basin proposed for disposal of treated effluent from the 200 Areas of the Hanford Site. The purpose of this plan is to present a groundwater monitoring program that is capable of determining the impact of effluent disposal at the SALDS on the quality of groundwater in the uppermost aquifer. This groundwater monitoring plan presents an overview of the SALDS, the geology and hydrology of the area, the background and indicator evaluation (detection) groundwater monitoring program, and an outline of a groundwater quality assessment (compliance) program. This plan does not provide a plan for institutional controls to track tritium beyond the SALDS.

Reidel, S.P.

1993-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The importance of conservation 7 What is Groundwater? The Hydrologic Cycle 8 Groundwater flow patterns 9 Saturated and unsaturated zones 9 Aquifers 10 Sole source aquifers 10 Water wells 12 Groundwater Quality Contamination and pollution, measuring... The High Plains Aquifer 22 Population served by groundwater 23 Competing uses for a limited resource 23 Groundwater declines 24 Contamination and Health Issues Water Testing 26 Regulatory Standards, Treatment Options 27 Table of Contents 3 Public...

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Anomalous  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site|Andrea4» AnnualCertification |impurity

22

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can ...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

23

Buying, Selling and Exporting Groundwater: Implications for Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Sales/ Lease Agreement, by Sandra Burns. Regulation of Exportation of Underground Water, by Doug Caroom. Roberts County Transportation Permits, by C.E. Williams. Export Fees: A Groundwater District Limits and Uses, by Jace Houston. The report also... in Texas, by Ronald Kaiser. Groundwater Transactions: Buyers Perspective, by Russell Johnson. Purchasing Groundwater for Export: The Kinney County Proposal, by Lynn Sherman. Model Lease of Groundwater Rights, by Ned Meister. Protecting Your Land and Water...

Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce A.; Silvey, Valeen

24

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

25

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

26

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

Connell, Carl W. Jr. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Carr, Jennifer S. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Conley, S. F. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Brown, W. L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Georgia Groundwater Use Act is to establish procedures to be followed to obtain a permit to withdraw, obtain or utilize groundwater and for the submission of information...

28

Anomalous Emission from HII regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

C. Dickinson

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cycle Track Lessons Learned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cycle Track Lessons Learned #12;Presentation Overview · Bicycling trends · Cycle track lessons learned · What is a "Cycle track"? · Essential design elements of cycle tracks Separation Width Crossing driveways & low-volume streets Signalized intersections #12;Trend in kilometers cycled per year

Bertini, Robert L.

30

Track 2: Worker Engagement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 2: Worker Engagement

31

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

32

Track 9: Quality Assurance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 9: Quality Assurance

33

Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

- D-Area Groundwater Savannah River Site - D-Area Groundwater January 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

34

Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

Kang, Peter Kyungchul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

36

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

37

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for Fiscal Year 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1997 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction continued in the 200-West Area to remove carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-vapor monitoring, and analysis and characterization of sediments sampled below a vadose-zone monitoring well. Source-term analyses for strontium-90 in 100-N Area vadose-zone sediments were performed using recent groundwater-monitoring data and knowledge of strontium`s ion-exchange properties. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1996 and June 1997. Water levels near the Columbia River increased during this period because the river stage was unusually high. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Groundwater monitoring system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A groundwater monitoring system includes a bore, a well casing within and spaced from the bore, and a pump within the casing. A water impermeable seal between the bore and the well casing prevents surface contamination from entering the pump. Above the ground surface is a removable operating means which is connected to the pump piston by a flexible cord. A protective casing extends above ground and has a removable cover. After a groundwater sample has been taken, the cord is disconnected from the operating means. The operating means is removed for taking away, the cord is placed within the protective casing, and the cover closed and locked. The system is thus protected from contamination, as well as from damage by accident or vandalism.

Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Richland, WA); Eschbach, Eugene A. (Richland, WA); Kelley, Roy C. (Kennewick, WA); Myers, David A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

CE 473/573 Groundwater Course information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Groundwater modeling 4.1. Introduction to finite-difference models 4.2. Models of groundwater flow 4.3. ModelsCE 473/573 Groundwater Fall 2011 Course information Instructor: Prof. Chris Rehmann rehmann of water and contaminants in groundwater systems to solve problems of groundwater resource evaluation

Rehmann, Chris

40

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar tracking apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to a solar tracking device which tracks the position of the sun using paired, partially-shaded photocells. Auxiliary photocells are used for initial acquisition of the sun and for the suppression of false tracking when the sun is obscured by clouds.

Hammons, Burrell E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) are being created in many parts of Texas to allow local citizens to manage and protect their groundwater. This publication answers frequently asked questions about groundwater and GCDs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

Harvey, Charles

44

Groundwater Recharge Simulator M. Tech. Thesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Groundwater Theory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 1.4 Groundwater Modelling System(GMS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 1.5 Chapter Reservoir/Lake Modelling 44 3.1 Lake and Groundwater Interaction

Sohoni, Milind

45

Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Medvedev Sergey

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

Groundwater Discharge Permit and Registration (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Discharge Permitting and Registration Program seeks to protect groundwater quality by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for wastewater discharges. The program...

47

Groundwater protection management program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the establishment of a groundwater protection management program to ensure compliance with DOE requirements and applicable Federal, state, and local laws and regulations. The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office has prepared a ``Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan`` (groundwater protection plan) of sufficient scope and detail to reflect the program`s significance and address the seven activities required in DOE Order 5400.1, Chapter 3, for special program planning. The groundwater protection plan highlights the methods designed to preserve, protect, and monitor groundwater resources at UMTRA Project processing and disposal sites. The plan includes an overview of the remedial action status at the 24 designated processing sites and identifies project technical guidance documents and site-specific documents for the UMTRA groundwater protection management program. In addition, the groundwater protection plan addresses the general information required to develop a water resources protection strategy at the permanent disposal sites. Finally, the plan describes ongoing activities that are in various stages of development at UMTRA sites (long-term care at disposal sites and groundwater restoration at processing sites). This plan will be reviewed annually and updated every 3 years in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

anomalous behaviours studied: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the diffraction patterns. Several 42 ANOMALOUS ISOTOPE SHIFTS IN Pb NUCLEI IN RMF THEORY CiteSeer Summary: We have studied the anomalous behaviour of isotopic shifts of Pb...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous energy exchange Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. and + represent normal anomalous Green's functions superconducting electron ordinary energy electron simple... . gain some insight into relative importance anomalous tree ......

50

NLO BFKL and Anomalous Dimensions of Light-Ray Operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators of twist two are obtained by analytical continuation of the anomalous dimensions of corresponding local operators. I demonstrate that the asymptotics of these anomalous dimensions at the "BFKL point" j ? 1 can be obtained by comparing the light-cone operator expansion with the high-energy expansion in Wilson lines.

Balitsky, Ian [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argu...

Thalabard, Simon; Galtier, Sebastien; Sergey, Medvedev

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Groundwater nitrates in the Seymour Aquifer: problem or resource?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 tx H2O Fall 2012 Story by Alejandra Arreola-Triana In the Rolling Plains of Texas, the Seymour Aquifer is the major source of water for Haskell, Jones and Knox counties. #31;e water from the Seymour Aquifer, however, contains nitrate levels... are working on ways to manage the nitrate levels in this aquifer. Tracking the source Nitrates in groundwater can come from runo#27;, fertilizer use, leaks from septic tanks, sewage and erosion of natural deposits, according to the U.S. Environmental...

Arreola-Triana, Alejandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are described for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants. An oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth. Withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene. 3 figures.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

57

Large scale tracking algorithms.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Data collection for groundwater study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting data for a recent groundwater study at Fermilab are collected together in one document, and are described in the context of how they were obtained and how they were used in the study.

Wehmann, A.A.; Malensek, A.J.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

59

 Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of...

60

Hoe Creek groundwater restoration, 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the summer of 1989, approximately 6.5 million gallons of contaminated groundwater were pumped from 23 wells at the Hoe Creek underground coal gasification site, near Gillette, Wyoming. The organic contaminants were removed using activated carbon before the water was sprayed on 15.4 acres at the sites. Approximately 2647 g (5.8 lb) of phenols and 10,714 g (23.6 lb) of benzene were removed from the site aquifers. Phenols, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and naphthalene concentrations were measured in 43 wells. Benzene is the only contaminant at the site exceeds the federal standard for drinking water (5 {mu}g/L). Benzene leaches into the groundwater and is slow to biologically degrade; therefore, the benzene concentration has remained high in the groundwater at the site. The pumping operation affected groundwater elevations across the entire 80-acre site. The water levels rebounded quickly when the pumping operation was stopped on October 1, 1989. Removing contaminated groundwater by pumping is not an effective way to clean up the site because the continuous release of benzene from coal tars is slow. Benzene will continue to leach of the tars for a long time unless its source is removed or the leaching rate retarded through mitigation techniques. The application of the treated groundwater to the surface stimulated plant growth. No adverse effects were noted or recorded from some 60 soil samples taken from twenty locations in the spray field area. 20 refs., 52 figs., 8 tabs.

Renk, R.R.; Crader, S.E.; Lindblom, S.R.; Covell, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

Smirnov, Sergey [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

Probing anomalous gauge boson couplings at LEP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We bound anomalous gauge boson couplings using LEP data for the Z {yields} {bar {integral}}{integral} partial widths. We use an effective field theory formalism to compute the one-loop corrections resulting from non-standard model three and four gauge boson vertices. We find that measurements at LEP constrain the three gauge boson couplings at a level comparable to that obtainable at LEPII.

Dawson, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Valencia, G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Physics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Bikini Atoll groundwater development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work.

Peterson, F.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Energy Tracking Software Platform  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acceleration has created an interactive energy tracking and visualization platform that supports decreasing electric, water, and gas usage. Homeowners have access to tools that allow them to gauge their use and track progress toward a smaller energy footprint. Real estate agents have access to consumption data, allowing for sharing a comparison with potential home buyers. Home builders have the opportunity to compare their neighborhood's energy efficiency with competitors. Home energy raters have a tool for gauging the progress of their clients after efficiency changes. And, social groups are able to help encourage members to reduce their energy bills and help their environment. EnergyIT.com is the business umbrella for all energy tracking solutions and is designed to provide information about our energy tracking software and promote sales. CompareAndConserve.com (Gainesville-Green.com) helps homeowners conserve energy through education and competition. ToolsForTenants.com helps renters factor energy usage into their housing decisions.

Ryan Davis; Nathan Bird; Rebecca Birx; Hal Knowles

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

Track 10: Feedback and Improvement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 10: Feedback and Improvement

69

ATLAS Tracking Event Data Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this report the event data model (EDM) relevant for tracking in the ATLAS experiment is presented. The core component of the tracking EDM is a common track object which is suited to describe tracks in the innermost tracking sub-detectors and in the muon detectors in offline as well as online reconstruction. The design of the EDM was driven by a demand for modularity and extensibility while taking into account the different requirements of the clients. The structure of the track object and the representation of the tracking-relevant information are described in detail.

Åkesson, P F; Costa, M J; Elsing, M; Fleischmann, S; Gaponenko, A N; Liebig, W; Moyse, E; Salzburger, A; Siebel, M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Groundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-economic modeling Introduction Groundwater interaction with surface water bodies and dependent ecosystems of conclusions and recommendations of some economic models or social sciences approaches regarding groundwaterGroundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

71

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

72

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

73

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Possible Explanation of Anomalous Earth Flybys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Doppler shift observations of several spacecrafts during near Earth flybys show an unexplained frequency shift. This shift is interpreted as an unexpected velocity change called Earth flyby anomaly. A theory of non-privileged reference frames is used to study the Doppler shift in such frames which are experimentally justified by the measured dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the solar system. The system in which the CMB is isotropic defines the privileged reference frame. The calculated frequency shift in non-privileged reference frames may give an explanation of the anomalous Earth flybys.

Walter Petry

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

Anomalous Light Absorption by Small Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new type of resonant light absorption by a small particle (nanocluster) is reported. The problem cannot be described within the commonly used dipole scattering approximation and should be studied with methods based upon the exact Mie solution. It is shown that the absorption cross-section has giant maxima realized at small values of the imaginary part of the complex dielectric permittivity of the particle. The maxima are situated in the vicinity of the plasmon (polariton) resonances and correspond to the regions where the dissipative damping equals the radiative one. The case is similar to the recently introduced anomalous scattering [PRL vol. 97, 263902 (2006)] and exhibits similar peculiarities.

Michael I. Tribelsky

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Groundwater Pollution David W. Watkins, Jr.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II 21 Mor 2003/10/14 page 391 i i i i i i i i Chapter 21 Groundwater Pollution Control David W pollution has resulted from the use of agricultural chemicals, and localized pollution has resulted from is frequently used to address groundwater pollution problems. In par- ticular, numerical groundwater simulation

Morton, David

77

GROUNDWATER FLOW MODELS C. P. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Uttaranchal) 1.0 INTRODUCTION The use of groundwater models is prevalent in the field of environmental scienceGROUNDWATER FLOW MODELS C. P. Kumar Scientist `E1' National Institute of Hydrology Roorkee ­ 247667, groundwater models are being applied to predict the transport of contaminants for risk evaluation. In general

Kumar, C.P.

78

CE 473/573 Groundwater Course information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-reactive and reactive contaminants 4. Groundwater modeling 4.1. Introduction to finite-difference models 4.2. Models of groundwater flow 4.3. Models of contaminant transport 4.4. Available models #12;Recommended textbooks FetterCE 473/573 Groundwater Fall 2009 Course information Instructor: Prof. Chris Rehmann rehmann

Rehmann, Chris

79

Anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with ENSO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the structure of anomalous atmospheric hydrologic processes associated with El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) using re-analysis data obtained from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) and outputs from GEOS climate model simulations. Our results show a very pronounced tropospheric warming over the equatorial central Pacific, with a double maxima located in 15{degrees}N and 15{degrees}/S, symmetric about the equator. This anomaly is in agreement with those found in earlier studies based on satellite estimates and is consistent with the predictions of Rossby wave dynamics. Most interestingly, we find a strong stratospheric temperature signal, which is tightly coupled to, but of opposite sign to the tropospheric anomaly. This temperature anomaly pattern is validated by the GCM simulations with respect to anomalous ENSO sea surface temperature (SST) forcing. The role of interaction between radiation and hydrologic cycle in producing and maintaining the ENSO anomalies is also investigated. 8 refs., 4 figs.

Lau, K.M.; Ho, C.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ATLAS sensitivity to Wtb anomalous couplings in top quark decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment to Wtb anomalous couplings in top pair production with semileptonic decay, pp -> t tbar -> W+ b W- bbar, with one of the W bosons decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. Several observables are examined, including the W helicity fractions and new quantities recently introduced, such as the ratios of helicity fractions and some angular asymmetries defined in the W rest frame. The dependence on anomalous couplings of all these observables has been previously obtained. In this work we show that some of the new observables also have smaller systematic uncertainties than the helicity fractions, with a dependence on anomalous couplings similar or stronger than for helicity fractions. Consequently, their measurement can significantly improve the limits on anomalous couplings. Moreover, the most sensitive measurements can be combined. In this case, the precision achieved in the determination of Wtb anomalous couplings can be of a few percent in the semileptonic channel alone.

J. A. Aguilar-Saavedra; J. Carvalho; N. Castro; A. Onofre; F. Veloso

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous electric conductions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Royal... expression for the anomalous exponent, equation (3.3). Because the electric fields are extremely high... Hot-Carrier Model for an Anomalous Exponent of ... Source:...

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous electron transport Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the electron energy equation more re- alistic and thus better behaved. 2.1 Anomalous Transport... -geometry MPD thruster flows including anomalous transport has been de- veloped...

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalously interacting extra Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON ANOMALOUS Summary: questionable, if one should study models with a fundamental Higgs boson, but with extra anomalous vector boson... vector bosons via normal standard model...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous pulmonary venous Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

case oF the month Summary: ). There was no anomalous pulmonary venous return. Right heart catheterization demonstrated a step up in mean oxygen... with partial anomalous...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous skin effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AT 35 GHZ Summary: us well into the anomalous skin effect regime. To facilitate comparison with the static resistivity... , we have used the the anomalous skin effect formula...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous specific heat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

be important for redistributing the anomalous heat content in the hot spot region to the remote Tropics... . The anomalous heat content of ... Source: Sobel, Adam - Department of...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous field effect Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with an anomalous friction torque being driven... by altering both the diabatic heating and surface friction fields. For example, in regions of anomalous... (Fig. 3b) and...

89

Comparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating vulnerability of production wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwaterage . Contamination . Numerical modeling . Water supply . USA Introduction Drinking-water productionComparison of particle-tracking and lumped-parameter age-distribution models for evaluating-source contaminant inputs at the water table, some representation of the distribution of groundwater ages in the well

90

Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System Pollution Prevention Tracking and Reporting System Welcome to the Department of Energy's Pollution Prevention Tracking and...

91

Circle Track Magazine Project GREEN: New Smyrna Track Testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Grassroots Renewable Fuels Revolution Presenters Forrest Jehlik -Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Danny Bocci (Argonne National Laboratory). Bob Bolles (Circle Track...

92

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Spring Semester 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Spring Semester 2009 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description tracers · Regional groundwater · Geology and groundwater occurrence · Groundwater models · Water Quality: Intermediate-level study of aquifer geology, groundwater flow, and related design factors. Includes de

Walter, M.Todd

93

AFBC Roadbed Project groundwater data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TVA permitted the use of AFBC material in a section of roadbed at Paducah, Kentucky, for the purpose of demonstrating its usability as a roadbed base. To determine if the material would leach and contaminate groundwater, four wells and seven lysimeters were installed beside and in the roadbed base material. In August 1991, TVA Field Engineering visited the AFBC Roadbed Project to collect samples and water quality data. The goal was to collect samples and data from four wells and seven lysimeters. All attempts to collect samples from the lysimeters failed with one exemption. All attempts to collect samples from the groundwater wells were successful. The analytical data from the four wells and one lysimeter are also attached. The well data is typical of groundwater in the Paducah, Kentucky area indicating that it was not affected by the AFBC roadbed material. The analysis of the lysimeter shows concentrations for iron and manganese above normal background levels, however, the data do not reflect significant concentrations of these heavy metals. Also, the difficulty in obtaining the lysimeter samples and the fact that the samples had to be composited to obtain sufficient quantity to analyze would make a qualitative evaluation of the data questionable.

Carpenter, W. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States). Engineering Lab.

1992-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Groundwater Use and Reporting Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control has established a groundwater management program, requiring entities withdrawing in excess of three million gallons during any one month to obtain...

96

Compendium of ordinances for groundwater protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater is an extremely important resource in the Tennessee Valley. Nearly two-thirds of the Tennessee Valley's residents rely, at least in part, on groundwater supplies for drinking water. In rural areas, approximately ninety-five percent of residents rely on groundwater for domestic supplies. Population growth and economic development increase the volume and kinds of wastes requiring disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal problems associated with increases in conventional wastewater and solid waste, technological advancements in recent decades have resulted in new chemicals and increased usage in agriculture, industry, and the home. Unfortunately, there has not been comparable progress in identifying the potential long-term effects of these chemicals, in managing them to prevent contamination of groundwater, or in developing treatment technologies for removing them from water once contamination has occurred. The challenge facing residence of the Tennessee Valley is to manage growth and economic and technological development in ways that will avoid polluting the groundwater resource. Once groundwater has been contaminated, cleanup is almost always very costly and is sometimes impractical or technically infeasible. Therefore, prevention of contamination -- not remedial treatment--is the key to continued availability of usable groundwater. This document discusses regulations to aid in this prevention.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Persistence of uranium groundwater plumes: Contrasting mechanisms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in microbially-driven redox properties; and the magnitude of groundwater hydrologic dynamics controlled by river-stage fluctuations, geologic structures, and aquifer...

98

Energy Boom andEnergy Boom and Groundwater BustGroundwater Bust  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and PolicySustainability and Policy Behind groundwater boom-bust cycles (e.g., Mexico) are energy supplyEnergy Boom andEnergy Boom and Groundwater BustGroundwater Bust MexicoMexico''s Waters Water--Energy) consequences for the other resource Sustainability ­ policy tools for water, energy need to be mutually

Keller, Arturo A.

99

Groundwater flow and groundwater-stream interaction in fractured and dipping sedimentary rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detailed numerical models to evaluate the effects of various factors that influence groundwater flow. Introduction [2] The rate and direction of groundwater flow at a given location is driven by hydraulic gradient], where groundwater occurs in tilted, fractured beds. A simple con- ceptual model of the hydrogeology

Toran, Laura

100

A CONVERGENT EXPLICIT GROUNDWATER MODEL Victor M. Ponce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A CONVERGENT EXPLICIT GROUNDWATER MODEL Victor M. Ponce Professor, Department of Civil Works, Ankara, Turkey. ABSTRACT: A groundwater model is developed by using an explicit formulation groundwater flow with excellent stability, convergence, and mass-conservation properties. 1 #12;INTRODUCTION

Ponce, V. Miguel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Origin of anomalous atomic vibrations in efficient thermoelectrics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Functional Materials for Energy Origin of anomalous atomic vibrations in efficient thermoelectrics revealed May 06, 2014 Figure 1: Comparison of S(Q,E) measured with INS (left) and...

102

Topological Spin Texture in a Quantum Anomalous Hall Insulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect has been recently discovered in an experiment using a thin-film topological insulator with ferromagnetic ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. Here we investigate the spin degree ...

Wu, Jiansheng

103

Standard Model Prediction of the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review the present Standard Model prediction of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. The discrepancy with its experimental determination is (25.5 +- 8.0) x 10^-10, i.e., 3.2 standard deviations.

Joaquim Prades

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

104

anomalous scattering boosts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

are not excluded, but they are constrained to be functions of conformal cross ratios of kinematic variables. Einan Gardi; Lorenzo Magnea 2009-01-08 3 Notes on Anomalous...

105

anomalous coupling limits: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the WWZ couplings. D0 Collaboration 1999-05-04 4 Limits on Anomalous Couplings from Higgs Boson Production at the Tevatron HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We estimate the...

106

anomalous scattering factor: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

D. Mitra; D. R. Lorimer; A. G. Lyne 2001-11-08 5 Anomalous gauge couplings of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: Semileptonic mode in WW scatterings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv)...

107

anomalously high number: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Baier; M. Dirks; O. Kober 1996-03-13 7 Anomalous behavior of pion production in high energy particle collisions HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A shape of invariant...

108

Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

109

Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

Taner, M. Turhan

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Searching for the fourth family quarks through anomalous decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flavor democracy hypothesis predicts the existence of the fourth standard model family. Because of the high masses of the fourth family quarks, their anomalous decays could be dominant if certain criteria are met. This will drastically change the search strategy at hadron colliders. We show that the fourth standard model family down quarks with masses up to 400-450 GeV can be observed (or excluded) via anomalous decays by Tevatron.

Sahin, M.; Sultansoy, S.; Turkoz, S. [TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Physics Division, Ankara (Turkey); TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Physics Division, Ankara, Turkey and Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan); Ankara University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Anomalous neutron Compton scattering from molecular hydrogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of neutron Compton scattering, which operates in the attosecond time scale, to (a) the equimolar H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} mixture and (b) the mixed-isotope system HD (liquids, both at 20 K), reveals a strong anomalous shortfall (about 30%) of the ratio R={sigma}{sub H}/{sigma}{sub D} of H and D cross sections. This striking effect is similar to that observed in liquid H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2}O mixtures [C. A. Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 2839 (1997)]. Crucially, the shortfall of R is equal in both samples (a) and (b). This result demonstrates that quantum exchange correlations of identical nuclei play no significant role in this effect, thus refuting corresponding theoretical models claiming its interpretation. In contrast, our findings are consistent with alternative theoretical models, in which attosecond dynamics of electronic degrees of freedom (via violation of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation) is considered to participate significantly in the dynamics of an elementary neutron-proton (-deuteron) scattering process. Possible implications for attosecond chemical dynamics, e.g., the onset of bond breaking, are mentioned.

Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C.A.; Krzystyniak, M. [Institute of Chemistry, Stranski Laboratory, Technical University of Berlin, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Abdul-Redah, T. [Physics Laboratory, The University of Kent at Canterbury, Canterbury, Kent CT2 7NR (United Kingdom)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons Learned (Post CD-4), Environmental Management Cleanup, May 2011 Soil and Groundwater Cleanup - In-Situ Grouting, Lessons...

114

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

115

2000 Annual Interim Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report includes a discussion of the groundwater flow direction and rate, the groundwater analytical results, and the methane monitoring results.

Chase, J.A.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

116

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

117

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

groundwater | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 Industrial Carbon Capture andDeepwaterfors | National91 Agrootvel AmesGroundwater

119

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

120

REC Tracking Systems Design Guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 The Design Guide is presented in three parts. Section II describes the need for REC tracking, the two principal tracking methods available, and, in simple terms, the operation of certificate-based systems. Section III presents the major issues in the design of certificate-based tracking systems and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of alternative solutions. Finally, Section IV offers design principles or recommendations for most of these issues.

Meredith Wingate

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data set from ARESE II, sponsored by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, provides a unique opportunity to understand solar absorption in the atmosphere because of the combination of three sets of broadband solar radiometers mounted on the Twin Otter aircraft and the ground based instruments at the ARM Southern Great Plains facility. In this study, we analyze the measurements taken on two clear sky days and three cloudy days and model the solar radiative transfer in each case with two different models. On the two clear days, the calculated and measured column absorptions agree to better than 10 Wm-2, which is about 10% of the total column absorption. Because both the model fluxes and the individual radiometer measurements are accurate to no better than 10 Wm-2, we conclude that the models and measurements are essentially in agreement. For the three cloudy days, the model calculations agree very well with each other and on two of the three days agree with the measurements to 20 Wm-2 or less out of a total column absorption of more than 200 Wm-2, which is again agreement at better than 10%. On the third day, the model and measurements agree to either 8% or 14% depending on which value of surface albedo is used. Differences exceeding 10% represent a significant absorption difference between model and observations. In addition to the uncertainty in absorption due to surface albedo, we show that including aerosol with an optical depth similar to that found on clear days can reduce the difference between model and measurement by 5% or more. Thus, we conclude that the ARESE II results are incompatible with previous studies reporting extreme anomalous absorption and can be modeled with our current understanding of radiative transfer.

Ackerman, Thomas P.; Flynn, Donna M.; Marchand, Roger T.

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer - 13158  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwater monitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons. Historically, the monitoring activities have been very 'people intensive'. Field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms showing information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from two official electronic databases: the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS). The samplers traditionally used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and other personnel posted the collected information. In Automating Groundwater Sampling at Hanford (HNF-38542-FP Revision 0, Presented at Waste Management 2009 Conference, March 1 - March 5, 2009, Phoenix, AZ), we described the methods, tools, and techniques that would be used in automating the activities associated with measuring water levels. The Field Logging and Electronic Data Gathering (FLEDG) application/database that automates collecting the water-level measurement data has now been implemented at Hanford. In addition to eliminating the need to print out documents, the system saves three-to-four man days each month for the field personnel taking the measurements and the scientists and administrators managing the data and the documentation. After the information has received technical review, FLEDG automatically updates the database for water-level measurements and loads the document management system with the completed sampling report. Due to safety considerations, access to wells is conditional. A spreadsheet with appropriate data not only lists the wells that are cleared for work, but also the safety personnel who must be present before work can start. This spreadsheet is used in planning daily activities. Daily plans are structured to ensure that the wells to be sampled are cleared for work and the appropriate safety personnel have been assigned and are present before the work starts. Historically, the spreadsheets have been prepared manually, and as a result, are potentially subject to human error. However, a companion database application has been developed to work with FLEDG - making the entire sampling process more efficient and safer for personnel. The Well Access List - Electronic, WAL-E, is a database that contains much the same information that was previously manually loaded into the spread sheet. In addition, WAL-E contains a managed work-flow application that shows the access requirements and allows for appropriate reviews of the compiled well. Various CHPRC organizations, including Industrial Hygiene, RADCON, and Well Maintenance and Sample Administration are able to enter and review the wells added or deleted from the WAL-E database. The FLEDG system then accesses this database information to identify appropriate support personnel and provide safety requirements to field personnel. In addition, WAL-E offers the assurance that wells have appropriate locks and are correctly labeled and electrically grounded as required, before well activities begin. This feature is an extremely important aspect of the FLEDG/WAL-E system because it adds another safety check to the work evolution and reduces the pote

Connell, Carl W. Jr.; Conley, S.F.; Carr, Jennifer S.; Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, P.O. Box 1600, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Brown, W.L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, P.O. Box 950, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, 825 Jadwin Ave., Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BSTBacterial Source Tracking Conference Proceedings 2012 Bacterial Source Tracking State Conference Conference Proceedings Prepared by: Lucas Gregory, Texas Water Resources Institute Courtney Smith of the Science Conference Texas Water Resources Institute TR-427 June 2012 #12;#12;Texas Water Resources

124

On the spatial nature of the groundwater pumping externality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the spatial nature of the groundwater pumping externality Nicholas Brozovic´ a, *, David L and instantly to groundwater pumping. In this paper, we develop an economic model of groundwater manage- ment the magnitude of the groundwater pumping externality relative to spatially explicit models. In particular

Sunding, David

125

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project.

Walker, Thomas G.

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

GROUNDWATER DATA REQUIREMENT AND ANALYSIS C. P. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 INTRODUCTION Groundwater is used for a variety of purposes, including irrigation, drinking, and manufacturing characteristics of groundwater. Numerical models are capable of solving large and complex groundwater problems/monitoring of required data form an integral part of any groundwater modelling exercise. 2.0 DATA REQUIREMENT

Kumar, C.P.

127

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Fall Semester 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEE 4710. Introduction to Groundwater Fall Semester 2006 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: Introduction, Field trip in afternoon Principles of groundwater flow Flow to Wells Properties of aquifiers Soil occurrence Groundwater models Water Quality Groundwater quality monitoring Vadose water quality monitoring

Walter, M.Todd

128

CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network NEW MEXICO Keeping Track, Promoting Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CS225774_D CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network NEW MEXICO Keeping Track Tracking Matters in New Mexico The New Mexico Tracking Program affords a better understanding of how diseases. The New Mexico Tracking Program has already begun using its state Tracking Network to monitor

129

Groundwater Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data and interpreted information that supports the groundwater module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) used in Hanford Assessments. The objective of the groundwater module is to predict movement of radioactive and chemical contaminants through the aquifer to the Columbia River or other potential discharge locations. This data package is being revised as part of the deliverables under the Characterization of Systems Project (#49139) aimed at providing documentation for assessments being conducted under the Hanford Assessments Project (#47042). Both of these projects are components of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessments Projects, managed by the Management and Integration Project (#47043).

Thorne, Paul D.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Williams, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky L.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

130

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Current distribution in systems with anomalous diffusion: renormalisation group approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the asymptotic properties of the large deviation function of the integrated particle current in systems, in or out of thermal equilibrium, whose dynamics exhibits anomalous diffusion. The physical systems covered by our study include mutually repelling particles with a drift, a driven lattice gas displaying a continuous nonequilibrium phase transition, and particles diffusing in a anisotropic random advective field. It is exemplified how renormalisation group techniques allow for a systematic determination of power laws in the corresponding current large deviation functions. We show that the latter are governed by known universal scaling exponents, specifically, the anomalous dimension of the noise correlators.

Vivien Lecomte; Uwe C. Tauber; Frederic van Wijland

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Midwest Renewable Energy Tracking System (M-RETS®) tracks renewable energy generation in participating States and Provinces and assists in verifying compliance with individual state/provincial...

133

Increasing Scientific Productivity by Tracking Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity Data Tracking Increases Scientific Productivity July 20, 2011 | Tags: HPSS, NERSC Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 2402 HPSS...

134

SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Project Tracking...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Project Tracking Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Project Tracking Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project...

135

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

136

Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

Farid Marandi, Sayena

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the fourth quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of analytical and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

138

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From 1951 to 1992, the Unites States government conducted 828 underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site. About one-third of these tests occurred near, below or within the water table - the very top portion of the groundwater layer where rock and soil are completely saturated with water. As a result, some groundwater was contaminated. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began exploring the effects of groundwater contamination in the 1970s. Though contamination from underground testing has never been detected on public land, the DOE was committed to developing an advanced, reliable monitoring network that ensures the long-term protection of the public. An intensive groundwater investigation program was launched in 1989.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Groundwater Classification and Standards (North Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules established in this Subchapter 2L of North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A are intended to maintain and preserve the quality of the groundwaters, prevent and abate pollution and...

140

Delineating Groundwater Sources and Protection Zones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Groundwater protection zones for five city-owned water supply wells in Sebastopol, Calif. Zones were City of Sebastopol Demonstration Project report by Leah G. Walker, California Dept. of Health Services

Pasternack, Gregory B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cooperative Modeling and Design History Tracking Using Design Tracking Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis suggests a new framework for cooperative modeling which supports concurrency design protocol with a design history tracking function. The proposed framework allows designers to work together while eliminating design conflicts...

Kim, Jonghyun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerates groundwater clean Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater clean Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS COASTAL AQUIFERS Summary: MANAGEMENT OF GROUNDWATER IN SALT WATER INGRESS...

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent anomalous weak Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between the two cases. As is apparent from equation 17, the anomalous... anomalous transport. It is again appar- ent that this decrease is greatest near the root of the...

144

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating DAVID W. J of anomalous diabatic heating in the polar stratosphere as stratospheric temperatures relax to climatology

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous gauge couplings Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IN p Zb... . Anomalous neutral triple gauge couplings (NTGC), which are not present at tree level in the SM, may induce... .07 0.96 12;Probing Anomalous ... Source: Magiera,...

146

Abrasion resistant track shoe grouser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A track shoe for a track-type vehicle. The track shoe includes a base plate and a grouser projecting away from the base plate. A capping surface structure of substantially horseshoe shaped cross-section is disposed across a distal portion of the grouser. The capping surface structure covers portions of a distal edge surface and adjacent lateral surfaces. The capping surface structure is formed from an material characterized by enhanced wear resistance relative to portions of the grouser underlying the capping surface structure.

Fischer, Keith D; Diekevers, Mark S; Afdahl, Curt D; Steiner, Kevin L; Barnes, Christopher A

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous left external Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 47 Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research Department Summary: diffusion and anomalous turbulent transport. Several...

150

Anomalous emissions of 103mRh biphoton transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this report, the anomalous emissions, centered on the one half transition energy 39.76/2 keV, are observed from the long-lived Mossbauer state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung exposure. Strong coupling with identical nuclei in Rh crystals opens cascade channels for biphoton transitions.

Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Anomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, as well as interpenetrating and bicontinu- ous networks.7,8 Phase inversion occurs when the mi- norityAnomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical Alloying Archie P strategies for producing highly dis- persed multicomponent polymer blends. By their very nature

152

Climatic regime shift and decadal anomalous events in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic regime shift and decadal anomalous events in China Weihong Qian & Xiang Lin & Yafen Zhu from China showed temporal and regional patterns in the last two to three centuries, including two. The coldest event occurred in the decade of 1965­1975 in eastern China, while the periods of 1920­1930, 1940

Qian, Weihong

153

anomalous energy dependence: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anomalous energy dependence First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Scale-dependent mass...

154

Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

155

Environmental project management using fast track methods to save time and money  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, Eaton Corporation (a major manufacturer of automotive, electronic controls and truck components) expedited installation of a groundwater recovery and treatment system to contain and remove a chlorinated solvent plume. The contamination (caused by a previous owner) was present in groundwater at significant concentrations in the unconsolidated material and fractured rock beneath the site. Standard groundwater project procedures typically involve completion of plume delineation prior to remediation. However, substantial delays were anticipated due to agency review of investigation reports and non-technical off site issues. Therefore, Eaton partnered with the state agency and initiated a ``fast track`` project approach. This paper presents a case history describing both project management methods and the technical approach used to expedite installation of the remediation system, and identify the resulting benefits. The approach allowed Eaton to bypass regulatory delays and install a barrier well system to contain and treat contaminated groundwater within eight months. It demonstrates how well established project management practices can be applied to site remediation to avoid costly delays, expedite project completion and protect the environment.

Kulick, E.J. [Eaton Corp., Cleveland, OH (United States); Havener, M.C. [Hydro Group, Inc., Bridgewater, NJ (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

How many objects can you track?: Evidence for a resource-limited attentive tracking mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How many objects can you track?: Evidence for a resource-limited attentive tracking mechanism can you track?: Evidence for a resource-limited attentive tracking mechanism. Journal of Vision, 7 model), or whether the limit on tracking is set by a resource that can be flexibly allocated to objects

Alvarez, George A.

157

Oxidative particle mixtures for groundwater treatment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method and a composition of a mixture for degradation and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater. The oxidative particle mixture and method includes providing a material having a minimal volume of free water, mixing at least one inorganic oxidative chemical in a granular form with a carrier fluid containing a fine grained inorganic hydrophilic compound and injecting the resulting mixture into the subsurface. The granular form of the inorganic oxidative chemical dissolves within the areas of injection, and the oxidative ions move by diffusion and/or advection, therefore extending the treatment zone over a wider area than the injection area. The organic contaminants in the soil and groundwater are degraded by the oxidative ions, which form solid byproducts that can sorb significant amounts of inorganic contaminants, metals, and radionuclides for in situ treatment and immobilization of contaminants. The method and composition of the oxidative particle mixture for long-term treatment and immobilization of contaminants in soil and groundwater provides for a reduction in toxicity of contaminants in a subsurface area of contamination without the need for continued injection of treatment material, or for movement of the contaminants, or without the need for continuous pumping of groundwater through the treatment zone, or removal of groundwater from the subsurface area of contamination.

Siegrist, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Murdoch, Lawrence C. (Clemson, SC)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

159

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

162

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment - various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field preliminary results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

In situ remediation of uranium contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an effort to develop cost-efficient techniques for remediating uranium contaminated groundwater at DOE Uranium Mill Tailing Remedial Action (UMTRA) sites nationwide, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) deployed a pilot scale research project at an UMTRA site in Durango, CO. Implementation included design, construction, and subsequent monitoring of an in situ passive reactive barrier to remove Uranium from the tailings pile effluent. A reactive subsurface barrier is produced by emplacing a reactant material (in this experiment various forms of metallic iron) in the flow path of the contaminated groundwater. Conceptually the iron media reduces and/or adsorbs uranium in situ to acceptable regulatory levels. In addition, other metals such as Se, Mo, and As have been removed by the reductive/adsorptive process. The primary objective of the experiment was to eliminate the need for surface treatment of tailing pile effluent. Experimental design, and laboratory and field results are discussed with regard to other potential contaminated groundwater treatment applications.

Dwyer, B.P.; Marozas, D.C.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J Diaz; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Petersburg, R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Zhitnikov, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

The Majorana Collaboration; N. Abgrall; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; D. C. Combs; C. Cuesta; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Esterline; J. E. Fast; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Green; J. Gruszko; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusev; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; A. Hegai; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Diaz Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; J. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. J. Meijer; S. Mertens; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; R. Petersburg; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; K. Pushkin; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; M. C. Ronquest; B. Shanks; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; N. Snyder; A. Soin; A. M. Suriano; D. Tedeschi; J. Thompson; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; W. Xu; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; I. Zhitnikov

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

167

Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

Degrande, Céline, E-mail: cdegrand@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Greiner, Nicolas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Kilian, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Mattelaer, Olivier [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Cen [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

Hussein, Khalid

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

176

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

Sohoni, Milind

178

CONTINUOUSTIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTINUOUS­TIME FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF MULTIPHASE FLOW IN GROUNDWATER HYDROLOGY Zhangxin Chen­water system in groundwater hydrology is given. The system is written in a fractional flow formulation, i for an air­water system in groundwater hydrology, ff = a; w [1], [11], [26]: @(OEae ff s ff ) @t +r \\Delta

179

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

THE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ancillary data is fundamental to the process of modelling a groundwater system. In an unconfined aquifer of the unconfined groundwater parameters as the unique minimum of a convex functional. 1. Introduction It is commonTHE RECONSTRUCTION OF GROUNDWATER PARAMETERS FROM HEAD DATA IN AN UNCONFINED AQUIFER IAN KNOWLES

Knowles, Ian W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Regionally compartmented groundwater flow on Mars Keith P. Harrison1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the basis for such a test. Specifically, we use groundwater models to predict regions of cryosphere that groundwater flow was likely regionally compartmented. Furthermore, the consistent occurrence of modeled. Geophys. Res., 114, E04004, doi:10.1029/2008JE003300. 1. Introduction [2] Groundwater is thought to have

Harrison, Keith

182

New approximation for free surface flow of groundwater: capillarity correction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capillarity correction for free surface groundwater flow as modelled by the Boussinesq equation is re; Shallow flow expansion; Simplified approximation 1. Introduction Groundwater heads in coastal aquifersNew approximation for free surface flow of groundwater: capillarity correction D.-S. Jeng a,*, B

Walter, M.Todd

183

Error Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and presentation of GMRES performance benchmarking results. Introduction As the groundwater model infrastructureError Control of Iterative Linear Solvers for Integrated Groundwater Models by Matthew F. Dixon1 for integrated groundwater models, which are implicitly coupled to another model, such as surface water models

Bai, Zhaojun

184

Visualization of groundwater flow using line integral convolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the simulation of groundwater flow and transport models. INTRODUCTION Nowadays, 3D numerical simulationsVisualization of groundwater flow using line integral convolution JÃ?RG GOTTHARDT & CAROLA BLÃ?MER of groundwater flow and transport problems become more and more common. At the same time the need for adequate

Andrzejak, Artur

185

Groundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading unGroundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 7.1 THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION's program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in U.S. Department of Energy

Homes, Christopher C.

186

Anomalous spin of the Chern-Simons-Georgi-Glashow model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the Coulomb gauge, the Chern-Simons-Georgi-Glashow (CSGG) model is quantized in the Dirac formalism for the constrained system. Combining the Gauss law and Coulomb gauge consistency condition, the difference between the Schwinger angular momentum and canonical angular momentum of the system is found to be an anomalous spin. The reason for this result lies in that the Schwinger energy momentum tensor and the canonical one have different symmetry properties in presence of the Chern-Simons term.

Huo Qiu-Hong; Jiang Yunguo

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

A structural framework for anomalous change detection and characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a spatially adaptive scheme for automatically searching a pair of images of a scene for unusual and interesting changes. Our motivation is to bring into play structural aspects of image features alongside the spectral attributes used for anomalous change detection (ACD). We leverage a small but informative subset of pixels, namely edge pixels of the images, as anchor points of a Delaunay triangulation to jointly decompose the images into a set of triangular regions, called trixels, which are spectrally uniform. Such decomposition helps in image regularization by simple-function approximation on a feature-adaptive grid. Applying ACD to this trixel grid instead of pixels offers several advantages. It allows: (1) edge-preserving smoothing of images, (2) speed-up of spatial computations by significantly reducing the representation of the images, and (3) the easy recovery of structure of the detected anomalous changes by associating anomalous trixels with polygonal image features. The latter facility further enables the application of shape-theoretic criteria and algorithms to characterize the changes and recognize them as interesting or not. This incorporation of spatial information has the potential to filter out some spurious changes, such as due to parallax, shadows, and misregistration, by identifying and filtering out those that are structurally similar and spatially pervasive. Our framework supports the joint spatial and spectral analysis of images, potentially enabling the design of more robust ACD algorithms.

Prasad, Lakshman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Anomalous Lagrangians and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The structure of an anomalous Lagrangian of the pi-rho-omega-a_1 system is investigated within the hidden local SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L symmetry approach. The interaction of the external electromagnetic and weak vector and axial-vector fields with the above hadron system is included. The Lagrangian of interest contains the anomalous Wess-Zumino term following from the well known Wess-Zumino-Witten action and six independent homogenous terms. It is characterized by four constants that are to be determined from a fit to the data on various elementary reactions. Present data allows one to extract the constants with a good accuracy. The homogenous part of the Lagrangian has been applied in the study of anomalous processes that could enhance the high energy tail of the spectrum of photons, produced in the radiative muon capture in hydrogen. It should be noted that recently, an intensive search for such enhancement processes has been carried in the literature, in an attempt to resolve the so called "g_P puzzle": an about 50 % difference between the theoretical prediction of the value of the induced pseudoscalar constant g_P and its value extracted from the high energy tail of the photon spectrum, measured in the precision TRIUMF experiment. Here, more details on the studied material are presented and new results, obtained by using the Wess-Zumino term, are provided.

J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik; F. C. Khanna

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

189

Robotic vehicle with multiple tracked mobility platforms  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robotic vehicle having two or more tracked mobility platforms that are mechanically linked together with a two-dimensional coupling, thereby forming a composite vehicle of increased mobility. The robotic vehicle is operative in hazardous environments and can be capable of semi-submersible operation. The robotic vehicle is capable of remote controlled operation via radio frequency and/or fiber optic communication link to a remote operator control unit. The tracks have a plurality of track-edge scallop cut-outs that allow the tracks to easily grab onto and roll across railroad tracks, especially when crossing the railroad tracks at an oblique angle.

Salton, Jonathan R. (Albuquerque, NM); Buttz, James H. (Albuquerque, NM); Garretson, Justin (Albuquerque, NM); Hayward, David R. (Wetmore, CO); Hobart, Clinton G. (Albuquerque, NM); Deuel, Jr., Jamieson K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tracking Radioactive Sources in Commerce  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Area Network­mobile phone, ethernet and/or satellite � security--encryption, short broadcast bursts Randy Walker, Robert Abercrombie, Rocky Cline, Sabrina Phillips; Oak Ridge National Laboratory Frederick security by commercial shippers � Knowledge of routes routinely taken � Inability to track location

191

Post-Closure RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to provide a post-closure groundwater monitoring program for the 216-S-10 Pond and Ditch (S-10) treatment, storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit. The plan incorporates the sum of knowledge about the potential for groundwater contamination to originate from the S-10, including groundwater monitoring results, hydrogeology, and operational history. The S-10 has not received liquid waste since October 1991. The closure of S-10 has been coordinated with the 200-CS-1 source operable unit in accordance with the Tri-Party Agreement interim milestones M-20-39 and M-15-39C. The S-10 is closely situated among other waste sites of very similar operational histories. The proximity of the S-10 to the other facilities (216-S-17 pond, 216-S-11 Pond, 216-S-5,6 cribs, 216-S-16 ditch and pond, and 216-U-9 ditch) indicate that at least some observed groundwater contamination beneath and downgradient of S-10 could have originated from waste sites other than S-10. Hence, it may not be feasible to strictly discriminate between the contributions of each waste site to groundwater contamination beneath the S-10. A post-closure groundwater monitoring network is proposed that will include the drilling of three new wells to replace wells that have gone dry. When completed, the revised network will meet the intent for groundwater monitoring network under WAC 173-303-645, and enable an improved understanding of groundwater contamination at the S-10. Site-specific sampling constituents are based on the dangerous waste constituents of concern relating to RCRA TSD unit operations (TSD unit constituents) identified in the Part A Permit Application. Thus, a constituent is selected for monitoring if it is: A dangerous waste constituent identified in the Part A Permit Application, or A mobile decomposition product (i.e., nitrate from nitrite) of a Part A constituent, or A reliable indicator of the site-specific contaminants (i.e., specific conductance). Using these criteria, the following constituent list and sampling schedule is proposed: Constituent; Sampling Frequency Site-Specific Parameters; Hexavalent chromium (a); Semiannual Chloride; Semiannual Fluoride; Semiannual Nitrate; Semiannual Nitrite; Semiannual Specific conductance (field)(a); Semiannual Ancillary Parameters; Anions; Annual Alkalinity Annual Metals, (in addition to chromium); Annual pH (field) Semiannual Temperature (field); Semiannual Turbidity (field) Semiannual (a). These constituents will be subject to statistical tests after background is established. It will be necessary to install new monitoring wells and accumulate background data on the groundwater from those wells before statistical comparisons can be made. Until then, the constituents listed above will be evaluated by tracking and trending concentrations in all wells and comparing these results with the corresponding DWS or Hanford Site background concentration for each constituent. If a comparison value (background or DWS) for a constituent is exceeded, DOE will notify Ecology per WAC 173-303-645 (9) (g) requirements (within seven days or a time agreed to between DOE and Ecology).

Barnett, D BRENT.; Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.; Hartman, Mary J.

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

Understanding the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the Effects of Groundwater Pumping on Streamflow Depletion through USGS Capture Maps (Vertical and Horizontal Distance from Streams) Pumping rates and pumping schedules The timing source of water to the wells in years to decades. 0 10 mi #12;Pumping Can Affect Other Hydrologic

194

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

Ewing, Richard E.

196

Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options Bruce Schumm Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics tracking somewhat more pressed for new S design (pattern recognition, ` resolution) S detector in real

California at Santa Cruz, University of

200

Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative in Massachusetts: Developing a New Electronic Tool Presented (CEH) Massachusetts Department of Public Health (MDPH) #12;Childhood Cancer Tracking Initiative "Develop methods for linking environmental databases with childhood cancer incidence data to identify

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Track 5: Integration of Safety Into Design  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 5: Integration of Safety Into Design

202

Track 6: Integrating Safety Into Security Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 6: Integrating Safety Into Security Operations

203

Rail ClipsRail Clips Track Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rail ClipsRail Clips and Track Renewal ver. 1 ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J 2009 7 #12;Track Renewal ­ Tie replacement ballast packingTie replacement, ballast packing ME 6222: Manufacturing Processes and Systems Prof. J.S. Colton © GIT 2009 8 #12;Track Renewal ME 6222: Manufacturing

Colton, Jonathan S.

204

Train track expansions of measured foliations February 16, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Train track expansions of measured foliations Lee Mosher February 16, 2003 Contents 1 Introduction foliations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 1.5 Train tracks and train track's classification of mapping classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 3 Train tracks 49 3.1 Pretracks

Mosher, Lee

205

Train track expansions of measured foliations December 28, 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Train track expansions of measured foliations Lee Mosher December 28, 2003 Contents 1 Introduction foliations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.5 Train tracks and train track's classification of mapping classes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 3 Train tracks 55 3.1 Pretracks

Mosher, Lee

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous conductance oscillations Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spatial conductivity distribution... .1 Numerical simulation of anomalous horizontal fields from conductance distribution map In case the nature... , contain information on the...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous diffusion dynamics Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Based on this finding, we... is used to derive a linear anomalous transport-diffusion equation ... Source: Mathematical Physics Preprint Archive Collection: Mathematics 19 Thesis...

208

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous fine structure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

structure derives micr PDF f elementary cell (with... 2005 Understanding anomalous transport intermittent maps: From ... Source: Klages, Rainer - School of Mathematical...

209

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous equilibrium fractionation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 98 Anomalous Properties of Poly(methyl methacrylate) Thin Films in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Summary: on the same line since the system is at equilibrium and...

210

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous temperature dependence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

polarity of the forcing. The deeper vertical penetration of anomalous heating compared to cooling... surface temperature (SST) and sea ice cover in the North Atlantic have...

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous temperature reversal Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

polarity of the forcing. The deeper vertical penetration of anomalous heating compared to cooling... surface temperature (SST) and sea ice cover in the North Atlantic have...

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous heat conduction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

parallel studies of the upper ocean heat budget have been conducted... of the anomalous heat ... Source: Kelly, Kathryn A. - Air-Sea Interaction and Remote Sensing Department,...

213

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous critical behavior Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlos III de Madrid Collection: Physics 31 Ris National Laboratory Optics and Plasma Research Department Summary: . argued that the ensuing anomalous transport is dominated by...

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous thermal conductivity Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering, University of Tokyo Collection: Materials Science 3 MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING COLLOQUIUM SERIES Summary: on heat transfer. To inform a debate on anomalous...

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous dimension matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

misregistration), and to focus instead on the "anomalous Source: Theiler, James - Nonproliferation and International Security Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory Collection:...

216

anomalous low-temperature behavior: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Investigation on Reliability and Anomalous Degradation of Low Temperature Poly-Si Thin-Film Transistor. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In this thesis, we will...

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous situations actuacion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics 45 Graph-Based Anomaly Detection Caleb C. Noble Summary: the Subdue system. The first, anomalous substructure detection, looks for specific, unusual substructures... within...

218

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous microwave emission Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sources, all detectable... We confirm the anomalous long-term behavior of the non-flare solar ... Source: Hudson, Hugh - Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at...

219

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous physical effects Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

advection (including the effect of ocean waves) and evaporational cooling... ) and the remote and local impact of the anomalous monsoon (Fig. 12d). The ... Source: Chang,...

220

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous dielectric absorption Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: anomalous dielectric absorption Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 PHY 7097--Optical Effects in Solids 2011 Course Syllabus Summary: dielectric function, . 3....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Anomalous effects due to the inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is introduced inertial anti-gravitational potential into the theory of gravity to stop gravitational collapse at the nuclear density and thus prevent singularities. It is considered effective gravity which includes Newtonian potential and inertial anti-gravitational potential. It is investigated footprints of the effective gravity in the solar system. The inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun allows to explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11, the anomalous increase in the lunar semi-major axis, the residuals of the seasonal variation of the proper angular velocity of the earth, the anomalous increase of the Astronomical Unit, the anomalous shift of the perihelion of mercury.

D. L. Khokhlov

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalously strong lines Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PRODUCTION IN THE TROPICS Celina A. Hernandez*, and Courtney Schumacher Summary: wind shear regimes propagate downward, an anomalous meridional circulation is induced...

223

Results of Phase I groundwater quality assessment for single-shell tank waste management areas T and TX-TY at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a Phase I, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) groundwater quality assessment for the Richland Field Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-RL) under the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Agreement. The purpose of the investigation was to determine if the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas (WMAs) T and TX-TY have impacted groundwater quality. Waste Management Areas T and TX-TY, located in the northern part of the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, contain the 241-T, 241-TX, and 241-TY tank farms and ancillary waste systems. These two units are regulated under RCRA interim-status regulations (under 40 CFR 265.93) and were placed in assessment groundwater monitoring because of elevated specific conductance in downgradient wells. Anomalous concentrations of technetium-99, chromium, nitrate, iodine-129, and cobalt-60 also were observed in some downgradient wells. Phase I assessment, allowed under 40 CFR 265, provides the owner-operator of a facility with the opportunity to show that the observed contamination has a source other than the regulated unit. For this Phase I assessment, PNNL evaluated available information on groundwater chemistry and past waste management practices in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY. Background contaminant concentrations in the vicinity of WMAs T and TX-TY are the result of several overlapping contaminant plumes resulting from past-practice waste disposal operations. This background has been used as baseline for determining potential WMA impacts on groundwater.

Hodges, F.N.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Anomalous diffusion for inertial particles under gravity in parallel flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the bounds between normal or anomalous effective diffusion for inertial particles transported by parallel flows. The infrared behavior of the fluid kinetic-energy spectrum, i.e. the possible presence of long-range spatio-temporal correlations, is modeled as a power law by means of two parameters, and the problem is studied as a function of these latter. Our results, obtained in the limit of weak relative inertia, extend well-known results for tracers and apply to particles of any mass density, subject to gravity and Brownian diffusion. We consider both steady and time-dependent flows, and cases of both vanishing and finite particle sedimentation.

Marco Martins Afonso

2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dirt Softens Soap: Anomalous Elasticity of Disordered Smectics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that a smectic in a disordered medium (e.g., aerogel) exhibits anomalous elasticity, with the compression modulus B(k) vanishing and the bend modulus K(k) diverging as k --> 0. In addition, the effective disorder develops long ranged correlations. These divergences are much stronger than those driven by thermal fluctuations in pure smectics, and are controlled by a zero temperature glassy fixed point, which we study in an $\\epsilon=5-d$ expansion. We discuss the experimental implications of these theoretical predictions.

Leo Radzihovsky; John Toner

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Infrared tag and track technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of covertly tagging an object for later tracking includes providing a material capable of at least one of being applied to the object and being included in the object, which material includes deuterium; and performing at least one of applying the material to the object and including the material in the object in a manner in which in the appearance of the object is not changed, to the naked eye.

Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Slater, John (Albuquerque, NM); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has monitored groundwater on the Hanford Site since the 1940s to help determine what chemical and radiological contaminants have made their way into the groundwater. As regulatory requirements for monitoring increased in the 1980s, there began to be some overlap between various programs. DOE established the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project (groundwater project) in 1996 to ensure protection of the public and the environment while improving the efficiency of monitoring activities. The groundwater project is designed to support all groundwater monitoring needs at the site, eliminate redundant sampling and analysis, and establish a cost-effective hierarchy for groundwater monitoring activities. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project. This QA Plan is based on the QA requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--General Provisions/Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the groundwater project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The groundwater project has determined that the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Luttrell, Stuart P.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

232

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

New Curved Spacetime Dirac Equations - On the Anomalous Gyromagnetic Ratio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I propose three new curved spacetime versions of the Dirac Equation. These equations have been developed mainly to try and account in a natural way for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio of Fermions. The derived equations suggest that particles including the Electron which is thought to be a point particle do have a finite spatial size which is the reason for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio. A serendipitous result of the theory, is that, two of the equation exhibits an asymmetry in their positive and negative energy solutions the first suggestion of which is clear that a solution to the problem as to why the Electron and Muon - despite their acute similarities - exhibit an asymmetry in their mass is possible. The Mourn is often thought as an Electron in a higher energy state. Another of the consequences of three equations emanating from the asymmetric serendipity of the energy solutions of two of these equations, is that, an explanation as to why Leptons exhibit a three stage mass hierarchy is possible.

G. G. Nyambuya

2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjörn Hartman; Bo Höistad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnér; Hanno Essén

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

235

Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjörn; Höistad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnér, Lars; Essén, Hanno

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

Wang, Yuqing

237

Apparent anomalous fading of thermoluminescence associated with competition with radiationless transitions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a thermoluminescence (TL) peak for its application in TL dosimetry and even more so, in TL dating is its stability; accepted 8 March 2000 Abstract Anomalous fading of thermoluminescence (TL) is the eect of a fading whichApparent anomalous fading of thermoluminescence associated with competition with radiationless

Chen, Reuven

238

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Quarks at Future e+e-, ep, and pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible single productions of fourth SM family u4 and d4 quarks via anomalous interactions at the e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are investigated. Signatures of such anomalous processes are discussed at above colliders comparatively.

Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H.Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yildiz, H. Duran [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Dumlupinar University, Merkez Kampus, Ankara (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Single Anomalous Production of the Fourth SM Family Leptons at Future e+e-, ep and pp Colliders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Possible single productions of fourth SM family charged and neutral leptons via anomalous interactions at the future e+e-, ep, and pp colliders are studied. Signatures of such anomalous processes are argued at above colliders comparatively.

Ciftci, A. K. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey); Ciftci, R.; Karadeniz, H. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Sultansoy, S. [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Gazi University, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Yildiz, H. Duran [Physics Department, Faculty of Sciences and Arts, Dumlupinar University, Merkez Campus, Kutahya (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

243

Groundwater in the Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwestern Part of the Jemez Mountains Volcanic Region, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Groundwater in the...

244

LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project...

245

alpine karst groundwater: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Hydrochemistry, a tool for understanding karst groundwater flows Jacques MUDRY, Chrono-Environment laboratory Physics Websites Summary: Hydrochemistry, a tool for understanding...

246

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of...

247

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

248

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD2 and the ERDF Amended ROD (EPA 1999). The overall objective of the groundwater monitoring program is to determine whether ERDF has impacted the groundwater. This objective is complicated by the fact that the ERDF is situated downgradient of the numerous groundwater contamination plumes originating from the 200 West Area.

Weiss, R. L.; Lawrence, B. L.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

per year. To learn more about groundwater treatment at the Hanford Site, including videos and photos, click here and here. Addthis Related Articles A team of drillers installs...

250

Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite. Abstract: The long-term success of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium (U) depends on the stability of...

251

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. In early April, five peer...

252

Tracking system for solar collectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tracking system is provided for pivotally mounted spaced-apart solar collectors. A pair of cables is connected to spaced-apart portions of each collector, and a driver displaces the cables, thereby causing the collectors to pivot about their mounting, so as to assume the desired orientation. The collectors may be of the cylindrical type as well as the flat-plate type. Rigid spar-like linkages may be substituted for the cables. Releasable attachments of the cables to the collectors is also described, as is a fine tuning mechanism for precisely aligning each individual collector.

Butler, B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Tracking system for solar collectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tracking system is provided for pivotally mounted spaced-apart solar collectors. A pair of cables is connected to spaced-apart portions of each collector, and a driver displaces the cables, thereby causing the collectors to pivot about their mounting, so as to assume the desired orientation. The collectors may be of the cylindrical type as well as the flat-plate type. Rigid spar-like linkages may be substituted for the cables. Releasable attachments of the cables to the collectors is also described, as is a fine tuning mechanism for precisely aligning each individual collector.

Butler, Barry L. (Golden, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived from piezometric head and groundwater quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Keywords: Groundwater levels, groundwater quality, time series analysis 1. Introduction Understanding results, a concept for modeling changes in groundwater and chemistry coupled with regional climate change1 The impacts of climate change on the groundwater system of the upper Danube catchment derived

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

255

Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion.

Johnson, Kenneth C. (201 W. California Ave., #401, Sunnyvale, CA 94086)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion.

Johnson, Kenneth C. (201 W. California Ave. #705, Sunnyvale, CA 94086)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Two-axis tracking solar collector mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a novel solar tracking mechanism incorporating a number of practical features that give it superior environmental resilience and exceptional tracking accuracy. The mechanism comprises a lightweight space-frame assembly supporting an array of point-focus Fresnel lenses in a two-axis tracking structure. The system is enclosed under a glass cover which isolates it from environmental exposure and enhances tracking accuracy by eliminating wind loading. Tracking accuracy is also enhanced by the system's broad-based tracking support. The system's primary intended application would be to focus highly concentrated sunlight into optical fibers for transmission to core building illumination zones, and the system may also have potential for photovoltaic or photothermal solar energy conversion. 16 figs.

Johnson, K.C.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2014 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring is performed by the GWPP during CY 2014 to achieve the following goals: 􀁸 to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; 􀁸 to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; 􀁸 to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; 􀁸 to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and 􀁸 to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12.

none,

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program...

260

Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Learn more at betterbuildings.energy.gov Energy Intensity Baselining and Tracking Guidance i Preface The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Better Buildings, Better Plants Program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Automated micro-tracking planar solar concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracking mechanics. Solar trackers rotate the solar panel orwith traditional solar trackers but its unique geometrysolar intensity depends on the role the micro micro-tracker

Hallas, Justin Matthew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Refinements in electroweak contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of strong interactions on the two loop electroweak radiative corrections to the muon anomalous magnetic moment, $a_\\mu=(g_\\mu-2)/2$, are examined. Short-distance logs are shown to be unaffected. Computation of long-distance contributions is improved by use of an effective field theory approach that preserves the chiral properties of QCD and accounts for constraints from the operator product expansion. Small, previously neglected, two loop contributions, suppressed by a $1-4\\sin^2\\theta_W$ factor, are computed and the complete three loop leading short-distance logs are reevaluated. These refinements lead to a reduction in uncertainties and a slight shift in the total electroweak contribution to $a_\\mu^{\\rm EW} = 154(1)(2)\\times 10^{-11}$ where the first error corresponds to hadronic uncertainties and the second is primarily due to the allowed Higgs mass range.

Andrzej Czarnecki; William J. Marciano; Arkady Vainshtein

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

263

The Running coupling BFKL anomalous dimensions and splitting functions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 01 03 21 0v 2 7 Ju n 20 01 Cavendish-HEP-01/03 The Running Coupling BFKL Anomalous Dimensions and Splitting Functions Robert S. Thorne1 Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, U... that it is is dominated by the NLO corrections at all values of x below about x = 0.01. For example, using the formulae in [11] the first few terms in the power series for P (x) go like xP (x,Q2) =?¯s + 2.4?¯4s?3/6 + 2.1?¯6s?5/120 + · · · ? ?¯s(0.43?¯s + 1.6?¯2s? + 11.7?...

Thorne, Robert S

264

Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Precise Measurement of the Positive Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A precise measurement of the anomalous g value, a_mu=(g-2)/2, for the positive muon has been made at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The result a_mu^+=11 659 202(14)(6) X 10^{-10} (1.3 ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the combined previous data. The current theoretical value from the standard model is a_mu(SM)=11 659 159.6(6.7) X 10^{-10} (0.57 ppm) and a_mu(exp)-a_mu(SM)=43(16) X 10^{-10} in which a_mu(exp) is the world average experimental value. This difference may be due to physics beyond the standard model.

Brown, H N; Carey, R M; Cushman, P B; Danby, G T; Debevec, P T; Deile, M; Deng, H; Deninger, W J; Dhawan, S K; Druzhinin, V P; Duong, L; Efstathiadis, E F; Farley, Francis J M; Fedotovich, G V; Giron, S; Gray, F; Grigoriev, D; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grossmann, A; Hare, M; Hertzog, D W; Hughes, V W; Iwasaki, M; Jungmann, Klaus; Kawall, D; Kawamura, M; Khazin, B I; Kindem, J; Krienen, F; Kronkvist, I J; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Logashenko, I B; McNabb, R; Meng, W; Mi, J; Miller, J P; Morse, W M; Nikas, D; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlov, Yu F; Ozben, C S; Paley, J M; Polly, C; Pretz, J; Prigl, R; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Redin, S I; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Ryskulov, N M; Sedykh, S N; Semertzidis, Y K; Shatunov, Yu M; Sichtermann, E P; Solodov, E P; Sossong, M; Steinmetz, A; Sulak, Lawrence R; Timmermans, C; Trofimov, A V; Urner, D; Von Walter, P; Warburton, D; Winn, D; Yamamoto, A; Zimmerman, D

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing groundwater model Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

surveys, groundwater chemistry data, and groundwater level data were... Effects of rainwater-harvesting-induced artificial ... Source: McClain, Michael - Department of...

267

E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer groundwater brazil Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: of rainfall. The karst aquifers on Barbados, Guam and Puerto Rico have similar rainwater and groundwater... by groundwater residence times of years to tens of years....

268

E-Print Network 3.0 - automating groundwater sampling Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT... summary of selected case studies is presented below. BACKGROUND A typical groundwater sampling event... . Automation through the use of sensors...

269

Probabilistic estimation and prediction of groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying and characterizing groundwater recharge are critical for water resources management. Unfortunately, low recharge rates are difficult to resolve in dry environments, where groundwater is often most important. ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered groundwater chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altered groundwater chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Seawater intrusion...

271

Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Eye-Tracking: Research Areas and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Part 1 Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Part 2 Eye-Tracking: Research Areas. & Bowlin, G. (Eds.) [ PREPRINT, FEB 2004. PLEASE DO NOT QUOTE ] #12;2 Eye-Tracking: Characteristics and Methods Introduction Eye movements are arguably the most frequent of all human movements (Bridgeman, 1992

Richardson, Daniel C.

272

April 6, 2010 Fast Track and Back Track between Master's and Doctoral Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

April 6, 2010 Fast Track and Back Track between Master's and Doctoral Programs Procedures for Graduate Programs and Students "Transfer" from the Master's to Doctoral Program (Fast tracking procedures) Upon recommendation by the program and approval by Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies (GPS

Barthelat, Francois

273

TANG et al.: DETECTION AND TRACKING OF OCCLUDED PEOPLE 1 Detection and Tracking of Occluded People  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with many subjects that partially occlude each other. This limitation is due to the fact that current peopleTANG et al.: DETECTION AND TRACKING OF OCCLUDED PEOPLE 1 Detection and Tracking of Occluded People We consider the problem of detection and tracking of multiple people in crowded street scenes. State

274

Groundwater migration of radionuclides at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simple Single Resident Well (SRW) Model has been used to calculate groundwater movement since Fermilab`s inception. A new Concentration Model is proposed which is more realistic and takes advantage of computer modeling that has been developed for the siting of landfills. Site geologic and hydrologic data were given to a consultant who made the migration calculations from an initial concentration that was based upon the existing knowledge of the radioactivity leached out of the soil. The various components of the new Model are discussed, and numerical examples are given and compared with DOE/EPA limits.

Malensek, A.J.; Wehmann, A.A.; Elwyn, A.J.; Moss, K.J.; Kesich, P.M.

1993-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

275

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Evaluation of Groundwater Impacts to Support the National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater impacts have been analyzed for the proposed RH-LLW disposal facility. A four-step analysis approach was documented and applied. This assessment compared the predicted groundwater ingestion dose to the more restrictive of either the 25 mrem/yr all pathway dose performance objective, or the maximum contaminant limit performance objective. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives. The analysis was prepared to support the NEPA-EA for the top two ranking of the proposed RH-LLW sites. As such, site-specific conditions were incorporated for each set of results generated. These site-specific conditions were included to account for the transport of radionuclides through the vadose zone and through the aquifer at each site. Site-specific parameters included the thickness of vadose zone sediments and basalts, moisture characteristics of the sediments, and aquifer velocity. Sorption parameters (Kd) were assumed to be very conservative values used in Track II analysis of CERCLA sites at INL. Infiltration was also conservatively assumed to represent higher rates corresponding to disturbed soil conditions. The results of this analysis indicate that the groundwater impacts for either proposed facility location are expected to be less than the performance objectives.

Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

GEOL4850 (GEOL5850) Groundwater Hydrology University of North Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or by appointment. Email: fpan@unt.edu Textbooks : Hudak P., Principles of Hydrogeology (Third Edition), CRC Press. Properties of aquifers ---porosity and specific yield, hydraulic conductivity, water table and potentiometric of groundwater flow ---hydraulic head, Darcy's law, equations of groundwater flow in confined and unconfined

Pan, Feifei

279

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in rural areas. Therefore, quality and quantity aspects of groundwater management constitute acute issues the villages, and pollution plumes downgradient of the main inhabited areas. The absence of sewage or solid waste collection and treatment facilities threatens groundwater quality by increasing its chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

F-Area Seepage Basins groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This progress report from the Savannah River Plant for first quarter 1992 includes discussion on the following topics: description of facilities; hydrostratigraphic units; monitoring well nomenclature; integrity of the monitoring well network; groundwater monitoring data; analytical results exceeding standards; tritium, nitrate, and pH time-trend data; water levels; groundwater flow rates and directions; upgradient versus downgradient results.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the findings of the groundwater and leachate monitoring and sampling at the Environmental restoration Disposal Facility for calendar year 2009. The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence, D.W. Woolery

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

283

MODELING OF CHLORINATED SOLVENTS TRANSPORT AND NATURAL ATTENUATION IN GROUNDWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.quiot@ineris.fr 2. ENVIROS, Spain S.L., Passeig de Rubí 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix ­ Spain, sjordana@enviros.biz 3 performed by 4 teams (ANTEA, ENSMP, ENVIROS and INERIS) to simulate a contamination of groundwater is the evaluation of the fate of pollutants in groundwaters and soils. This knowledge is based on the result

Boyer, Edmond

284

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater.

285

Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis Submitted of Doctor of Philosophy Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Environmental Engineering Section May 2011 #12;ii Activated Peroxygens for Remediation of Contaminated Soil and Groundwater Ph.D. thesis

Hansen, René Rydhof

286

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA Abstract Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley products sold (U.S. Department of 1Corresponding author: U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science

287

An Efficient Probabilistic Finite Element Method for Stochastic Groundwater Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater flow and transport from mathematical models involves considerable uncertainty due to the presenceAn Efficient Probabilistic Finite Element Method for Stochastic Groundwater Flow Harald Osnes Hans by nonlinear effects as oe Y approaches unity in more general domains. 1 #12; 1 Introduction The prediction

Osnes, Harald

288

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground- water systems are modelled one has to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system

Knowles, Ian W.

289

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Models for Groundwater Behavioral Analysis in Regions of Maharashtra M.Tech Dissertation on groundwater and classified the years into good year if water levels are above the seasonal model in that year such as land-use, local hydrogeology. #12;Contents 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Spatial Models

Sohoni, Milind

290

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE RECOVERY OF TRANSPORT PARAMETERS IN GROUNDWATER MODELLING IAN KNOWLES AND AIMIN YAN. Introduction Saturated flow and single phase solute transport in confined ground­ water systems are modelled to resort to indirect, or inverse, techniques to populate the model. In a groundwater system one

Knowles, Ian W.

291

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

155: Numerical Models of Groundwater Flow and Transport EKKEHARD HOLZBECHER1 AND SHAUL SOREK2 1. #12;2402 GROUNDWATER Calibration as a task cannot be separated from the other tasks. Inverse modeling of the Negev, J. Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Sede Boker, Israel The article gives an introduction

Sorek, Shaul

292

Simulation of salt migrations in density dependent groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and uses a finite element method for the simulation of groundwater flow in the lateral (2D) direction (third dimension) a finite difference method is used in the simula- tions. Numerical experiments are done of this thesis is to investigate the possibilities of modelling salt migrations in density dependent groundwater

Vuik, Kees

293

Groundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or main- tain compliance with regulatory requirements and to implement best management practices designedGroundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 DRAFT 7.1 THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION regulations. BNL's program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in DOE Order

294

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring: Setting, sources and methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is conducted on the Hanford Site to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) orders; and the Washington Administrative Code. Results of monitoring are published annually (e.g., PNNL-11989). To reduce the redundancy of these annual reports, background information that does not change significantly from year to year has been extracted from the annual report and published in this companion volume. This report includes a description of groundwater monitoring requirements, site hydrogeology, and waste sites that have affected groundwater quality or that require groundwater monitoring. Monitoring networks and methods for sampling, analysis, and interpretation are summarized. Vadose zone monitoring methods and statistical methods also are described. Whenever necessary, updates to information contained in this document will be published in future groundwater annual reports.

M.J. Hartman

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

295

Position and orientation tracking system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning apparatus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle. 14 figs.

Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Muller, R.C.; Gee, T.F.

1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

Position and orientation tracking system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning appaus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle.

Burks, Barry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); DePiero, Fred W. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Gary A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Muller, Richard C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Riceville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Rotorcraft Trajectory Tracking by Supervised NLI Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a four rotor aircraft with fixed pitch blades, or rotorcraft, are considered. One important limitation tracking by a four rotor aircraft is considered. After introducing the flight dynamics equations for the four rotor aircraft, a trajectory tracking control structure based on a two layer non linear inverse

Boyer, Edmond

298

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy-Efficient Computing for Wildlife Tracking: Design Tradeoffs and Early Experiences with ZebraNet Philo Juang Hidekazu Oki Yong Wang Margaret Martonosi Li-Shiuan Peh Dan Rubenstein Dept. of Electrical Princeton University ZebraNet Project VET TES EN NOV TAM TVM Current Tracking Technology Most common: VHF

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

299

User centered story tracking Ilija Subasic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and their evolu- tion and comprehending the general the story development. This situation calls for systems thatUser centered story tracking Ilija Subasi´c Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Leuven-Heverlee, Belgium is to identify and highlight these changes to better enable readers to track stories. In this work we restrict

Hammerton, James

300

DISTRIBUTED EVENT LOCALIZATION AND TRACKING ALGORITHM (DELTA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a distributed event localization and tracking algorithm (DELTA). DELTA is extended with energy-efficient network management, event classification functionality and an energy based source localization. The energy;#12;Abstract Different approaches to do event detection, tracking, localization and classification have been

Braun, Torsten

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Status Report on REC Verification, Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RECs 11. Ability to prevent double-selling of attributes 12. Coordination between electricity tracking · Acceptance and support of REC market by the regulatory community, OR · Policy driver (GHG regulation · Mission: Provide a forum for coordination and cooperation of certificate tracking systems in North America

302

GPU COMPUTING FOR PARTICLE TRACKING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a feasibility study of using a modern Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to parallelize the accelerator particle tracking code. To demonstrate the massive parallelization features provided by GPU computing, a simplified TracyGPU program is developed for dynamic aperture calculation. Performances, issues, and challenges from introducing GPU are also discussed. General purpose Computation on Graphics Processing Units (GPGPU) bring massive parallel computing capabilities to numerical calculation. However, the unique architecture of GPU requires a comprehensive understanding of the hardware and programming model to be able to well optimize existing applications. In the field of accelerator physics, the dynamic aperture calculation of a storage ring, which is often the most time consuming part of the accelerator modeling and simulation, can benefit from GPU due to its embarrassingly parallel feature, which fits well with the GPU programming model. In this paper, we use the Tesla C2050 GPU which consists of 14 multi-processois (MP) with 32 cores on each MP, therefore a total of 448 cores, to host thousands ot threads dynamically. Thread is a logical execution unit of the program on GPU. In the GPU programming model, threads are grouped into a collection of blocks Within each block, multiple threads share the same code, and up to 48 KB of shared memory. Multiple thread blocks form a grid, which is executed as a GPU kernel. A simplified code that is a subset of Tracy++ [2] is developed to demonstrate the possibility of using GPU to speed up the dynamic aperture calculation by having each thread track a particle.

Nishimura, Hiroshi; Song, Kai; Muriki, Krishna; Sun, Changchun; James, Susan; Qin, Yong

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

303

Anomalous Scaling and Refined Similarity of an Active Scalar in a Model of Homogeneous Turbulent Convection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous scaling in the statistics of an active scalar in homogeneous turbulent convection is studied using a dynamical shell model. We extend refined similarity ideas for homogeneous and isotropic turbulence to homogeneous turbulent convection and attribute the origin of the anomalous scaling to variations of the entropy transfer rate. We verify the consequences and thus the validity of our hypothesis by showing that the conditional statistics of the active scalar and the velocity at fixed values of entropy transfer rate are not anomalous but have simple scaling with exponents given by dimensional considerations, and that the intermittency corrections are given by the scaling exponents of the moments of the entropy transfer rate.

Emily S. C. Ching; W. C. Cheng

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations. 3 figures.

Nichols, R.L.; Widdowson, M.A.; Mullinex, H.; Orne, W.H.; Looney, B.B.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

305

Characterization of shallow groundwater at TNX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located on 300 square miles along the Savannah River near Aiken, South Carolina, is owned by the Department of Energy and operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company. The site`s mission is to support the national security through the production of nuclear weapons material. With the recent reduction of the nation`s nuclear stockpile and the stronger focus on the cleanup of sites where nuclear operations activities have left behind soil and groundwater contamination, identifying and remediating all inactive wastes has become a primary goal.The TNX Area is located adjacent to the Savannah River in the western portion of SRS (Figure 1). The area is a pilot-scale test facility for the Savannah River Technology Center. Pilot-scale testing and evaluation of chemical processes at TNX have included support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Separations Area, and fuel and target manufacturing areas. Wastewater generated during tests was discharged to unlined basins through a network of underground process sewers.A discussion of waste disposal activities for the TNX Area is included in this report to identify the major sources of contaminants that have impacted the groundwater.

Nichols, R.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

ATLAS Tracking Event Data Model -- 12.0.0  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viewcvs-all.cgi/offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkEvent/all.cgi/ offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkEvent/all.cgi/offline/? cvsroot=atlas : Tracking/TrkDetDescr/

Akesson, F.; ATLAS

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track| DepartmentPinakin Patel /DepartmentContamination

308

Nature of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I summarize recent developments in the magnetar model of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars, give a critical inventory of alternative models for the AXPs, and outline the improved diagnostics expected from present observational efforts.

Christopher Thompson

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Anomalous positrons from heavy ion collisions: Past results and future plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current status of the experimental study of anomalous lines observed in the spectra of positrons produced in heavy ion collisions is reviewed. A new experiment to measure positron-electron coincidences is discussed. 26 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Betts, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous laser light Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anomalous laser light Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 July 1, 2001 Vol. 26, No. 13 OPTICS LETTERS 989 Waveguide grating mirror for large-area semiconductor lasers Summary: a...

311

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous quasi-elastic electron Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sample search results for: anomalous quasi-elastic electron Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Neutron scattering study of the quasi-elastic spectral width in CeMg, CeMg3 and NdMg3...

312

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalously strong effect Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 4 , providing strong... is strongly damped by the effects of phonons. Because of the energy loss to phonons, the electrons and holes... Hot-Carrier Model for an Anomalous...

313

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous flux-ratio gravitational Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

57 THE FIRST OBSERVATION OF SULFUR IN ANOMALOUS COSMIC RAYS BY THE GEOTAIL AND THE WIND SPACECRAFTS Summary: that the threshold FIP is at least as small as 10.4 eV. The flux...

314

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous ion transport Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Physics and Fusion ; Physics 10 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC02-76CH03073. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Summary: . The anomalous...

315

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous elastic behavior Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute, University of Chicago Collection: Materials Science 51 VOLUME 76, NUMBER 16 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 15 APRIL 1996 Anomalous Viscous Loss in...

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous solar chemical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: anomalous solar chemical Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Grains and gamma-ray observations NICXI371 Stardust Material in the Meteorite SAH 97096 Summary: can be...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous ultrasound propagation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3, pp. 257-263, 1991 0301-562991 3.00 + .00 Printed in the U.S.A. 1991 Pergamon Press plc Summary: but also that due to beam diffrac- tion and other anomalous behaviors of the...

318

Enhancements to System for Tracking Radioactive Waste Shipments...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Multiple Users January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Transportation Tracking and Communication System users can now track shipments of radioactive materials and access...

319

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

320

ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO Verification of Employment Tracking System(VETS) PIA, Oak ridge Operations Office ORO...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System and Visitor Control System PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Office Safeguards and Security Clearance Tracking System...

322

Quantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins, using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-solute, deep groundwater and a low-solute, soil-water. The mixing model indicated 69% ± 10% deep groundwater-member mixing, hydrological pathway, interbasin groundwater flow INTRODUCTION Knowledge of hydrological pathwaysQuantifying the differential contributions of deep groundwater to streamflow in nested basins

Chappell, Nick A

323

Search for the Anomalous Interactions of Up-Type Heavy Quarks in $? ?$ Collision at the LHC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the anomalous interactions of heavy up-type quark t' in a $\\gamma \\gamma$ collision at the LHC. We have obtained 95% confidence level(CL)limit of $t'q \\gamma$ anomalous coupling by taking into account three forward detector acceptances: $0.0015<\\xi<0.15$,$0.0015<\\xi<0.5$, and $0.1<\\xi<0.5$.

M. Köksal; S. C. ?nan

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

324

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR §264.90 through §264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] §6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Class 3 Tracking and Monitoring System Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Class 3 tracking system are to assist DOE in tracking and performance and progress of these projects and to capture the technical and financial information collected during the projects' monitoring phase. The captured information was used by DOE project managers and BDM-Oklahoma staff for project monitoring and evaluation, and technology transfer activities. The proposed tracking system used the Class Evaluation Executive Report (CLEVER), a relation database for storing and disseminating class project data; GeoGraphix, a geological and technical analysis and mapping software system; the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS) database; and MS-Project, a project management software system.

Safely, Eugene; Salamy, S. Phillip

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

Yang, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Latent ion tracks in amorphous silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence for the formation of ion tracks in amorphous Si induced by swift heavy ion irradiation. An underlying core-shell structure consistent with remnants of a high density liquid structure was revealed by small-angle x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations. Ion track dimensions dier for as-implanted and relaxed Si as attributed to dierent microstructures and melting temperatures. The identication and characterisation of ion tracks in amorphous Si yields new insight into mechanisms of damage formation due to swift heavy ion irradiation in amorphous semiconductors.

Bierschenk, Thomas [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Giulian, Raquel [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Afra, Boshra [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Rodriguez, Matias D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Schauries, D [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Mudie, Stephen [Australian Synchrotron] [Australian Synchrotron; Pakarinen, Olli H [ORNL] [ORNL; Djurabekova, Flyura [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Nordlund, Kai [University of Helsinki] [University of Helsinki; Osmani, Orkhan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany] [University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany; Medvedev, Nikita [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Rethfield, Baerbel [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany] [University of Kaiserslautern, Germany; Ridgway, Mark C [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia; Kluth, Patrick [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia] [Australian National University, Canberra, Australia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1991 EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Beginning in 1991, the flagging criteria are based on EPA drinking water standards and method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Understanding what lies beneath: Groundwater critical to Texas water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organizations and programs associated with groundwater in Texas: Aquifers: Geological formations that can store, transmit, and yield groundwater to a well or spring. Groundwater comes from nine major and 21 minor aquifers in Texas. Confined aquifer: Layer... of water that is held between two layers of clay. The recharge area is limited to land surface where the aquifer?s geologic material is exposed to the land surface. Unconfined aquifer: Layer of water that has a confining layer on bottom and a layer...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Management Plan is to define the function, organizational structure (including associated matrix organizations), interfaces, roles and responsibilities, authority, and relationship to the Department of Energy for the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO). GWPO is charged with the responsibility of coordinating all components of the groundwater program for Energy Systems. This mandate includes activities at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

Early, T.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

MARTINEZ, C.R.

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

333

Final Report - Ferrographic Tracking of Bacterial Transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work performed during the past three years has been extremely productive. Ferrographic capture was utilized in analysis of several thousand field samples collected from arrays of multilevel samplers during three intensive field campaigns conducted at two shallow sandy aquifer sites in Oyster, VA. This work has shown resulted in three important conclusions: (1) Ferrographic capture provides unparalleled low quantitation limits for bacterial cell enumeration (Johnson et al., 2000). (2) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of increased bacterial removal rates (from groundwater) that corresponded to increased populations of protozoa in the groundwater (Zhang et al., 2001). This novel data allowed determination of bacterial predation rates by protists in the field, a consideration that will be important for successful bioaugmentation strategies. (3) The high-resolution analyses provided by ferrographic capture allowed observation of detachment of indigenous cells in response to breakthrough of injected cells in groundwater (Johnson et al., 2001). The implication of this unique observation is that bacterial transport, specifically bacterial attachment and detachment, may be much more dynamic than has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies. Dynamic attachment and detachment of bacteria in groundwater may lead to greatly increased transport distances over long terms relative to what has been indicated by short-term laboratory and field studies.

William P. Johnson

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Extent Of The Primary Groundwater Contaminants At The Y-12 National Security Complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data summary tables and maps used to define and illustrate the approximate lateral extent of groundwater contamination at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The data tables and maps address the primary (i.e., most widespread and mobile) organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in the groundwater. The sampling locations, calculated contaminant concentrations, plume boundary values, and paired map format used to define, quantify, delineate, and illustrate the approximate extent of the primary organic, inorganic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater at Y-12 are described.

none,

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Current LCD Tracking Options Bruce Schumm Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics for new S design (pattern recognition, resolution) S detector in real trouble at low angle w/out beam

California at Santa Cruz, University of

336

HCI gesture tracking using wearable passive tags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis. a wearable system is developed to track hand gestures with passive RFID sensor tags. This system was composed of an ultra-high frequency reader and small, passive, finger-worn tags powered by scavenged RFID ...

Bainbridge, Rachel M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Spin Rotation of Formalism for Spin Tracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of which coefficients are adequate to correctly represent the spin rotation in vector spin tracking for polarized proton and deuteron beams in synchrotrons is here re-examined in the light of recent discussions. The main aim of this note is to show where some previous erroneous results originated and how to code spin rotation in a tracking code. Some analysis of a recent experiment is presented that confirm the correctness of the assumptions.

Luccio,A.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Priority Groundwater Management Areas: Overview and Frequently Asked Questions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water shortages and water quality problems in Texas are prompting the state to address the security of its water supplies. One approach being taken is to create priority groundwater management areas (PGMAs) in critical regions. This publication...

Silvy, Valeen; Lesikar, Bruce J.; Persyn, Russell A.

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

339

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE has mandated in DOE Order 5400.1 that its operations will be conducted in an environmentally safe manner. The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) will comply with DOE Order 5400.1 and will conduct its operations in a manner that ensures the safety of the environment and the public. This document outlines how the WIPP will protect and preserve groundwater within and surrounding the WIPP facility. Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. The WIPP groundwater surveillance program is designed to determine statistically if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will be determined and appropriate corrective action initiated.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for additional arsenic removal. Several bench-scale experiments revealed that the resultant IOCS could treat arsenic-laden groundwater for extended periods of time before approaching its effective life cycle. The adsorption capacity for As(III) and As...

Abia, Thomas Sunday

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Institutional Arrangements for Effective Groundwater Management to Halt Land Subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater use and development but political entities with adequate scope to deal with the problem were either unwilling or unable to engage in regional water management. Indeed, these political organizations and other institutions may have actually...

Brah, W. L.; Jones, L. L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF, to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R. L. Weiss; D. W. Woolery

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD.

R. L. Weiss

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD.

R. L. Weiss

2007-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

345

Chloride-Magnesium Ratio of Shallow Groundwaters as a Regional...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chloride-Magnesium Ratio of Shallow Groundwaters as a Regional Geothermal Indicator in Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

346

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of the Surface and Groundwater Use and Protection is to ensure that Mississippi's public resource of water is safe and used properly. It requires that any person must obtain a permit...

347

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Groundwater Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These rules establish a series of practices for the protection of groundwater which are to be followed by any person who conducts coal mining operations subject to the provisions of West Virginia...

349

Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

Reed, David Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

351

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2013-2014 CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2013-2014 CATALOG There are three tracks in Interdisciplinary Studies (IS). This handout is for the Environmental Studies track. Office Classroom I ­ Suite 302 for students seeking a combination of studies. The Environmental Studies track is designed for students who

Wu, Shin-Tson

352

On-Line Selection of Discriminative Tracking Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in lighting conditions. Tracking success/failure is highly correlated with our ability to distinguish object

Collins, Robert T.

353

Location-Tracking Applications ecent technological advances in wireless loca-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

areas they have visited. #12;Location-Tracking Applications broker as part of their service contract

Gruteser, Marco

354

Original Article Clinician-Educator Tracks for Residents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and graduate outcomes. Results: Common elements in the tracks are faculty mentor- ship, formal didactics

Yoo, S. J. Ben

355

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

LFV decays and anomalous magnetic (electric) moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz induced by SUSY GUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By using the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $\\tau$ lepton in an effective lagrangian approach to the new physics, we investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays, $l\\to l'\\gamma$, and $\\mu,\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz which induced by SUSY GUT. We put very stringent constraints LFV decays and $\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments.

W. J. Huo

2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Radioiodine Biogeochemistry and Prevalence in Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

129I is commonly either the top or among the top risk drivers, along with 99Tc, at radiological waste disposal sites and contaminated groundwater sites where nuclear material fabrication or reprocessing has occurred. The risk stems largely from 129I having a high toxicity, a high bioaccumulation factor (90% of all the body’s iodine concentrates in the thyroid), a high inventory at source terms (due to its high fission yield), an extremely long half-life (16M yr), and rapid mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that 129I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define 129I mass balance and flux at sites, but cannot predict accurately its response to changes in the environment. As a consequence of some of these characteristics, 129I has a very low Drinking Water Standard, DWS, which is set at 1 pCi/L, the lowest of all radionuclides in the Federal Register. Recently, significant advancements have been made in detecting iodine species at ambient groundwater concentrations, defining the nature of the organic matter and iodine bond, and quantifying the role of naturally occurring sediment microbes to promote iodine oxidation and reduction. These recent studies have led to a more mechanistic understanding of radioiodine biogeochemistry. The objective of this review is to describe these advances and to provide a state of the science of radioiodine biogeochemistry relevant to its fate and transport in the terrestrial environment and provide information useful for making decisions regarding the stewardship and remediation of 129I contaminated sites. As part of this review, knowledge gaps were identified that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating 129I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of 129I waste. Together the information gained from addressing these knowledge gaps will not alter the observation that 129I is primarily mobile, but it will likely permit demonstration that the entire 129I pool in the source term is not moving at the same rate and some may be tightly bound to the sediment, thereby “smearing” the modeled 129I peak and reducing maximum calculated risk.

Kaplan, Daniel I.; Denham, Miles E.; Zhang, Saijin; Yeager, Chris; Xu, Chen; Schwehr, Kathy; Li, Hsiu-Ping; Ho, Yi-Fang; Wellman, Dawn M.; Santschi, Peter H.

2014-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network VERMONT Keeping Track, Promoting Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exposures such as air pollution and drinking water contaminants. The health department began receiving monitoring data show that this county also has the most days per year of air pollution from fine particulateCS225774_O CDC's National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network VERMONT Keeping Track

359

Tracking Graphics State forTracking Graphics State for Network RenderingNetwork Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking Graphics State forTracking Graphics State for Network RenderingNetwork Rendering Ian Buck 2000 Distributed GraphicsDistributed Graphics Application Application Application Renderer Renderer Renderer Network How to manage distributed graphics applications, renderers, and displays? #12;HWWS 2000

Pratt, Vaughan

360

A Guide for Using the Transient Ground-Water Flow Model of the Death Valley Regional Ground-Water Flow System, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a guide for executing numerical simulations with the transient ground-water flow model of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system, Nevada and California using the U.S. Geological Survey modular finite-difference ground-water flow model, MODFLOW-2000. Model inputs, including observations of hydraulic head, discharge, and boundary flows, are summarized. Modification of the DVRFS transient ground-water model is discussed for two common uses of the Death Valley regional ground-water flow system model: predictive pumping scenarios that extend beyond the end of the model simulation period (1998), and model simulations with only steady-state conditions.

Joan B. Blainey; Claudia C. Faunt, and Mary C. Hill

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Classification of groundwater at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater occurring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been classified according to the ``Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ground-Water Protection Strategy`` (June 1988). All of the groundwater units at the NTS are Class II, groundwater currently (IIA) or potentially (IIB) a source of drinking water. The Classification Review Area (CRA) for the NTS is defined as the standard two-mile distance from the facility boundary recommended by EPA. The possibility of expanding the CRA was evaluated, but the two-mile distance encompasses the area expected to be impacted by contaminant transport during a 10-year period (EPA,s suggested limit), should a release occur. The CRA is very large as a consequence of the large size of the NTS and the decision to classify the entire site, not individual areas of activity. Because most activities are located many miles hydraulically upgradient of the NTS boundary, the CRA generally provides much more than the usual two-mile buffer required by EPA. The CRA is considered sufficiently large to allow confident determination of the use and value of groundwater and identification of potentially affected users. The size and complex hydrogeology of the NTS are inconsistent with the EPA guideline assumption of a high degree of hydrologic interconnection throughout the review area. To more realistically depict the site hydrogeology, the CRA is subdivided into eight groundwater units. Two main aquifer systems are recognized: the lower carbonate aquifer system and the Cenozoic aquifer system (consisting of aquifers in Quaternary valley fill and Tertiary volcanics). These aquifer systems are further divided geographically based on the location of low permeability boundaries.

Chapman, J.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An automatically processed alpha-track radon monitor is provided which includes a housing having an aperture allowing radon entry, and a filter that excludes the entry of radon daughters into the housing. A flexible track registration material is located within the housing that records alpha-particle emissions from the decay of radon and radon daughters inside the housing. The flexible track registration material is capable of being spliced such that the registration material from a plurality of monitors can be spliced into a single strip to facilitate automatic processing of the registration material from the plurality of monitors. A process for the automatic counting of radon registered by a radon monitor is also provided.

Langner, G.H. Jr.

1993-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

363

Tracking Provenance in ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Provenance is dened as information about the origin of objects, a concept that applies to both physical and digital objects and often overlaps both. The use of provenance in systems designed for research is an important but forgotten feature. Provenance allows for proper and exact tracking of information, its use, its lineage, its derivations and other metadata that are important for correctly adhering to the scien- tic method. In our project's prescribed use of provenance, researchers can determine detailed information about the use of sensor data in their experiments on ORNL's Flexible Research Platforms (FRPs). Our project's provenance system, Provenance Data Management System (ProvDMS), tracks information starting with the creation of information by an FRP sensor. The system determines station information, sensor information, and sensor channel information. The system allows researchers to derive generations of experiments from the sensor data and tracks their hierarchical flow. Key points can be seen in the history of the information as part of the information's workflow. The concept of provenance and its usage in science is relatively new and while used in other cases around the world, our project's provenance diers in a key area. To keep track of provenance, most systems must be designed or redesigned around the new provenance system. Our system is designed as a cohesive but sepa- rate entity and allows for researchers to continue using their own methods of analysis without being constrained in their ways in order to track the provenance. We have designed ProvDMS using a lightweight provenance library, Core Provenance Library (CPL) v.6 In addition to keeping track of sensor data experiments and its provenance, ProvDMS also provides a web-enabled visualization of the inheritance.

Hensley, Zachary P [ORNL; Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Flow calculations for Yucca Mountain groundwater travel time (GWTT-95)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1983, high-level radioactive waste repository performance requirements related to groundwater travel time were defined by NRC subsystem regulation 10 CFR 60.113. Although DOE is not presently attempting to demonstrate compliance with that regulation, understanding of the prevalence of fast paths in the groundwater flow system remains a critical element of any safety analyses for a potential repository system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Therefore, this analysis was performed to allow comparison of fast-path flow against the criteria set forth in the regulation. Models developed to describe the conditions for initiation, propagation, and sustainability of rapid groundwater movement in both the unsaturated and saturated zones will form part of the technical basis for total- system analyses to assess site viability and site licensability. One of the most significant findings is that the fastest travel times in both unsaturated and saturated zones are in the southern portion of the potential repository, so it is recommended that site characterization studies concentrate on this area. Results support the assumptions regarding the importance of an appropriate conceptual model of groundwater flow and the incorporation of heterogeneous material properties into the analyses. Groundwater travel times are sensitive to variation/uncertainty in hydrologic parameters and in infiltration flux at upper boundary of the problem domain. Simulated travel times are also sensitive to poorly constrained parameters of the interaction between flow in fractures and in the matrix.

Altman, S.J.; Arnold, B.W.; Barnard, R.W.; Barr, G.E.; Ho, C.K.; McKenna, S.A.; Eaton, R.R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Chemical tracking at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc., has developed a chemical tracking system to support compliance with the Emergency Planning and community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at the Rocky Flats Plant. This system, referred to as the EPCRA Chemical Control system (ECCS), uses bar code technology to uniquely identify and track the receipt, distribution, and use of chemicals. Chemical inventories are conducted using hand-held electronic scanners to update a site wide chemical database on a VAX 6000 computer. Information from the ECCS supports preparation of the EPCRA Tier II and Form R reports on chemical storage and use.

Costain, D.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Anomalous scaling and super-roughness in the growth of CdTe polycrystalline films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CdTe films grown on glass substrates covered by fluorine doped tin oxide by Hot Wall Epitaxy (HWE) were studied through the interface dynamical scaling theory. Direct measures of the dynamical exponent revealed an intrinsically anomalous scaling characterized by a global roughness exponent $\\alpha$ distinct from the local one (the Hurst exponent $H$), previously reported [Ferreira \\textit{et al}., Appl. Phys. Lett. \\textbf{88}, 244103 (2006)]. A variety of scaling behaviors was obtained with varying substrate temperature. In particular, a transition from a intrinsically anomalous scaling regime with $H\

Angélica S. Mata; Silvio C. Ferreira, Jr.; Igor R. B. Ribeiro; Sukarno O. Ferreira

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

368

Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry "violation" in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry "violation" phenomena. For example certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the Chiral Magnetic Effect, Chiral Separation Effect, Chiral Electric Separation Effect, Chiral Electric/Magnetic Waves, etc) in the hot QCD fluid created by such collisions.

Jinfeng Liao

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

369

Equivalence of the channel-corrected-T-matrix and anomalous-propagator approaches to condensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Any many-body approximation corrected for unphysical repeated collisions in a given condensation channel is shown to provide the same set of equations as they appear by using anomalous propagators. The ad hoc assumption in the latter theory about nonconservation of particle numbers can be released. In this way, the widespread used anomalous-propagator approach is given another physical interpretation. A generalized Soven equation follows which improves a chosen approximation in the same way as the coherent-potential approximation improves the averaged T matrix for impurity scattering.

Morawetz, K. [Muenster University of Applied Science, Stegerwaldstrasse 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany); International Institute of Physics (IIP), Universidade Federal do Rio grande do Norte, BrazilAvenida Odilon Gomes de Lima, 1722-CEP 59078-400, Natal/RN (Brazil) and Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha, E-mail: shikha@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Dash, P. [Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Singh, C. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi 110067 (India)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE OF A CALCAREOUS SOIL OF SOUTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 MODELING SHALLOW GROUNDWATER TABLE CONTRIBUTION TO SOIL WATER RETENTION IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE...................................................................................................................................13 CHAPTER 1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................................15 Shallow Groundwater Capillarity

Migliaccio, Kati White

372

Designing A New Elitist Nondominated Sorted Genetic Algorithm For A Multiobjective Long Term Groundwater Monitoring Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

historical data for the migration of a plume of perchloroethylene (PCE) in groundwater. PCE is a commonly groundwater samples are used to assess the effectiveness of clean up efforts in reducing the amount of PCE

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxic groundwater sediment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater sediment Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anoxic groundwater sediment Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Use of Dissolved H2...

374

Effect of hydrological flow pattern on groundwater arsenic concentration in Bangladesh by Khandaker Ashfaque.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Widespread arsenic contamination of groundwater has become a major concern in Bangladesh since the water supply, particularly in rural areas, is heavily dependent on groundwater. However, relative to the extent of research ...

Ashfaque, Khandaker

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Application of Stable Isotope Probing to Identify RDX-degrading Bacteria in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carcinogen; therefore, occurrence of RDX in groundwater has raised a public health concern. As RDX is biodegradable; bioremediation of RDX-contaminated groundwater has been recognized as a feasible cleanup technology. Several RDX-degrading isolates...

Cho, Kun-Ching

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

E-Print Network 3.0 - area groundwater biodenitrification Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vol. 8, 03933, 2006 SRef-ID: 1607-7962graEGU06-A-03933 Summary: groundwater extraction potential are present in the whole basin area. The groundwater quality is fairly...

377

Probabilistic analysis of the effects of climate change on groundwater recharge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Groundwater recharge is likely to be affected by climate change. In semiarid regions where groundwater resources are often critical, annual recharge rates are typically small and most recharge occurs episodically. Such ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

378

Water balance investigations of groundwater depletion in Asia : information needs and uncertainty analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irrigated agriculture is an essential component of global food production. In many regions of the world, and Asia in particular, groundwater is a major source of irrigation water. Over-pumping of groundwater aquifers has ...

Kiang, Julie E. (Julie Ega), 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

1 Introduction In Southeast Michigan the source of groundwater is almost guaranteed by its climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater extractors in the countyöstone quarries, golf courses, farms, and house- holds. The groundwater, while eliminating quarry dewatering did not entirely solve the problem. Both low-density and high

Illinois at Chicago, University of

380

Seasonal dynamics in costal aquifers : investigation of submarine groundwater discharge through field measurements and numerical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fresh and saline groundwater flowing from coastal aquifers into the ocean comprise submarine groundwater discharge (SGD). This outflow is an important pathway for the transport of nutrients and contaminants, and has ...

Michael, Holly Anne, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Groundwater Dynamic Simulation Model: Application to the Upper San Pedro Basin Report Prepared by using tools such as tracers to determine groundwater travel times and this dynamic simulation modeling

Fay, Noah

382

MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R. Lund  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme F. Marques, Marion W. Jenkins, Jay R University of California, Davis April 2003 #12;MODELING OF FRIANT WATER MANAGEMENT AND GROUNDWATER Guilherme;TABLE OF CONTENTS i INTRODUCTION

Pasternack, Gregory B.

383

Mixed waste landfill annual groundwater monitoring report April 2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual groundwater sampling was conducted at the Sandia National Laboratories' Mixed Waste Landfill (MWL) in April 2005. Seven monitoring wells were sampled using a Bennett{trademark} pump in accordance with the April 2005 Mini-Sampling and Analysis Plan for the MWL (SNL/NM 2005). The samples were analyzed off site at General Engineering Laboratories, Inc. for a broad suite of radiochemical and chemical parameters, and the results are presented in this report. Sample splits were also collected from several of the wells by the New Mexico Environment Department U.S. Department of Energy Oversight Bureau; however, the split sample results are not included in this report. The results of the April 2005 annual groundwater monitoring conducted at the MWL showed constituent concentrations within the historical ranges for the site and indicated no evidence of groundwater contamination from the landfill.

Lyon, Mark L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

None

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic groundwater system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department, University of Florida Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies 2 Arsenic Occurrence in Groundwater...

386

Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project- March 2007  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Evaluation to determine whether Soil and Groundwater Remediation Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP recognition.

387

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Field site investigation: Effect of mine seismicity on groundwater hydrology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a field investigation on the groundwater-hydrologic effect of mining-induced earthquakes are presented in this report. The investigation was conducted at the Lucky Friday Mine, a silver-lead-zinc mine in the Coeur d`Alene Mining District of Idaho. The groundwater pressure in sections of three fracture zones beneath the water table was monitored over a 24-mo period. The fracture zones were accessed through a 360-m-long inclined borehole, drilled from the 5,700 level station of the mine. The magnitude, source location, and associated ground motions of mining-induced seismic events were also monitored during the same period, using an existing seismic instrumentation network for the mine, augmented with additional instruments installed specifically for the project by the center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA). More than 50 seismic events of Richter magnitude 1.0 or larger occurred during the monitoring period. Several of these events caused the groundwater pressure to increase, whereas a few caused it to decrease. Generally, the groundwater pressure increased as the magnitude of seismic event increased; for an event of a given magnitude, the groundwater pressure increased by a smaller amount as the distance of the observation point from the source of the event increased. The data was examined using regression analysis. Based on these results, it is suggested that the effect of earthquakes on groundwater flow may be better understood through mechanistic modeling. The mechanical processes and material behavior that would need to be incorporated in such a model are examined. They include a description of the effect of stress change on the permeability and water storage capacity of a fracture rock mass; transient fluid flow; and the generation and transmission of seismic waves through the rock mass.

Ofoegbu, G.I.; Hsiung, S.; Chowdhury, A.H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States). Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses; Philip, J. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Economics UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Fall 2013 and Beyond Freshman Year/ Fall Semester.201 (H) Honors Economics I 3 49.202 Economics II 3 92.121 Pre-calc or any higher level 3 92.109 First Year Seminar 1 16 16 Sophomore Year/Fall Semester Cr Sophomore/Spring Semester 49.3/4 Economics

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

390

Locating and tracking assets using RFID  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In this research, we will focus on how to ?nd the location of an item by using RFID in real time indoors to track equipment. When an item needs to be located, the purpose of using RFID is to minimize the searching time, e?ort, and investment cost. Thus...

Kim, Gak Gyu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Tracking Mobile Units for Dependable Message Delivery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tracking Mobile Units for Dependable Message Delivery Amy L. Murphy, Member, IEEE Computer Society at their disposal at any time, mobile computing is developing as an important research area. One of the fundamental problems in mobility is maintaining connectivity through message passing as the user moves through

Zhou, Yuanyuan

392

Software for precise tracking of cell proliferation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed software for analyzing cultured cells that divide as well as migrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The active contour model (Snakes) was used as the core algorithm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time backward analysis was also used for efficient detection of cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With user-interactive correction functions, the software enables precise tracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The software was successfully applied to cells with fluorescently-labeled nuclei. -- Abstract: We have developed a multi-target cell tracking program TADOR, which we applied to a series of fluorescence images. TADOR is based on an active contour model that is modified in order to be free of the problem of locally optimal solutions, and thus is resistant to signal fluctuation and morphological changes. Due to adoption of backward tracing and addition of user-interactive correction functions, TADOR is used in an off-line and semi-automated mode, but enables precise tracking of cell division. By applying TADOR to the analysis of cultured cells whose nuclei had been fluorescently labeled, we tracked cell division and cell-cycle progression on coverslips over an extended period of time.

Kurokawa, Hiroshi [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Noda, Hisayori [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sugiyama, Mayu [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukami, Kiyoko [School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)] [School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Miyawaki, Atsushi, E-mail: matsushi@brain.riken.jp [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan) [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Copyright Siemens Business Services Patient Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

© Copyright Siemens Business Services Patient Tracking based on RFID labels ThomasThomas JellJell Principal ConsultantPrincipal Consultant DirectorDirector SBS SI 22 #12;2 Siemens One Projects · SBS Companies / Goverment #12;3 Siemens One Projects · Showroom GfM Furniture · Designer Knock Offs ( · Theft

Manstein, Dietmar J.

394

Double tracks test site characterization report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Ubiquitous Computing, Customer Tracking, and Price Discrimination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ubiquitous Computing, Customer Tracking, and Price Discrimination Alessandro Acquisti H. John Heinz's analysis is the possibility of combining context, historical, location and other personal data to dynamically alter the price of a product for each consumer - a form of price discrimination also known

Sadeh, Norman M.

396

Situational Awareness: Personalizing Issue Tracking Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Situational Awareness: Personalizing Issue Tracking Systems Olga Baysal, Reid Holmes, and Michael W. Godfrey Software Architecture Group (SWAG) David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science, University role in ongoing software development; they are used by developers to support collaborative bug fixing

Godfrey, Michael W.

397

Predictive tracking control of constrained nonlinear systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"diffusive" and "constant" parameter dynamics, by means of a simulation example. Finally Section 6 draws some of constrained nonlinear systems are proposed. Simulation experiments demonstrate the good tracking properties, the controller directly synthesizes the plant control input and, hence, has more freedom than the RG which can

Chisci, Luigi

398

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Additive manufacturing of metallic tracks on green ceramic/dielectrics Problem this technology microelectronics such as manufacture of LTCC ceramic/ Dielectric antenna and rapid PCB prototyping or repair (note: may require additional tooling/ set up time) · Rapid Prototyping & small scale manufacture

Painter, Kevin

399

Prof. Alessandro De Luca Trajectory Tracking Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robotics 2 Prof. Alessandro De Luca Trajectory Tracking Control #12;Inverse dynamics control given the robot dynamic model ! B(q)q + n(q,q) = u and a twice-differentiable desired trajectory for t [0,T] ! qd state) ! c(q,q) + g(q) + friction model Robotics 2 2 . . #12;In practice ... " initial state is "not

De Luca, Alessandro

400

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.

Fingersh, L. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Plastics Engineering UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastics Engineering UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Fall 2013 and Beyond Freshman Year Sophomore Year/Fall Semester Cr Sophomore/Spring Semester 26.001 Plastics Safety Lecture 0 26.002 Plastics Safety Lecture 0 26.201 Polymeric Materials I 3 26.202 Polymeric Materials II 3 26.215 Plastics Proc. Eng

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

403

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2013 Traditional Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Engineering Catalog 2013 Traditional Track Fall Math 141 or 147 (4) FA, SP, SU English 101-approved by the department advisor. Courses in Nuclear Engineering other than 500, 502 and 598 may also be used as technical, which depends on academic performance. Factors considered include overall grade point average

Tennessee, University of

404

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

405

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry UMass Lowell Commonwealth Honors Track Scholarship Rises. Freshman Year/ Fall Semester Cr) Honors Chemistry I 3 84.136 (H) Honors Chemistry II 3 84.123 (H) Honors Chemistry I Lab 1 84.124 (H) Honors Chemistry II Lab 1 92.131 Calculus I 4 92.132 Honors Calculus II 4 Hon 110 Honors FYSH (AH) 3 Gen

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

406

Assessment of University Sustainability Activities SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of University Sustainability Activities under the SUSTAINABILITY TRACKING, ASSESSMENT Rashed-Ali, PhD. Prepared for: The UTSA Sustainability Council May 3rd , 2011 #12;yhd/s ^hDD Zz 2 | P a g-Ali, Assistant Professor in the College of Architecture, conducted a survey and assessment of UTSA sustainability

Dodla, Ramana

407

TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

408

ADAPTIVE ROBUST TRACKING CONTROL OF PRESSURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accuracy of pressure trajectory in the chamber when the pneumatic cylinder is moving. Off-line fitting, it is necessary to utilize the adaptive model compensation for improving the tracking accuracy of pressure and attenuation in pneumatic lines, valve dynamics, flow nonlinearities through the valve orifice, piston friction

Yao, Bin

409

Theoretical foundation for measuring the groundwater age distribution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, we use PFLOTRAN, a highly scalable, parallel, flow and reactive transport code to simulate the concentrations of 3H, 3He, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, SF6, 39Ar, 81Kr, 4He and themean groundwater age in heterogeneous fields on grids with an excess of 10 million nodes. We utilize this computational platform to simulate the concentration of multiple tracers in high-resolution, heterogeneous 2-D and 3-D domains, and calculate tracer-derived ages. Tracer-derived ages show systematic biases toward younger ages when the groundwater age distribution contains water older than the maximum tracer age. The deviation of the tracer-derived age distribution from the true groundwater age distribution increases with increasing heterogeneity of the system. However, the effect of heterogeneity is diminished as the mean travel time gets closer the tracer age limit. Age distributions in 3-D domains differ significantly from 2-D domains. 3D simulations show decreased mean age, and less variance in age distribution for identical heterogeneity statistics. High-performance computing allows for investigation of tracer and groundwater age systematics in high-resolution domains, providing a platform for understanding and utilizing environmental tracer and groundwater age information in heterogeneous 3-D systems. Groundwater environmental tracers can provide important constraints for the calibration of groundwater flow models. Direct simulation of environmental tracer concentrations in models has the additional advantage of avoiding assumptions associated with using calculated groundwater age values. This study quantifies model uncertainty reduction resulting from the addition of environmental tracer concentration data. The analysis uses a synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and the calibration of a flow and transport model using the pilot point method. Results indicate a significant reduction in the uncertainty in permeability with the addition of environmental tracer data, relative to the use of hydraulic measurements alone. Anthropogenic tracers and their decay products, such as CFC11, 3H, and 3He, provide significant constraint oninput permeability values in the model. Tracer data for 39Ar provide even more complete information on the heterogeneity of permeability and variability in the flow system than the anthropogenic tracers, leading to greater parameter uncertainty reduction.

Gardner, William Payton; Arnold, Bill Walter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Majority of Livestock Waste Lagoons Pose No Risk to Groundwater Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Majority of Livestock Waste Lagoons Pose No Risk to Groundwater Pollution by Steve Ress UNL Water livestock waste lagoons may not be significant contributors to groundwater pollution. "This is particularly of groundwater pollution from livestock waste lagoons, Spalding said. Samples also were analyzed for nitrogen

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

411

Quarterly RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Data for the Period April Through June 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information about RCRA groundwater monitoring for the period April through June 2006. Seventeen RCRA sites were sampled during the reporting quarter. Sampled sites include seven monitored under groundwater indicator evaluation (''detection'') programs, eight monitored under groundwater quality assessment programs, and two monitored under final-status programs.

Hartman, Mary J.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada.sader@mmg.com) ABSTRACT: Peat groundwater compositions at depths of 0.4 and 1.1 m below ground surface in the Attawapiskat on hydrogeological measurements and variations in peat groundwater geochemical parameters (pH and EC are high

413

Remediation of MTBE in groundwater: A case where pump-and-treat works  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two case studies are discussed in which groundwater pumping reduced levels of dissolved methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in groundwater by more than two orders of magnitude, in some cases to below detection limits. MTBE contamination in groundwater is becoming an important issue due to the increasing prevalence and regulation of this gasoline additive. In addition, MTBE is more mobile in groundwater than most hydrocarbons, so it is usually the first gasoline constituent to reach sensitive receptors. Since its Henry`s constant is low, in situ removal of MTBE from groundwater by air sparging is slow, and MTBE does not rapidly degrade, either biologically or abiotically. Therefore, groundwater pumping is usually employed to contain and collect MTBE-contaminated groundwater. Pumping groundwater can reduce MME levels to below detection limits within a few years, because MTBE in the subsurface is found mostly dissolved in groundwater. In contrast, the more hydrophobic gasoline hydrocarbons exist mostly in pockets of separate phase material and adsorbed to soil particles and dissolve slowly in groundwater. Hydrocarbon concentrations are rarely reduced to closure levels within a reasonable time frame by pumping. Sites in eastern Massachusetts and southern New Jersey, where groundwater was contaminated with MTBE due to releases of unleaded gasoline from underground storage tanks, are discussed. At these sites, average MTBE levels were reduced by two to three orders of magnitude, from several ppm or more to less than 10 ppb within three years by pumping groundwater at 10 to 30 gpm.

Bass, D.H.; Riley, B. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Norwood, MA (United States); Farrell, T. [Groundwater Technology, Inc., Trenton, NJ (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Growth and metal uptake of microalgae produced using salt groundwaters from the Bay of Bourgneuf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth and metal uptake of microalgae produced using salt groundwaters from the Bay of Bourgneuf production of microalgae. Salt groundwaters, available in this region, support a large part of four microalgae grown in two salt groundwaters or in enriched coastal seawater. Cultures of microalgae

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

415

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers and isotope fractionation studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammonium transport and reaction in contaminated groundwater: Application of isotope tracers the groundwater velocity. Retardation factors and groundwater ages indicate that much of the NH4 + in the plume was recharged early in the history of the wastewater disposal. NO3 Ã? and excess N2 gas, which were related

416

Assessment groundwater monitoring plan for single shell tank waste management area B-BX-BY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single Shell Tank Waste Management Area B-BX-BY has been placed into groundwater quality assessment monitoring under interim-status regulations. This document presents background and an assessment groundwater monitoring plan to evaluate any impacts of risks/spills from these Single Shell Tanks in WMA B-BX-BY on groundwater quality.

Caggiano, J.A.

1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

417

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling Groundwater flow Solute transport INTRODUCTION Predicting any natural process is a very difficultHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES, VOL. 6, 369-395 (1992) STOCHASTIC MODELLING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND SOLUTE MODELLING Scales of heterogeneity, REV, dispersion and measurement scale groundwater flow and convection

418

Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parameter Estimation in Groundwater Flow Models with Distributed and Pointwise Observations* Ben G concerning the least sqaures estimation of parameters in a groundwater flow model. As is typically the case­93­1­0153. #12; 1 Introduction Understanding the flow of groundwater is an important scientific and engineering

419

Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compounds; Groundwater management; Drinking water. Introduction Approximately one-half of the U and Hitt 2006 , or more complex process-based analyses utilizing groundwater models Eberts et al. 2005Low-Level Detections of Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds in Groundwater: Use in Vulnerability

420

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries With Heterogeneities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMSOL Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport in Two-Dimensional Geometries, Environmental Sys- tems. 1 Introduction Groundwater contributes an large portion of stream flow and subsequently% of a streams nitrogen load has been discharged from groundwater. The surficial aquifer geometry in this area

Gobbert, Matthias K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Role of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the ECHAM4.5 general circulation model indicate that it is possible to quantify groundwater variability; Groundwater-surface water interaction; Hydroclimatology; Forecasting. Introduction ClimateRole of Climate Variability in Modulating the Surface Water and Groundwater Interaction over

Arumugam, Sankar

422

Spring temperatures in the Sagehen Basin, Sierra Nevada, CA: implications for heat flow and groundwater circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on groundwater flow depths within the basin. An analytical model based on these constraints indicates@berkeley.edu. Tel: +1 510 642 2288. Fax: +1 510 643 9980. Geofluids (2009) 9, 195­207 INTRODUCTION Groundwater and groundwater circulation MARIA BRUMM, CHI-YUEN WANG AND MICHAEL MANGA Earth and Planetary Science, University

Manga, Michael

423

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts for a physical aquifer experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport forecasts, and D. M. Rizzo (2008), Addressing model bias and uncertainty in three dimensional groundwater transport. Introduction [2] Eigbe et al. [1998] provide an excellent review of groundwater applications of the linear

Vermont, University of

424

Determining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of freshwater into the bay. A second model using Sr2+ /Ca2+ ratios was developed to discern fresh groundwater. Florida . Submarine groundwater discharge Introduction The timing and sources of freshwater deliveryDetermining Spatial and Temporal Inputs of Freshwater, Including Submarine Groundwater Discharge

Miami, University of

425

Predictive Simulations to Assess Potential Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Mining Activities on Groundwater April 23, 2010 Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................ 6 2.2.2 Modifications to Groundwater Flow Model to Simulate Pond Seepage and Pumping.. 6 2.3 Results ............................................................................................................9 3.1 Changes to the Groundwater Flow Model

Netoff, Theoden

426

Groundwater flow and salt transport in a subterranean estuary2 driven by intensified wave conditions3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

groundwater discharge, aquifer-ocean exchange, coastal45 aquifer, numerical modeling.46 #12;1. Introduction47 A numerical study, based on a density-dependent variably saturated groundwater flow model,26 was conducted1 Groundwater flow and salt transport in a subterranean estuary2 driven by intensified wave

Candea, George

427

7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading underground7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. #12;7-22001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER

Homes, Christopher C.

428

Particle Tracking in Circular Accelerators Using the Exact Hamiltonian in SixTrack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle motion in accelerators is in general complex. Tracking codes are developed to simulate beam dynamics in accelerators. SixTrack is a long lived particle tracking code maintained at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. A particle accelerator consists of a large number of magnets and other electromagnetic devices that guide the particle through the accelerator. Each device defines its own equation of motion, which often cannot be solved exactly. For this purpose, a number of approximations are introduced in order to facilitate the solution and to speed up the computation. In a high-energy accelerator, the particle has small transverse momentum components. This is exploited in the small-angle approximation. In this approximation the equations of motion are expanded to a low order in the transverse momentum components. In low-energy particle accelerators, or in tracking with large momentum deviations, this approximation is invalid. The equations of motion of a particle passing through a f...

Fjellstrom, Mattias; Hansson, Johan

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

WIPP Transparency Project - container tracking and monitoring demonstration using the Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Authenticated Tracking and Monitoring System (ATMS) is designed to answer the need for global monitoring of the status and location of proliferation-sensitive items on a worldwide basis, 24 hours a day. ATMS uses wireless sensor packs to monitor the status of the items within the shipment and surrounding environmental conditions. Receiver and processing units collect a variety of sensor event data that is integrated with GPS tracking data. The collected data are transmitted to the International Maritime Satellite (INMARSAT) communication system, which then sends the data to mobile ground stations. Authentication and encryption algorithms secure the data during communication activities. A typical ATMS application would be to track and monitor the stiety and security of a number of items in transit along a scheduled shipping route. The resulting tracking, timing, and status information could then be processed to ensure compliance with various agreements.

SCHOENEMAN, J. LEE; SMARTT, HEIDI ANNE; HOFER, DENNIS

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

SunShot Award Helps Solar Tracking Company Expand Internationally...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

SunShot Award Helps Solar Tracking Company Expand Internationally SunShot Award Helps Solar Tracking Company Expand Internationally October 30, 2014 - 5:46pm Addthis SunShot...

431

Peak power tracking for a solar buck charger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis discusses the design, implementation, and testing of a buck converter with peak power tracking. The peak power tracker uses a perturb and observe algorithm to actively track the solar panel's peak power point ...

Cohen, Jeremy Michael, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Advances in Visual Tracking Ming-Hsuan Yang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detector [Harris and Stephens, 1988] SIFT (Scale-Invariant Feature Transform) [Lowe, 2004] SURF (Speeded Up at People and Objects Dudek Tracking and appearance modeling Lee walking 3D human tracking Tom and Jerry

Yang, Ming-Hsuan

433

Biomedical Engineering AB Track Rev. October 2012 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomedical Engineering AB Track Rev. October 2012 1/2 Plan of Study for the Biomedical or summer project resulting in a significant written report _______ #12;Biomedical Engineering AB Track Rev

434

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface water Sampling and Analysis Plan for Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2006 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: {sm_bullet} to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; {sm_bullet} to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; {sm_bullet} to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and ! to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2006 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation (Figure A.1). Modifications to the CY 2006 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. The monitoring frequency and selection criteria for each sampling location is in Appendix C. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix D. If issued, addenda to this plan will be inserted in Appendix E, and Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued) will be inserted in Appendix F. Guidance for managing purged groundwater is provided in Appendix G.

N /A

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Anomalous Microfluidic Phonons Induced by the Interplay of Hydrodynamic Screening and Incompressibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous Microfluidic Phonons Induced by the Interplay of Hydrodynamic Screening the acoustic normal modes (``phonons'') of a 1D microfluidic droplet crystal at the crossover between 2D flow.55.Dÿ, 47.60.+i, 47.63.mf, 63.22.+m Microfluidic two-phase flow offers experimental tools to investigate

Tlusty, Tsvi

436

Search for anomalous production of multilepton events in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 fb[superscript ?1], were collected ...

Bauer, Gerry P.

437

Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings are presented from a study of WW/WZ? e?jj events produced in pp¯ collisions at s?=1.8?TeV. Results from the analysis of data collected using the DØ detector during the 1993–1995 Tevatron collider run...

Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

438

Leading-order hadronic contributions to the electron and tau anomalous magnetic moments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leading hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moments of the electron and the $\\tau$-lepton are determined by a four-flavour lattice QCD computation with twisted mass fermions. The continuum limit is taken and systematic uncertainties are quantified. Full agreement with results obtained by phenomenological analyses is found.

Florian Burger; Grit Hotzel; Karl Jansen; Marcus Petschlies

2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas Jerolmack Earth & Environmental Science, UPenn [sediment@sas.upenn.edu] "Bridging the Gap", Princeton U., 2" describable by: 1. Particle volume, v [L3 ]. 2.Average velocity, us , of bed load sediment [L/T]. 3. Surface

440

Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone Hill  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous electron density events in the quiet summer ionosphere at solar minimum over Millstone region ionosphere over Millstone Hill with calculations from the IZMIRAN model for solar minimum layer. This phenomenon occurs frequently in the quiet ionosphere at solar minimum during summer

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Anomalous trichromats' judgments of surface color in natural scenes under different daylights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anomalous trichromats' judgments of surface color in natural scenes under different daylights daylight illuminants were presented on a high-resolution color monitor to 7 deuteranomalous, 7 to the daylight locus rather than along the daylight locus ~Foster & Linnell, 1995; Amano et al., 2003

Foster, David H.

442

Lossless anomalous dispersion and an inversionless gain doublet via dressed interacting ground states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transparent media exhibiting anomalous dispersion have been of considerable interest since Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu [Nature 406, 277 (2000)] first observed light propagate with superluminal and negative group velocities without absorption. Here, we propose an atomic model exhibiting these properties, based on a generalization of amplification without inversion in a five-level dressed interacting ground-state system. The system consists of a {Lambda} atom prepared as in standard electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with two additional metastable ground states coupled to the {Lambda} atom ground states by two rf-microwave fields. We consider two configurations by which population is incoherently pumped into the ground states of the atom. Under appropriate circumstances, we predict a pair of new gain lines with tunable width, separation, and height. Between these lines, absorption vanishes but dispersion is large and anomalous. The system described here is a significant improvement over other proposals in the anomalous dispersion literature in that it permits additional coherent control over the spectral properties of the anomalous region, including a possible 10{sup 4}-fold increase over the group delay observed by Wang, Kuzmich, and Dogariu.

Weatherall, James Owen [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States); Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California Irvine, 3151 Social Science Plaza A, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Search, Christopher P. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, Stevens Institute of Technology, Castle Point on Hudson, Hoboken, New Jersey 07030 (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

444

Search for anomalous heavy-flavor quark production in association with W bosons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for anomalous production of heavy-flavor quark jets in association with W bosons at the Fermilab Tevatron p(p) over bar Collider in final states in which the heavy-flavor quark content is enhanced by requiring ...

Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Christofek, L.; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Jabeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TENSILE PROPERTIES OF PLA AND PHBV BLENDS: ANOMALOUS ELONGATION AND AGING T. Gérard, T. Noto and T, France tatiana.budtova@mines-paristech.fr INTRODUCTION Polylactide (PLA) and polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA the drawbacks of the pure components. In this work, PLA and poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Leading-order hadronic contributions to the electron and tau anomalous magnetic moments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The leading hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moments of the electron and the $\\tau$-lepton are determined by a four-flavour lattice QCD computation with twisted mass fermions. The continuum limit is taken and systematic uncertainties are quantified. Full agreement with results obtained by phenomenological analyses is found.

Burger, Florian; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure and anomalous solubility for hard spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M spheres in an associating lattice gas model Marcia M. Szortyka,1,a) Mauricio Girardi,2,b) Vera B-sphere gas in a solvent modeled as an associating lattice gas. The solution phase diagram for solute at 5

Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

448

Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in sedimentary basins training in a range of skills will mean opportunities for academic, government or Oil and Gas sector (e geoscience for oil and gas). References & Further Reading Neagu, R.C. Cartwright, J., Davies R.J. & Jensen L

Henderson, Gideon

449

Splenic Artery Aneurysm of the Anomalous Splenomesenteric Trunk: Successful Treatment by Transcatheter Embolization Using Detachable Coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A splenomesenteric trunk, which involves replacing the splenic artery from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is rare and occurs in less than 1% of patients. We report a case of an aneurysm involving the origin of the splenic artery that anomalously arose from the SMA, and which was successfully treated using Guglielmi detachable coils.

Sato, Motohiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)], E-mail: mo-sato@chubyoin.pref.ibaraki.jp; Anno, Izumi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki [Institute of Clinical Medicine University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology (Japan); Iida, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo [Tsukuba Gakuen Hospital, Department of Surgery (Japan)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Tracking in a Spaghetti Bowl: Monitoring Transactions Using Footprints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

adhere to the best practices such as those ad- vocated by the ITIL specifications to keep track of its

Anandkumar, Animashree

451

Track 7: Environmental Protection, Environmental Management System (EMS), "Greening Initiatives"  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 7: Environmental Protection, Environmental Management System (EMS), "Greening Initiatives"

452

Track 1: Safety Culture- Taking ISMS to the Next Level  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 1: Safety Culture - Taking ISMS to the Next Level

453

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

FEASIBILITY STUDY REPORT FOR THE 200-ZP-1 GROUNDWATER OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), encompasses approximately 1,517 km{sup 2} (586 mi{sup 2}) in the Columbia Basin of south-central Washington State. In 1989, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the 100, 200, 300, and 1100 Areas of the Hanford Site on the 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 300, 'National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan' National Contingency Plan [NCPD], Appendix B, 'National Priorities List' (NPL), pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The 200 Areas NPL sites consist of the 200 West and 200 East Areas (Figure 1-1). The 200 Areas contain waste management facilities, inactive irradiated fuel reprocessing facilities, and the 200 North Area (formerly used for interim storage and staging of irradiated fuel). Several waste sites in the 600 Area, located near the 200 Areas, also are included in the 200 Areas NPL site. The 200 Areas NPL site is in a region referred to as the 'Central Plateau' and consists of approximately 700 waste sites, excluding sites assigned to the tank farm waste management areas (WMAs). The 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) consists of the groundwater located under the northern portion of the 200 West Area. Waste sources that contributed to the 200-ZP-1 OU included cribs and trenches that received liquid and/or solid waste in the past from the Z Plant and T Plant aggregate areas, WMA-T, WMA-TX/TY, and the State-Approved Land Disposal Site (SALDS). This feasibility study (FS) for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater OU was prepared in accordance with the requirements of CERCLA decision documents. These decision documents are part of the Administrative Record for the selection of remedial actions for each waste site and present the selected remedial actions that are chosen in accordance with CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and to the extent practicable, the NCP. This FS conforms to the conditions set forth in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 2003) and amendments, signed by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), EPA, and DOE Richland Operations Office (RL). This also includes Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-00C for completing all 200 Area non-tank farm OU pre-Record of Decision (ROD) documents on or before December 31, 2011. This FS supports the final remedy selection for the 200-ZP-1 OU, as described in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI/FS work plan) (DOE/RL-2003-55), as agreed upon by RL and EPA. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-015-48B required Draft A of the 200-ZP-1 OU FS and proposed plan to be transmitted to EPA by September 30, 2007. As agreed to with EPA in the 200 Area Unit Managers Meeting Groundwater Operable Unit Status (FH-0503130), the baseline risk assessment (BRA) was delayed from inclusion in the remedial investigation (RI) report and is completed and documented in this FS. The Remedial Investigation Report for 200-ZP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (referred to as the 200-ZP-1 RI report) (DOE/RL-2006-24) included an evaluation of human health and ecological risks and hazards. The RI report identified the radiological and chemical contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) that represent the primary risks to human health and the environment. The complete risk assessment in this FS incorporates additional analytical data from the unconfined aquifer that were obtained during or after preparation of the RI report, particularly for carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99. This FS also includes the initial results from an ongoing study of technetium-99 contamination near WMA-T, the sampling of new wells near the 216-W-LC laundry waste crib and T Plant, updated Hanford vadose zone fate and transport modeling, and groundwater particle-tracking analysis. The purpose of this FS is to develop and evaluate alternatives for remediation of

BYRNES ME

2008-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

455

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2011-2012 CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2011 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2011-2012 CATALOG There are three tracks in Interdisciplinary Studies (IS). This handout is for the Environmental Studies track. Office Classroom I ­ Suite 302. It is a university-wide program designed for students seeking a combination of studies. The Environmental Studies

Van Stryland, Eric

456

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2012-2013 CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2012 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES TRACK (B.S.) 2012-2013 CATALOG There are three tracks in Interdisciplinary Studies (IS). This handout is for the Environmental Studies track. Office Classroom I ­ Suite 302. It is a university-wide program designed for students seeking a combination of studies. The Environmental Studies

Foroosh, Hassan

457

People Tracking with Human Motion Predictions from Social Forces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People Tracking with Human Motion Predictions from Social Forces Matthias Luber Johannes A. Stork Gian Diego Tipaldi Kai O. Arras Abstract-- For many tasks in populated environ- ments, robots need to keep track of current and future motion states of people. Most approaches to people tracking make weak

Arras, Kai O.

458

Tracking Interacting People Stephen J. McKenna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people move in groups or interact with other peo- ple cause considerable difficulty to many trackingTracking Interacting People Stephen J. McKenna Department of Applied Computing University of Dundee, wechsler @cs.gmu.edu Abstract A computer vision system for tracking multiple people in relatively

Duric, Zoran

459

Tracking Groups of People Stephen J. McKenna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in groups or interact with other people cause considerable difficulty for many tracking schemes. HoweverTracking Groups of People Stephen J. McKenna Department of Applied Computing, University of Dundee, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3275 A computer vision system for tracking multiple people

Duric, Zoran

460

Experimental Target Injection and Tracking System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Targets must be injected into an IFE power plant with an accuracy of and plusmn; 5 mm at a rate of approximately 5 to 10 each second. Targets must be tracked very accurately to allow driver beams to be aligned with defined points on the targets with accuracy {+-}200{mu}m for indirect drive and {+-}20{mu}m for direct drive. An experimental target injection and tracking system has been designed and is being constructed at General Atomics to investigate injection and tracking of both direct drive and indirect drive targets. The design is modular to allow testing of alternate target acceleration and tracking methods. The injector system will be used as a tool for testing the survivability of various target designs and provide feed back to the target designers. This 30 m long system will be the centerpiece of a Facility for developing IFE target fabrication and injection technologies. A high-speed high-flow gas valve (designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will provide helium propellant gas to the targets. To avoid target damage from excessive acceleration, an 8 m gun barrel is being built to achieve 400 m/s target speed while not exceeding 10,000 m/s{sup 2} acceleration. Direct-drive targets are protected in the barrel by sabots that are spring loaded to separate into two halves after acceleration. A sabot deflector directs the sabot halves away from the target injection path. Gas expansion chambers and orifices, keep propellant gas out of the target-tracking region. Targets will be optically tracked with laser beams and line scan cameras. High-speed computations will calculate target position in less than 2 ms based on the output from the line-scan cameras. Target position and arrival time to a plane in the reaction chamber center will be predicted in real-time based on early target position measurements. The system design, construction progress, and early testing results will be presented.

Petzoldt, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Alexander, N.B. [General Atomics (United States); Drake, T.J. [General Atomics (United States); Goodin, D.T. [General Atomics (United States); Stemke, R.W. [General Atomics (United States); Jonestrask, K

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Factors Governing Sustainable Groundwater Pumping near a River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

treat- ment technologies include lower capital investments and operating costs due to lower energy of the estimated riverbed permeability reflects clogging and scouring mechanisms. Our results indicate that (1 system. Introduction Groundwater pumping near rivers is utilized in water resources management

Hubbard, Susan

464

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, third quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1991, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. Analytical results from third quarter 1991 are listed in this report.

Not Available

1992-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

465

Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M.N.; Szekely, F. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The UMTRA PEIS: A strategy for groundwater remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) was initiated in 1992 for the uranium mill tailings remedial action (UMTRA) program. The PEIS kicked off the groundwater restoration phase of UMTRA, a project involving remediation of 24 sites in ten states and tribal lands contaminated with tailings from uranium mining and milling operations. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed, in early 1992, that a PEIS was an appropriate strategy to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) for this second, groundwater phase of the project. This decision recognized that although a parallel effort was being undertaken in preparing a PEIS for DOE's Environmental Restoration/Waste Management (ER/WM) program, characteristics and the maturity of the UMTRA project made it more appropriate to prepare a separate PEIS. The ER/WM PEIS is intended to examine environmental restoration and waste management issues from a very broad perspective. For UMTRA, with surface remediation completed or well under way at 18 of the 24 sites, a more focused programmatic approach for groundwater restoration is more effective than including the UMTRA project within the ER/WM environmental impact statements. A separate document allows a more focused and detailed analysis necessary to efficiently tier site-specific environmental assessments for groundwater restoration at each of the 24 UMTRA former processing sites.

Burt, C.; Ulland, L.; Weston, R.F.; Metzler, D. (DOE, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

IMPROVING THE EFFICIENCY OF AN EXISTING GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.9 kilowatt total) 14 #12;ENERGY IMPROVEMENT BENEFITS 15 #12;RETURN ON INVESTMENT: SOLAR PANELS 16 #12 of grid energy with solar panel arrays Long-term operations and maintenance costs were significantly.7 kilowatt total) 13 #12;GROUNDWATER SYSTEM ENERGY IMPROVEMENTS ­ Northern Solar Array: 56 panel system (10

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

468

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky Vitaly A. Zlotnik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stream depletion by groundwater pumping from leaky aquifers Vitaly A. Zlotnik Department Maximum Stream Depletion Rate, which is defined as a maximum fraction of the pumping rate supplied focused on hy- draulic connection between a stream and an aquifer for pumping wells in alluvial valleys

Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

469

2005 ASHRAE. 109 Groundwater heat pump systems using standing column  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

©2005 ASHRAE. 109 ABSTRACT Groundwater heat pump systems using standing column wells as their ground heat exchanger can be used as a highly efficient source of heating and cooling in residential the well through the heat pump in an open-loop pipe circuit. Standing column wells have been in use

470

Remediation alternatives for low-level herbicide contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1995, an evaluation of alternatives for remediation of a shallow groundwater plume containing low-levels of an organic herbicide was conducted at BASF Corporation, a petrochemical facility located in Ascension Parish, Louisiana. The contaminated site is located on an undeveloped portion of property within 1/4 mile of the east bank of the Mississippi River near the community of Geismar. Environmental assessment data indicated that about two acres of the thirty acre site had been contaminated from past waste management practices with the herbicide bentazon. Shallow soils and groundwater between 5 to 15 feet in depth were affected. Maximum concentrations of bentazon in groundwater were less than seven parts per million. To identify potentially feasible remediation alternatives, the environmental assessment data, available research, and cost effectiveness were reviewed. After consideration of a preliminary list of alternatives, only two potentially feasible alternatives could be identified. Groundwater pumping, the most commonly used remediation alternative, followed by carbon adsorption treatment was identified as was a new innovative alternative known as vegetative transpiration. This alternative relies on the natural transpiration processes of vegetation to bioremediate organic contaminants. Advantages identified during screening suggest that the transpiration method could be the best remediation alternative to address both economic and environmental factors. An experiment to test critical factors of the vegetatived transpiration alternative with bentazon was recommended before a final decision on feasibility can be made.

Conger, R.M. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda R.E. Ewing, y , M.S. Pilant, y J.G. Wade, z and A.T. Watson x Abstract The petroleum industry has well­established partial differential equation models for multi­phase fluid flow through porous media, but the use of control

Ewing, Richard E.

472

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility and to report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF Record of Decision and the ERDF Amended Record of Decision.

R. L. Weiss; T. A. Lee

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

473

Methods Note/ Net Recharge vs. Depth to Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

excluded, yielding a mixture of predominantly range, pasture, grass, and riparian forest covers on sandy to sandy soils and/or flat topography, such as the Nebraska Sand Hills (Figure 1) or the interfluvial sand-groundwater ecoregions (shaded) in Nebraska. The Wet Meadow and Marsh Plain region within the Sand Hills was dropped from

Szilagyi, Jozsef

474

Treatability studies of groundwater contaminated with bis(2-chloroethyl) ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The groundwater aquifer underneath a chemical manufacturing plant in Southeast Texas has been contaminated with the leachate from its landfill. There are 17 major chlorinated hydrocarbon contaminants found in the groundwater with concentrations ranging from 1 ppm to 1,200 ppm. An air-stripping unit followed by a thermal catalytic oxidation unit is currently operating on-site to remove all of the chlorinated compounds from the contaminated groundwater. One of the contaminants, bis(2-chloroethyl)ether (DCEE), has a fairly low Henry`s Law constant; therefore, a high air flow rate is employed in the stripping unit to improve the overall stripping efficiency. Nevertheless, the treated groundwater still contains a fair amount of DCEE. An UV-peroxidation reactor is set up to study its feasibility for oxidizing DCEE. The treatability data indicate that DCEE at a concentration of 200 ppm can be oxidized effectively in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the effective UV wavelengths lie between 200 and 280 nm. No noticeable reduction of the oxidation rate is observed at low temperature ({approximately} 11 C). Apparent oxidation rate equations of DCEE are determined and several process design parameters are discussed.

Huang, F.Y.C. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering] [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mineral and Environmental Engineering; Li, K.Y.; Liu, C.C. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Modeling the atmospheric inputs of MTBE to groundwater systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical transport model was used to calculate the movement of methyl-t-butyl ether (MTBE) and several other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the atmosphere downward through the unsaturated zone and into shallow groundwater. Simulations were carried out for periods as long as 10 years to investigate whether a gaseous atmospheric MTBE source at typical ambient concentrations could account for the presence of MTBE in shallow groundwater at the types of low ug/L levels that have been found during the National Water Quality Assessment Program currently being conducted by the US Geological Survey. The simulations indicate that downward movement of MTBE to shallow groundwater will be very slow when there is no net downward movement of water through the vadose zone. For example, for a vadose zone composed of fine sand, and assuming tens of cm of infiltration, then only a few years will be required for water at a water table that is 5.0 m below ground surface to attain MTBE levels that correspond to saturation with respect to the atmospheric source gaseous concentration. An on/off atmospheric source, as might occur in the seasonal use of MTBE, will lead to concentrations in shallow groundwater that correspond to saturation with the time-averaging atmospheric source concentration.

Pankow, J.F.; Johnson, R.L. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering; Thomson, N.R. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

476

Volatile Organic Compounds in Untreated Ambient Groundwater of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1608 Mt. View Road, Rapid City, South Dakota 57702 As part of the National Water-Quality Assessment from this ambient groundwater is uncertain because the quality of the finished drinking water with the largest releases to the environment are VOCs and that the total release for these 10 compounds was almost

477

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Integration of Groundwater Transport Models with Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~nigo Urteaga2 , Qi Han2 , Anura Jayasumana3 , Tissa Illangasekare1 1 Division of Environmental Sciences dynamic hydrological and environmental processes. As the wireless nodes are resource constrained, mass be conceptualized in the WSN context. INTRODUCTION As groundwater contamination is an established problem with many

Han, Qi "Chee"

479

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

480

Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specificall

Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tracking anomalous groundwater" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Groundwater Management Tools: Analytical Procedure and Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Practice Guideline 2 1. The Management Objective 2 2. Concepts of Sustainable Yield 2 2.1. A MisconceptionGroundwater Management Tools: Analytical Procedure and Case Studies MAF Technical Paper No: 2003. Eigenmodels 11 4.1. Assumptions 11 #12;ii 4.1.1.Dynamics of Recharge Processes 11 4.1.2.Land Surface Recharge

Hickman, Mark

483

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 1997 BNL Site Environmental Report 8 -1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 12) and five secondary cooling/process water supply wells (Wells 9, 101, 102, 103, and 105); all Concentration Facility (WCF), Supply and Materiel, and several other smaller facilities. Groundwater quality is also routinely monitored at all active potable supply wells and process supply wells. Figures 8

484

On Grid Partitioning for a High Performance Groundwater Simulation Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equations using a finite volume method. The application problems considered are from the Yucca Mountain equations using a finite volume method. The serial version of TOUGH2 (Transport Of Unsaturated Groundwater. #12; 2 Erik Elmroth equations of water and gas flow, heat transfer and radionuclide migration

Elmroth, Erik

485

AN AGGREGATIONBASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the standard finite element framework from [18,24]. The preconditioner also works well in the context of finiteAN AGGREGATION­BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW \\Lambda E. W. JENKINS analysis of a two­level additive Schwarz method in which the coarse mesh basis is constructed

486

Application of the discontinuous spectral Galerkin method to groundwater flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method uses a finite-element discretization of the groundwater flow domain with basis functions with a standard finite-element method and a mixed finite-element method. Numerical sim- ulations show that the discontinuous spectral Galerkin approximation is more efficient than the standard finite-element method (in

Fagherazzi, Sergio

487

AN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Our analysis uses the standard finite element framework from [18,24]. The preconditioner also works well in the context of finite differences, however, as some of the examples in £ 3 illustrateAN AGGREGATION-BASED DOMAIN DECOMPOSITION PRECONDITIONER FOR GROUNDWATER FLOW E. W. JENKINS ¡, C

488

Groundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or maintain com- pliance with regulatory requirements and to implement best management practices designedGroundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7- Brookhaven National Laboratory. The program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in DOE Or- der 450

489

Arsenic in groundwater in Bangladesh: A geostatistical and epidemiological framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations in deep wells remain relatively low. INDEX TERMS: 1831 Hydrology: Groundwater quality; 6309 Policy Sciences: Decision making under uncertainty; 6304 Policy Sciences: Benefit-cost analysis; 1829 Hydrology al., 1968], northern China [Wang, 1984], Vietnam [Berg et al., 2001], Argentina [Hopenhayn- Rich et

Entekhabi, Dara

490

Urban land-use effects on groundwater phosphate distribution in a shallow aquifer, Nanfei River basin, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basin, China Jiazhong Qian & Lulu Wang & Hongbin Zhan & Zhou Chen Abstract Groundwater, surface water

Zhan, Hongbin

491

A comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complete model-based methods. Keywords Groundwater age . Groundwater recharge/ water budget . USA Introduction Well-constrained water budgets are needed to assess groundwater availability and manage aquifersA comparison of recharge rates in aquifers of the United States based on groundwater-age data P. B

492

Innovative Mobile Technologies for Asset Tracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO Session 15 - Innovative Mobile Technologies for Asset Tracking Agenda ? Learn how clients have mobilized their enterprise data to increase the consistent capture and reporting of important building information, from lease data to work... orders to space & occupancy costs. ? Top 5 lessons learned implementing a mobile solution Who We Are ? Experts in both Real Property and Facilities Management Business and Technology ? Over 250 years of combined experience that encompasses facility...

Liko, W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Longitudinal and transverse tracking studies for ESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The techniques currently being employed to model beam transport and injection into the ESS accumulator rings are described. These use a combination of one dimensional (longitudinal) and two-dimensional (transverse) particle tracking codes, incorporating a variety of methods of simulating self-field effects. A description of the proposed mechanism for painting longitudinal and transverse phase-space for ESS is given, and the results of the modeling and subsequent optimization are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Prior, C.R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon (United Kingdom)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

An interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an Early Career Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to develop an interface tracking model for droplet electrocoalescence. Many fluid-based technologies rely on electrical fields to control the motion of droplets, e.g. microfluidic devices for high-speed droplet sorting, solution separation for chemical detectors, and purification of biodiesel fuel. Precise control over droplets is crucial to these applications. However, electric fields can induce complex and unpredictable fluid dynamics. Recent experiments (Ristenpart et al. 2009) have demonstrated that oppositely charged droplets bounce rather than coalesce in the presence of strong electric fields. A transient aqueous bridge forms between approaching drops prior to pinch-off. This observation applies to many types of fluids, but neither theory nor experiments have been able to offer a satisfactory explanation. Analytic hydrodynamic approximations for interfaces become invalid near coalescence, and therefore detailed numerical simulations are necessary. This is a computationally challenging problem that involves tracking a moving interface and solving complex multi-physics and multi-scale dynamics, which are beyond the capabilities of most state-of-the-art simulations. An interface-tracking model for electro-coalescence can provide a new perspective to a variety of applications in which interfacial physics are coupled with electrodynamics, including electro-osmosis, fabrication of microelectronics, fuel atomization, oil dehydration, nuclear waste reprocessing and solution separation for chemical detectors. We present a conformal decomposition finite element (CDFEM) interface-tracking method for the electrohydrodynamics of two-phase flow to demonstrate electro-coalescence. CDFEM is a sharp interface method that decomposes elements along fluid-fluid boundaries and uses a level set function to represent the interface.

Erickson, Lindsay Crowl

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Search for anomalous production of events with a photon, jet, b-quark jet, and missing transverse energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a signature-based search for the anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (E?[subscript T]). ...

Xie, Si

496

Determination of the polarization state of x rays with the help of anomalous transmission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Besides intensity and direction, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave provides characteristic information on the crossed medium. Here, we present two methods for the determination of the polarization state of x rays by polarizers based on anomalous transmission (Borrmann effect). Using a polarizer-analyzer setup, we have measured a polarization purity of less than 1.5?×?10{sup ?5}, three orders of magnitude better than obtained in earlier work. Using the analyzer crystal in multiple-beam case with slightly detuned azimuth, we show how the first three Stokes parameters can be determined with a single angular scan. Thus, polarization analyzers based on anomalous transmission make it possible to detect changes of the polarization in a range from degrees down to arcseconds.

Schulze, K. S., E-mail: kai.sven.schulze@uni-jena.de; Uschmann, I.; Förster, E. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Marx, B.; Paulus, G. G. [Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Stöhlker, T. [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

497

Engineering the quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene with uniaxial strains  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in graphene by means of the uniaxial strain. The values of Chern number and Hall conductance demonstrate that the strained graphene in presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and exchange field, for vanishing intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, possesses non-trivial topological phase, which is robust against the direction and modulus of the strain. Besides, we also find that the interplay between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings results in a topological phase transition in the strained graphene. Remarkably, as the strain strength is increased beyond approximately 7%, the critical parameters of the exchange field for triggering the quantum anomalous Hall phase transition show distinct behaviors—decrease (increase) for strains along zigzag (armchair) direction. Our findings open up a new platform for manipulation of the QAHE by an experimentally accessible strain deformation of the graphene structure, with promising application on novel quantum electronic devices with high efficiency.

Diniz, G. S., E-mail: ginetom@gmail.com; Guassi, M. R. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970 Brasília-DF (Brazil); Qu, F. [Institute of Physics, University of Brasília, 70919-970 Brasília-DF (Brazil); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

498

Global vs local cosmic strings from pseudo-anomalous U(1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the structure of cosmic strings produced at the breaking of an anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry present in many superstring compactification models. We show that their coupling with the axion necessary in order to cancel the anomalies does not prevent them from being local, even though their energy per unit length is found to diverge logarithmically. We discuss the formation of such strings and the phenomenological constraints that apply to their parameters.

Binétruy, Pierre; Peter, P

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Anomalous light-by-light scattering at the LHC: recent developments and future perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The installation of forward proton detectors at the LHC will provide the possibility to perform new high-precision measurements, opening a novel window on physics beyond the Standard Model. We review recent simulations and theoretical developments about the measurement of anomalous light-by-light scattering. The search for this process is expected to provide bounds on a wide range of new particles. Future perspectives for precision QED at the LHC are also briefly discussed.

Fichet, Sylvain

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Semiclassical origin of anomalous shell effect for tetrahedral deformation in radial power-law potential model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shell structures in single-particle energy spectra are investigated against regular tetrahedral type deformation using radial power-law potential model. Employing a natural way of shape parametrization which interpolates sphere and regular tetrahedron, we find prominent shell effects at rather large tetrahedral deformations, which bring about shell energies much larger than the cases of spherical and quadrupole type shapes. We discuss the semiclassical origin of these anomalous shell structures using periodic orbit theory.

Ken-ichiro Arita; Yasunori Mukumoto

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z