Sample records for tracer gas technique

  1. Preliminary Investigation of Tracer Gas Reaeration Method for Shallow Bays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Sarah H.; Holley, Edward R.

    apparently the first tests to be performed using the tracer gas technique in bays. As a result, the emphasis was on the development of techniques rather than on obtaining data. It appears that workable techniques have been developed, but they now need...

  2. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  3. Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Experiments to Evaluate and Implement Passive Tracer Gas Methods to Measure Ventilation Rates the concentrations of pollutants emitted by indoor sources and brings in pollutants from the outdoors. The air gas techniques. One method involves either real-time injections of tracer gases or real

  4. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy for conducting gas tracer tests and measuring water saturations in landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Yoojin; Han, Byunghyun; Mostafid, M. Erfan; Chiu, Pei [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Yazdani, Ramin [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Yolo County, 44090 County Rd. 28H, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Imhoff, Paul T., E-mail: imhoff@udel.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy tested for measuring tracer gas in landfills. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Measurement errors for tracer gases were 1-3% in landfill gas. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Background signals from landfill gas result in elevated limits of detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Technique is much less expensive and easier to use than GC. - Abstract: Gas tracer tests can be used to determine gas flow patterns within landfills, quantify volatile contaminant residence time, and measure water within refuse. While gas chromatography (GC) has been traditionally used to analyze gas tracers in refuse, photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) might allow real-time measurements with reduced personnel costs and greater mobility and ease of use. Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of PAS for conducting gas tracer tests in landfills. Two tracer gases, difluoromethane (DFM) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}), were measured with a commercial PAS instrument. Relative measurement errors were invariant with tracer concentration but influenced by background gas: errors were 1-3% in landfill gas but 4-5% in air. Two partitioning gas tracer tests were conducted in an aerobic landfill, and limits of detection (LODs) were 3-4 times larger for DFM with PAS versus GC due to temporal changes in background signals. While higher LODs can be compensated by injecting larger tracer mass, changes in background signals increased the uncertainty in measured water saturations by up to 25% over comparable GC methods. PAS has distinct advantages over GC with respect to personnel costs and ease of use, although for field applications GC analyses of select samples are recommended to quantify instrument interferences.

  5. Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, J. B.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is presented for using tracer gas testing to detect and quantify duct leakage in homes. Since air is invisible, leakage of air from duct systems often remains undetected. Smoke sticks used in conjunction with blower doors are excellent...

  6. New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine

  7. Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    Iodine as a tracer of organic material: 129 I results from gas hydrate systems and fore arc fluids of this system, investigations of gas hydrates from the Peru Margin (ODP 201, Site 1230) and of fluids collected for these fluids. The results are in good agreement with earlier investigations of gas hydrate systems at Blake

  8. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  9. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  10. Uncertainties in Air Exchange using Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling Tracer-Gas Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.; Lunden, Melissa M.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PerFluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) method is a low-cost approach commonly used for measuring air exchange in buildings using tracer gases. It is a specific application of the more general Continuous-Injection, Long-Term Sampling (CILTS) method. The technique is widely used but there has been little work on understanding the uncertainties (both precision and bias) associated with its use, particularly given that it is typically deployed by untrained or lightly trained people to minimize experimental costs. In this article we will conduct a first-principles error analysis to estimate the uncertainties and then compare that analysis to CILTS measurements that were over-sampled, through the use of multiple tracers and emitter and sampler distribution patterns, in three houses. We find that the CILTS method can have an overall uncertainty of 10-15percent in ideal circumstances, but that even in highly controlled field experiments done by trained experimenters expected uncertainties are about 20percent. In addition, there are many field conditions (such as open windows) where CILTS is not likely to provide any quantitative data. Even avoiding the worst situations of assumption violations CILTS should be considered as having a something like a ?factor of two? uncertainty for the broad field trials that it is typically used in. We provide guidance on how to deploy CILTS and design the experiment to minimize uncertainties.

  11. Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

    The Motorola Exhaust Optimization Program strives toward identifying the optimum exhaust requirements for gas panel enclosures to help conserve energy and provide future exhaust capacity for new tools. Various Motorola studies have shown...

  12. PERFLUOROCARBON GAS TRACER STUDIES TO SUPPORT RISK ASSESSMENT MODELING OF CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SUBJECTED TO TERRORIST ATTACKS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, T.M.; HEISER, J.; WATSON, T.; ALLWINE, K.J.; FLAHERTY, J.E.

    2006-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of real-time predictive modeling to identify the dispersion and/or source(s) of airborne weapons of mass destruction including chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear material in urban environments is needed to improve response to potential releases of these materials via either terrorist or accidental means. These models will also prove useful in defining airborne pollution dispersion in urban environments for pollution management/abatement programs. Predicting gas flow in an urban setting on a scale of less than a few kilometers is a complicated and challenging task due to the irregular flow paths that occur along streets and alleys and around buildings of different sizes and shapes, i.e., ''urban canyons''. In addition, air exchange between the outside and buildings and subway areas further complicate the situation. Transport models that are used to predict dispersion of WMD/CBRN materials or to back track the source of the release require high-density data and need defensible parameterizations of urban processes. Errors in the data or any of the parameter inputs or assumptions will lead to misidentification of the airborne spread or source release location(s). The need for these models to provide output in a real-time fashion if they are to be useful for emergency response provides another challenge. To improve the ability of New York City's (NYC's) emergency management teams and first response personnel to protect the public during releases of hazardous materials, the New York City Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) has been initiated. This is a four year research program being conducted from 2004 through 2007. This paper will discuss ground level and subway Perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) release studies conducted in New York City. The studies released multiple tracers to study ground level and vertical transport of contaminants. This paper will discuss the results from these tests and how these results can be used for improving transport models needed for risk assessment.

  13. Tracer-dilution method indicates flowrate through compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagus, P.L.; Flanagan, B.S. (Lagus Applied Technology Inc., San Diego, CA (US)); Peterson, M.E. (Tennessee Gas Pipeline Co., Middleton, TN (US)); Clowney, S.L. (Tenneco Gas, Houston, TX (US))

    1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for measuring compressor flowrate through an operating natural-gas centrifugal compressor has been tested and found to have a precisions approaching {plus minus}1.5%. The technique employs constant-flow tracer dilution. Testing demonstrated that use of a critical-flow nozzle to inject a constant, known flow of tracer into a flowing natural-gas stream is feasible. Effects of potential pulsation on a tracer flow measurement appear to be eliminated by this technique. With experimental and operational streamlining, the constant-flow tracer dilution technique is capable of being used to measure the flowrate through operating centrifugal compressors with sufficient precisions and accuracy to allow compressor operating characteristics to be determined. This technique is especially useful in situations in which an orifice-flow measurement cannot be performed because of physical space limits or economic considerations.

  14. Tracer Detection by Laser Spectroscopy for Applications in the Oil and Gas R. Nava, Texas A&M University, H. Schuessler, M. Fahes and H. Nasrabadi, Texas A&M University at Qatar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuessler, Hans

    SPE 124689 Tracer Detection by Laser Spectroscopy for Applications in the Oil and Gas Industry R and more accurate option for applications in the oil and gas industry. The research work is currently being applications in the oil and gas industry. Chemical or radioactive tracers are used to label fluids from

  15. Retention of Tracer Gas from Instantaneous Releases of SF6 in an Urban Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doran, J. C.; Allwine, K Jerry; Clawson, Kirk L.; Carter, Roger G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a series of instantaneous releases of SF6 tracer during the Joint Urban 2003 study in Oklahoma City have been analyzed to determine characteristic retention times for puffs in an urban environment. Results from nine real-time tracer detectors with a time response of 0.5 seconds were used in the analysis. Distances from the source ranged from less than 200 m to over 1 km. For each individual intensive operating period (IOP), the detector locations were adjusted so that, given the expected wind directions during the releases, the detectors would lie generally downwind of the release point. As a result, building characteristics upwind of the detectors varied from one IOP to the next. Animations of the tracer concentrations show clear evidence of channeling along street canyons approximately parallel to the prevailing wind directions, trapping in street canyons perpendicular to the flow, and other complex circulation patterns. Retention times for individual puffs ranged from a few minutes to over 20 minutes, with a strong mode in the distribution around 11 minutes. There was surprisingly little correlation with wind speed or direction. Comparisons with simple puff models are presented.

  16. Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques Wolfgang Dahmen is investigated. Keywords: Finite Volume Method, Film cooling, Cooling gas injection, Multiscale techniques, Grid Mathematik, RWTH Aachen, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen Abstract The interaction of a jet of cooling gas

  17. Extraplanar Dust: a Tracer of Cold Dense Gas in the Thick Disks of Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Christopher Howk

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The interstellar thick disks of galaxies contain not only gas, but significant quantities of dust. Most of our knowledge of extraplanar dust in disk galaxies comes from direct broadband optical imaging of these systems, wherein the dust is identified due to the irregular extinction it produces against the thick disk and bulge stars. This observational technique is sensitive to only the most dense material, and we argue much of the material identified in this way traces a cold phase of the interstellar thick disks in galaxies. The presence of a cold, dense phase likely implies the interstellar pressures in the thick disks of spiral galaxies can be quite high. This dense phase of the interstellar medium may also fueling thick disk star formation, and H-alpha observations are now revealing H II regions around newly-formed OB stars associations in several galaxies. We argue that the large quantities of dust and the morphologies of the structures traced by the dust imply that much of the extraplanar material in disk galaxies must have been expelled from the underlying thin disk.

  18. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    implements ... NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon components Posted: June 12, 2012 - 1:34pm The National Nuclear Security Administration...

  19. Applications of Ensemble-based Data Assimilation Techniques for Aquifer Characterization using Tracer Data at Hanford 300 Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Hammond, Glenn E.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface aquifer characterization often involves high parameter dimensionality and requires tremendous computational resources if employing a full Bayesian approach. Ensemble-based data assimilation techniques, including filtering and smoothing, are computationally efficient alternatives. Despite the increasing number of applications of ensemble-based methods in assimilating flow and transport related data for subsurface aquifer charaterization, most are limited to either synthetic studies or two-dimensional problems. In this study, we applied ensemble-based techniques for assimilating field tracer experimental data obtained from the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at the Hanford 300 Area. The forward problem was simulated using the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to effectively deal with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of ensemble-based methods. This study demonstrates the effectiveness of ensemble-based methods for characterizing a heterogeneous aquifer by sequentially assimilating multiple types of data. The necessity of employing high performance computing is shown to enable increasingly mechanistic non-linear forward simulations to be performed within the data assimilation framework for a complex system with reasonable turnaround time.

  20. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  1. Using dissolved noble gas and isotopic tracers to evaluate the vulnerability of groundwater resources in a small, high elevation catchment to predicted climate changes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M J; Moran, J E

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers in groundwater and stream water in a small high elevation catchment to provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge; and to determine subsurface residence times of different groundwater components. They identify three sources that contribute to groundwater flow: (1) seasonal groundwater recharge with short travel times, (2) water from bedrock aquifers that have elevated radiogenic {sup 4}He, and (3) upwelling of deep fluids that have 'mantle' helium and hydrothermal carbon isotope signatures. Although a bimodal distribution in apparent groundwater age indicates that groundwater storage times range from less than a year to several decades, water that recharges seasonally is the largest likely contributor to stream baseflow. Under climate change scnearios with earlier snowmelt, the groundwater that moves through the alluvial aquifer seasonally will be depleted earlier, providing less baseflow and possible extreme low flows in the creek during summer and fall. Dissolved noble gas measurements indciate recharge temperatures are 5 to 11 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that excess air concentrations are lower than would be expected for recharge through bedrock fractures. Instead, recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, as indicated by {delta}{sup 13}C-DIC values that are consistent with incorporation of CO{sub 2} from soil respiration. Recharge temperatures are close to or slightly higher than mean annual air temperature, and are consistent with recharge during May and June, when snowpack melting occurs.

  2. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  3. Optimization Techniques for the Brazilian Natural Gas Network ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 4, 2013 ... Brazilian natural gas network. A stochastic approach to address uncertainties related to the gas demand is considered. Representing.

  4. atmospheric tracer experiments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    112 6.1. Meteorological conditions 112 6.2. Roughness length 6 Uncertainties in gas exchange parameterization during the SAGE dual-tracer experiment Geosciences Websites...

  5. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling. In this research, infrared cameras have been used to visualize liquefied natural gas (LNG) plumes from LNG spills on water. The analyses of the thermograms showed that the apparent temperatures were different from the thermocouple measurement...

  6. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement in infrared imaging technology has allowed the thermal imaging to detect and visualize several gases, mostly hydrocarbon gases. In addition, infrared cameras could potentially be used as a non-contact temperature measurement for gas...

  7. Production-management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Annual Report, August 1990-December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Abbott, W.A.; Arsenault, J.W.; Jones, R.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project was designed to investigate production management strategies through a field study approach. The initial task was to prepare a summary of industry experience with water-drive gas and water-drive gas storage reservoirs. This activity was necessary to define the variety of reservoir situations in which water influx occurs, to identify those cases where alternative production practices will increase ultimate recovery, and to develop techniques to better characterize these reservoirs for further analysis. Four fields were selected for study: 1 onshore Gulf Coast gas reservoir, 2 offshore Gulf Coast reservoirs, and 1 mid-continent aquifier gas storage field. A modified material balance technique was developed and validated which predicts the pressure and production performance of water-drive gas reservoirs. This method yields more accurate results than conventional water influx techniques.

  8. "Trace Analysis of Speciality and Electronic Gases," Chapter 4, "Emerging Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques for Gas Analysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R.; McWhorter, S.; Tittel, F.; Lewicki, R.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications of Semiconductor LAS Based Trace Gas Sensor Systems.

  9. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, J.M.; Palumbo, A.V.

    1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. 2 figs.

  10. Biological tracer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strong-Gunderson, Janet M. (Ten Mile, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a biological tracer method for characterizing the movement of a material through a medium, comprising the steps of: introducing a biological tracer comprising a microorganism having ice nucleating activity into a medium; collecting at least one sample of the medium from a point removed from the introduction point; and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer. The present invention is also a method for using a biological tracer as a label for material identification by introducing a biological tracer having ice nucleating activity into a material, collecting a sample of a portion of the labelled material and analyzing the sample for the presence of the biological tracer.

  11. A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ERG/200806 A graphical technique for explaining the relationship between energy security the relationship between energy security and greenhouse gas emissions Larry Hughes and Nikita Sheth Abstract for explaining this relationship, based upon jurisdiction-specific data on energy supply, infrastructure

  12. Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proper Oil Sampling Intervals and Sample Collection Techniques Gasoline/Diesel/Natural Gas Engines: · Oil samples can be collected during oil changes. Follow manufacturers recommendations on frequency (hours, mileage, etc) of oil changes. · Capture a sample from the draining oil while the oil is still hot

  13. Tracer studies of sheet flow in the Florida Everglades David T. Ho,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Tracer Release Experiment (EverTREx), two SF6 tracer releases were conducted to measure sheet flow. [5] EverTREx represents the first application of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in a shallow-water vegetated environ- ment. SF6, a gas tracer that has been applied previously in investigations of transport

  14. Determination of tritium activity in environmental water samples using gas analyzer techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salsman, John Matthew

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    undesirable when looking for low levels of tritium activity in water. In general, gas analyzer techniques consist of dispersing the radioactive material in some type of gaseous medium and then pressurizing the system with this gas. The analyzer then uses... by reaction with gaseous hydrogen. The vapor HTO is formed readily, as shown by. Equation 2, and is the most commonly encountered form of tritium in the environment. HT + 820 H2 + HTO (2) The accumulation of tritium on the Earth occurs both naturally...

  15. Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to:TownTownerOpenEnergyG,Tracers and

  16. A Partial Oxidation Technique for Fuel-Cell Anode Exhaust-Gas Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward H. Robey, Jr.; Randall S. Gemmen

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the performance of a gas generator used to synthesize the exhaust gas from the anode of a molten-carbonate fuel cell. The composition of this gas is estimated to be that of equilibrium at 1,250 ° F and 1 atm: 48% CO2 , 39% H2O, 5% CO, and 8% H2, with an energy content of approximately 39 Btu/scf (higher heating value). To synthesize a range of gas compositions around this point, the gas generator partially oxidizes a mixture of CH4 , O2 , and CO2 to generate energy densities between 20 and 60 Btu/scf at temperatures between 1,198 and 1,350 ° F. Results show that the technique provides a relatively high ratio of CO to H2 concentrations compared with the target composition (CO:H2 of 2, versus 0.71). A detailed chemical model shows that the likely cause is quenching of the CO and H2 chemistry below 2,000 ° F.

  17. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  18. Adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for uncertainty quantification of a gas cooled fast reactor transient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z. [Section Physics of Nuclear Reactors, Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, TU Delft, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands); Gilli, L.; Lathouwers, D.; Kloosterman, J. L. [Section Physics of Nuclear Reactors, Department of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainty quantification plays an increasingly important role in the nuclear community, especially with the rise of Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies. Sensitivity analysis, surrogate models, Monte Carlo sampling and several other techniques can be used to propagate input uncertainties. In recent years however polynomial chaos expansion has become a popular alternative providing high accuracy at affordable computational cost. This paper presents such polynomial chaos (PC) methods using adaptive sparse grids and adaptive basis set construction, together with an application to a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor transient. Comparison is made between a new sparse grid algorithm and the traditionally used technique proposed by Gerstner. An adaptive basis construction method is also introduced and is proved to be advantageous both from an accuracy and a computational point of view. As a demonstration the uncertainty quantification of a 50% loss of flow transient in the GFR2400 Gas Cooled Fast Reactor design was performed using the CATHARE code system. The results are compared to direct Monte Carlo sampling and show the superior convergence and high accuracy of the polynomial chaos expansion. Since PC techniques are easy to implement, they can offer an attractive alternative to traditional techniques for the uncertainty quantification of large scale problems. (authors)

  19. Measurement of the odor impact of a waste deposit using the SF6-tracer method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roetzer, H.; Muehldorf, V.; Riesing, J.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill gas emitted from a waste disposal often causes odor nuisance in the vicinity. To verify that the odor concentrations were below these limit values, the odor contributions of different sources had to be distinguished. A tracer method was applied to measure the odor impact of the sanitary landfill to its environment. The emitted landfill gas was labelled with the tracer gas SF6. The tracer gas was parted to even amounts and released through ten special nozzles equally distributed over the surface of the landfill. In the area around the landfill the concentration of the tracer gas was measured by collecting air samples and analyzing them with a gas chromatograph with an electron capture detector. Fifteen air sampling units were used to collect eight consecutive air samples at each selected point. These measurements gave the relation between the emission of landfill gas and the resulting concentrations in ambient air.

  20. Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

  1. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

  2. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

  3. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

  4. Tracking thermal fronts with temperature-sensitive, chemically reactive tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos is developing tracer techniques using reactive chemicals to track thermal fronts in fractured geothermal reservoirs. If a nonadsorbing tracer flowing from the injection to production well chemically reacts, its reaction rate will be a strong function of temperature. Thus the extent of chemical reaction will be greatest early in the lifetime of the system, and less as the thermal front progresses from the injection to production well. Early laboratory experiments identified tracers with chemical kinetics suitable for reservoirs in the temperature range of 75 to 100/sup 0/C. Recent kinetics studies have focused on the kinetics of hydrolysis of derivatives of bromobenzene. This class of reactions can be used in reservoirs ranging in temperature from 150 to 275/sup 0/C, which is of greater interest to the geothermal industry. Future studies will include laboratory adsorption experiments to identify possibly unwanted adsorption on granite, development of sensitive analytical techniques, and a field demonstration of the reactive tracer concept.

  5. Alternative Techniques for Injecting Massive Quantities of Gas for Plasma Disruption Mitigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Commaux, Nicolas JC [ORNL; Fehling, Dan T [ORNL; Foust, Charles R [ORNL; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; McGill, James M [ORNL; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of massive quantities of noble gases or D2 has proven to be effective at mitigating some of the deleterious effects of disruptions in tokamaks. Two alternative methods that might offer some advantages over the present technique for massive gas injection are shattering massive pellets and employing closecoupled rupture disks. Laboratory testing has been carried out to evaluate their feasibility. For the study of massive pellets, a pipe gun pellet injector cooled with a cryogenic refrigerator was fitted with a relatively large barrel (16.5 mm bore), and D2 and Ne pellets were made and were accelerated to speeds of ~600 and 300 m/s, respectively. Based on the successful proof-of-principle testing with the injector and a special double-impact target to shatter pellets, a similar system has been prepared and installed on DIII-D, with preliminary experiments already carried out. To study the applicability of rupture disks for disruption mitigation, a simple test apparatus was assembled in the lab. Commercially available rupture disks of 1 in. nominal diameter were tested at conditions relevant for the application on tokamaks, including tests with Ar and He gases and rupture pressures of ~54 bar. Some technical and practical issues of implementing this technique on a tokamak are discussed.

  6. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  7. Gas-phase thermal dissociation of uranium hexafluoride: Investigation by the technique of laser-powered homogeneous pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostick, W.D.; McCulla, W.H.; Trowbridge, L.D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the gas-phase, uranium hexafluoride decomposes thermally in a quasi-unimolecular reaction to yield uranium pentafluoride and atomic fluorine. We have investigated this reaction using the relatively new technique of laser-powered homogeneous pyrolysis, in which a megawatt infrared laser is used to generate short pulses of high gas temperatures under strictly homogeneous conditions. In our investigation, SiF/sub 4/ is used as the sensitizer to absorb energy from a pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser and to transfer this energy by collisions with the reactant gas. Ethyl chloride is used as an external standard ''thermometer'' gas to permit estimation of the unimolecular reaction rate constants by a relative rate approach. When UF/sub 6/ is the reactant, CF/sub 3/Cl is used as reagent to trap atomic fluorine reaction product, forming CF/sub 4/ as a stable indicator which is easily detected by infrared spectroscopy. Using these techniques, we estimate the UF/sub 6/ unimolecular reaction rate constant near the high-pressure limit. In the Appendix, we describe a computer program, written for the IBM PC, which predicts unimolecular rate constants based on the Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory. Parameterization of the theoretical model is discussed, and recommendations are made for ''appropriate'' input parameters for use in predicting the gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate for UF/sub 6/ as a function of temperature and gas composition and total pressure. 85 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. Porosity of coal and shale: Insights from gas adsorption and SANS/USANS techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastalerz, Maria [Indiana Geological Survey; He, Lilin [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL; Rupp, John A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Pennsylvanian coal samples (Spr326 and Spr879-IN1) and two Upper Devonian-Mississippian shale samples (MM1 and MM3) from the Illinois Basin were studied with regard to their porosity and pore accessibility. Shale samples are early mature stage as indicated by vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) values of 0.55% for MM1 and 0.62% for MM3. The coal samples studied are of comparable maturity to the shale samples, having vitrinite reflectance of 0.52% (Spr326) and 0.62% (Spr879-IN1). Gas (N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}) adsorption and small-angle and ultrasmall-angle neutron scattering techniques (SANS/USANS) were used to understand differences in the porosity characteristics of the samples. The results demonstrate that there is a major difference in mesopore (2-50 nm) size distribution between the coal and shale samples, while there was a close similarity in micropore (<2 nm) size distribution. Micropore and mesopore volumes correlate with organic matter content in the samples. Accessibility of pores in coal is pore-size specific and can vary significantly between coal samples; also, higher accessibility corresponds to higher adsorption capacity. Accessibility of pores in shale samples is low.

  9. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in FracturedReservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport of chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is strongly affected by the fracture-matrix interfacial area. In a vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir, this area can be estimated by inert gas tracer tests, where gas diffusion between the fracture and matrix causes the tracer breakthrough curve (BTC) to have a long tail determined by the interfacial area. For water-saturated conditions, recent studies suggest that sorbing solute tracers can also generate strong tails in BTCs that may allow a determination of the fracture-matrix interfacial area. To theoretically explore such a useful phenomenon, this paper develops an analytical solution for BTCs in slug-tracer tests in a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows that increased sorption should have the same effect on BTCs as an increase of the diffusion coefficient. The solution is useful for understanding transport mechanisms, verifying numerical codes, and for identifying appropriate chemicals as tracers for the characterization of fractured reservoirs.

  10. Planning techniques for avoiding sublease treatment on assigning oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kells, R.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many oil and gas leasebrokers and other industry people who have bought and transferred oil and gas leases may have unintentionally exposed themselves to a large potential tax liability, wholly unrelated to their actual economic gain or loss, by transferring oil and gas leases subject to a continuing nonoperating interest such as an overriding royalty interest. This article is concerned with the various tax consequences which may ensue when a nonproducing oil and gas lease is transferred, and provides suggestions for structuring the purchase and sale of nonproducing oil and gas leases to obtain the most favorable tax treatment. Throughout the article the assignment of leases is assumed to be by a leasebroker.

  11. Development of MELCOR Input Techniques for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corson, James

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    and other HTGRs. In the present study, new input techniques have been developed for MELCOR HTGR analysis. These new techniques include methods for modeling radiation heat transfer between solid surfaces in an HTGR, calculating fuel and cladding geometric...

  12. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned for stranded gas reserves. The recent experiments and their results from the testing within NETL's 15-Liter Hydrate Cell Facility exhibit promising results. Introduction of water at the desired temperature and pressure through an NETL designed nozzle into a temperature controlled methane environment within the 15-Liter Hydrate Cell allowed for instantaneous formation of methane hydrates. The instantaneous and continuous hydrate formation process was repeated over several days while varying the flow rate of water, its' temperature, and the overall temperature of the methane environment. These results clearly indicated that hydrates formed immediately after the methane and water left the nozzle at temperatures above the freezing point of water throughout the range of operating conditions. [1] Oil and Gas Journal Vol. 160.48, Dec 22, 2008. [2] http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/chapter3.html and http://www.eia.doe.gov/oiaf/servicerpt/natgas/pdf/tbl7.pdf [3] U.S. Geological Survey, “Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal: Estimates of Undiscovered Oil and Gas North of the Arctic Circle,” May 2008.

  13. Comparison of Various Deterministic Forecasting Techniques in Shale Gas Reservoirs with Emphasis on the Duong Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Krunal Jaykant

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a huge demand in the industry to forecast production in shale gas reservoirs accurately. There are many methods including volumetric, Decline Curve Analysis (DCA), analytical simulation and numerical simulation. Each one of these methods...

  14. Application of Condition-Based Monitoring Techniques for Remote Monitoring of a Simulated Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, David A [ORNL; Henkel, James J [ORNL; Whitaker, Michael [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents research into the adaptation of monitoring techniques from maintainability and reliability (M&R) engineering for remote unattended monitoring of gas centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) for international safeguards. Two categories of techniques are discussed: the sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) for diagnostic monitoring, and sequential Monte Carlo (SMC or, more commonly, particle filtering ) for prognostic monitoring. Development and testing of the application of condition-based monitoring (CBM) techniques was performed on the Oak Ridge Mock Feed and Withdrawal (F&W) facility as a proof of principle. CBM techniques have been extensively developed for M&R assessment of physical processes, such as manufacturing and power plants. These techniques are normally used to locate and diagnose the effects of mechanical degradation of equipment to aid in planning of maintenance and repair cycles. In a safeguards environment, however, the goal is not to identify mechanical deterioration, but to detect and diagnose (and potentially predict) attempts to circumvent normal, declared facility operations, such as through protracted diversion of enriched material. The CBM techniques are first explained from the traditional perspective of maintenance and reliability engineering. The adaptation of CBM techniques to inspector monitoring is then discussed, focusing on the unique challenges of decision-based effects rather than equipment degradation effects. These techniques are then applied to the Oak Ridge Mock F&W facility a water-based physical simulation of a material feed and withdrawal process used at enrichment plants that is used to develop and test online monitoring techniques for fully information-driven safeguards of GCEPs. Advantages and limitations of the CBM approach to online monitoring are discussed, as well as the potential challenges of adapting CBM concepts to safeguards applications.

  15. Predicting Forage Nutritive Value Using an In Vitro Gas Production Technique and Dry Matter Intake of Grazing Animals Using n-Alkanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguiar, Andre D.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the first experiment, forage samples (n = 39) were collected during 4 years (2006 ? 2009) from pastures grazed by Santa Gertrudis cattle at the King Ranch, TX. The in vitro gas production technique (IVGP) was performed to understand the pattern...

  16. Planning techniques for avoiding sublease treatment on assigning oil and gas leases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kells, R.B.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative tax consequences that may occur upon transfer of a nonproducing oil and gas lease are discussed. It is usually assumed that income taxes are computed on their actual economic gain, however, taxes are computed often on income that is far greater an amount than the economic gain. Suggestionss are made for structuring the sales to obtain the most-favorable tax arrangement. It is also suggested that legislation be enacted to provide for sale treatment in the instance when a lessee assigns a lease but still retains a continuing non-operating interest. Taxing discrepancies that now exist between oil/gas properties and those of other minerals would also be lessened by such legislation. 48 references.

  17. Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Ferguson, R. M. [LodeSpin Labs, P.O. Box 95632, Seattle, Washington 98145 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

  18. A technique to control mercury from flue gas: The Thief Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dowd, W.J.; Pennline, H.W.; Freeman, M.C.; Granite, E.J.; Hargis, R.A.; Lacher, C.J.; Karash, A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thief Process is a mercury removal process that may be applicable to a broad range of pulverized coal-fired combustion systems. This is one of several sorbent injection technologies under development by the U.S. Department of Energy for capturing mercury from coal-fired electric utility boilers. A unique feature of the Thief Process involves the production of a thermally activated sorbent in situ at the power plant. The sorbent is obtained by inserting a lance, or thief, into the combustor, in or near the flame, and extracting a mixture of partially combusted coal and gas. The partially combusted coal or sorbent has adsorptive properties suitable for the removal of vapor-phase mercury at flue gas temperatures that are typical downstream of a power plant preheater. One proposed scenario, similar to activated carbon injection (ACI), involves injecting the extracted sorbent into the downstream ductwork between the air preheater and the particulate collection device of the power plant. Initial laboratory-scale and pilot-scale testing, using an eastern bituminous coal, focused on the concept validation. Subsequent pilot-scale testing, using a Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, focused on the process development and optimization. The results of the experimental studies, as well as an independent experimental assessment, are detailed. In addition, the results of a preliminary economic analysis that documents the costs and the potential economic advantages of the Thief Process for mercury control are discussed.

  19. Analysis of Injection-Backflow Tracer Tests in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocabas, I.; Horne, R.N.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer tests have been an important technique for determining the flow and reservoir characteristics in various rock matrix systems. While the interwell tracer tests are aimed at the characterization of the regions between the wells, single-well injection-backflow tracer tests may be useful tools of preliminary evaluation, before implementing long term interwell tracer tests. This work is concerned with the quantitative evaluation of the tracer return profiles obtained from single well injection-backflow tracer tests. First, two mathematical models of tracer transport through fractures, have been reviewed. These two models are based on two different principles: Taylor Dispersion along the fracture and simultaneous diffusion in and out of the adjacent matrix. Then the governing equations for the transport during the injection-backflow tests have been solved. Finally the results were applied to field data obtained from Raft River and East Mesa geothermal fields. In order to determine the values of the parameters of the models that define the transport mechanisms through fractures a non-linear optimization technique was employed. 26 refs., 10 figs.

  20. Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  1. Investigation of a mercury speciation technique for flue gas desulfurization materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.Y.; Cho K.; Cheng L.; Keener, T.C.; Jegadeesan G.; Al-Abed, S.R. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the synthetic gypsum generated from wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers is currently being used for wallboard production. Because oxidized mercury is readily captured by the wet FGD scrubber, and coal-fired power plants equipped with wet scrubbers desire to benefit from the partial mercury control that these systems provide, some mercury is likely to be bound in with the FGD gypsum and wallboard. In this study, the feasibility of identifying mercury species in the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples was investigated using a large sample size thermal desorption method and samples from power plants in Pennsylvania. Potential candidates of pure mercury standards including mercuric chloride, mercurous chloride, mercury oxide, mercury sulfide, and mercuric sulfate were analyzed to compare their results with those obtained from FGD gypsum and dry wallboard samples. Although any of the thermal evolutionary curves obtained from these pure mercury standards did not exactly match with those of the FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, it was identified that Hg{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and HgCl{sub 2} could be candidates. An additional chlorine analysis from the gypsum and wallboard samples indicated that the chlorine concentrations were approximately 2 orders of magnitude higher than the mercury concentrations, suggesting possible chlorine association with mercury. 21 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. 5, 58415874, 2005 Ozone/tracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 5, 5841­5874, 2005 Ozone/tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller et al. Title Page Discussions Impact of mixing and chemical change on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller 1 Commons License. 5841 #12;ACPD 5, 5841­5874, 2005 Ozone/tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller et

  3. Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to:TownTownerOpenEnergyG, andTracer

  4. A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  5. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

  6. A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Archna

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified...

  7. Use of tracers in materials-holdup study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillay, K.K.S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Holdup measurements of special nuclear materials in large processing facilities offer considerable challenges to conventional nondestructive-assay techniques. The use of judiciously chosen radioactive tracers offer a unique method of overcoming this difficulty. Three examples involving the use of /sup 46/Sc and fission products from activated uranium in large-scale experimental studies of uranium holdup are discussed. A justification for the method and its advantages along with examples of successful applications of this technique for large-sale experimental studies are presented.

  8. Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ability to accurately detect reservoir characteristics including fluid pathways, dynamics, residence time, etc." - 4.1.5.1-Barrier J: "Inadequate tracers andor tracer...

  9. Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending...

  10. Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs...

  11. Tracer Study of Mixing and Transport in the Upper Hudson River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    ; Peter Schlosser2 ; and David T. Ho3 Abstract: In October 2001, 0.2 mol of SF6 was injected reduce longitudinal dispersion below the value expected in a natural channel with the same discharge. SF6, and gas exchange in a river by means of a deliberately released tracer, sulfur hexafluoride SF6

  12. Overview of SIMS-Based Experimental Studies of Tracer Diffusion in Solids and Application to Mg Self-Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam [ORNL; HunterJr., Jerry [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Coffey, Kevin [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer diffusivities provide the most fundamental information on diffusion in materials and are the foundation of robust diffusion databases. Compared to traditional radiotracer techniques that utilize radioactive isotopes, the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based thin-film technique for tracer diffusion is based on the use of enriched stable isotopes that can be accurately profiled using SIMS. Experimental procedures & techniques that are utilized for the measurement of tracer diffusion coefficients are presented for pure magnesium, which presents some unique challenges due to the ease of oxidation. The development of a modified Shewmon-Rhines diffusion capsule for annealing Mg and an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system for sputter deposition of Mg isotopes are discussed. Optimized conditions for accurate SIMS depth profiling in polycrystalline Mg are provided. An automated procedure for the correction of heat-up and cool-down times during tracer diffusion annealing is discussed. The non-linear fitting of a SIMS depth profile data using the thin film Gaussian solution to obtain the tracer diffusivity along with the background tracer concentration and tracer film thickness is discussed. An Arrhenius fit of the Mg self-diffusion data obtained using the low-temperature SIMS measurements from this study and the high-temperature radiotracer measurements of Shewmon and Rhines (1954) was found to be a good representation of both types of diffusion data that cover a broad range of temperatures between 250 - 627 C (523 900 K).

  13. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Section B (NIMB) Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternativeinjection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use

  14. Development of submicron particle size classification and collection techniques for nuclear facility off-gas streams. [Diffusion battery and electrofluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohorst, F.A.; Fernandez, S.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are an essential part of nuclear facility off-gas cleanup systems. However, HEPA-rated sampling filters are not the most appropriate samplers for the particle penetrating off-gas cleanup systems. Previous work at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) estimated perhaps 5% of the radioactivity that challenged sampling filters penetrated them in the form of submicron particles - typically less than 0.2 microns. Accordingly, to evaluate these penetrating aerosols more fully, a suitable robust monitoring system for size differentiation and measurement of submicron particles was developed. A literature survey revealed that the diffusion battery was the best choice for particle size classification and that the electrofluidized bed was the best method for particle collection in ICPP off-gas streams. This report describes the laboratory study and in-plant demonstration of these two techniques.

  15. Deposition of device quality, low hydrogen content, amorphous silicon films by hot filament technique using ``safe`` silicon source gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mahan, A.H.; Molenbroek, E.C.; Nelson, B.P.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for producing hydrogenated amorphous silicon on a substrate by flowing a stream of safe (diluted to less than 1%) silane gas past a heated filament. 7 figs.

  16. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, Thomas P. (Belleville, MI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  17. Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revi, Frank

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

  18. A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Archna

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    on the location of the one well in different portions of the basin. Since there is such a large range in the gas content, the EUR varies quite a bit in the Antrim. Through core analysis, pressure transient testing, and well testing, Pickering (2009) believes... that the estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) could be as low as 20% to as high at 60%. If the recovery factor actually gets high enough to 60%, it can be deduced that operators will produce adsorbed gas that will be released. Shale Mineralogy The mineralogy...

  19. Informal Report USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BNL-66726 Informal Report USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected

  20. Chelated Indium Activable Tracers for Geothermal Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Center (SLAC), for providing the califclmiurh-252 neutron source. Appreciation is extended to Lew, rock size, and temperature on the tracer adsoqjtion and ther- mal degradation. The rock employed for these measurements was gragwacke, a prek valent rock type at The Geysers, California geothermal field. The re

  1. A continuous fast-response dual-tracer analyzer for halogenated atmospheric tracer studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rydock, J.P.; Lamb, B.K. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)] [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the simultaneous measurement of two tracers, sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and a perfluorocarbon compound, is introduced. The new instrument is a modification of a commercially available fast-response, continuous analyzer for single halogenated atmospheric tracer studies. A two-channel flow system was implemented consisting of an alumina cartridge in one channel and a glass beads cartridge of equal flow resistance in the second channel. The alumina passes only sulfur hexafluoride, while the glass beads pass both SF6 and the perfluoroarbon tracer. The SF6 is quantified directly from the electron capture detector (ECD) signal in the alumina channel, and the perfluorocarbon concentration is obtained from the difference of the ECD responses in the two channels. The dual-tracer analyzer is field portable for mobile operations or fixed-location monitoring, has a response time of 1.2 s, and has limits of detection of about 15 pptv for SF6 and 10 pptv for perfluoro-methylcyclohexane, which was the principal perfluorocarbon tracer used in this study. The present instrument configuration, which requires periodic purging of the adsorbent trap, can obtain continuous measurements for a 10-15-min segment in every half hour of operation. Dual-tracer data from a field demonstration test are presented.

  2. Generation and characterization of plasma channels in gas puff targets using soft X-ray radiography technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachulak, P. W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com; Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; W?grzy?ski, ?.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jabczy?ski, J.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our recent results of a formation and characterization of plasma channels in elongated krypton and xenon gas puff targets. The study of their formation and temporal expansion was carried out using a combination of a soft X-ray radiography (shadowgraphy) and pinhole camera imaging. Two high-energy short laser pulses were used to produce the channels. When a pumping laser pulse was shaped into a line focus, using cylindrical and spherical lenses, the channels were not produced because much smaller energy density was deposited in the gas puff target. However, when a point focus was obtained, using just a spherical lens, the plasma channels appeared. The channels were up to 9?mm in length, had a quite uniform density profile, and expanded in time with velocities of about 2?cm/?s.

  3. Asian Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project: Draft Field Work Plan for the Asian Long-Range Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an experimental plan for a proposed Asian long-range tracer study as part of the international Tracer Experiment and Atmospheric Modeling (TEAM) Project. The TEAM partners are China, Japan, South Korea and the United States. Optimal times of year to conduct the study, meteorological measurements needed, proposed tracer release locations, proposed tracer sampling locations and the proposed durations of tracer releases and subsequent sampling are given. Also given are the activities necessary to prepare for the study and the schedule for completing the preparation activities leading to conducting the actual field operations. This report is intended to provide the TEAM members with the information necessary for planning and conducting the Asian long-range tracer study. The experimental plan is proposed, at this time, to describe the efforts necessary to conduct the Asian long-range tracer study, and the plan will undoubtedly be revised and refined as the planning goes forward over the next year.

  4. Chemical tracers of episodic accretion in low-mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Ruud; Jorgensen, Jes K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: Accretion rates in low-mass protostars can be highly variable in time. Each accretion burst is accompanied by a temporary increase in luminosity, heating up the circumstellar envelope and altering the chemical composition of the gas and dust. This paper aims to study such chemical effects and discusses the feasibility of using molecular spectroscopy as a tracer of episodic accretion rates and timescales. Methods: We simulate a strong accretion burst in a diverse sample of 25 spherical envelope models by increasing the luminosity to 100 times the observed value. Using a comprehensive gas-grain network, we follow the chemical evolution during the burst and for up to 10^5 yr after the system returns to quiescence. The resulting abundance profiles are fed into a line radiative transfer code to simulate rotational spectra of C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, and N2H+ at a series of time steps. We compare these spectra to observations taken from the literature and to previously unpublished data of HCO+ and N2H+ 6-5 from th...

  5. THE BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER TECHNOLOGY: A PROVEN AND COST EFFECTIVE METHOD TO VERIFY INTEGRITY AND MONITOR LONG TERM PERFORMANCE OF WALLS, FLOORS, CAPS, AND COVER SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER, J.; SULLIVAN, T.

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, containment system failures are detected by monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. Clearly this approach is inefficient, as the contaminants will have migrated from the disposal area before they are detected. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict impending cover failure are needed. The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Perfluorocarbon Tracer (PFT) technology can measure performance changes and integrity losses as the cover ages. This allows early detection of cover failure or pending failure so that repair or replacement can be made before contaminants leave the disposal cell. The PFT technology has been successfully applied to four subsurface barrier problems, one leak detection problem from underground ducts, and one surface cover problem. Testing has demonstrated that the PFTs are capable of accurately detecting and locating leaks down to fractions of an inch. The PFT technology has several advantages over competing approaches. The ability to simultaneously use multiple PFTs separates it from other gas tracer technologies. Using multiple tracers provides independent confirmation of flaw location, helps to clearly define transport pathways, and can be used for confirmatory testing (e.g., repeat the test using a new tracer). The PFT tests provide a direct measure of flaws in a barrier, whereas other measurements (pressure, moisture content, temperature, subsidence) provide indirect measures that need interpretation. The focus of the six PFT demonstrations has been on engineering aspects of the technology with the intent of finding if a flaw existed in the barrier. Work remains to be done on the scientific basis for this technology. This includes determining PFT diffusion rates through various materials (soils and barrier) as a function of moisture content, determining the effects of barometric pumping on PFT flow for cover systems, and determining wind effects on side slopes of cover systems and their impact on PFT performance. It also includes application of models to assist in the design of the monitoring system and the interpretation of the data. The set of demonstrations was performed on small sites (< 1/4 acre). Future work also needs to consider scaling issues to develop and design optimal techniques for delivery and monitoring of the PFTs.

  6. Tracers and Exploration Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,DepartmentFebruary 19,TopProcess |Town o5Tracers

  7. abdominal tracer activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the...

  8. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution in CO2- and Water-Based Geothermal Reservoirs Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last...

  9. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    surface area to volume ratios in fractured rock groundwater systems - differential tracer transport has also been used by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and others in oil...

  10. Assessment of inhalation and ingestion doses from exposure to radon gas using passive and active detecting techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, A. H.; Jafaar, M. S. [Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this study was to assess an environmental hazard of radon exhalation rate from the samples of soil and drinking water in selected locations in Iraqi Kurdistan, passive (CR-39NTDs) and active (RAD7) detecting techniques has been employed. Long and short term measurements of emitted radon concentrations were estimated for 124 houses. High and lower radon concentration in soil samples was in the cities of Hajyawa and Er. Tyrawa, respectively. Moreover, for drinking water, high and low radon concentration was in the cities of Similan and Kelak, respectively. A comparison between our results with that mentioned in international reports had been done. Average annual dose equivalent to the bronchial epithelium, stomach and whole body in the cities of Kelak and Similan are estimated, and it was varied from 0.04{+-}0.01 mSv to 0.547{+-}0.018 mSv, (2.832{+-}0.22)x10{sup -5} to (11.972{+-}2.09)x10{sup -5} mSv, and (0.056 {+-}0.01) x10{sup -5} to (0.239{+-}0.01)x10{sup -5} mSv, respectively. This indicated that the effects of dissolved radon on the bronchial epithelium are much than on the stomach and whole body. (authors)

  11. Molecular gas and AGN fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO emission, tracing the molecular content and distribution in galaxies, is a privileged tool to trace gas towards the nucleus, since the HI tracer is in general depleted there. A review is done of recent CO line observations, with sufficient spatial resolution to indicate the morphology and kinematics of the gas near the nucleus. The puzzling result that nuclei presently observed in an active phase have little sign of fueling, is discussed.

  12. Kinetic analysis of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone as a deposited myocardial flow tracer: Comparison to thallium-201.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Robert C.; Powers-Risius, Patricia; Reutter, Bryan W.; O'Neil, James P.; La Belle, Michael; Huesman, Ronald H.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this investigation was to assess the accuracy of 18F-fluorodihydrorotenone (18F-FDHR) as a new deposited myocardial flow tracer and compare the results to those for 201Tl. Methods. The kinetics of these flow tracers were evaluated in 22 isolated, erythrocyte- and albumin-perfused rabbit hearts over a flow range encountered in patients. The two flow tracers plus a vascular reference tracer (131I-albumin) were introduced as a bolus through a port just above the aortic cannula. Myocardial extraction, retention, washout, and uptake parameters were computed from the venous outflow curves using the multiple indicator dilution technique and spectral analysis. Results. The mean initial extraction fractions of 18F-FDHR (0.85 +- 0.07) and 201Tl (0.87 +- 0.05) were not significantly different, although the initial extraction fraction for 18F-FDHR declined with flow (P < 0.0001), whereas the initial extraction fraction of 201Tl did not. Washout of 201Tl was faster (P < 0.001) and more affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 18F-FDHR washout. Except for initial extraction fraction, 18F-FDHR retention was greater (P < 0.001) and less affected by flow (P < 0.05) than 201Tl retention. Reflecting its superior retention, net uptake of 18F-FDHR was better correlated with flow than 201Tl uptake at both one and fifteen minutes after tracer introduction (P < 0.0001 for both comparisons). Conclusion. The superior correlation of 18F-FDHR uptake with flow indicates that it is a better flow tracer than 201Tl in the isolated rabbit heart. Compared to the other currently available positron-emitting flow tracers (82Rb, 13N-ammonia, and 15O-water), 18F-FDHR has the potential of providing excellent image resolution without the need for an on-site cyclotron.

  13. Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts United;Multispecies Reactive Tracer Test in a Sand and Gravel Aquifer, Cape Cod, Massachusetts Part 2 Transport- effectiveness for prevention and control of pollution to air, land, water, and subsurface resources; protection

  14. DESCRIPTION OF HETEROGENEOUS USING PRESSURE AND TRACER DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    DESCRIPTION OF HETEROGENEOUS RESERVOIRS USING PRESSURE AND TRACER DATA A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED of characterizing areally heterogeneous reservoirs through the interpretation of pressure data and tracer data for the selected reservoir model, increases the tolerance to noise in the data, increases the confidence

  15. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  16. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  17. Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The trend toward production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oilgas) has caused a large increase in the use of hydraulic fracture stimulation of...

  18. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  19. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  20. Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction of the Development ofIntroduction of the Development of New PET TracersNew PET Tracers The Center for Translational Neuroimaging KunKun--EekEek KilKil #12;Principles of PET-1 PET: Positron Emission Tomography #12;Principles of PET-2 Cyclotron Scanner #12;Principles of PET-3 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0

  1. Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, T.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

  2. Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

  3. Elemental Fluorine-18 Gas: Enhanced Production and Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanBrocklin, Henry F. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to develop an efficient, reproducible and reliable process for the preparation of fluorine-18 labeled fluorine gas ([¹?F]F?) from readily available cyclotron-produced [¹?F]fluoride ion. The two step process entailed the production of [¹?F]fluoromethane with subsequent conversion to [¹?F]F? by electric discharge of [¹?F]fluoromethane in the presence of carrier nonradioactive F? gas. The specific goals of this project were i) to optimize the preparation of [¹?F]fluoromethane from [¹?F]fluoride ion; ii) to develop a prototype automated system for the production of [¹?F]F? from [¹?F]fluoride ion and iii) develop a compact user friendly automated system for the preparation of [¹?F]F? with initial synthesis of fluorine-18 labeled radiotracers. Over the last decade there has been an increased interest in the production of "non-standard" positron-emitting isotopes for the preparation of new radiotracers for a variety of applications including medical imaging and therapy. The increased availability of these isotopes from small biomedical cyclotrons has prompted their use in labeling radiotracers. In much the same way the production of [¹?F]F? gas has been known for several decades. However, access to [¹?F]F? gas has been limited to those laboratories with the means (e.g. F? targetry for the cyclotron) and the project-based need to work with [¹?F]F? gas. Relatively few laboratories, compared to those that produce [¹?F]fluoride ion on a daily basis, possess the capability to produce and use [¹?F]F? gas. A simplified, reliable system employing [¹?F]fluoride ion from cyclotron targetry systems that are already in place coupled with on-demand production of the [¹?F]F? gas would greatly enhance its availability. This would improve the availability of [¹?F]F? gas and promote further work with a valuable precursor. The major goals of the project were accomplished over the funding period. The preparation of ¹?F]fluoromethane has been automated with reproducible yields greater than 90% conversion from [¹?F]fluoride ion. A trap and release system was established for the [¹?F]fluoride ion concentration and direct elution of the [¹?F]fluoride ion into the reaction vial with the appropriate base and precursor in DMSO. Other solvents were also investigated. The production time for [¹?F]fluoromethane is less than 10 minutes. An automated system for the [¹?F]F? gas production from the [18F]fluoromethane has been developed. The unit coupled to the [¹?F]fluoromethane system permits the on demand production of [¹?F]F? gas. In less than 30 minutes, mCi quantities of [¹?F]F? gas were produced. Several variables for the [¹?F]F? gas production were investigated and a set of parameters for reproducible operation were determined. These parameters included discharge chamber size, carrier gas (He, Ne, Ar), discharge time, discharge current, mass of F? gas added to the chamber. FDOPA and EF5 were used to test the reactivity of the [¹?F]F? gas. Both products were produced in low to modest yield. The ready availability of [¹?F]F? gas has potential impact to advance both DOE mission-driven initiatives and nuclear medicine initiatives through other federally funded agencies such as NIH and DoD. New reactions involving the use of [¹?F]F? gas will lead to direct labeling of new radiotracers and intermediates as well as new fluorine-18 labeled synthons that may be further reacted with other reagents to provide useful fluorine-18 labeled compounds. New tracers to understand and follow plant and microbial metabolism as well as new tracers for nuclear medicine applications, that have been either difficult to obtain or never produced due to the limited availability of [¹?F]F? gas, may be prepared using the techniques developed .

  4. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Natural Gas HCCI Combustion: Gas Compositionfor heating the flowing gas. Combustion timing is consideredup. Exhaust gas samples were collected at varying combustion

  5. Home Safety: Radon Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

  6. Home Safety: Radon Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. This publication explains the health risks, testing methods, and mitigation and reduction techniques....

  7. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  8. Mass spectral characterization of petroleum dyes, tracers, and additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngless, T.L.; Swansiger, J.T.; Danner, D.A.; Greco, M.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum dyes, additives, and tracers are important for identifying gasolines in spill and contamination problems. High-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) was used for the characterization of 21 commercial petroleum dyes. Many contained common chromophores, typically azo or anthraquinone groups, and often differed only in their degree of alkyl substitution. Few dyes were pure and typically contained several chromogens with homologous series of substituents. A separation method was developed to concentrate the polar fractions containing the additives. Subsequent characterization of the polar fraction by GC/MS showed distinct differences between different gasolines. Various colorless tracers were evaluated in terms of detectability, soil adsorption, and cost. Many tracers exhibited soil adsorption and interferences which limited their detectability. Alcohols in the C8-C10 range were found to be the most suitable tracers with GC/MS detection limits of 1 ppm. 22 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: To develop and demonstrate a new class of tracers?semiconductor nanoparticles(quantum dots)?that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs.

  10. Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

    2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed...

  11. Inverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta-Gupta, Akhil

    computations, inverse modeling 1. Introduction [2] It is recognized that the presence of nonaqueous phaseInverse modeling of partitioning interwell tracer tests: A streamline approach Akhil Datta orders of magnitude. INDEX TERMS: 1832 Hydrology: Groundwater transport; 1829 Hydrology: Groundwater

  12. A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 WindtheEnergySulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso

  13. The feasibility of ethyl iodide as an atmospheric tracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, Joe Vincent

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. R. D. Neff Interest in atmospheric diffusion has been heightened within the last decade by the increasing concern of air pollution and the possibility of radiation hazards intro- duced into the air from nuclear facilities.... Gaseous tracers provide an excellent means of measuring concentration levels at various points downwind of a facility. However, for long range stud cs, ve y low detectable levels are needed. Many problems encountered with tracers for use in long range...

  14. Resuspension rates from aged inert-tracer sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind-caused particle resuspension rates were investigated with molybdenum tracers at two circular resuspension sites in the Hanford area. The tracer particles were calcium molybdate. The radii of each circular tracer-source area were 22.9 m and 29.9 m respectively for tracer deposited on 2 October 1973 and 29 May 1979. Resuspension rates were investigated by sampling resuspended tracer with air sampling equipment mounted as a function of height on a centrally located sampling tower at each site. Sampling equipment was operated as a function of wind speed increments in order to investigate resuspension rates, wind speed dependencies of resuspension rates, and for subsequent comparisons of resuspension rate changes as a function of time for constant wind speed ranges. Experimental results are reported for measurements over several years. Resuspension rates ranged from about 10/sup -13/ to 10/sup -6/ fraction of the tracer source resuspended per second. Resuspension rates tended to increase with increasing wind speed. At one investigation site, resuspension rates were nearly constant, except for seasonal variations, for a four-year time period. Resuspension rates appear higher in the autumn than in the spring and summer.

  15. Spectral analysis for evaluation of myocardial tracers for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesman, Ronald H.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Marshall, Robert C.

    2000-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic analysis of dynamic tracer data is performed with the goal of evaluating myocardial radiotracers for cardiac nuclear medicine imaging. Data from experiments utilizing the isolated rabbit heart model are acquired by sampling the venous blood after introduction of a tracer of interest and a reference tracer. We have taken the approach that the kinetics are properly characterized by an impulse response function which describes the difference between the reference molecule (which does not leave the vasculature) and the molecule of interest which is transported across the capillary boundary and is made available to the cell. Using this formalism we can model the appearance of the tracer of interest in the venous output of the heart as a convolution of the appearance of the reference tracer with the impulse response. In this work we parameterize the impulse response function as the sum of a large number of exponential functions whose predetermined decay constants form a spectrum, and each is required only to have a nonnegative coefficient. This approach, called spectral analysis, has the advantage that it allows conventional compartmental analysis without prior knowledge of the number of compartments which the physiology may require or which the data will support.

  16. Gas mixing in the wall layer of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterneus, J.; Johnsson, F. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer-gas measurements were carried out in the transport zone of a 12 MW CFB boiler with special emphasis on the wall-layer flow. Helium (He) was used as tracer gas and a mass spectrometer was used to determine the He-concentrations. The primary gas velocity, U{sub 0}, was 1.2, 2.6 and 4.3 m/s (no secondary air) and the bed material was silica sand with an average particle diameter of 0.32 mm. Tracer gas was injected at different distances from one of the furnace walls and sampled above and below the injection level. In the wall layer, tracer-gas concentrations were detected above (C{sub above}) as well as below (C{sub below}) the injection height for all operating conditions, i.e., the gas flows both up and down from the injection point. The data show that the net flow of tracer gas in the wall layer depends on the operating conditions, and the concentration ratio of the down- and up-flowing gas, {psi} = C{sub below}/C{sub above}, decreases with increased gas velocity ({psi} > 1 for U{sub 0} = 1.2 m/s, {psi} {approx} 1 for U{sub 0} = 2.6 m/s and {psi} < 1 for U{sub 0} = 4.3 m/s). There exists a gas exchange between the core region and the wall-layer. A plug flow model applied to the core region gives a radial dispersion coefficient, D{sub r}, in the range of 0.015--0.025 m{sup 2}/s which is higher than the D{sub r} values reported in literature which are below 0.01 m{sup 2}/x. However, the latter values were obtained in tall and narrow risers.

  17. Potential method for measurement of CO2 leakage from underground sequestration fields using radioactive tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelor, Paula P.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Amonette, James E.; Hayes, James C.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Saripalli, Prasad

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) release to the environment is a pressing challenge that should be addressed to avert the potential devastating effects of global warming. Within the United States, the most abundant sources of CO2 emissions are those generate from coal- or gas-fired power plants; one method to control CO2 emissions is to sequester it in deep underground geological formations. From integrated assessment models the overall leakage rates from these storage locations must be less than 0.1% of stored volume per year for long-term control. The ability to detect and characterize nascent leaks, in conjunction with subsequent remediation efforts, will significantly decrease the amount of CO2 released back into the environment. Because potential leakage pathways are not necessarily known a priori, onsite monitoring must be performed; the monitoring region in the vicinity of a CO2 injection well may be as large as 100 km2, which represents the estimated size of a supercritical CO2 bubble that would form under typical injection scenarios. By spiking the injected CO2 with a radiological or stable isotope tracer, it will be possible to detect ground leaks from the sequestered CO2 using fewer sampling stations, with greater accuracy than would be possible using simple CO2 sensors. The relative merits of various sorbent materials, radiological and stable isotope tracers, detection methods and potential interferences will be discussed.

  18. A gas-jet transport and catcher technique for on-line production of radioactive ion beams using an electron cyclotron resonance ion-source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, V.; Chakrabarti, A.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Karmakar, P.; Bandyopadhyay, A.; Dechoudhury, S.; Mondal, M.; Pandey, H. K.; Lavanyakumar, D.; Mandi, T. K.; Dutta, D. P.; Kundu Roy, T.; Bhowmick, D.; Sanyal, D.; Srivastava, S. C. L.; Ray, A.; Ali, Md. S. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Sector-1, Block-AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Bhattacharjee, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive ion beams (RIB) have been produced on-line, using a gas-jet recoil transport coupled Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion-source at the VECC-RIB facility. Radioactive atoms/molecules carried through the gas-jet were stopped in a catcher placed inside the ECR plasma chamber. A skimmer has been used to remove bulk of the carrier gas at the ECR entrance. The diffusion of atoms/molecules through the catcher has been verified off-line using stable isotopes and on-line through transmission of radioactive reaction products. Beams of {sup 14}O (71 s), {sup 42}K (12.4 h), {sup 43}K (22.2 h), and {sup 41}Ar (1.8 h) have been produced by bombarding nitrogen and argon gas targets with proton and alpha particle beams from the K130 cyclotron at VECC. Typical measured intensity of RIB at the separator focal plane is found to be a few times 10{sup 3} particles per second (pps). About 3.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} pps of 1.4 MeV {sup 14}O RIB has been measured after acceleration through a radiofrequency quadrupole linac. The details of the gas-jet coupled ECR ion-source and RIB production experiments are presented along with the plans for the future.

  19. 6/10/12 Technique Devised to Measure Pipeline Gas Bubbles | Science Business 1/2sciencebusiness.technewslit.com/?p=9481

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    of the blow out preventer was a key factor in the extensive damage caused by the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010. Current methods for estimating bubble size distribution involve for Oil and Gas Eight Teams Funded for Research on Gulf Oil Spill Impact * * * NEW PRODUCTS ENGINEERING

  20. 36Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cl as a tracer in geothermal systems- Example from Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: 36Cl as a tracer...

  1. Time-scales of passive tracers in the ocean with paleoapplications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siberlin, Charlotte

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantifying time-responses of the ocean to passive and active tracers is critical when interpreting paleodata from sediment cores. Surface-injected tracers are not spreading instantaneously or uniformly throughout the ...

  2. Measurement of the Tracer Gradient and Sampling System Bias of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Air Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes tracer gas uniformity and bias measurements made in the exhaust air discharge of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at Idaho National Laboratory. The measurements were a follow-up on earlier measurements which indicated a lack of mixing of the two ventilation streams being discharged via a common stack. The lack of mixing is detrimental to the accuracy of air emission measurements. The lack of mixing was confirmed in these new measurements. The air sampling probe was found to be out of alignment and that was corrected. The suspected sampling bias in the air sample stream was disproved.

  3. Category:Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here.Telluric Survey as exploration techniques, clickpage? For detailed

  4. Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

  5. Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    . Additionally, a sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer dispersion test was conducted by releasing SF6 from a line source within the burn and measuring SF6 concentrations at the supertower. Supertower Instrumentation (TGAPS) connected to a CO2 closed path Licor LI-6262 and a SF6 detector (7 inlet locations) ·Cambell CSAT

  6. Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sick, V; Westbrook, C

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

  7. Diss. ETH Nr. 10714 Helium und Tritium als Tracer fr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

    Diss. ETH Nr. 10714 Helium und Tritium als Tracer für physikalische Prozesse in Seen ABHANDLUNG zur Zürich 1994 #12;Kurzfassung ix Kurzfassung Der radioaktive Zerfall von 3H (Tritium) zu 3He mit einer Fluide aus dem Erdinnern. Helium und Tritium werden massenspektrometrisch analysiert. Im Rahmen dieser Ar

  8. THE EFFECT OF TRANSVERSE MIXING ON TRACER DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Hardware Data Acquisition And Analysis Software Experimental Procedure Analysis Procedure Results: Taylor. The theoretical response for linear Taylor dispersion was matched to the data to determine the non-linear Of Tracer Valve Constant-pressure Reservoir Design Schematic Drawing Of Electrode Circuit Results: Run 16

  9. Application of a NAPL partitioning interwell tracer test (PITT) to support DNAPL remediation at the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico chemical waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, J.E. [INTERA Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mariner, P.; Jin, M. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chlorinated solvents as dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) are present at a large number of hazardous waste sites across the U.S. and world. DNAPL is difficult to detect in the subsurface, much less characterize to any degree of accuracy. Without proper site characterization, remedial decisions are often difficult to make and technically effective, cost-efficient remediations are even more difficult to obtain. A new non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) characterization technology that is superior to conventional technologies has been developed and applied at full-scale. This technology, referred to as the Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT), has been adopted from oil-field practices and tailored to environmental application in the vadose and saturated zones. A PITT has been applied for the first time at full-scale to characterize DNAPL in the vadose zone. The PITT was applied in December 1995 beneath two side-by-side organic disposal pits at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) RCRA Interim Status Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL), located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. DNAPL, consisting of a mixture of chlorinated solvents, aromatic hydrocarbons, and PCE oils, is known to exist in at least one of the two buried pits. The vadose zone PITT was conducted by injecting a slug of non-partitioning and NAPL-partitioning tracers into and through a zone of interest under a controlled forced gradient. The forced gradient was created by a balanced extraction of soil gas at a location 55 feet from the injector. The extracted gas stream was sampled over time to define tracer break-through curves. Soil gas sampling ports from multilevel monitoring installations were sampled to define break-through curves at specific locations and depths. Analytical instrumentation such as gas chromatographs and a photoacoustical analyzers operated autonomously, were used for tracer detection.

  10. Australian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Access to different pore structure evaluation techniques including low pressure nitrogen adsorptionAustralian Shale Gas Assessment Project Reza Rezaee Unconventional Gas Research Group of natural gas in many countries. According to recent assessments, Australia has around 437 trillion cubic

  11. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T. [Lagoven, S.A., Pdvsa (Venezuela); Lake, L.W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Simulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen: finite volume method, film cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation AMS@igpm.rwth-aachen.de (Thomas Gotzen) #12;Numerical simulation of cooling gas injection using adaptive multiscale techniques

  13. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of Natural Gas HCCI Combustion: Gas CompositionPeroxide (DTBP) Additive on HCCI Combustion of Fuel BlendsCharge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines: Key Research and

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, What is the skill of ocean tracers in reducing uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haran, Murali

    in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions

  15. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  16. Application of multispectral data processing techniques to cholesteric liquid crystal tracer particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Neal Allen

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coordinates was derived. This model has a functionally accurate form based on a reasonable set of assumptions. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ln TABLE OF CONTENTS 1V LIST OF TABLES . LIST OF FIGURES INTRODUCTION LITERATURE REVIEW V1 V11 Color Measurement... 165 LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Nominal calibration of liquid crystals. 2 Description of the calibration frames. 29 37 3 Interference filter set. 4 Unit spectral integral densities for Ektachrome VNF 7250. 55 5 Variables and parameter...

  17. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

  18. Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePtyTown Hall MeetingTracer Testing

  19. Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePtyTown Hall MeetingTracer TestingTesting

  20. Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePtyTown Hall MeetingTracer

  1. Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePtyTown Hall MeetingTracerInformation

  2. Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1984) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThePtyTown Hall MeetingTracerInformation

  3. Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGenerationMethod Jump to:ThisPublicPutnamQuail Valley, California:tracer

  4. AN INTERCOMPARISON OF TRACER GASES USED FOR AIR INFILTRATION MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, D.T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Janssen, A.N. Pearman, Honeywell, Inc. , Minneapolis, MN,gas. TABLE Z Research Group Honeywell Princeton LBL LBL LBL

  5. Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples...

  6. Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. The objective of this project is to develop a matrix of the smart geothermal tracer and its interpretation tools.

  7. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs Chao Shan and Karstenof chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is stronglyin a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows

  8. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have adopted an integrated approach whereby we combine data from multiple sources to minimize the uncertainty and non-uniqueness in the interpreted results. For partitioning interwell tracer tests, these are primarily the distribution of reservoir permeability and oil saturation distribution. A novel approach to multiscale data integration using Markov Random Fields (MRF) has been developed to integrate static data sources from the reservoir such as core, well log and 3-D seismic data. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, the behavior of partitioning tracer tests in fractured reservoirs is investigated using a dual-porosity finite-difference model.

  9. Steam tracer experiment at the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsness, C.B.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Water plays an important role in in-situ coal gasification. To better understand this role, we conducted a steam tracer test during the later stages of the Hoe Creek No. 3 underground coal gasification field test. Deuterium oxide was used as the tracer. This report describes the tracer test and the analysis of the data obtained. The analysis indicates that at Hoe Creek the injected steam interacts with a large volume of water as it passes through the underground system. We hypothesize that this water is undergoing continual reflux in the underground system, resulting in a tracer response typical of a well-stirred tank.

  10. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  11. Inversion of Hydrological Tracer Test Data Using TomogrpahicConstraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Niklas; Finsterle, Stefan; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A reasonable description of the hydraulic conductivity structure is a prerequisite for modeling contaminant transport. However, formulations of hydrogeological inverse problems utilizing hydrogeological data only often fail to reliably resolve features at a resolution required for accurately predicting transport. Incorporation of geophysical data into the inverse problem offers the potential to increase this resolution. In this study, we invert hydrological tracer test data using the shape and relative magnitude variations derived from geophysical tomographic data to regionalize a hydrogeological inverse problem in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivity structure. Our approach does not require that the petrophysical relationship be known a-priori, but that it is linear and stationary within each geophysical anomaly. However, tomograms are imperfect models of geophysical properties and geophysical properties are not necessarily strongly linked to hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, we focus on synthetic examples where the correlation between radar velocity and hydraulic conductivity, as well as the geophysical data acquisition errors, are varied in order to assess what aspects of the hydraulic conductivity structure we can expect to resolve under different conditions. The results indicate that regularization of the tracer inversion procedure using geophysical data improves estimates of hydraulic conductivity. We find that even under conditions of corrupted geophysical data, we can accurately estimate the effective hydraulic conductivity and areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity. However, given imperfect geophysical data, our results suggest that we cannot expect accurate estimates of the variability of the hydraulic conductivity structure.

  12. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Study; Progress report, January 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.J.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies continue on the use of organic acids as tracers in hydrology studies of Yucca Mountain. Work performed during this time period has been concentrated in three main areas: the familiarization with, and optimization of, the LC-MS hardware and data system; the initial development of soil column test procedures, which are used for evaluation of both the columns themselves and the tracer compounds; and continuation of the batch sorption and degradation studies for the potential tracers. All three of these tasks will continue, as the addition of new tracer compounds, analytical information, and equipment will necessitate further evaluation of existing methods and procedures. Also included in this report is the final report on an information system.

  13. SENSITIVITY OF A REACTIVE-TRACER BASED ESTIMATE OF THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN AN EGS TO PROPERTIES OF THE RESERVOIR AND TRACER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Laurence C. Hull; Earl D. Mattson

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions. Our analyses suggest that modifications to that method, where practical, could provide much greater sensitivity. In particular, if the reaction can be quenched before maximum temperature is reached, the sensitivity is greatly enhanced. Push-pull tracer tests conducted at the injection well demonstrate similar advantages. Other alternatives, such as combinations of tracers, and tracers with parallel or chain decay behavior may offer similar advantages.

  14. A coupled isotope tracer method to characterize input water to lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    of input waters after accounting for the effects of secondary evaporative isotopic enrichment. As shownA coupled isotope tracer method to characterize input water to lakes Yi Yi a,*, Bronwyn E. Brock in revised form 7 November 2007; accepted 9 November 2007 KEYWORDS Water isotope tracers; Isotope hydrology

  15. ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 25, NO. 5, 2008, 805814 Diagnosing Ocean Tracer Transport from Sellafield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    2 Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, Bergen, Norway 3 Nansen-Zhu International Research Centre of biogeochemi- cal tracers influencing the oceanic carbon cycle are just two examples of where such information tracer concentration from idealized pulse releases from the British nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

  16. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  17. Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heat as a tracer to determine streambed water exchanges Jim Constantz1 Received 13 March 2008 of heat as a tracer of shallow groundwater movement and describes current temperature-based approaches relying on traditional observation wells, and remote sensing and other large-scale advanced temperature

  18. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: identify tracers with sorption properties favorable for EGS applications; apply reversibly sorbing tracers to determine the fracture-matrix interface area available for heat transfer; and; explore the feasibility of obtaining fracture-matrix interface area from non-isothermal; single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests.

  19. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  20. TRACER ANALYSIS IN A FRACTURED GEO'MERMAL RESERVOIR: FIELD RESULTS FROM WAIRAKEI, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    TRACER ANALYSIS IN A FRACTURED GEO'MERMAL RESERVOIR: FIELD RESULTS FROM WAIRAKEI, NEW ZEALAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122 -V- #12;Chapter I INTRODUCTION Interwell tracers have been used extensively in oil reservoirs to detect reservoir heterogeneities. High permeability production zones can channel a disproportionate

  1. Numerical study of the diapycnal flow through a tidal front with passive tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Changming "Charles"

    . This qualitatively agrees with a recent field experiment using a dye tracer on Georges Bank. Additional experiments are performed to investigate the sensitivity of the tracer dispersion to the tidal phase and the location, the previous studies indicated Eulerian cross-front mean circu- lation maybe is in a multiple-cell structure

  2. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER, and Architectural Engineering 2006 #12;ii This thesis entitled: Sources and Effects of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado

  3. INTERPRETATION OF TRACER SURFACE DIFFUSION EXPERIMENTS ON UO2 ROLES OF GAS AND SOLID TRANSPORT PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, D.R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrogen. This extrapolation was made using Eq [2) and the values of the trans- port properties (hydrogen in the MK experiment means that the UO is probably not stoichiometric. That this transport property

  4. The Critical Density and the Effective Excitation Density of Commonly Observed Molecular Dense Gas Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Yancy L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optically thin critical densities and the effective excitation densities to produce a 1 K km/s (or 0.818 Jy km/s $(\\frac{\

  5. L\\'evy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaid, Irwin M; Yeomans, Julia M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer'...

  6. Curvature Induced Activation of a Passive Tracer in an Active Bath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. A. Mallory; C. Valeriani; A. Cacciuto

    2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We use numerical simulations to study the motion of a large asymmetric tracer immersed in a low density suspension of self-propelled nanoparticles in two dimensions. Specifically, we analyze how the curvature of the tracer affects its translational and rotational motion in an active environment. We find that even very small amounts of curvature are sufficient for the active bath to impart directed motion to the tracer which results in its effective activation. We propose simple scaling arguments to characterize this induced activity in terms of the curvature of the tracer and the strength of the self-propelling force. Our results suggest new ways of controlling the transport properties of passive tracers in an active medium by carefully tailoring their geometry.

  7. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mack, J H; Flowers, D L; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the use of alternative fuels and combustion regimes is increasing as the price of petroleum climbs. The inherently higher efficiency of Diesel engines has led to increased adoption of Diesels in Europe, capturing approximately 40% of the new passenger car market. Unfortunately, lower CO{sub 2} emissions are countered with higher nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions, and higher noise. Noise and PM have traditionally been the obstacles toward consumer acceptance of Diesel passenger cars in North America, while NOx (a key component in photochemical smog) has been more of an engineering challenge. Diesels are lean burning (combustion with excess oxygen) and reducing NOx to N2 in an oxygen rich environment is difficult. Adding oxygenated compounds to the fuel helps reduce PM emissions, but relying on fuel alone to reduce PM is unrealistic. Keeping peak combustion temperature below 1700 K prevents NOx formation. Altering the combustion regime to burn at temperatures below the NOx threshold and accept a wide variety of fuels seems like a promising alternative for future engines. Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a possible solution. Fuel and air are well mixed prior to intake into a cylinder (homogeneous charge) and ignition occurs by compression of the fuel-air mixture by the piston. HCCI is rapid and relatively cool, producing little NOx and PM. Unfortunately, it is hard to control since HCCI is initiated by temperature and pressure instead of a spark or direct fuel injection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use intrinsically labeled biofuels as tracers of HCCI combustion. Data from tracer experiments are used to validate combustion modeling.

  8. A new chemodynamical tool to study the evolution of galaxies in the local Universe: a quick and accurate numerical technique to compute gas cooling rate for any chemical composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Champavert; Hervé Wozniak

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a quick and accurate numerical tool to compute gas cooling whichever its chemical composition.

  9. Comparison of SF6 and Fluorescein as Tracers for Measuring Transport Processes in a Large Tidal River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    Comparison of SF6 and Fluorescein as Tracers for Measuring Transport Processes in a Large Tidal SF6 as tracers of advection and longitudinal dispersion from a dual tracer release experiment of SF6 were injected into the Hudson River at an averaged depth of 9.5 m, 1 m above the bottom, near

  10. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters, Global Biogeochem

  11. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  12. NumericalS imulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NumericalS imulation of Cooling Gas Injection Using Adaptive Multiscale Techniques Wolfgang Dahmen words:fi nite volume method,fi lm cooling, cooling gas injection, multiscale techniques, grid adaptation#ciency is investigated. Keywords: Finite Volum Method,Film cooling, Cooling gas injection, Multiscale techniques, Grid

  13. New Multi-functional Diagnostic Method with Tracer-encapsulated Pellet Injection on LHD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudo, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Graduate Univ. Advanced Studies, Hayama 240-0193 (Japan); Tamura, N.; Sato, K.; Matsubara, A.; Inagaki, S.; Goncharov, P.R.; Ozaki, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kalinina, D.V. [Graduate Univ. Advanced Studies, Hayama 240-0193 (Japan); Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M. [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tracer-Encapsulated Solid PELlet (TESPEL) injection is one of the simplest new ideas to study the impurity confinement and other plasma properties. The special features of this method are: (a) local deposition inside the plasma, (b) precise knowledge of the deposited tracer amount, (c) wide selection of tracer materials. The achievements of the multi-functional diagnostics using TESPEL injection on LHD are to measure: (a) impurity transport properties, (b) heat diffusivity, (c) particle flow features in and out of the magnetic island, and (d) fast neutral particle fluxes.

  14. Tracer diffusion at low temperature in kinetically constrained models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oriane Blondel

    2015-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the motion of a tracer in an environment given by a kinetically constrained spin model (KCSM) at equilibrium. We check convergence of its trajectory properly rescaled to a Brownian motion and positivity of the diffusion coefficient $D$ as soon as the spectral gap of the environment is positive (which coincides with the ergodicity region under general conditions). Then we study the asymptotic behavior of $D$ when the density $1-q$ of the environment goes to $1$ in two classes of KCSM. For noncooperative models, the diffusion coefficient $D$ scales like a power of $q$, with an exponent that we compute explicitly. In the case of the Fredrickson-Andersen one-spin facilitated model, this proves a prediction made in Jung, Garrahan and Chandler [Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 061205]. For the East model, instead we prove that the diffusion coefficient is comparable to the spectral gap, which goes to zero faster than any power of $q$. This result contradicts the prediction of physicists (Jung, Garrahan and Chandler [Phys. Rev. E 69 (2004) 061205; J. Chem. Phys. 123 (2005) 084509]), based on numerical simulations, that suggested $D\\sim \\operatorname {gap}^{\\xi}$ with $\\xi<1$.

  15. GASEOUS CO ABUNDANCE-AN EVOLUTIONARY TRACER FOR MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Tie; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei, E-mail: liutiepku@gmail.com, E-mail: ywu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Planck cold clumps are among the most promising objects to investigate the initial conditions of the evolution of molecular clouds. In this work, by combing the dust emission data from the survey of the Planck satellite with the molecular data of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O (1-0) lines from observations with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope, we investigate the CO abundance, CO depletion, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor of 674 clumps in the early cold cores sample. The median and mean values of the CO abundance are 0.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, respectively. The mean and median of CO depletion factor are 1.7 and 0.9, respectively. The median value of X{sub CO-to-H{sub 2}} for the whole sample is 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -2} K{sup -1} km{sup -1} s. The CO abundance, CO depletion factor, and CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor are strongly (anti-)correlated to other physical parameters (e.g., dust temperature, dust emissivity spectral index, column density, volume density, and luminosity-to-mass ratio). To conclude, the gaseous CO abundance can be used as an evolutionary tracer for molecular clouds.

  16. Methane hydrate gas production: evaluating and exploiting the solid gas resource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuire, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate gas could be a tremendous energy resource if methods can be devised to produce this gas economically. This paper examines two methods of producing gas from hydrate deposits by the injection of hot water or steam, and also examines the feasibility of hydraulic fracturing and pressure reduction as a hydrate gas production technique. A hydraulic fracturing technique suitable for hydrate reservoirs and a system for coring hydrate reservoirs are also described.

  17. Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilicaslan, Ufuk

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for better management...

  18. Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability 2009 Accepted 6 April 2009 Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment

  19. Radium isotopes as tracers of coastal circulation pathways in the Mid-Atlantic Blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Linda L

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pathways of exchange between the shelf and slope in the Mid-Atlantic Bight were investigated using a combination of radiochemical tracer and hydrographic measurements. The motivation was to provide evidence of transport ...

  20. USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE...

  1. Inversion of tracer test data using tomographic constraints Niklas Linde,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Inversion of tracer test data using tomographic constraints Niklas Linde,1,2 Stefan Finsterle,3 be limited to field sites where this condition is partially or fully satisfied. Citation: Linde, N., S

  2. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

  3. CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    * CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA A Report Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering of Stanford University in Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of Science

  4. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies of living systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luong, E.

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation focuses on the development of methods for stable isotope metabolic tracer studies in living systems using inductively coupled plasma single and dual quadrupole mass spectrometers. Sub-nanogram per gram levels of molybdenum (Mo) from human blood plasma are isolated by the use of anion exchange alumina microcolumns. Million-fold more concentrated spectral and matrix interferences such as sodium, chloride, sulfate, phosphate, etc. in the blood constituents are removed from the analyte. The recovery of Mo from the alumina column is 82 {+-} 5% (n = 5). Isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICP-MS) is utilized for the quantitative ultra-trace concentration determination of Mo in bovine and human blood samples. The average Mo concentration in reference bovine serum determined by this method is 10.2 {+-} 0.4 ng/g, while the certified value is 11.5 {+-} 1.1 ng/g (95% confidence interval). The Mo concentration of one pool of human blood plasma from two healthy male donors is 0.5 {+-} 0.1 ng/g. The inductively coupled plasma twin quadrupole mass spectrometer (ICP-TQMS) is used to measure the carbon isotope ratio from non-volatile organic compounds and bio-organic molecules to assess the ability as an alternative analytical method to gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-combustion-IRMS). Trytophan, myoglobin, and {beta}-cyclodextrin are chosen for the study, initial observation of spectral interference of {sup 13}C{sup +} with {sup 12}C{sup 1}H{sup +} comes from the incomplete dissociation of myoglobin and/or {beta}-cyclodextrin.

  5. Glass mixing theory and tracer study results from the SF-10 run

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, B.W.; Routt, K.R.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general, partial differential equation governing glass mixing in the Slurry Fed Ceramic Melter (SFCM) was derived and a solution obtained based upon certain simplifying assumptions. Tracer studies were then conducted in the SFCM during the SF-10 run to test the theory and characterize glass mixing in this melter. Analysis of the tracer data shows that glass mixing in the SFCM can be explained by use of a model of two, well-mixed tanks in series.

  6. A Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehne, Bernd

    . Sc = /D denotes the Schmidt number, the ratio of kinematic viscosity of water and the tracersA Laboratory Study of the Schmidt Number Dependency of Air-Water Gas Transfer Kerstin Richter1 of exchange hap- pens with an exponent of 1/2 and links this fraction with a physical property of the wave

  7. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  8. Lévy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin M. Zaid; Jörn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

  9. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

  10. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

  11. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

  12. Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water-Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Janik & Goff, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Water-Gas...

  13. Isotopic mass-dependence of noble gas diffusion coefficients inwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Noble gas isotopes are used extensively as tracers inhydrologic and paleoclimatic studies. These applications requireknowledge of the isotopic mass (m) dependence of noble gas diffusioncoefficients in water (D), which has not been measured but is estimatedusing experimental D-values for the major isotopes along with an untestedrelationship from kinetic theory, D prop m-0.5. We applied moleculardynamics methods to determine the mass dependence of D for four noblegases at 298 K, finding that D prop m-beta with beta<0.2, whichrefutes the kinetic theory model underlying all currentapplications.

  14. Recover Act: Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Matthew

    2014-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant pumping tests in identifying a poorly connected well. As a result, we were able to predict which well pairs would demonstrate channelized flow. The focus of the tracer investigation was multi-ionic tests. In multi-ionic tests several ionic tracers are injected simultaneously and the detected in a nearby pumping well. The time history of concentration, or breakthrough curve, will show a separation of the tracers. Anionic tracers travel with the water but cationic tracer undergo chemical exchange with cations on the surface of the rock. The degree of separation is indicative of the surface area exposed to the tracer. Consequently, flow channelization will tend to decrease the separation in the breakthrough. Estimation of specific surface area (the ration of fracture surface area to formation volume) is performed through matching the breakthrough curve with a transport model. We found that the tracer estimates of surface area were confirmed the prediction of channelized flow between well pairs produced by the periodic hydraulic tests. To confirm that the hydraulic and tracer tests were correctly predicting channelize flow, we imaged the flow field using surface GPR. Saline water was injected between the well pairs which produced a change in the amplitude and phase of the reflected radar signal. A map was produced of the migration of saline tracer from these tests which qualitatively confirmed the flow channelization predicted by the hydraulic and tracer tests. The resolution of the GPR was insufficient to quantitatively estimate swept surface area, however. Surface GPR is not applicable in typical geothermal fields because the penetration depths do not exceed 10’s of meters. Nevertheless, the method of using of phase to measure electrical conductivity and the assessment of antennae polarization represent a significant advancement in the field of surface GPR. The effect of flow character on fracture / rock thermal exchange was evaluated using heated water as a tracer. Water elevated 30 degrees C above the formation water was circulated between two wells pairs. One

  15. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  16. Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

  17. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria north east field in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karingithi, C.W. [Kenya Power Company Ltd., Naivasha (Kenya)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer and injection tests were performed in the Olkaria North East Field with the objective to reduce uncertainty in the engineering design and to determine the suitability of well OW-704 as a re-injection well for the waste brine from the steam field during production. An organic dye (sodium fluorescein) was injected into well OW-704 as a slug. The tracer returns were observed in well OW-M2 which is 580 m deep, 620 m from well OW-704 and well OW-716 which is 900 m from well OW-704. The other wells on discharge, OW-714, and OW-725 did not show any tracer returns. However, other chemical constituents suggested., that well OW-716 experienced a chemical breakthrough earlier than OW-M2. Tracer return velocities of 0.31 m/hr and 1.3 m/hr were observed. Results of the tracer and injection tests indicate that OW-704 may be used as a re-injection well provided a close monitoring program is put in place.

  18. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  19. A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

  20. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  1. Single-well tracer methods for hydrogeologic evaluation of target aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, S.H.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing an efficient well field for an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project requires measuring local groundwater flow parameters as well as estimating horizontal and vertical inhomogeneity. Effective porosity determines the volume of aquifer needed to store a given volume of heated or chilled water. Ground-water flow velocity governs the migration of the thermal plume, and dispersion and heat exchange along the flow path reduces the thermal intensity of the recovered plume. Stratigraphic variations in the aquifer will affect plume dispersion, may bias the apparent rate of migration of the plume, and can prevent efficient hydraulic communication between wells. Single-well tracer methods using a conservative flow tracer such as bromide, along with pumping tests and water-level measurements, provide a rapid and cost-effective means for estimating flow parameters. A drift-and-pumpback tracer test yields effective porosity and flow velocity. Point-dilution tracer testing, using new instrumentation for downhole tracer measurement and a new method for calibrating the point-dilution test itself, yields depth-discrete hydraulic conductivity as it is affected by stratigraphy, and can be used to estimate well transmissivity. Experience in conducting both drift-and-pumpback and point-dilution tests at three different test sites has yielded important information that highlights both the power and the limitations of the single-well tracer methods. These sites are the University of Alabama Student Recreation Center (UASRC) ATES well field and the VA Medical Center (VA) ATES well field, both located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, and the Hanford bioremediation test site north of Richland, Washington.

  2. An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have investigated the relative merits of the traditional history matching ('amplitude inversion') and a novel travel time inversion in terms of robustness of the method and convergence behavior of the solution. We show that the traditional amplitude inversion is orders of magnitude more non-linear and the solution here is likely to get trapped in local minimum, leading to inadequate history match. The proposed travel time inversion is shown to be extremely efficient and robust for practical field applications. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

  3. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, H.; Fallas, T.T.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gas-liquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use. 3 figs.

  4. Transient Water Age Distributions in Environmental Flow Systems: The Time-Marching Laplace Transform Solution Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental fluid circulations are very often characterized by analyzing the fate and behavior of natural and anthropogenic tracers. Among these tracers, age is taken as an ideal tracer which can yield interesting diagnoses, as for example the characterization of the mixing and renewal of water masses, of the fate and mixing of contaminants, or the calibration of hydro-dispersive parameters used by numerical models. Such diagnoses are of great interest in atmospheric and ocean circulation sciences, as well in surface and subsurface hydrology. The temporal evolution of groundwater age and its frequency distributions can display important changes as flow regimes vary due to natural change in climate and hydrologic conditions and/or human induced pressures on the resource to satisfy the water demand. Steady-state age frequency distributions can be modelled using standard numerical techniques, since the general balance equation describing age transport under steady-state flow conditions is exactly equivalent to...

  5. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  6. Gas-phase electron diffraction studies of unstable molecules 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble-Eddy, Robert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) is the only viable technique for the accurate structural study of gas-phase molecules that contain more than ~10 atoms. Recent advances in Edinburgh have made it possible to study ...

  7. Jeffrey Kortright | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Kortright group is developing novel soft x-ray based techniques for probing gas adsorption in MOFs. EFRC publications: Drisdell, Walter S.; and Kortright, Jeffrey B Gas cell...

  8. Direct estimation of gas reserves using production data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buba, Ibrahim Muhammad

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of a semi-analytical technique that can be used to estimate the gas-in-place for volumetric gas reservoirs. This new methodology utilizes plotting functions, plots, extrapolations, ...

  9. A CFD study of gas-solid jet in a CFB riser flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Tingwen; Guenther, Chris

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations of a gas–solid jet in a high-density riser flow were conducted. The impact of gas–solid injection on the riser flow hydrodynamics was investigated with respect to voidage, tracer mass fractions, and solids velocity distribution. The behaviors of a gas–solid jet in the riser crossflow were studied through the unsteady numerical simulations. Substantial separation of the jetting gas and solids in the riser crossflow was observed. Mixing of the injected gas and solids with the riser flow was investigated and backmixing of gas and solids was evaluated. In the current numerical study, both the overall hydrodynamics of riser flow and the characteristics of gas–solid jet were reasonably predicted compared with the experimental measurements made at NETL.

  10. Correction to ``Stratospheric CO2 isotopic anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations in the Arctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, Becky

    Correction to ``Stratospheric CO2 isotopic anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations anomalies and SF6 and CFC tracer concentrations in the Arctic polar vortex'' [Alexander et al., 2001 of the approx- imate mean SF6 ages versus Á17 O (diamonds) and d18 O (circles). References Alexander, B., M. K

  11. Ventilation of the deep ocean constrained with tracer observations and implications for radiocarbon estimates of ideal mean age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    Ventilation of the deep ocean constrained with tracer observations and implications for radiocarbon: ocean ventilation tracers ideal mean age radiocarbon age Green function inverse modeling Ocean ventilation is the process that transports water and climatically important trace gases such as carbon dioxide

  12. Characterizing the Hydrology of Shallow Floodplain Lakes in the Slave River Delta, NWT, Canada, Using Water Isotope Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Thomas W.D.

    , all delta lakes underwent heavy-isotope enrichment due to evaporation, although lakes flooded, Using Water Isotope Tracers Bronwyn E. Brock*{ Brent B. Wolfe*{ and Thomas W. D. Edwards* *Department using water isotope tracers and total suspended sediment (TSS) analyses. A suite of 41 lakes from three

  13. GeneTracer: Gene Sequence Analysis of Disease Mutations VAST 2010 Mini Challenge 3 Award: Excellent Process Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stasko, John T.

    GeneTracer: Gene Sequence Analysis of Disease Mutations VAST 2010 Mini Challenge 3 Award: ExcellentTracer, developed for the VAST 2010 genetic sequence mini challenge, visualizes gene sequences of cur- rent outbreaks and native sequences along with disease character- istics. We successfully used Gene

  14. Optical on line techniques for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doizi, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM (France); Pailloux, A.; Maury, C.; Sirven, J. B.; Dauvois, V.; Roujou, J. L.; Rosset, C. D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC (France); Hartmann, J. M. [CNRS., UMR 7583, LISA, Creteil (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical on line techniques enable non intrusive physical measurements in harsh environments (high temperature, high pressure, radioactivity, ...). Optical absorption spectrometries such as UV-Visible, FTIR, CRDS have been successfully used to study gas phase speciation in different nuclear applications. LIBS which relies on laser matter interactions is a on line optical technique for solids and liquids elementary analysis. (authors)

  15. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

  16. Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

  17. Assessment of the detection abilities of monitoring networks for passive tracers at local and regional scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallet, Vivien

    -field studies involve measurement sensors placed within 30 km of nuclear power plants, whether at fixed to power plant locations. They have been carried out at several spatial scales, from local to global: nearAssessment of the detection abilities of monitoring networks for passive tracers at local

  18. Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas] #12;Velocity autocorrelation: Controlled by inertia 0.1 1 Dispersion: inertial at short time particles spend much more time at rest than in motion. Stochastic modeling approach: Direct solution of f

  19. 6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC STRUCTURE A Dissertation Jagadheep Dhanasekara Pandian ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS transition of methanol is the strongest of methanol masers, and is the second strongest maser transition ever

  20. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum of propane over ZrO2-supported MoOx catalysts. Competitive reactions of C3H6 and CH3 13 CH2CH3 showed combustion of propene, or by direct combustion of propane. A mixture of C3H8 and C3D8 undergoes oxidative

  1. Tracer transport in the presence of steady zonal jets in a forced and viscous barotropic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracers released into a barotropic fluid which was not subject to the beta-effect were seen to disperse according to the classical laws given by G.I. Taylor in 1921. In the short-time limit, the average total displacement was proportional...

  2. TRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    that catchment or even slope scale simulation using parameters of the Darcy-Buckingham-Richards equation, the validity of the Richards equation (or the Darcy- Buckingham equation in its steady-state form) at slopeTRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST, SINGAPORE M

  3. TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems Zhuo Liu1 , Fei of accurately evaluating energy-efficient storage systems and objectively comparing a wide range of energy RAID5 enterprise disk array. Our experiments demonstrate that energy-efficient mass storage systems can

  4. Fracture Model, Ground Displacements and Tracer Observations: Fruitland Coals, San Juan Basin, New Mexico,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Thomas H.

    that the coal reservoirs consist of six separate coal beds rather than three. Perfluorocarbon tracer monitoring the site consist of two coal beds, each separated by a shale parting. This observation indicates will improve our understanding of Fruitland coal reservoirs; help develop more effective strategies to enhance

  5. Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, P. Buford

    Globally synchronous ice core volcanic tracers and abrupt cooling during the last glacial period R ash layers determined by remote optical borehole logging and core assays. We find that the Antarctic. These globally coincident volcanics were associated with abrupt cooling, often simultaneous with onsets or sudden

  6. ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

  7. Small-scale mixing, large-scale advection and stratospheric tracer distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanneste, Jacques

    , United Kingdom. Email: J.Vanneste@ed.ac.uk #12;The vertical mixing of tracers in the stratosphere distributions which are demonstrated using numerical simulations based on observed stratospheric winds. Specif in the turbulent-energy input, three-dimensional turbulence is confined within patches that are lo- calized

  8. Passive gas separator and accumulator device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Choe, Hwang (Saratoga, CA); Fallas, Thomas T. (Berkeley, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separation device employing a gas separation filter and swirler vanes for separating gas from a gasliquid mixture is provided. The cylindrical filter utilizes the principle that surface tension in the pores of the filter prevents gas bubbles from passing through. As a result, the gas collects in the interior region of the filter and coalesces to form larger bubbles in the center of the device. The device is particularly suited for use in microgravity conditions since the swirlers induce a centrifugal force which causes liquid to move from the inner region of the filter, pass the pores, and flow through the outlet of the device while the entrained gas is trapped by the filter. The device includes a cylindrical gas storage screen which is enclosed by the cylindrical gas separation filter. The screen has pores that are larger than those of the filters. The screen prevents larger bubbles that have been formed from reaching and interfering with the pores of the gas separation filter. The device is initially filled with a gas other than that which is to be separated. This technique results in separation of the gas even before gas bubbles are present in the mixture. Initially filling the device with the dissimilar gas and preventing the gas from escaping before operation can be accomplished by sealing the dissimilar gas in the inner region of the separation device with a ruptured disc which can be ruptured when the device is activated for use.

  9. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

  10. Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

    2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

  11. Isotopic tracers of gold deposition in Paleozoic limestones, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, Z.E.; Widmann, B.L.; Marshall, B.D.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Futa, K.; Mahan, S.A.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotopic analyses of barren and mineralized Paleozoic carbonate rocks show that hydrothermal fluids added radiogenic strontium ({sup 87}Sr) to the mineralized zones. At Bare Mountain, samples collected from mineralized areas have {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values ranging from +3.0 to +23.0, whereas unmineralized carbonate rocks have {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of {minus}0.6 to +2.9. In other ranges, {delta}{sup 87}Sr, values of the unmineralized carbonate rocks are even lower and virtually indistinguishable from primary marine values. This correlation of elevated {delta}{sup 87}Sr{sub t} values with mineralized zones provides a useful technique for assessing the mineral potential of the Paleozoic basement beneath Yucca Mountain, and may find broader use in mineral exploration in the Basin and Range province as a whole.

  12. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  13. Laser and gas centrifuge enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinonen, Olli [Senior Fellow, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Principles of uranium isotope enrichment using various laser and gas centrifuge techniques are briefly discussed. Examples on production of high enriched uranium are given. Concerns regarding the possibility of using low end technologies to produce weapons grade uranium are explained. Based on current assessments commercial enrichment services are able to cover the global needs of enriched uranium in the foreseeable future.

  14. USING PERFLUOROCARBON TRACERS FOR VERIFICATION OF CAP AND COVER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) office has committed itself to an accelerated cleanup of its national facilities. The goal is to have much of the DOE legacy waste sites remediated by 2006. This includes closure of several sites (e.g., Rocky Flats and Fernald). With the increased focus on accelerated cleanup, there has been considerable concern about long-term stewardship issues in general, and verification and long-term monitoring (LTM) of caps and covers, in particular. Cap and cover systems (covers) are vital remedial options that will be extensively used in meeting these 2006 cleanup goals. Every buried waste site within the DOE complex will require some form of cover system. These covers are expected to last from 100 to 1000 years or more. The stakeholders can be expected to focus on system durability and sustained performance. DOE EM has set up a national committee of experts to develop a long-term capping (LTC) guidance document. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, desiccation, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. Very little is available in terms of long-term monitoring other than downstream groundwater or surface water monitoring. By its very nature, this can only indicate that failure of the cover system has already occurred and contaminants have been transported away from the site. This is unacceptable. Methods that indicate early cover failure (prior to contaminant release) or predict approaching cover failure are needed. The LTC committee has identified predictive monitoring technologies as a high priority need for DOE, both for new covers as well as existing covers. The same committee identified a Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) technology as one approach that may be capable of meeting the requirements for LTM. The Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD) at BNL developed a novel methodology for verifying and monitoring subsurface barriers (1,2). The technology uses perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) to determine flaws (e.g., holes or cracks) and high permeability areas in subsurface barriers. Gaseous tracers are injected on one side of the barrier and searched for on the opposite side of the barrier. The sampling grid, concentration, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) on the opposite side are used to determine the size and location of flaws and relative permeability of the barrier. In addition, there are multiple tracers available, which allows different tracers to be injected in different quadrants of the barrier. This yields additional information on transport phenomena of the barrier.

  15. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  16. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at various planes. Together, these two techniques can provide the needed local solids flow dynamic information for the same setup under identical operating conditions, and the data obtained can be used as a benchmark for development, and refinement of the appropriate riser models. For the above reasons these two techniques were implemented in this study on a fully developed section of the riser. To derive the global mixing information in the riser, accurate solids RTD is needed and was obtained by monitoring the entry and exit of a single radioactive tracer. Other global parameters such as Cycle Time Distribution (CTD), overall solids holdup in the riser, solids recycle percentage at the bottom section of the riser were evaluated from different solids travel time distributions. Besides, to measure accurately and in-situ the overall solids mass flux, a novel method was applied.

  17. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  18. Simultaneous Measurement of Tracer and Interdiffusion Coefficients: An Isotopic Phenomenological Diffusion Formalism for the Binary Alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a new development of the classic Onsager phenomenological formalism is derived using relations based on linear response theory. The development concerns the correct description of the fluxes of the atomic isotopes. The resulting expressions in the laboratory frame are surprisingly simple and consist of terms coming from the standard interdiffusion expressions and from Fick s first law where the tracer diffusion coefficient is involved thus providing a better understanding of the relationship between the two approaches - Fick s first law and the Onsager phenomenological formalism. From an experimental application perspective, the new development is applied to the binary alloy case. The formalism provides the means to obtain the interdiffusion coefficient and tracer diffusion coefficients simultaneously from analysis of the interdiffusion concentration profiles in a single experiment.

  19. Assessment of coal bed gas prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, T.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal bed gas is an often overlooked source of clean, methane-rich, H{sub 2}S-free natural gas. The economic development of coal bed gas requires a knowledge of coal gas reservoir characteristics and certain necessary departures from conventional evaluation, drilling, completion, and production practices. In many ways coal seam reservoirs are truly unconventional. Most coals sufficient rank have generated large volumes of gas that may be retained depth in varying amounts through adsorption. Coal gas production can take place only when the reservoir pressure is reduced sufficiently to allow the gas to desorb. Gas flow to the well bore takes place through a hierarchy of natural fractures, not the relatively impermeable coal matrix. Economic production is dependent upon critical factors intrinsic to the reservoir, including coal petrology, gas content, internal formation stratigraphy, fracture distribution, hydrogeology, in situ stress conditions, initial reservoir pressure and pressure regime, and the presence or absence of a {open_quote}free{close_quotes} gas saturation. Further, the coal bed reservoir is readily subject to formation damage through improper drilling, completion, or production techniques. This presentation will review the data types critical to the assessment of any coal seam gas prospect, suggest an outline method for screening such prospects, and point out some possible pitfalls to be considered in any coal bed gas development project.

  20. Hillslope Hydrological Processes in a Costa Rican Rainforest: Water Supply Partitioning Using Isotope Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DuMont, Andrea Lyn

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Blancas Hydroelectric Project, and for improved predictions in similar, ungauged watersheds (ICE 2002). Study Watershed The study watershed is located in San Juan de Peñas Blancas, east of the Cordillera de Tilarán mountain range backing up... peaks. These goals were accomplished by supplementing hydraulic and physical data already available at the site with use of isotope tracers. Methods Study Site The 2.2 ha watershed used in this research is located in Peñas Blancas, Costa Rica...

  1. Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INVERSION OF FIELD-SCALE PARTITIONING TRACER RESPONSE FOR CHARACTERIZING OIL SATURATION DISTRIBUTION: A STREAMLINE APPROACH A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... A Thesis by PAVEL ALEXANDROVICH ILIASSOV Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: c 4- Akhil Datta-Gupta (Chair of Committee...

  2. ELIXYS - a fully automated, three-reactor high-pressure radiosynthesizer for development and routine production of diverse PET tracers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cancer treatment with PET/CT: does it make a difference? Jfor decentralized production of PET tracers. In Positronprobes FMAU, FHBG, and FHPG as PET imaging agents for HSV1-

  3. Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment trap Scavenging North Pacific

  4. Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This objective of this project is to develop an innovative approach to estimate fracture surface area and spacing through interpretation of signals of natural chemical and isotopic tracers.

  5. Interpreting Energy and Tracer Spectra of Upper-Ocean Turbulence in the Submesoscale Range (1–200 km)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    Submesoscale (1–200 km) wavenumber spectra of kinetic and potential energy and tracer variance are obtained from in situ observations in the Gulf Stream region and in the eastern subtropical North Pacific. In the Gulf ...

  6. Field studies of streamflow generation using natural and injected tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genereux, D.; Hemond, H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Mulholland, P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate Rn{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of Rn{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach.

  7. Filtering a statistically exactly solvable test model for turbulent tracers from partial observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gershgorin, B., E-mail: borisg@cims.nyu.ed [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States); Majda, A.J. [Department of Mathematics and Center for Atmosphere and Ocean Science, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, NY 10012 (United States)

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A statistically exactly solvable model for passive tracers is introduced as a test model for the authors' Nonlinear Extended Kalman Filter (NEKF) as well as other filtering algorithms. The model involves a Gaussian velocity field and a passive tracer governed by the advection-diffusion equation with an imposed mean gradient. The model has direct relevance to engineering problems such as the spread of pollutants in the air or contaminants in the water as well as climate change problems concerning the transport of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide with strongly intermittent probability distributions consistent with the actual observations of the atmosphere. One of the attractive properties of the model is the existence of the exact statistical solution. In particular, this unique feature of the model provides an opportunity to design and test fast and efficient algorithms for real-time data assimilation based on rigorous mathematical theory for a turbulence model problem with many active spatiotemporal scales. Here, we extensively study the performance of the NEKF which uses the exact first and second order nonlinear statistics without any approximations due to linearization. The role of partial and sparse observations, the frequency of observations and the observation noise strength in recovering the true signal, its spectrum, and fat tail probability distribution are the central issues discussed here. The results of our study provide useful guidelines for filtering realistic turbulent systems with passive tracers through partial observations.

  8. Tracer measurements during long-term circulation of the Rosemanowes HDR geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwakwa, K.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circulation experiments have been in operation for over two years in the artificially stimulated hot dry rock (HDR) doublet of the Camborne School of Mines (CSM) research facility in Cornwall, England. During that period tracer tests have been run at intervals using inert and reactive compounds. Initially, the results of the inert tracer investigations showed that the active volume (indicated by modal and median volumes) of the circulating system was dormant. Then, after a period of sustained oscillation, notable increases in active volume were observed which depended on both the subsequent flow rate changes and circulation time. these dynamic changes had almost reached optimum values when a downhole pump was introduced in the production well. The drawdown in the production well caused a reduction of the modal volume, whilst the median volume remained almost the same. Since then, the active volume has remained unchanged and irresponsive to circulation time and flow rate. The results of the reactive tracer tests confirm increasing chemical reaction with increasing circulation time and correlate qualitatively with the opening of newer and hotter pathways within the reservoir. However, repeated production logs throughout the circulation have identified flow paths that have depleted thermally; a discrepancy that can be explained by the geometry of the system and the preferential downward reservoir growth.

  9. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  10. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  11. Mid-infrared gas sensing using a photonic bandgap fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The gas filling process of the air core is described, and qualitative methane concentrations measurements. Introduction Sensing of gas species and their concentrations is widely used for process control [1-proven technique requires a spectrometer and a sensing volume (gas cell) in which the light can interact

  12. Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines S Chakraborty, S Sarkar and computationally inexpensive technique of component-level fault detection in aircraft gas-turbine engines identification, gas turbine engines, language-theoretic analysis 1 INTRODUCTION The propulsion system of modern

  13. Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2: Buena Vista Oil and Gas Field, Kern County, California: Proved reserves, Developed and undeveloped, Sections 6 and 8: Development history and exploitation techniques, Effective July 1, 1987: (Final technical report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, K.B.

    1987-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The research for the initial Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 2 (NPR-2), study Task Assignment 010, showed the possibility of undeveloped proved reserves in the Shallow Pool on Government leases. Task Assignment 010C included a study to confirm or disprove the possibility. The six-section area, which is highlighted on Exhibit M-2, was chosen as the area for specific study of this subject. The Shallow Oil Zone, as depicted on Exhibit S-1, was the focal point of the study in the area. Competitive development of Government land with adjacent privately held land is an issue which has often been raised regarding NPR-2; however, it has never been formally addressed. Task Assignment 010C commissioned a study of the subject in the same six-section area designated for the study of proved undeveloped reserves. The producing formations in the Buena Vista Field of NPR-2 are very similar to the producing formations in the Elk Hills Field of NPR-1 to the north. It is possible that some of the successful development techniques utilized in NPR-2 by the various operators might enhance production efficiency at NPR-1. Task Assignment 010C included a detailed task of researching techniques used in NPR-2 for possible application in NPR-1. Because the detailed tasks of Task Assignment 010C are divergent in scope, a composite summary of the study's research is not included in this report. Each task's research is detailed in a separate Discussion section. Exhibits for these discussions are contained in an Exhibit section at the end of this volume. The appendices include: task assignment; DOE letters to lessees; Evans, Carey and Crozier letters to lessees; reports and studies from lessees; core analysis data; production data; geologic picks of formation tops; and annotated well logs. 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Centrifuge Techniques and Apparatus for Transport Experiments in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earl D. Mattson; Carl D. Paler; Robert W. Smith; Markus Flury

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes experimental approaches and apparatus that we have developed to study solute and colloid transport in porous media using Idaho National Laboratory's 2-m radius centrifuge. The ex-perimental techniques include water flux scaling with applied acceleration at the top of the column and sub-atmospheric pressure control at the column base, automation of data collection, and remote experimental con-trol over the internet. These apparatus include a constant displacement piston pump, a custom designed liquid fraction collector based on switching valve technology, and modified moisture monitoring equipment. Suc-cessful development of these experimental techniques and equipment is illustrated through application to transport of a conservative tracer through unsaturated sand column, with centrifugal acceleration up to 40 gs. Development of such experimental equipment that can withstand high accelerations enhances the centrifuge technique to conduct highly controlled unsaturated solute/colloid transport experiments and allows in-flight liquid sample collection of the effluent.

  15. Spirometer techniques for measuring molar composition in argon carbon dioxide mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chonde, Daniel Burje

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a new technique for measuring gas composition through the use of a spirometer. A spirometer is high precision pressure transducer which measures the speed of sound in a gas through the emission and ...

  16. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  17. Trip Report for the 2005 Sino-American SF6 Tracer Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, M M; Sullivan, T J; Keating II, G A; Leach, M J

    2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chinese Institute for Radiation Protection (CIRP) conducted an SF6 atmospheric tracer experiment in July 2005 in the vicinity of the Qinshan Nuclear Power Company complex on the coast of the East China Sea. The experiment was partially sponsored by the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, under the NA-23 International Emergency Management and Cooperation Program. NA-23 sent a delegation of five scientists to observe the experiment; four of the observers were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and one was from the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). CIRP's cooperation with the US-Japanese delegation was excellent, and the project was very successful from the international cooperation perspective. Although the experiment was modest in scope, it may provide one or more data sets that can be used for international dispersion model validation and intercomparison projects. Several areas for procedural improvements were noted by the US and Japanese observers, and a more concise measure of the experiment's scientific value will be available after CIRP completes and delivers the database of the experiment results by the end of the fiscal year. The consensus recommendation of the observers is that CIRP and DOE/NNSA NA-23 build on the experience and personal contacts gained during the experiment to plan and conduct an even more effective experiment in the future, perhaps as early as next year (2006). If the decision is made to conduct a follow-on experiment, we strongly recommend that the LLNL and JAERI representatives work cooperatively with CIRP throughout the entire planning phase of the experiment. As discussed in Section V, a 2006 China tracer experiment could serve as a springboard to a 2007 long-range international tracer experiment involving South Korea.

  18. Results of injection and tracer tests in Olkaria East Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambusso, Willis J.

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results of a six month Injection and Tracer test done in Olkaria East Geothermal Field The Injection tests show that commencement of injection prior to onset of large drawdown in the reservoir leads to greater sustenance of well production and can reduce well cycling which is a common feature of wells in Olkaria East Field. For cases where injection is started after some drawdown has occurred in the reservoir, injection while leading to improvement of well output can also lead to increase in well cycling which is a non desirable side effect. Tracer tests reveal slow rate of fluid migration (< 5 m/hr). However estimates of the cumulative tracer returns over the period of injection is at least 31% which is large and reveals the danger of late time thermal drawdown and possible loss of production. It is shown in the discussion that the two sets of results are consistent with a reservoir where high permeability occurs along contact surfaces which act as horizontal "fractures" while the formations between the "fractures" have low permeability. This type of fracture system will lead to channeled flow of injected fluid and therefore greater thermal depletion along the fractures while formations further from the fracture would still be at higher temperature. In an attempt to try and achieve a more uniform thermal depletion in the reservoir, it is proposed that continuous injection be done for short periods (~2 years) and this be followed by recovery periods of the nearly the same length of time before resumption of injection again.

  19. An automated tracer dispersal system for snow accumulation and saltation transport investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratzlaff, Kenneth L.; Braaten, David A.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and disperses at fixed time intervals an aero- sol of colored glass microspheres which gravitationally settle onto the snow surface to act as a time marker and tracer. Primary design considerations for this instrumentation are manageable size and weight of all... the outlet port. When assembled, the inlet and outlet port tubing extends 1.9 and 0.6 cm, respectively, into each chamber, and a high pressure seal is maintained using 8.9 cm diameter buna o-rings. III. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Each microsphere generator...

  20. Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012 Qualified Energy ConservationDepartmentQuantum Dot Tracers

  1. Nocturnal Low-Level Jet in a Mountain Basin Complex. Part II: Transport and Diffusion of Tracer under Stable Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, Lisa S.; Allwine, K Jerry; Banta, Robert M.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in nighttime transport and diffusion of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer in an urban complex-terrain setting (Salt Lake City, Utah) are investigated using surface and Dopplerlidar wind data, and large-scale surface pressure differences. Interacting scales of motion, as studied through the URBAN 2000 field program combined with the Vertical Transport and Mixing Experiment (VTMX), explained the differences in the tracer behavior during three separate Intensive Operating Periods (IOPs). With an emphasis on nighttime stable boundary layer conditions, these field programs were designed to study flow features responsible for the nighttime transport of airborne substances. This transport has implications for air quality, homeland security, and emergency response issues if the airborne substances are hazardous. The important flow features investigated included thermally forced canyon and slope flows and a low-level jet (LLJ) that dominated the basin-scale winds when the surface pressure gradient was weak. The presence of thermally forced flows contributed to the complexity and hindered the predictability of the tracer motion within and beyond the city. When organized thermally forced flows were present, the tracer tended to stay closer to the city for longer periods of time, even though a strong basin-scale LLJ did develop. When thermally forced flows were short-lived or absent, the basin-scale low-level jet dominated the wind field and enhanced the transport of tracer material out of the city.

  2. Synthesis and properties of green phosphor SrGa2S4:Eu2 emission displays by an environmentally clean technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    sulfide (H2S) or carbon disulfide (CS2) [6­10]. Since H2S is a very toxic gas and can cause serious technique to prepare calcium and europium thiogallates. In their method H2S was replaced by inert Ar gas of this technique is that the toxic H2S gas is replaced by Ar gas, eliminating environmental hazard

  3. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  4. Gas Companies Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Gas Companies program is a set of rules that encourage the development of the natural gas industry in Tennessee. They empower gas companies to lay piped and extend conductors through the...

  5. Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

  6. Gas Utilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

  7. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts *...

  8. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  9. Supervisory Natural Gas Analyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energys Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Oil and Natural Gas, Office of Oil and Gas Global Security and Supply (FE) is responsible for regulating natural gas imports and exports...

  10. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  11. REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES VIA ELECTRONIC WIRELINE AND TELEMETRY DATA TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George L. Scott III

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Finalized Phase 2-3 project work has field-proven two separate real-time reservoir processes that were co-developed via funding by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Both technologies are presently patented in the United States and select foreign markets; a downhole-commingled reservoir stimulation procedure and a real-time tracer-logged fracturing diagnostic system. Phase 2 and early Phase 3 project work included the research, development and well testing of a U.S. patented gamma tracer fracturing diagnostic system. This stimulation logging process was successfully field-demonstrated; real-time tracer measurement of fracture height while fracturing was accomplished and proven technically possible. However, after the initial well tests, there were several licensing issues that developed between service providers that restricted and minimized Realtimezone's (RTZ) ability to field-test the real-time gamma diagnostic system as was originally outlined for this project. Said restrictions were encountered after when one major provider agreed to license their gamma logging tools to another. Both of these companies previously promised contributory support toward Realtimezone's DE-FC26-99FT40129 project work, however, actual support was less than desired when newly-licensed wireline gamma logging tools from one company were converted by the other from electric wireline into slickline, batter-powered ''memory'' tools for post-stimulation logging purposes. Unfortunately, the converted post-fracture measurement memory tools have no applications in experimentally monitoring real-time movement of tracers in the reservoir concurrent with the fracturing treatment. RTZ subsequently worked with other tracer gamma-logging tool companies for basic gamma logging services, but with lessened results due to lack of multiple-isotope detection capability. In addition to real-time logging system development and well testing, final Phase 2 and Phase 3 project work included the development of a real-time reservoir stimulation procedure, which was successfully field-demonstrated and is presently patented in the U.S. and select foreign countries, including Venezuela, Brazil and Canada. Said patents are co-owned by RTZ and the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL). In 2002, Realtimezone and the NETL licensed said patents to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Additional licensing agreements (LA) are anticipated with other service industry companies in 2005. Final Phase 3 work has led to commercial applications of the real-time reservoir stimulation procedure. Four successfully downhole-mixed well tests were conducted with commercially expected production results. The most recent, fourth field test was a downhole-mixed stimulated well completed in June, 2004, which currently produces 11 BOPD with 90 barrels of water per day. Conducted Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-test work to date has resulted in the fine-tuning of a real-time enhanced stimulation system that will significantly increase future petroleum well recoveries in the United States and foreign petroleum fields, both onshore and offshore, and in vertical and horizontal wells.

  12. Gas jet disruption mitigation studies on Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollmann, E. M.

    High-pressure noble gas jet injection is a mitigation technique which potentially satisfies the requirements of fast response time and reliability, without degrading subsequent discharges. Previously reported gas jet ...

  13. Natural Gas Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue...

  14. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  15. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  16. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  17. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  18. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  19. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  20. erwations of ax~s~~~~tr~~ tracer particle orientation ng flow through a dilute fixed bed of fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaqfeh, Eric

    erwations of ax~s~~~~tr~~ tracer particle orientation ng flow through a dilute fixed bed of fibers.A dilute fixed bed of randomly placedfiberswasconstructedand glycerol/water suspensionsof either synthetic the tracer particle population at the end of the bed.The effectof Brownian motion on the hydrodynamically

  1. Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) 1 EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geochemical fluid characteristics and main achievements about tracer tests at Soultz Related with Work Package WP1a (Short term fluid circulation tests) and WP1c (Data acquisition) GEOCHEMICAL FLUID CHARACTERISTICS AND MAIN ACHIEVEMENTS ABOUT TRACER TESTS AT SOULTZ-SOUS-FORÃ?TS (FRANCE

  2. Indirect Gas Species Monitoring Using Tunable Diode Lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Saucedo, Victor M. (Willowbrook, IL)

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for indirect gas species monitoring based on measurements of selected gas species is disclosed. In situ absorption measurements of combustion species are used for process control and optimization. The gas species accessible by near or mid-IR techniques are limited to species that absorb in this spectral region. The absorption strength is selected to be strong enough for the required sensitivity and is selected to be isolated from neighboring absorption transitions. By coupling the gas measurement with a software sensor gas, species not accessible from the near or mid-IR absorption measurement can be predicted.

  3. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

  4. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  5. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  6. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  7. Use of a directional spray system design to control respirable dust and free gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodman, G.V.R.; Pollock, D.E. [NIOSH, Pittsburgh, PA (US). Pittsburgh Research Lab.

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory study assessed the impacts of water spray pressure, face ventilation quantity, and line brattice setback distance on respirable dust and SF6 tracer gas concentrations around a continuous mining machine using a sprayfan or directional spray system. Dust levels were measured at locations representing the mining machine operator and the standard and off standard shuttle car operators, and in the return airway. The results showed that changes in all three independent variables significantly affected log-transformed dust levels at the three operator sampling locations. Changes in setback distance impacted return airway dust levels. Laboratory testing also identified numerous variable interactions affecting dust levels. Tracer gas levels were measured on the left and right sides of the cutting drum and in the return. Untransformed gas levels around the cutting drum were significantly affected by changes in water pressure, face ventilation quantity, and setback distance. Return gas levels measured at the low curtain quantity were generally unaffected by changes in water pressure or curtain setback distance. At the high curtain quantity, return airway gas levels were affected by curtain setback distance. A field study was conducted to assess the impact of these parameters in an actual mining operation. These data showed that respirable dust levels may have been impacted by a change in water pressure and, to a lesser extent, by an increase in curtain setback distance. A series of tracer gas pulse tests were also conducted during this study. The results showed that effectiveness of the face ventilation was impacted by changes in curtain flow quantity and setback distance.

  8. NNSA implements nondestructive gas sampling technique for nuclear weapon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLoveReferenceAgendaSecurityAbout Us /Administrationcomponents

  9. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.J. [North American Weather Consultants, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  10. X-ray evaluation of coke-oven gas line deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swain, Y.T.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of coke-oven gas pipeline deposits has been facilitated through the use of an X-ray technique that provides quantitative data without disrupting plant operations.

  11. An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications) to quantify mixing and transport rates. SF6 was injected in the San Joaquin River upstream of the DWSC and mapped for 8 days. From the temporal change in SF6 distributions, the longitudinal dispersion coefficient

  12. Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy Frank Ludwig a , Hilke. Krishnan b,n a Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig

  13. Residual alkalinity as tracer to estimate the changes induced by forage cultivation in a non-saline irrigated sodic soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Residual alkalinity as tracer to estimate the changes induced by forage cultivation in a non, 31000 Toulouse, France Short title: Residual alkalinity and reclamation of sodic soil Summary Soil) the large amount of water supplied during cultivation that induced salt leaching. This is the main

  14. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

  15. A study of the distribution of surface active agent on sand by the use of radioactive tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Jack Edward

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    " with a radioiso- tope which would permit detection with the available equip- ment. The first radioactive tracer used to tag the Arquad 0-50 was C13 , which emits beta rays with energies of 1. 11, 6 2. 77 and 4. 81 Mev and has a half-life of' 38...

  16. Isolating the role of mesoscale eddies in mixing of a passive tracer in an eddy resolving model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Isolating the role of mesoscale eddies in mixing of a passive tracer in an eddy resolving model February 2008; published 16 May 2008. [1] This study examines the role of mesoscale eddies in distribution was replaced by a down-gradient diffusive parameterization. Our results demonstrate that advection by mesoscale

  17. Effects from influent boundary conditions on tracer migration and spatial variability features in intermediate-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Springer, E.P.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous unsaturated transport studies at Los Alamos dispersion coefficients were estimated to be higher close to the tracer source than at greater distances from the source. Injection of tracers through discrete influent outlets could have accounted for those higher dispersions. Also, a lack of conservation of mass of the tracers was observed and suspected to be due to spatial variability in transport. In the present study experiments were performed under uniform influent (ponded) conditions in which breakthrough of tracers was monitored at four locations at each of four depths. All other conditions were similar to those of the unsaturated transport experiments. A comparison of results from these two sets of experiments indicates differences in the parameter estimates. Estimates were made for the dispersion coefficient and the retardation factor by the one-dimensional steady flow computer code, CFITIM. Estimates were also made for mass and for velocity and the dispersion coefficient by the method of moments. The dispersion coefficient decreased with depth under discrete influent application and increased with depth under ponded influent application. Retardation was predicted better under the discrete influent application than under ponded influent application. Differences in breakthroughs and in estimated parameters among locations at the same depth were observed under ponded influent application. Those differences indicate that there is a lack of conservation of mass as well as significant spatial variability across the experimental domain. 14 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Submitted to Water Resources Research -May, 2006 Wong et al. (2006) Experiments with tracer stones -Equilibrium bedload transport Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - Equilibrium bedload transport Page 1 Experiments on vertical and streamwise dispersion of tracer stones under. Notwithstanding the proven success of this approach in modeling various morphodynamic scenarios, it does not contain the mechanics necessary to relate the bulk sediment transport rate to the displacement patterns

  19. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  20. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling and analysis partitioning interwell tracer tests in heterogeneous and fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

  1. TESEC 2001, Genova, Italy ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    TESEC 2001, Genova, Italy 1 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS TURBINE for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control and electrical power supply of the centre of ENEA CR Casaccia. The plant is based on a small gas turbine and has

  2. Gas Hydrates Research Programs: An International Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas hydrates sediments have the potential of providing a huge amount of natural gas for human use. Hydrate sediments have been found in many different regions where the required temperature and pressure conditions have been satisfied. Resource exploitation is related to the safe dissociation of the gas hydrate sediments. Basic depressurization techniques and thermal stimulation processes have been tried in pilot efforts to exploit the resource. There is a growing interest in gas hydrates all over the world due to the inevitable decline of oil and gas reserves. Many different countries are interested in this valuable resource. Unsurprisingly, developed countries with limited energy resources have taken the lead in worldwide gas hydrates research and exploration. The goal of this research project is to collect information in order to record and evaluate the relative strengths and goals of the different gas hydrates programs throughout the world. A thorough literature search about gas hydrates research activities has been conducted. The main participants in the research effort have been identified and summaries of their past and present activities reported. An evaluation section discussing present and future research activities has also been included.

  3. Development of a miniature, continuous measurement, stochastic perturbation gas chromatograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paster, Eli (Eli Travis)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas chromatography is one of the most widely used analytical chemistry techniques for separating and analyzing chemical compounds. Chromatographic methods are used to identify constituent species within a compound and ...

  4. Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Li

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques are being studied to convert natural gas to useful hydrocarbon liquids, which can be transported with far less cost. Direct pyrolysis of methane, followed by catalytic reaction, is a promising technology that can be commercialized in industry...

  5. The effect of condensate dropout on pressure transient analysis of a high-pressure gas condensate well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briens, Frederic Jean-Louis

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of drawdown or buildup tests, the formation permeability can be estimated. Although these conventional techniques have been successfully applied to 'dry' gas well analysis, they have not been extended to high-pressure gas condensate wells. The application... Condensate Reser voir Data. . 43 Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Reservoir Fluid Composition Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Well Production Test Data. Drawdown Test F1 of Elf Aquitaine Gas Condensate Mell 45 46 Drawdown Test F2 of Elf Aquitaine Gas...

  6. New fluorescence techniques for detecting noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, T.J.; Cannon, B.D.; Bushaw, B.A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new concepts for detecting noble gases are reported. Both techniques involve formation of the long-lived 1s/sup 5/ metastable state of noble gases. The first technique utilizes the photon-burst method and should be capable of isotopically selective detection at extremely small relative abundances. The second concept incorporates a shelving technique that stores noble gas atoms in the metastable state and then pumps these atoms to a higher excited state that radiatively cascades to the ground state, emitting vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) photons. A significant advantage is that AlGaAs diode lasers can be used for the techniques rather than continuous wave cw dye lasers. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new fields to answer our energy needs. Oil companies are keen to use novel techniques) techniques represent arguably the most significant technological advance in the field of oil exploration

  8. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  9. Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

  10. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

  11. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  12. Methods developed for detecting hazardous elements in produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, S.; Attari, A. (Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States))

    1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, Ill. has been developing sampling and analytical methods to detect in natural gas various trace constituents that may pose health, safety, or operational risks. The constituents of interest include paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons, H[sub 2]S, organic sulfur compounds, arsenic, mercury, radon, and others. Better sampling and analytical techniques for produced natural gas, similar to those developed by IGT for processed gas, will enhance producers and processors' abilities to monitor undesirable constituents in raw gas streams and improve their clean-up processes. The methods developed at IGT were modifications of air sampling and analytical methods that are commonly used for air toxic substances. These monitoring methods, when applied to natural gas, present special challenges because gas has a much more complex matrix than the air. Methods for the analysis of the following are discussed: arsenic, mercury, radon, sulfur compounds, hydrocarbons, and aromatics including BTEX and PAHs.

  13. Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

  14. COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

  15. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  16. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas have continued to make small contributions to transportation,transportation actions include electric power sector actions, eg coal to natural gas

  17. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  18. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  19. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  20. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  1. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  2. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  3. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  4. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  5. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  6. Measurement of HVAC system performance and local ventilation using passive perfluorocarbon tracer technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, R.N.; Goodrich, R.W.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 1993, two (2) perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) ventilation/indoor air quality assessment tests were performed in the Gleeson Hall building of the SUNY Farmingdale campus. The building was being modified, in part, as a result of significant occupant complaints of perceived poor air quality. The four story building had a basement first floor with air supplied normally by an HVAC system labelled as AC1. During this study, AC1 was inoperational and the basement interior rooms (walls) were primarily gone; the other three floors were still being used for classes. It is possible that a sense of poor air quality may have been perceived by first-floor occupants because they were working in the basement, but this issue could not be addressed. The second floor had two (2) lecture halls--Rm 202 (handled by AC4) and Rm 204 (handled by AC5); the balance of the second floor interior rooms and corridors was split between two other air handling systems, AC2 for the west side of the building and AC3 for the east side. The remaining 3rd and 4th floors were also split about evenly between AC2 and AC3. The perimeter rooms, equipped with wall units having their own outside air (OA) source plus centralized return air (RA) bypasses, were not included in this testing which was restricted to the basement floor (1st floor) and the four operating air handling systems, AC2 to AC5, during Test 1 and only AC2 to AC5 during Test 2. Two types of tests were performed using the full suite of 5 PFT types available. The first test was designed to measure the infiltration, exfiltration, and air exchange between the 5 AC zones above and the second test used the 5th tracer, which had been in the basement, as a distributed source throughout the four other zones to act as a surrogate pollutant source. This report provides final conclusions of both tests and suggestions regarding its usefulness in similar building ventilation and indoor air quality assessments.

  7. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  8. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  9. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  10. Natural Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    . Exploration and extraction of natural gas from the Marcellus shale is a potentially valuable economic stimulus for landowners. You might be wondering how the nation's economic situation is affecting the market for naturalNatural Gas Exploration: A Landowners Guide to Financial Management Natural Gas Exploration

  11. From gas to starburst and AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan H. Knapen

    2003-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Although it is clear that the circumnuclear regions of galaxies are intimately related to their host galaxies, most directly through their bars, it remains unclear what exactly initiates and fuels nuclear stellar (starburst) and non-stellar (AGN) activity. Deviations from axisymmetry in the gravitational potential of a galaxy, set up by a bar or an interaction, are known to cause gas inflow, and must at some scale and level be related to the fueling of AGN and starbursts. We review the observed relations between bars and interactions on the one, and nuclear activity of the Seyfert and starburst variety on the other hand, and conclude that none of these relations is particularly significant in a statistical sense, except in extreme and rare cases, such as ultra-luminous infrared galaxies. Nuclear rings of star formation, however, are not only related directly to non-axisymmetries in the potential, but also, it seems, to the occurrence of nuclear activity. Their role as potential tracers of the fueling process must be further explored.

  12. Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

  13. A New Multi-wavelength Solar Telescope: Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, C; Li, Z; Ding, M D; Dai, Y; Zhang, X Y; Mao, W J; Zhang, J P; Li, T; Liang, Y J; Lu, H T

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new multi-wavelength solar telescope, Optical and Near-infrared Solar Eruption Tracer (ONSET) of Nanjing University, was constructed, being fabricated by Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics & Technology and run in cooperation with Yunnan Astronomical Observatory. ONSET is able to observe the Sun in three wavelength windows: He {\\small I} 10830 \\AA, H$\\alpha$, and white-light at 3600 \\AA and 4250 \\AA, which are selected in order to obtain the dynamics in the corona, chromosphere, and the photosphere simultaneously. Full-disk or partial-disk solar images with a field of 10 arcmin at three wavelengths can be obtained nearly simultaneously. It is designed to trace solar eruptions with high spatial and temporal resolutions. This telescope was installed at a new solar observing site near Fuxian Lake in Yunnan Province, southwest China. The site is located at E102N24, with an altitude of 1722 m. The seeing is stable and of high quality. We give a brief description of the scientific objectives and the basi...

  14. Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers and the Dark Energy Equation of State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plionis, M; Basilakos, S; Bresolin, F; Terlevich, E; Melnick, J; Georgantopoulos, I

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & \\Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII-like starburst galaxies, as an alternative to SNIa, which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of ~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative rute to measure the contribution to the global dynamics, and the e...

  15. Constraining the Dark Energy Equation of State using Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plionis, M; Basilakos, S; Bressolin, F; Terlevich, E; Melnick, J; Chavez, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII galaxies which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, as an alternative to supernovae type Ia, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of z~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative route to measure the contribution to the global dynamics and the equ...

  16. Transport of tracers and pollutants from the Geysers Geothermal Resource Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orgill, M.M.; Lee, R.N.; Schreck, R.I.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An initial analysis of both surface and aerial SF/sub 6/ tracer data from the Geysers illustrates the importance that terrain, vertical wind shear, time-varying winds and stability have on the downwind distribution of cooling tower effluents during the daytime. Atmospheric stability and near surface winds above 3 m/s results in fumigation and surface impaction of a portion of cooling tower plumes on downwind surfaces and terrain. Vertical wind shear and possible gravity waves in upper-levels (approx. 1800 to 2000 m m.s.l), in addition, to terrain influences assist in distributing plumes horizontally and in the vertical at relative short (approx. 10 to 20 km) distances from the source. Small quantities of gaseous sulfur, primarily H/sub 2/S, are transported up to 20 km or more from the Geysers area. A variety of trace materials such as sulfate, copper, zinc, arsenic, bromine, lead, antimony, selenium and barium appear to be enriched over background levels and transported downwind from the Geysers Area at times.

  17. Simulations of greenhouse trace gases using the Los Alamos chemical tracer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Morz, E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Tie, X. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through three-dimensional global model studies on atmospheric composition and transport, we are improving our quantitative understanding of the origins and behavior of trace gases that affect Earth's radiative energy balance and climate. We will focus, in this paper, on the simulations of three individual trace gases including CFC-11, methyl chloroform, and methane. We first used our chemical tracer model to study the global distribution and trend of chemically inert CFC-11 observed by the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment. The results show that the model has the ability to reproduce the time-series of the observations. The purpose of this CFC-11 simulation was to test the transport of the model. We then used to model introduce methyl chloroform into the atmosphere according to the known emission patterns and iteratively varied OH fields so that the observed concentrations of methyl chloroform from the observations could be simulated well. The rationale behind this approach is that the reaction with OH is the dominant sink for metyl chloroform and the transport of the model has been tested in the previous CFC-11 study. Finally, using the inferred OH distributions, we conducted a steady-state simulation to reproduce the current methane distribution. The general agreement between the modeled an observed methane surface concentrations has laid a foundation for the simulation of the transient increase of methane.

  18. Simulations of greenhouse trace gases using the Los Alamos chemical tracer model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, C.Y.J.; Morz, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tie, X. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through three-dimensional global model studies on atmospheric composition and transport, we are improving our quantitative understanding of the origins and behavior of trace gases that affect Earth`s radiative energy balance and climate. We will focus, in this paper, on the simulations of three individual trace gases including CFC-11, methyl chloroform, and methane. We first used our chemical tracer model to study the global distribution and trend of chemically inert CFC-11 observed by the Atmospheric Lifetime Experiment. The results show that the model has the ability to reproduce the time-series of the observations. The purpose of this CFC-11 simulation was to test the transport of the model. We then used to model introduce methyl chloroform into the atmosphere according to the known emission patterns and iteratively varied OH fields so that the observed concentrations of methyl chloroform from the observations could be simulated well. The rationale behind this approach is that the reaction with OH is the dominant sink for metyl chloroform and the transport of the model has been tested in the previous CFC-11 study. Finally, using the inferred OH distributions, we conducted a steady-state simulation to reproduce the current methane distribution. The general agreement between the modeled an observed methane surface concentrations has laid a foundation for the simulation of the transient increase of methane.

  19. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meeting—provides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  20. Numerical Study of Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows About a Toroidal Ballute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riabov, Vladimir V.

    , pressure distribution, and drag have been found. Keywords: Torus, Balloon Parachute, Transition Rarefied-GasNumerical Study of Hypersonic Rarefied-Gas Flows About a Toroidal Ballute Vladimir V. Riabov investigated numerically using the Direct Simulation Monte-Carlo technique under transition rarefied-gas flow

  1. Planar shock cylindrical focusing by a perfect-gas lens P. E. Dimotakis and R. Samtaneya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Al

    ; for matched temperature and pressure across C, the gas properties expressed as the density ratio = 2/ 0 acrossPlanar shock cylindrical focusing by a perfect-gas lens P. E. Dimotakis and R. Samtaneya Graduate 2005; accepted 10 February 2006; published online 17 March 2006 We document a gas lensing technique

  2. 129 Iodine: A New Hydrologic Tracer for Aquifer Recharge Conditions Influenced by River Flow Rate and Evapotranspiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, K. A.; Santschi, P. H.; Moran, J. E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    County using boron isotopes and general geochemistry, In Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UCRL-ID-133529 (pp. 44). ? Davisson, M.L., Hudson, G.B., Herndon, R., & Woodside, G. (1999b). Report on isotope tracer investigations in the Forebay... of the Orange County Groundwater Basin: Fiscal years 1996 and 1997, In Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory UCRL-ID- 133531 (pp. 44). ? Dissanayake, C.B. & Chandrajith, R. (1999). Medical geochemistry of tropical environments. Earth-Science Reviews 47, 219...

  3. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  4. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dunbar, N.W. [New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, with lesser amounts of {sup 6O}Co, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 239,240}Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the {sup 137}Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 239,240}Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500{degrees}C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  5. Tracer-level radioactive pilot-scale test of in situ vitrification for the stabilization of contaminated soil sites at ORNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, B.P.; Jacobs, G.K.; Naney, M.T. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Dunbar, N.W. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)); Tixier, J.S.; Powell, T.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field demonstration of in situ vitrification (ISV) was completed in May 1991, and produced approximately 12 Mg of melted earthen materials containing 12.7 mCi of radioactivity within 500 g of sludge in amodel of an old seepage trench waste disposal unit. Past waste disposal operations at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have left several contaminated seepage sites. In planning for remediation of such sites, ISV technology has been identified as a leading candidate because of the high risks associated with any retrieval option and because of the usual high quality of vitreous waste form. Major isotopes placed in the test trench were [sup 137]Cs and [sup 90]Sr, with lesser amounts of [sup 6O]Co, [sup 241]Am, and [sup 239,240]Pu. A total of 29 MWh of electrical power was delivered to the ground over a 5-day period producing a melt depth of 8.5 ft. During melting, 2.4% of the [sup 137]Cs volatilized from the melt into an off-gas containment hood and was captured quantitatively on a high efficiency particulate air filter. No volatilization of [sup 90]Sr, [sup 241]Am, or [sup 239,240]Pu was detected and > 99.993% retention of these isotopes in the melt was estimated. The use of added rare earth tracers (Ce, La, and Nd), as surrogates for transuranic isotopes, led to estimated melt retentions of >99.9995% during the test. The molten material, composed of the native soil and dolomitic limestone used for filling the test trench, reached a processing temperature of 1500[degrees]C. Standardized leaching procedures using Product Consistency Testing indicated that the ISV product has excellent characteristics relative to other vitreous nuclear waste forms.

  6. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  7. Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

  8. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

  9. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  10. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  11. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  12. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  13. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  14. Effect of Cr2O3 on the 18O Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterbusch, M.; Lussier, A; Negusse, E; Zhu, Z; Smith, R; Schaefer, J; Idzerda, Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of the impact of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers on the oxygen self diffusion in two SOFC materials were conducted to gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects. High density Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2} (YSZ) and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Standard {sup 18}O tracer diffusion experiments at 800 C were performed and ToF-SIMS profiling revealed that the oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were unaffected by the thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property, but the extracted effective surface exchange coefficients varied with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer thickness. Solid-state reaction measurements and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A critical thickness for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined to be 12 nm where the transition from decreasing cathode-performance to a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-property-governed regime occurs.

  15. Effect of Cr2O3 on the O-18 Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterbusch, Martin; Lussier, Alexandre; Negusse, Ezana; Zhu, Zihua; Smith, Richard J.; Schaefer, Jurgen A.; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects, we conducted an investigation of the impact of Cr2O3 overlayers on oxygen diffusion in various SOFC electrolyte and cathode materials. High density Gd0.10Ce0.90O2 (GDC), Y0.15Zr0.85O2 (YSZ) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O2 (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr - overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr2O3. Standard 18O tracer diffusion experiments at 800°C were performed and TOFSIMS profiling revealed a Cr2O3 thickness-dependent oxygen uptake process. The oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were found to be unaffected by the Cr2O3 overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property. The extracted surface exchange coefficients however varied with Cr2O3 overlayer thickness. Solid state reaction measurements of Cr2O3 with the three materials of interest, and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr2O3. The rate limitation of the oxygen incorporation into the materials is therefore strongly dependent on the surface electronic properties. A critical thickness of Cr2O3 was determined where the transition from decreased cathode-performance to a Cr2O3-property-governed regime occurs.

  16. The Dark Energy Equation of State using Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Plionis; R. Terlevich; S. Basilakos; F. Bresolin; E. Terlevich; J. Melnick; R. Chavez

    2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII galaxies which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, as an alternative to supernovae type Ia, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of z~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative route to measure the contribution to the global dynamics and the equation of state of dark energy. A preliminary joint analysis of X-ray selected AGN (based on the largest to-date XMM survey; the 2XMM) and the currently largest SNIa sample (Hicken et al.), using as priors a flat universe and the WMAP5 normalization of the power-spectrum, provides: Omega_m=0.27+-0.02 and w=-0.96+-0.07. Equivalent and consistent results are provided by the joint analysis of X-ray selected AGN clustering and the latest Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation measures, providing: Omega_m=0.27+-0.02 and w=-0.97+-0.04.

  17. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  18. Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

  19. Brown Carbon Absorption Linked to Organic Mass Tracers in 1 Biomass Burning Particles 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    and acetonitrile is assessed. Acetonitrile is 15 a relatively long-lived gas-phase BB these VOCs are strongly correlated with acetonitrile for the two BB plumes sample, Relationship of Benzene, Propene and 1,3-Butadiene with Acetonitrile. 2 3 4

  20. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  1. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  2. Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document adopts the standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association as rules for the transportation, storage, handling, and use of liquefied natural gas. The NFPA standards...

  3. Oil and Gas Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

  4. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  5. NETL: Oil & Gas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that address the unique nature and challenging locations of many of our remaining oil and natural gas accumulations. The National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL)...

  6. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  7. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  8. Gas venting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. XX, NO. X, MONTH 2009 1 Machine Learning Techniques for the Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, James P.

    ) technique is commonly used for non-destructive testing of oil and gas pipelines. This testing involves of installed oil and natural gas pipelines using inline magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection techniques that could result from a pipeline leak or catastrophic fail- ure, pipelines must be routinely evaluated

  10. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  11. Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/UnionGlossary Shale GasShale gas

  12. Documentation of the Oil and Gas Supply Module (OGSM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Oil and Gas Supply Model (OGSM), to describe the model`s basic approach, and to provide detail on how the model works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. Projected production estimates of US crude oil and natural gas are based on supply functions generated endogenously within National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) by the OGSM. OGSM encompasses domestic crude oil and natural gas supply by both conventional and nonconventional recovery techniques. Nonconventional recovery includes enhanced oil recovery (EOR), and unconventional gas recovery (UGR) from tight gas formations, Devonian/Antrim shale and coalbeds. Crude oil and natural gas projections are further disaggregated by geographic region. OGSM projects US domestic oil and gas supply for six Lower 48 onshore regions, three offshore regions, and Alaska. The general methodology relies on forecasted profitability to determine exploratory and developmental drilling levels for each region and fuel type. These projected drilling levels translate into reserve additions, as well as a modification of the production capacity for each region. OGSM also represents foreign trade in natural gas, imports and exports by entry region. Foreign gas trade may occur via either pipeline (Canada or Mexico), or via transport ships as liquefied natural gas (LNG). These import supply functions are critical elements of any market modeling effort.

  13. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyEvaluation of deepwater gas-hydrate systems. The Leadingfor Gas Production from Gas Hydrates Reservoirs. J. Canadian

  14. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    , oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics Products 23. Sloan dolomite quarry 24. Weiser gypsum quarry Oil Fields 1. Blackburn field 2. North WillowMetals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada

  15. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  16. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  17. Gas Kick Mechanistic Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubairy, Raheel

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    -gain and temperature profile in the annulus. This research focuses on these changes in these parameters to be able to detect the occurrence of gas kick and the circulation of the gas kick out from the well. In this thesis, we have developed a model that incorporates...

  18. Fission gas detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colburn, Richard P. (Pasco, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  19. Western Europe's future gas supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardaun, G.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decline in indigenous natural gas production by 2000 will be compensated by imported natural gas and LNG and gas from unconventional sources. Coal gas will furnish about 10 percent of the demand, more natural gas imports will come from North Africa and the USSR and additional LNG will come from West Africa, the Middle East and the Western Hemisphere.

  20. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osher, John E. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  1. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Sullivan, Francis Martin

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  2. Intermountain Gas Company (IGC)- Gas Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Intermountain Gas Company's (IGC) Gas Heating Rebate Program offers customers a $200 per unit rebate when they convert to a high efficiency natural gas furnace that replaces a heating system...

  3. Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas- Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Natural Gas Savings Programs are offering the following bonus rebates (in addition to the joint utilities bonus rebate). For both offers below, installation must...

  4. Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation of natural gas and permits the accumulation of...

  5. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Corridors About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural...

  6. Supersonic gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

  7. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  8. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  9. Core follow calculation with the nTRACER numerical reactor and verification using power reactor measurement data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Y. S.; Joo, H. G. [Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J. I. [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel, 1047 Daedukdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nTRACER direct whole core transport code employing the planar MOC solution based 3-D calculation method, the subgroup method for resonance treatment, the Krylov matrix exponential method for depletion, and a subchannel thermal/hydraulic calculation solver was developed for practical high-fidelity simulation of power reactors. Its accuracy and performance is verified by comparing with the measurement data obtained for three pressurized water reactor cores. It is demonstrated that accurate and detailed multi-physic simulation of power reactors is practically realizable without any prior calculations or adjustments. (authors)

  10. Exotic populations in Globular Clusters: Blue Stragglers as tracers of the internal dynamical evolution of stellar systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferraro, Francesco R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper I present an overview of the main observational properties of a special class of exotic objects (the so-called Blue Straggler Stars, BSSs) in Galactic Globular Clusters (GCs). The BSS specific frequency and their radial distribution are discussed in the framework of using this stellar population as probe of GC internal dynamics. In particular, the shape of the BSS radial distribution has been found to be a powerful tracer of the dynamical evolution of stellar systems, thus allowing the definition of an empirical "clock" able to measure the dynamical age of stellar aggregates from pure observational properties.

  11. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders to construct energy efficient homes. Rebates are provided for both energy efficient gas equipment and whole home Energy Star certification. All...

  12. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders to construct energy efficient homes. Rebates are provided for energy efficient gas equipment. Builders can also receive whole house rebates for...

  13. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders who incorporate energy efficiency into new construction. Rebates are provided for energy efficient gas equipment placed into new construction....

  14. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders who incorporate energy efficiency into new construction. Rebates are provided for energy efficient gas equipment placed into new construction. ...

  15. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:43:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"...

  16. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  17. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

  18. Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas, desorbtion, tracing, migration Overview The discovery of shale gas in UK Shales demonstrates how important and no doubt will vary from shale to shale. An improved understanding of the controls on gas production from

  19. Sources of organic aerosol investigated using organic compounds as tracers measured during CalNex in Bakersfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    to be mainly through gas-to-particle condensation of gas-phase oxidation products during the day. Our results) and provide insights into secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, positive matrix factorization analysis in the afternoon. Although contributions to SOA from oxidation of biogenic gas-phase compounds were less

  20. Oil and Gas Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oil and Gas section of the Tennessee Code, found in Title 60, covers all regulations, licenses, permits, and laws related to the production of natural gas. The laws create the Oil and Gas...

  1. Oil and Gas Production (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This...

  2. Exhaust gas recirculation apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egnell, R.A.; Hansson, B.L.

    1981-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for recirculating combustion exhaust gases to the burner region of a Stirling cycle hot-gas engine to lower combustion temperature and reduct NO/sub x/ formation includes a first wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the inlet air stream, a second wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the burner region, and low flow resistance ejectors formed in the first and second walls for admitting the inlet air to the burner region and for entraining and mixing with the inlet air portion of the exhaust gas stream. In a preferred embodiment the ejectors are arranged around the periphery of a cylindrical burner region and oriented to admit the air/exhaust gas mixture tangentially to promote mixing. In another preferred embodiment a single annular ejector surrounds and feeds the air/exhaust gas mixture to a cylindrical burner region. The annular ejector includes an annular plate with radially-directed flow passages to provide an even distribution of the air/exhaust gas mixture to the burner region.

  3. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  4. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  5. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  6. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  7. Gas only nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William Theodore (15 Olde Coach Rd., Scotia, NY 12302); Fitts, David Orus (286 Sweetman Rd., Ballston Spa, NY 12020); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (60 St. Stephens La., Glenville, NY 12302)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  8. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Don D. (Aiken, SC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one end and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  9. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, D.D.

    1985-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  10. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fossil Natural Gas Natural Gas September 15, 2014 NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study The National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a technical report on the...

  11. Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations for Gas Companies, implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority) outline the standards for metering, distribution and electricity generation for utilities using gas....

  12. Citizens Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to its residential customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebates are generally available for residential homes...

  13. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    p. 163, January 1, 2005. Battelle, Assessment of Technologymodel, TANK, was developed by Battelle for the Gas Research93/0186. Prepared by Battelle for Gas Research Institute

  14. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  15. Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce,Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniaturized fluid handling devices have recently attracted considerable interest in many areas of science1. Such microfluidic chips perform a variety of functions, ranging from analysis of biological macromolecules2,3 to catalysis of reactions and sensing in the gas phase4,5. To enable precise fluid handling, accurate knowledge of the flow properties within these devices is important. Due to low Reynolds numbers, laminar flow is usually assumed. However, either by design or unintentionally, the flow characteristic in small channels is often altered, for example by surface interactions, viscous and diffusional effects, or electrical potentials. Therefore, its prediction is not always straight-forward6-8. Currently, most microfluidic flow measurements rely on optical detection of markers9,10, requiring the injection of tracers and transparent devices. Here, we show profiles of microfluidic gas flow in capillaries and chip devices obtained by NMR in the remote detection modality11,12. Through the transient measurement of dispersion13, NMR is well adaptable for non-invasive, yet sensitive determination of the flow field and provides a novel and potentially more powerful tool to profile flow in capillaries and miniaturized flow devices.

  16. ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas & North Shore Gas- Small Business Energy Savings Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas, and North Shore Gas fund the Small Business Energy Savings program in which an energy advisor conducts a free on-site energy assessment and provides free installati...

  17. ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas- Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is a bundled promotion in partnership with ComEd...

  18. Discovery of Large Molecular Gas Reservoirs in Post-Starburst Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    French, K Decker; Zabludoff, Ann; Narayanan, Desika; Shirley, Yancy; Walter, Fabian; Smith, John-David; Tremonti, Christy A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Post-starburst (or "E+A") galaxies are characterized by low H$\\alpha$ emission and strong Balmer absorption, suggesting a recent starburst, but little current star formation. Although many of these galaxies show evidence of recent mergers, the mechanism for ending the starburst is not yet understood. To study the fate of the molecular gas, we search for CO (1-0) and (2-1) emission with the IRAM 30m and SMT 10m telescopes in 32 nearby ($0.01tracer for molecular hydrogen, and a Galactic conversion factor, we obtain molecular gas masses of $M(H_2)=10^{8.6}$-$10^{9.8} M_\\odot$ and molecular gas mass to stellar mass fractions of $\\sim10^{-2}$-$10^{-0.5}$, comparable to those of star-forming galaxies. The large amounts of molecular gas rule out complete gas consumption, expulsion, or starvation as the primary mechanism that ends the starburst in these galaxies. The upper limits on $M(H_2)$ for th...

  19. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  20. Galaxy Redshifts: Improved Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. F. Heavens

    1993-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyses the effects of random noise in determining errors and confidence levels for galaxy redshifts obtained by cross-correlation techniques. The main finding is that confidence levels have previously been overestimated, and errors inaccurately calculated in certain applications. New formul\\ae\\ are presented.

  1. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  2. GARDIENNAGE Help Desk technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    --> Relais vers Garde GTPW ASCENSEURS 1ère impulsion Dispatching UCL (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) Dispatching UCL --> SECURITAS LEW ALARMES CDC (Système EBI -Enterprise Building Integrator -Honeywell GTPW téléphonique ) TECHNIQUES CDC (Système EBI Honeywell GTPW) GTPW (Heures ouvrables) CDC (En dehors des heures

  3. Many-body effects in tracer particle diffusion with applications for single-protein dynamics on DNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastian Ahlberg; Tobias Ambjörnsson; Ludvig Lizana

    2015-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    30% of the DNA in E. coli bacteria is covered by proteins. Such high degree of crowding affect the dynamics of generic biological processes (e.g. gene regulation, DNA repair, protein diffusion etc.) in ways that are not yet fully understood. In this paper, we theoretically address the diffusion constant of a tracer particle in a one dimensional system surrounded by impenetrable crowder particles. While the tracer particle always stays on the lattice, crowder particles may unbind to a surrounding bulk and rebind at another or the same location. In this scenario we determine how the long time diffusion constant ${\\cal D}$ (after many unbinding events) depends on (i) the unbinding rate of crowder particles $k_{\\rm off}$, and (ii) crowder particle line density $\\rho$, from simulations (Gillespie algorithm) and analytical calculations. For small $k_{\\rm off}$, we find ${\\cal D}\\sim k_{\\rm off}/\\rho^2$ when crowder particles are immobile on the line, and ${\\cal D}\\sim \\sqrt{D k_{\\rm off}}/\\rho$ when they are diffusing; $D$ is the free particle diffusion constant. For large $k_{\\rm off}$, we find agreement with mean-field results which do not depend on $k_{\\rm off}$. From literature values of $k_{\\rm off}$ and $D$, we show that the small $k_{\\rm off}$-limit is relevant for in vivo protein diffusion on a crowded DNA. Our results applies to single-molecule tracking experiments.

  4. Query Optimization Techniques Class Hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mannheim, Universität

    Query Optimization Techniques Exploiting Class Hierarchies Sophie Cluet 1 Guido Moerkotte 2 1 INRIA Since the introduction of object base management systems (OBMS), many query optimization techniques tailored for object query languages have been proposed. They adapt known optimization techniques

  5. Development of Alaskan gas hydrate resources. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamath, V.A.; Sharma, G.D.; Patil, S.L.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research undertaken in this project pertains to study of various techniques for production of natural gas from Alaskan gas hydrates such as, depressurization, injection of hot water, steam, brine, methanol and ethylene glycol solutions through experimental investigation of decomposition characteristics of hydrate cores. An experimental study has been conducted to measure the effective gas permeability changes as hydrates form in the sandpack and the results have been used to determine the reduction in the effective gas permeability of the sandpack as a function of hydrate saturation. A user friendly, interactive, menu-driven, numerical difference simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of natural gas hydrates in porous media with variable thermal properties. A numerical, finite element simulator has been developed to model the dissociation of hydrates during hot water injection process.

  6. PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

    2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

  7. Western Gas Sands Project: stratigrapy of the Piceance Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S. (comp.)

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Western Gas Sands Project Core Program was initiated by US DOE to investigate various low permeability, gas bearing sandstones. Research to gain a better geological understanding of these sandstones and improve evaluation and stimulation techniques is being conducted. Tight gas sands are located in several mid-continent and western basins. This report deals with the Piceance Basin in northwestern Colorado. This discussion is an attempt to provide a general overview of the Piceance Basin stratigraphy and to be a useful reference of stratigraphic units and accompanying descriptions.

  8. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  9. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  10. Gas Turbine Emissions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederick, J. D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of regulatory interest in the 'real world' test results coupled with the difficulties of gathering analogous bench test data for systems employing gas turbines with Heat Recovery Steam Generators (HRSG) and steam injection. It appears that the agencies...

  11. Gas-Saving Tips

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Properly Tuned Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emis- sions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 percent. However, results vary based on...

  12. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  13. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  14. Gas Pipelines (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter applies to any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as any...

  15. Gas Pipeline Securities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes that entities engaged in the transmission of gas by pipelines are not required to obtain the consent of the Utility Regulatory Commission for issuance of stocks,...

  16. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  17. (bulb) , (1) Gas(1) Gas(1) Gas(1) Gas----saturation methodsaturation methodsaturation methodsaturation method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    (bulb) , . . , . . 1. . (1) Gas(1Static MethodStatic Method Isoteniscope bulb U-tube . bulb U-tube bulb . bulb . U bulb . manometer . . Isoteniscope Boling Point Method . #12;2. (1) Boiling

  18. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Gerber, F.B. [BENTEK Energy Research, DeSoto, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  19. (GAS HYDRATES) 2 ()

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : ... ... .... .... «» , 28 2007 : « » #12; · ·· #12; 2 #12; (GAS HYDRATES) #12;Y · µ 2 µ () µ · µ µ · µ µ µ ·µ: - - µ CO2 - - #12; - 3S·2M·1L·34H3S

  20. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

  1. Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale The University of Oxford http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/joec Key Words Shale gas, hydraulic fracture, groundwater contamination, transport in porous media Overview Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale

  2. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Edward D. (Alliance, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Jankura, Bryan J. (Mogadore, OH); McCoury, Jr., John M. (Mineral City, OH)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sampling gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extends in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  3. Gas sampling system for reactive gas-solid mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daum, Edward D. (Alliance, OH); Downs, William (Alliance, OH); Jankura, Bryan J. (Mogadore, OH); McCoury, Jr., John M. (Mineral City, OH)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sampling a gas containing a reactive particulate solid phase flowing through a duct and for communicating a representative sample to a gas analyzer. A sample probe sheath 32 with an angular opening 34 extends vertically into a sample gas duct 30. The angular opening 34 is opposite the gas flow. A gas sampling probe 36 concentrically located within sheath 32 along with calibration probe 40 partly extend in the sheath 32. Calibration probe 40 extends further in the sheath 32 than gas sampling probe 36 for purging the probe sheath area with a calibration gas during calibration.

  4. Supernova-Driven Outflows in NGC 7552: A Comparison of H-alpha and UV Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Corey M; Calzetti, Daniela; Leitherer, Claus; Chisholm, John; Gallagher, John S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the supernova-driven galactic wind of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 7552, using both ground-based optical nebular emission lines and far-ultraviolet absorption lines measured with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We detect broad (~300 km/s) blueshifted (-40 km/s) optical emission lines associated with the galaxy's kpc-scale star-forming ring. The broad line kinematics and diagnostic line ratios suggest that the H-alpha emission comes from clouds of high density gas entrained in a turbulent outflow. We compare the H-alpha emission line profile to the UV absorption line profile measured along a coincident sight line and find significant differences. The maximum blueshift of the H-alpha-emitting gas is ~290 km/s, whereas the UV line profile extends to blueshifts upwards of 1000 km/s. The mass outflow rate estimated from the UV is roughly nine times greater than that estimated from H-alpha. We argue that the H-alpha emission traces a cluster-scale outflow of dense, low velocit...

  5. HD gas analysis with Gas Chromatography and Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, T; Didelez, J -P; Fujiwara, M; Fukuda, K; Kohri, H; Kunimatsu, T; Morisaki, C; Ono, S; Rouille, G; Tanaka, M; Ueda, K; Uraki, M; Utsuro, M; Wang, S Y; Yosoi, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas analyzer system has been developed to analyze Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for producing frozen-spin polarized HD targets, which are used for hadron photoproduction experiments at SPring-8. Small amounts of ortho-H$_{2}$ and para-D$_{2}$ gas mixtures ($\\sim$0.01%) in the purified HD gas are a key to realize a frozen-spin polarized target. In order to obtain reliable concentrations of these gas mixtures in the HD gas, we produced a new gas analyzer system combining two independent measurements with the gas chromatography and the QMS. The para-H$_{2}$, ortho-H$_{2}$, HD, and D$_{2}$ are separated using the retention time of the gas chromatography and the mass/charge. It is found that the new gas analyzer system can measure small concentrations of $\\sim$0.01% for the otho-H$_2$ and D$_2$ with good S/N ratios.

  6. HD gas analysis with Gas Chromatography and Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Ohta; S. Bouchigny; J. -P. Didelez; M. Fujiwara; K. Fukuda; H. Kohri; T. Kunimatsu; C. Morisaki; S. Ono; G. Rouille; M. Tanaka; K. Ueda; M. Uraki; M. Utsuro; S. Y. Wang; M. Yosoi

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas analyzer system has been developed to analyze Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for producing frozen-spin polarized HD targets, which are used for hadron photoproduction experiments at SPring-8. Small amounts of ortho-H$_{2}$ and para-D$_{2}$ gas mixtures ($\\sim$0.01%) in the purified HD gas are a key to realize a frozen-spin polarized target. In order to obtain reliable concentrations of these gas mixtures in the HD gas, we produced a new gas analyzer system combining two independent measurements with the gas chromatography and the QMS. The para-H$_{2}$, ortho-H$_{2}$, HD, and D$_{2}$ are separated using the retention time of the gas chromatography and the mass/charge. It is found that the new gas analyzer system can measure small concentrations of $\\sim$0.01% for the otho-H$_2$ and D$_2$ with good S/N ratios.

  7. Evaluation of C-14 as a natural tracer for injected fluids at the Aidlin sector of The Geysers geothermal system through modeling of mineral-water-gas Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick; Sonnenthal, Eric; Lewicki, Jennifer; Kennedy, Mack

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer in fractured geothermal reservoirs is controlled byThe Aidlin reservoir rocks consist of fractured argillites

  8. The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , for it was dependent upon their polarity and the required heat supply for sufficient signals. The pipeline required

  9. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  10. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  11. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  12. Resin infiltration transfer technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, David V. (Pittsburgh, PA); Baranwal, Rita (Glenshaw, PA)

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A process has been developed for fabricating composite structures using either reaction forming or polymer infiltration and pyrolysis techniques to densify the composite matrix. The matrix and reinforcement materials of choice can include, but are not limited to, silicon carbide (SiC) and zirconium carbide (ZrC). The novel process can be used to fabricate complex, net-shape or near-net shape, high-quality ceramic composites with a crack-free matrix.

  13. Innovative Technologies and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samano, R.; Swinford, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    November 2014 Innovative Technologies and Techniques ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 What’s New in Energy Efficient Cooling Systems? ? Director of Energy Management ? Moving Away From... Refrigerants ? LEED ? Reducing the Carbon Footprint ? Improving Indoor Air Quality - IAQ ? High Efficiency Fans and Motors ? Economizers ESL-KT-14-11-22 CATEE 2014: Clean Air Through Efficiency Conference, Dallas, Texas Nov. 18-20 Outside Air Management Experts...

  14. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  15. Gas cleaning system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newby, Richard Allen

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas cleaning system for removing at least a portion of contaminants, such as halides, sulfur, particulates, mercury, and others, from a synthesis gas (syngas). The gas cleaning system may include one or more filter vessels coupled in series for removing halides, particulates, and sulfur from the syngas. The gas cleaning system may be operated by receiving gas at a first temperature and pressure and dropping the temperature of the syngas as the gas flows through the system. The gas cleaning system may be used for an application requiring clean syngas, such as, but not limited to, fuel cell power generation, IGCC power generation, and chemical synthesis.

  16. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  17. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  18. Jet finding techniques at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BOUMEDIENE, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet finding techniques at hadron colliders, including pile-up removal tricks, jet deconstruction, etc

  19. Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    11 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques (3rd ed.) -- Chapter 1 -- Jiawei Han, Micheline Kamber. All rights reserved. #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 2 #12;July 29, 2013 Data Mining: Concepts and Techniques 3July 29, 2013 Data Mining

  20. Optimization of condensing gas drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofton, Larry Keith

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

  1. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  2. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  3. Ultrafast gas switching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, C.A.; Martin, T.H.; Patterson, P.E.; Rinehart, L.F.; Rohwein, G.J.; Roose, L.D.; Aurand, J.F.; Buttram, M.T.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe recent experiments which studied the physics of ultrafast gas breakdown under the extreme overvoltages which occur when a high pressure gas switch is pulse charged to hundreds of kV in 1 ns or less. The highly overvolted peaking gaps produce powerful electromagnetic pulses with risetimes < 100 ps which can be used for ultrawideband radar systems, particle accelerators, laser drivers, bioelectromagnetic studies, electromagnetic effects testing, and for basic studies of gas breakdown physics. We have produced and accurately measured pulses with 50 to 100 ps risetimes to peak levels of 75 to 160 kV at pulse repetition frequencies (PRF) to I kHz. A unique gas switch was developed to hold off hundreds of kV with parasitic inductance less than I nH. An advanced diagnostic system using Fourier compensation was developed to measure single-shot risetimes below 35 ps. The complete apparatus is described and wave forms are presented. The measured data are compared with a theoretical model which predicts key features including dependence on gas species and pressure. We have applied this technology to practical systems driving ultrawideband radiating antennas and bounded wave simulators. For example, we have developed a thyristor/pulse transformer based system using a highly overvolted cable switch. This pulser driving a Sandia- designed TEM cell, provides an ultra wideband impulse with < 200 ps risetime to the test object at a PRF > 1 kHz at > 100 kV/m E field.

  4. The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelleher, R.L.; O'Leary, T.J.; Shirk, I.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gonzaga desulfurization flue gas process removes sulfur dioxide from a flue by cold water scrubbing. Sulfur dioxide is significantly more soluable in cold water (35/sup 0/F to 60/sup 0/F) than in warm water (100/sup 0/F). Sulfur dioxide reacts in water similarly as carbon dioxide reacts in water, in that both gasses are released from the water as the temperature of the water increases. The researchers at the Gonzaga University developed this process from the observations and techniques used in studying the acid and aldehyde concentrations in flue gasses with varying of fuel to air ratios. The apparatus was fixed to a stationary engine and a gas/oil fired boiler. The flue gas was cooled to the dew point temperature of the air entering the combustion chamber on the pre-air heater. The system is described in two parts: the energies required for cooling in the scrubbing section and the energies required in the treatment section. The cold flue gas is utilized in cooling the scrubber section.

  5. Life-cycle analysis of shale gas and natural gas.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C.E.; Han, J.; Burnham, A.; Dunn, J.B.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies and practices that have enabled the recent boom in shale gas production have also brought attention to the environmental impacts of its use. Using the current state of knowledge of the recovery, processing, and distribution of shale gas and conventional natural gas, we have estimated up-to-date, life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions. In addition, we have developed distribution functions for key parameters in each pathway to examine uncertainty and identify data gaps - such as methane emissions from shale gas well completions and conventional natural gas liquid unloadings - that need to be addressed further. Our base case results show that shale gas life-cycle emissions are 6% lower than those of conventional natural gas. However, the range in values for shale and conventional gas overlap, so there is a statistical uncertainty regarding whether shale gas emissions are indeed lower than conventional gas emissions. This life-cycle analysis provides insight into the critical stages in the natural gas industry where emissions occur and where opportunities exist to reduce the greenhouse gas footprint of natural gas.

  6. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  7. Applied ALARA techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waggoner, L.O.

    1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation focuses on some of the time-proven and new technologies being used to accomplish radiological work. These techniques can be applied at nuclear facilities to reduce radiation doses and protect the environment. The last reactor plants and processing facilities were shutdown and Hanford was given a new mission to put the facilities in a safe condition, decontaminate, and prepare them for decommissioning. The skills that were necessary to operate these facilities were different than the skills needed today to clean up Hanford. Workers were not familiar with many of the tools, equipment, and materials needed to accomplish:the new mission, which includes clean up of contaminated areas in and around all the facilities, recovery of reactor fuel from spent fuel pools, and the removal of millions of gallons of highly radioactive waste from 177 underground tanks. In addition, this work has to be done with a reduced number of workers and a smaller budget. At Hanford, facilities contain a myriad of radioactive isotopes that are 2048 located inside plant systems, underground tanks, and the soil. As cleanup work at Hanford began, it became obvious early that in order to get workers to apply ALARA and use hew tools and equipment to accomplish the radiological work it was necessary to plan the work in advance and get radiological control and/or ALARA committee personnel involved early in the planning process. Emphasis was placed on applying,ALARA techniques to reduce dose, limit contamination spread and minimize the amount of radioactive waste generated. Progress on the cleanup has,b6en steady and Hanford workers have learned to use different types of engineered controls and ALARA techniques to perform radiological work. The purpose of this presentation is to share the lessons learned on how Hanford is accomplishing radiological work.

  8. Corporate bodies and chemical bonds : an STS analysis of natural gas development in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wylie, Sara Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas extraction in the United States in the early 21st century has transformed social, physical, legal and biological landscapes. The technique of hydraulic fracturing, which entails the high-pressure injection into ...

  9. Gas turbine sealing apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiebe, David J; Wessell, Brian J; Ebert, Todd; Beeck, Alexander; Liang, George; Marussich, Walter H

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas turbine includes forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, a row of stationary vanes between the forward and aft rows of rotatable blades, an annular intermediate disc, and a seal housing apparatus. The forward and aft rows of rotatable blades are coupled to respective first and second portions of a disc/rotor assembly. The annular intermediate disc is coupled to the disc/rotor assembly so as to be rotatable with the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine. The annular intermediate disc includes a forward side coupled to the first portion of the disc/rotor assembly and an aft side coupled to the second portion of the disc/rotor assembly. The seal housing apparatus is coupled to the annular intermediate disc so as to be rotatable with the annular intermediate disc and the disc/rotor assembly during operation of the gas turbine.

  10. Development of a Darcy-Brinkman model to simulate water flow and tracer transport in a heterogeneous karstic aquifer (Val d'Orlans, France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling karstic aquifers is problematic because the equation of references (i.e. Darcy) is adapted: i) the Darcy law used to describe the hydraulic behaviour of massive limestone, and ii) the equationDevelopment of a Darcy- Brinkman model to simulate water flow and tracer transport

  11. The Intense Radiation Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

  12. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coslow, Billy Joe (Winter Park, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Great Blue, CT)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit.

  13. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis D. (Albuquerque, NM); Blair, Dianna S. (Albuquerque, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Reber, Stephen D. (Corrales, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute.

  14. Gas turbine combustor transition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coslow, B.J.; Whidden, G.L.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for converting a steam cooled transition to an air cooled transition in a gas turbine having a compressor in fluid communication with a combustor, a turbine section in fluid communication with the combustor, the transition disposed in a combustor shell and having a cooling circuit connecting a steam outlet and a steam inlet and wherein hot gas flows from the combustor through the transition and to the turbine section, includes forming an air outlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit and providing for an air inlet in the transition in fluid communication with the cooling circuit. 7 figs.

  15. Proceedings of: X Convegno Tecnologie e Sistemi Energetici Complessi, (TESEC), June 2001, Genova, Italy ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    , Italy 1 ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR SAFETY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS TURBINE CONTROL SYSTEM OF ICARO CO of complex computer based systems. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co of the centre of ENEA CR Casaccia. The plant is based on a small gas turbine and has been specifically designed

  16. On-Board Hydrogen Gas Production System For Stirling Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, Lennart N. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed. A hydrogen production system for use in connection with Stirling engines. The production system generates hydrogen working gas and periodically supplies it to the Stirling engine as its working fluid in instances where loss of such working fluid occurs through usage through operation of the associated Stirling engine. The hydrogen gas may be generated by various techniques including electrolysis and stored by various means including the use of a metal hydride absorbing material. By controlling the temperature of the absorbing material, the stored hydrogen gas may be provided to the Stirling engine as needed.

  17. Gas-phase CO2 emission toward Cepheus A East: the result of shock activity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sonnentrucker; E. González-Alfonso; D. A. Neufeld; E. A. Bergin; G. J. Melnick; W. J. Forrest; J. L. Pipher; D. M. Watson

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first detection of gas-phase CO2 emission in the star-forming region Cepheus A East, obtained by spectral line mapping of the v2 bending mode at 14.98 micron with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. The gaseous CO2 emission covers a region about 35'' x 25'' in extent, and results from radiative pumping by 15 micron continuum photons emanating predominantly from the HW2 protostellar region. The gaseous CO2 exhibits a temperature distribution ranging from 50 K to 200 K. A correlation between the gas-phase CO2 distribution and that of H2 S(2), a tracer of shock activity, indicates that the CO2 molecules originate in a cool post-shock gas component associated with the outflow powered by HW2. The presence of CO2 ice absorption features at 15.20 micron toward this region and the lack of correlation between the IR continuum emission and the CO2 gas emission distribution further suggest that the gaseous CO2 molecules are mainly sputtered off grain mantles -- by the passage of slow non-dissociative shocks with velocities of 15-30 km/s -- rather than sublimated through grain heating.

  18. The Beckett System Recovery and Utilization of Low Grade Waste Heat From Flue Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, W. R.; DeBiase, J. F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beckett Heat Recovery is a series of techniques for recovering low-grade waste heat from flue gas. Until the cost of fossil fuels began rising rapidly, flue gas below 600 F was considered economically unworthy of reclaim. This paper...

  19. The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Z. Jane

    The Role of Isotopes in Monitoring Water Quality Impacts Associated with Shale Gas Drilling Methane contamination is usually due to natural causes; however, it can also be the result of drilling activities, including shale gas drilling. Monitoring techniques exist for detecting methane and, in some cases

  20. 2006-01-3276 Residual Gas Fraction Measurement and Estimation on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    on a Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine. A novel in- cylinder gas sampling technique of the HCCI cycle and good agreement was found in steady engine running conditions. Some form of oscillating behaviour that HCCI exhibits because of exhaust gas coupling was studied and the model was modified

  1. CHEM333: Lab Experiment 3: Distillation and Gas Chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taber, Douglass

    CHEM­333: Lab Experiment 3: Distillation and Gas Chromatography: Prelab-Assignment: read Chapters 5 and 6. Distillation is one of the most powerful techniques for purifying volatile organic compounds. Distillation is used to isolate many of life's essentials such as gasoline from oil or brandy from wine

  2. Economical analysis of a new gas to ethylene technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abedi, Ali Abdulhamid

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . In Europe and Japan, where natural gas is not abundant, thermal cracking of naphtha using a fired heater is the most common process. In addition to these processes; ethylene could also be produced from crude oil by autothermic and fluidized bed techniques...

  3. CONSIDERING SHALE GAS EXTRACTION IN NORTH CAROLINA: LESSONS FROM OTHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    viable in recent years due to advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques, which hearings on the issues of horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing for shale gas extraction. 3 Unlike prohibits both horizontal drilling and the injection of waste (including hydraulic fracturing fluids

  4. Environmental Monitoring and the Gas Industry: Program Manager Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Gillispie

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been developed for the nontechnical gas industry manager who has the responsibility for the development of waste or potentially contaminated soil and groundwater data or must make decisions based on such data for the management or remediation of these materials. It explores the pse of common analytical chemistry instrumentation and associated techniques for identification of environmentally hazardous materials. Sufficient detail is given to familiarize the nontechnical reader with the principles behind the operation of each technique. The scope and realm of the techniques and their constituent variations are portrayed through a discussion of crucial details and, where appropriate, the depiction of real-life data. It is the author's intention to provide an easily understood handbook for gas industry management. Techniques which determine the presence, composition, and quantification of gas industry wastes are discussed. Greater focus is given to traditional techniques which have been the mainstay of modem analytical benchwork. However, with the continual advancement of instrumental principles and design, several techniques have been included which are likely to receive greater attention in fiture considerations for waste-related detection. Definitions and concepts inherent to a thorough understanding of the principles common to analytical chemistry are discussed. It is also crucial that gas industry managers understand the effects of the various actions which take place before, during, and after the actual sampling step. When a series of sample collection, storage, and transport activities occur, new or inexperienced project managers may overlook or misunderstand the importance of the sequence. Each step has an impact on the final results of the measurement process; errors in judgment or decision making can be costly. Specific techniques and methodologies for the collection, storage, and transport of environmental media samples are not described or discussed in detail in thk handbook. However, the underlying philosophy regarding the importance of proper collection, storage, and transport practices, as well as pertinent references, are presented.

  5. Sulfur gas geochemical detection of hydrothermal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, G.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a system of exploration using sulfur gases was capable of detecting convecting hydrothermal systems. Three surveying techniques were used at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA in Utah. These were (a) a sniffing technique, capable of instantaneous determinations of sulfur gas concentration, (b) an accumulator technique, capable of integrating the sulfur gas emanations over a 30 day interval, and (c) a method of analyzing the soils for vaporous sulfur compounds. Because of limitations in the sniffer technique, only a limited amount of surveying was done with this method. The accumulator and soil sampling techniques were conducted on a 1000 foot grid at Roosevelt Hot Springs, and each sample site was visited three times during the spring of 1980. Thus, three soil samples and two accumulator samples were collected at each site. The results are shown as averages of three soil and two accumulator determinations of sulfur gas concentrations at each site. Soil surveys and accumulator surveys were conducted at two additional KGRA's which were chosen based on the state of knowledge of these hydrothermal systems and upon their differences from Roosevelt Hot Springs in an effort to show that the exploration methods would be effective in detecting geothermal reservoirs in general. The results at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah show that each of the three surveying methods was capable of detecting sulfur gas anomalies which can be interpreted to be related to the source at depth, based on resistivity mapping of that source, and also correlatable with major structural features of the area which are thought to be controlling the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. The results of the surveys at Roosevelt did not indicate that either the soil sampling technique or the accumulator technique was superior to the other.

  6. Acidic gas capture by diamines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

  7. Natural gas monthly, October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  8. Gas Cooling Through Galaxy Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariwan A. Rasheed; Mohamad A. Brza

    Abstract-- Gas cooling was studied in two different boxes of sizes and by simulation at same redshifts. The gas cooling is shown in four different redshifts (z=1.15, 0.5, 0.1 and 0). In the simulation the positions of the clumps of cooled gas were studied with slices of the two volumes and also the density of cooled gas of the two volumes shown in the simulation. From the process of gas cooling it is clear that this process gives different results in the two cases. Index Term- Gas Cooling, Simulation, galaxy Formation. I.

  9. Natural gas monthly, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. There are two feature articles in this issue: Natural gas 1998: Issues and trends, Executive summary; and Special report: Natural gas 1998: A preliminary summary. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  10. Natural gas monthly, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  11. Natural gas monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highhghts activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  12. Natural gas monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) is prepared in the Data Operations Branch of the Reserves and Natural Gas Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The NGM highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  13. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Constraining the Parameter Space of the Dark Energy Equation of State Using Alternative Cosmic Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chávez, Ricardo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to use HII galaxies (HIIG) to trace the redshift-distance relation, by means of their $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ correlation, in an attempt to constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter solution space, as an alternative to the cosmological use of type Ia supernovae. For a sample of 128 local compact HIIG with high equivalent widths of their Balmer emission lines we obtained ionised gas velocity dispersion from high S/N, high-dispersion spectroscopy (Subaru-HDS and ESO VLT-UVES) and integrated H$\\beta$ fluxes from low dispersion wide aperture spectrophotometry. We find that the $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ relation is strong and stable against restrictions in the sample. The size of the starforming region is an important second parameter, while adding the emission line equivalent width or the continuum colour and metallicity, produces the solution with the smallest rms scatter. We have used the $L(\\mathrm{H}\\beta) - \\sigma$ relation from a local sample of HIIG and a local calibration ...

  15. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Potter, Thomas F. (Denver, CO)

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber.

  16. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  17. Natural Gas Purchasing Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, G.

    As a result of economic and regulatory changes, the natural gas marketplace now offers multiple options for purchasers. The purpose of this panel is to discuss short-term purchasing options and how to take advantage of these options both to lower...

  18. Compressed Gas Cylinder Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contained in cylinders display chemical hazards that include toxic, flammable, corrosive, pyrophoric on their side but stored in a way to prevent damage to the product label. In a free standing gas cylinder the height of the cylinder. So that the cylinder label is easily viewed. On a dry surface allowing no contact

  19. Polymide gas separation membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yong; Bikson, Benjamin; Nelson, Joyce Katz

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Soluble polyamic acid salt (PAAS) precursors comprised of tertiary and quaternary amines, ammonium cations, sulfonium cations, or phosphonium cations, are prepared and fabricated into membranes that are subsequently imidized and converted into rigid-rod polyimide articles, such as membranes with desirable gas separation properties. A method of enhancing solubility of PAAS polymers in alcohols is also disclosed.

  20. Gas turbine diagnostic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talgat, Shuvatov

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the given article the methods of parametric diagnostics of gas turbine based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The diagnostic map of interconnection between some parts of turbine and changes of corresponding parameters has been developed. Also we have created model to define the efficiency of the compressor using fuzzy logic algorithms.