National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for tracer detection technology

  1. Tracers and Exploration Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings forTitle XVIIofTracers and Exploration

  2. Chlorofluorocarbon leak detection technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munday, E.B.

    1990-12-01

    There are about 590 large coolant systems located at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) and the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) leaking nearly 800,000 lb of R-114 refrigerant annually (1989 estimate). A program is now under way to reduce the leakage to 325,000 lb/year -- an average loss of 551 lb/year (0.063 lb/h) per coolant system, some of which are as large as 800 ft. This report investigates leak detection technologies that can be used to locate leaks in the coolant systems. Included are descriptions, minimum leak detection rate levels, advantages, disadvantages, and vendor information on the following technologies: bubbling solutions; colorimetric leak testing; dyes; halogen leak detectors (coronea discharge detectors; halide torch detectors, and heated anode detectors); laser imaging; mass spectroscopy; organic vapor analyzers; odorants; pressure decay methods; solid-state electrolytic-cell gas sensors; thermal conductivity leak detectors; and ultrasonic leak detectors.

  3. Using CO2 Lidar for Standoff Detection of a Perfluorocarbon Tracer in Air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser,J.H.; Smith, S.; Sedlacek, A.

    2008-02-06

    The Tag, Track and Location System Program (TTL) is investigating the use of PFTs as tracers for tagging and tracking items of interest or fallen soldiers. In order for the tagging and tracking to be valuable there must be a location system that can detect the PFTs. This report details the development of an infrared lidar platform for standoff detection of PFTs released into the air from a tagged object or person. Furthering work performed using a table top lidar system in an indoor environment; a mobile mini lidar platform was assembled using an existing Raman lidar platform, a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was then successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The lidar system was able to detect PFTs released into a vehicle from a distance of 100 meters. In its final, fully optimized configuration the lidar was capable of repeatedly detecting PFTs in the air released from tagged vehicles. Responses were immediate and clear. This report details the results of a proof-of-concept demonstration for standoff detection of a perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) using infrared lidar. The project is part of the Tag, Track and Location System Program and was performed under a contract with Tracer Detection Technology Corp. with funding from the Office of Naval Research. A lidar capable of detecting PFT releases at distance was assembled by modifying an existing Raman lidar platform by incorporating a grating tunable CO{sub 2} IR laser, Judson HgCdTe detector and miscellaneous folding optics and electronics. The lidar achieved {approx}200 ppb-m sensitivity in laboratory and indoor testing and was successfully demonstrated at an outdoor test. The demonstration test (scripted by the sponsor) consisted of three parked cars, two of which were tagged with the PFT. The cars were located 70 (closest) to 100 meters (farthest) from the lidar (the lidar beam path was limited by site constraints and was {approx}100 meters). When one door of each of the cars was opened (sequentially), the lidar was clearly able to determine which vehicles had been tagged and which one was not. The lidar is probably capable of greater than 0.5 kilometer standoff distances based on the extreme amount of signal return achieved (so much that the system had to be de-tuned). The BNL lidar system, while optimized to the extent possible with available parts and budget, was not as sensitive as it could be. Steps to improve the lidar are detailed in this report and include using a better laser system (for more stable power output), dual wavelengths (to improve the sensitivity and allow common mode noise reduction and to allow the use of the lidar in a scanning configuration), heterodyning (for range resolved PFT detection) and an off-axis optical configuration (for improved near field sensitivity).

  4. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting...

  5. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing...

  6. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture...

  7. Tracer Detection by Laser Spectroscopy for Applications in the Oil and Gas R. Nava, Texas A&M University, H. Schuessler, M. Fahes and H. Nasrabadi, Texas A&M University at Qatar, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuessler, Hans

    SPE 124689 Tracer Detection by Laser Spectroscopy for Applications in the Oil and Gas Industry R and more accurate option for applications in the oil and gas industry. The research work is currently being applications in the oil and gas industry. Chemical or radioactive tracers are used to label fluids from

  8. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  9. Detection of high molecular weight organic tracers in vegetation smoke samples by high-temperature gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elias, V.O.; Simoneit, B.R.T. ); Pereira, A.S.; Cardoso, J.N. ); Cabral, J.A. )

    1999-07-15

    High-temperature high-resolution gas chromatography (HTGC) is an established technique for the separation of complex mixtures of high molecular weight (HMW) compounds which do not elute when analyzed on conventional GC columns. The combination of this technique with mass spectrometry is not so common and application to aerosols is novel. The HTGC and HTGC-MS analyses of smoke samples taken by particle filtration from combustion of different species of plants provided the characterization of various classes of HMW compounds reported to occur for the first time in emissions from biomass burning. Among these components are a series of wax esters with up to 58 carbon numbers, aliphatic hydrocarbons, triglycerides, long chain methyl ketones, alkanols and a series of triterpenyl fatty acid esters which have been characterized as novel natural products. Long chain fatty acids with more than 32 carbon numbers are not present in the smoke samples analyzed. The HMW compounds in smoke samples from the burning of plants from Amazonia indicate the input of directly volatilized natural products in the original plants during their combustion. However, the major organic compounds extracted from smoke consist of a series of lower molecular weight polar components, which are not natural products but the result of the thermal breakdown of cellulose and lignin. In contrast, the HMW natural products may be suitable tracers for specific sources of vegetation combustion because they are emitted as particles without thermal alternation in the smoke and can thus be related directly to the original plant material.

  10. Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Phase III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TPF-5(171) Evaluation of Non-intrusive Traffic Detection Technologies Ð Phase III #12 not intrude into pavement for installation. ·! Sensors above, below or to the side of the roadway qualify;Miovision #12;Miovision #12;Laser-based sensors #12;PEEK AxleLight #12;TIRTL #12;TIRTL #12;#12;#12;#12;

  11. Particle detection technology for space-borne astroparticle experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Pohl

    2014-09-05

    I review the transfer of technology from accelerator-based equipment to space-borne astroparticle detectors. Requirements for detection, identification and measurement of ions, electrons and photons in space are recalled. The additional requirements and restrictions imposed by the launch process in manned and unmanned space flight, as well as by the hostile environment in orbit, are analyzed. Technology readiness criteria and risk mitigation strategies are reviewed. Recent examples are given of missions and instruments in orbit, under construction or in the planning phase.

  12. detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of 25 Million Grant to Improve Technological Capabilities for Detecting Nuclear Proliferation http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesncstateconsortium

  13. Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    2014-01-13

    This GNDD Technology Roadmap is intended to provide guidance to potential researchers and help management define research priorities to achieve technology advancements for ground-based nuclear explosion monitoring science being pursued by the Ground-based Nuclear Detonation Detection (GNDD) Team within the Office of Nuclear Detonation Detection in the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Four science-based elements were selected to encompass the entire scope of nuclear monitoring research and development (R&D) necessary to facilitate breakthrough scientific results, as well as deliver impactful products. Promising future R&D is delineated including dual use associated with the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Important research themes as well as associated metrics are identified along with a progression of accomplishments, represented by a selected bibliography, that are precursors to major improvements to nuclear explosion monitoring.

  14. Developments in Nanosecond Pulse Detection Methods and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. McFadden; N. D. R. Bhat; R. D. Ekers; C. W. James; D. Jones; S. J. Tingay; P. P. Roberts; C. J. Phillips; R. J. Protheroe

    2008-01-22

    A promising method for the detection of UHE neutrinos is the Lunar Cherenkov technique, which utilises Earth-based radio telescopes to detect the coherent Cherenkov radiation emitted when a UHE neutrino interacts in the outer layers of the Moon. The LUNASKA project aims to overcome the technological limitations of past experiments to utilise the next generation of radio telescopes in the search for these elusive particles. To take advantage of broad-bandwidth data from potentially thousands of antennas requires advances in signal processing technology. Here we describe recent developments in this field and their application in the search for UHE neutrinos, from a preliminary experiment using the first stage of an upgrade to the Australia Telescope Compact Array, to possibilities for fully utilising the completed Square Kilometre Array. We also explore a new real time technique for characterising ionospheric pulse dispersion which specifically measures ionospheric electron content that is line of sight to the moon.

  15. MICROWAVE IMAGING FOR DAMAGE DETECTION Microwave imaging technology has been developed to detect invisible damage such as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Flaviis, Franco

    MICROWAVE IMAGING FOR DAMAGE DETECTION By ABSTRACT Microwave imaging technology has been developed to construct 2D and 3D objects from the scattered microwave fields. Both numerical simulation and experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed microwave imaging technology in detecting voids inside

  16. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  17. General Technical Report PSW-GTR-243 New Technologies to Detect and Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General Technical Report PSW-GTR-243 124 New Technologies to Detect and Monitor Phytophthora technologies suitable for field use. These efforts have led to the development of a rapid Immunostrip

  18. Webinar: America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar, "America's Next Top Energy Innovator Runner-Up Presents Hydrogen Detection Technologies," originally presented on April 3, 2012.

  19. Breast Cancer Detection Using Communications Technology Hacer Varol 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouaynaya, Nidhal

    have attempted to investigate the efficiency of statistical-based methods as computer-aided diagnostic detection and classification (cancerous vs. benign) in ultrasound breast images based on a two- dimensional], the detection of microcalcifications in digital mammograms is formulated as a statistical change detection

  20. Plasmon-controlled fluorescence: A new detection technology Joseph R. Lakowicz*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Plasmon-controlled fluorescence: A new detection technology Joseph R. Lakowicz*a , Mustafa H fundamentally change and increase the capabilities of fluorescence technology. This change will be based to control the decay rates, location and direction of fluorophore emission. We refer to this technology

  1. LALP-07-085 Fall 2007 Nanowire technologies for radiation detection applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LALP-07-085 Fall 2007 Nanowire technologies for radiation detection applications Materials in nanowire form can be developed for radiation detection applications. Properties such as widely tunable and approaches for radiation detection. Focus Three teams at LANL have been developing independent approaches

  2. Dispersion of Passive Tracers in the Surfzone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedderson, Falk; Guza, Robert T.

    2007-01-01

    Dispersion of passive tracers in the surfzone Feddersen andThe dispersion of passive tracers, such as pollutants, in

  3. Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    of the underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain the injected CO2 for very long time. If a leakageSPE 166137 Using Big Data and Smart Field Technology for Detecting Leakage in a CO2 Storage sequestration of carbon dioxide is one of the most fascinating developing technologies in order to reduce

  4. Knowledge Transfer and Opinion Detection in the TREC2006 Blog Track Language Technologies Inst.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callan, Jamie

    Knowledge Transfer and Opinion Detection in the TREC2006 Blog Track Hui Yang Language Technologies Callan Language Technologies Inst. School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA Mellon University for TREC 2006 Blog track. The system performed a two-stage process: passage retrieval

  5. Tracer airflow measurement system (TRAMS)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Duo (Albany, CA)

    2007-04-24

    A method and apparatus for measuring fluid flow in a duct is disclosed. The invention uses a novel high velocity tracer injector system, an optional insertable folding mixing fan for homogenizing the tracer within the duct bulk fluid flow, and a perforated hose sampling system. A preferred embodiment uses CO.sub.2 as a tracer gas for measuring air flow in commercial and/or residential ducts. In extant commercial buildings, ducts not readily accessible by hanging ceilings may be drilled with readily plugged small diameter holes to allow for injection, optional mixing where desired using a novel insertable foldable mixing fan, and sampling hose.

  6. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  7. Assessment of NDE Technologies for Detection and Characterization of Stress Corrosion Cracking in LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Bond, Leonard J.; Montgomery, Robert O.

    2012-12-31

    Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in light water reactors (LWRs) has been a persistent form of degradation in the nuclear industry. Examples of SCC can be found for a range of materials in boiling and pressurized water reactor environments, including carbon steels, stainless steels, and nickel-base stainless alloys. The evolution of SCC is often characterized by a long initiation stage followed by a phase of more rapid crack growth to failure. This provides a relatively short window of opportunity to detect the start of observable SCC, and it is conceivable that SCC could progress from initiation to failure between subsequent examinations when managed by applying periodic in-service inspection techniques. Implementation of advanced aging management paradigms in the current fleet of LWRs will require adaptation of existing measurement technologies and development of new technologies to perform on-line measurements during reactor operation to ensure timely detection of material degradation and to support the implementation of advanced diagnostics and prognostics. This paper considers several non-destructive examination (NDE) technologies with known sensitivity to detection of indicators for SCC initiation and/or propagation, and assesses these technologies with respect to their ability to detect and accurately characterize the significance of an SCC flaw. Potential strategies to improve SCC inspection or monitoring performance are offered to benefit management of SCC degradation in LWRs.

  8. Sub-Lithographic Patterning Technology for Nanowire Model Catalysts and DNA Label-Free Hybridization Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bokor, Jeffrey

    Sub-Lithographic Patterning Technology for Nanowire Model Catalysts and DNA Label were used as a mold in nanoimprint lithography and lift-off patterning of sub-30nm platinum nanowires a label-free tool for DNA hybridization detection based on measuring capacitance changes in the gap

  9. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, Tom

    2012-02-15

    Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  10. SYNTHESIS OF DIVERSE TRACERS ON EWOD MICRODEVICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY (PET)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , spatial, and temporal measurement of biochemical processes. Applications of PET include studying disease-labeled PET tracers with electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) technology [3],[4], the digital microfluidicSYNTHESIS OF DIVERSE TRACERS ON EWOD MICRODEVICE FOR POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY (PET) S. Chen1

  11. The evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, R.H.; Workhoven, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Interior Intrusion Detection Technology began at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in 1975 as part of the Fixed Facilities Physical Protection Research and Development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy in connection with their nuclear safeguards effort. This paper describes the evolution of Interior Intrusion Detection Technology at Sandia National Laboratories from the beginning of the Interior Sensor Laboratory to the present. This Laboratory was established in 1976 to evaluate commercial interior intrusion sensors and to assist in site-specific intrusion detection system designs. Examples of special test techniques and new test equipment that were developed at the Lab are presented, including the Sandia Intruder Motion Simulator (SIMS), the Sensor and Environment Monitor (SEM), and the Sandia Interior Robot (SIR). We also discuss new sensors and unique sensor combinations developed when commercial sensors were unavailable and the future application of expert systems.

  12. A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene Sulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  13. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers. Second technical annual progress report, October 1991--September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1992-12-31

    This second annual report on innovative uses of tracers for reservoir characterization contains four sections each describing a novel use of oilfield tracers. The first section describes and illustrates the use of a new single-well tracer test to estimate wettability. This test consists of the injection of brine containing tracers followed by oil containing tracers, a shut-in period to allow some of the tracers to react, and then production of the tracers. The inclusion of the oil injection slug with tracers is unique to this test, and this is what makes the test work. We adapted our chemical simulator, UTCHEM, to enable us to study this tracer method and made an extensive simulation study to evaluate the effects of wettability based upon characteristic curves for relative permeability and capillary pressure for differing wetting states typical of oil reservoirs. The second section of this report describes a new method for analyzing interwell tracer data based upon a type-curve approach. Theoretical frequency response functions were used to build type curves of ``transfer function`` and ``phase spectrum`` that have dimensionless heterogeneity index as a parameter to characterize a stochastic permeability field. We illustrate this method by analyzing field tracer data. The third section of this report describes a new theory for interpreting interwell tracer data in terms of channeling and dispersive behavior for reservoirs. Once again, a stochastic approach to reservoir description is taken. The fourth section of this report describes our simulation of perfluorocarbon gas tracers. This new tracer technology developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being tested at the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California. We report preliminary simulations made of these tracers in one of the oil reservoirs under evaluation with these tracers in this field. Our compostional simulator (UTCOMP) was used for this simulation study.

  14. Summary tables of six commercially available entry control and contraband detection technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, John Anthony

    2005-07-01

    Existing contraband detection and entry control devices such as metal detectors, X-ray machines, and radiation monitors were investigated for their capability to operate in an automated environment. In addition, a limited number of new devices for detection of explosives, chemicals, and biological agents were investigated for their feasibility for inclusion in future physical security systems. The tables in this document resulted from this investigation, which was part of a conceptual design upgrade for the United States Mints. This summary of commercially available technologies was written to provide a reference for physical security upgrades at other sites.

  15. Systematic Assessment of Neutron and Gamma Backgrounds Relevant to Operational Modeling and Detection Technology Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Daniel E.; Hornback, Donald Eric; Johnson, Jeffrey O.; Nicholson, Andrew D.; Patton, Bruce W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Miller, Thomas Martin; Ayaz-Maierhafer, Birsen

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of a two year effort to systematically assess neutron and gamma backgrounds relevant to operational modeling and detection technology implementation. The first year effort focused on reviewing the origins of background sources and their impact on measured rates in operational scenarios of interest. The second year has focused on the assessment of detector and algorithm performance as they pertain to operational requirements against the various background sources and background levels.

  16. Low background high efficiency radiocesium detection system based on positron emission tomography technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Ogata, Yoshimune [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)] [Department of Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-1-20 Daiko-Minami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

    2013-09-15

    After the 2011 nuclear power plant accident at Fukushima, radiocesium contamination in food became a serious concern in Japan. However, low background and high efficiency radiocesium detectors are expensive and huge, including semiconductor germanium detectors. To solve this problem, we developed a radiocesium detector by employing positron emission tomography (PET) technology. Because {sup 134}Cs emits two gamma photons (795 and 605 keV) within 5 ps, they can selectively be measured with coincidence. Such major environmental gamma photons as {sup 40}K (1.46 MeV) are single photon emitters and a coincidence measurement reduces the detection limit of radiocesium detectors. We arranged eight sets of Bi{sub 4}Ge{sub 3}O{sub 12} (BGO) scintillation detectors in double rings (four for each ring) and measured the coincidence between these detectors using PET data acquisition system. A 50 × 50 × 30 mm BGO was optically coupled to a 2 in. square photomultiplier tube (PMT). By measuring the coincidence, we eliminated most single gamma photons from the energy distribution and only detected those from {sup 134}Cs at an average efficiency of 12%. The minimum detectable concentration of the system for the 100 s acquisition time is less than half of the food monitor requirements in Japan (25 Bq/kg). These results show that the developed radiocesium detector based on PET technology is promising to detect low level radiocesium.

  17. National Biomedical Tracer Facility. Project definition study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafer, R.

    1995-02-14

    We request a $25 million government-guaranteed, interest-free loan to be repaid over a 30-year period for construction and initial operations of a cyclotron-based National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF) in North Central Texas. The NBTF will be co-located with a linear accelerator-based commercial radioisotope production facility, funded by the private sector at approximately $28 million. In addition, research radioisotope production by the NBTF will be coordinated through an association with an existing U.S. nuclear reactor center that will produce research and commercial radioisotopes through neutron reactions. The combined facilities will provide the full range of technology for radioisotope production and research: fast neutrons, thermal neutrons, and particle beams (H{sup -}, H{sup +}, and D{sup +}). The proposed NBTF facility includes an 80 MeV, 1 mA H{sup -} cyclotron that will produce proton-induced (neutron deficient) research isotopes.

  18. Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related to the aging of population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Patent analysis, detection of new markets for employment Example of technologies related normes : complémentarités et conflits, Tours : France (2013)" #12;2 Patent analysis, detection of new Patent Analysis). The world patent database from the EPO (the European Patent Office), covers more than

  19. RCUT: A Non-Invasive Method for Detection, Location, and Quantification of Radiological Contaminants in Pipes and Ducts - 12514

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bratton, Wesley L.; Maresca, Joseph W. Jr.; Beck, Deborah A.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Characterization Using Tracers (RCUT) is a minimally invasive method for detection and location of residual radiological contamination in pipes and ducts. The RCUT technology utilizes reactive gaseous tracers that dissociate when exposed to gamma and/or beta radiation emitting from a radiological contaminant in a pipe or duct. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) was selected as a tracer for this radiological application, because it is a chemically inert gas that is both nonflammable, nontoxic, and breaks down when exposed to gamma radiation. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the tracer pair of SF{sub 6} and O{sub 2} formed SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} when exposed to a gamma or beta radioactive field, which indicated the presence of radiological contamination. Field application of RCUT involves first injecting the reactive tracers into the pipe to fill the pipe being inspected and allowing sufficient time for the tracer to interact with any contaminants present. This is followed by the injection of an inert gas at one end of the pipe to push the reactive tracer at a known or constant flow velocity along the pipe and then out the exit and sampling port at the end of the pipeline where its concentration is measured by a gas chromatograph. If a radiological contaminant is present in the pipe being tested, the presence of SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. The time of arrival of the SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} can be used to locate the contaminant. If the pipe is free of radiological contamination, no SO{sub 2}F{sub 2} will be detected. RCUT and PCUT are both effective technologies that can be used to detect contamination within pipelines without the need for mechanical or human inspection. These methods can be used to detect, locate, and/or estimate the volume of a variety of radioactive materials and hazardous chemicals such as chlorinated solvents, petroleum products, and heavy metals. While further optimization is needed for RCUT, the key first step of identification of a tracer compound appropriate for the application of detecting radioactive pipeline contamination through the detection of decomposition products of SF{sub 6} has been demonstrated. Other tracer gases that will also undergo radiolysis will be considered in the future. The next step for the RCUT development process is conducting laboratory scale tests using short pipelines to define analytical requirements, establish performance boundaries, and develop strategies for lower exposure levels. Studies to identify additional analytical techniques using equipment that is more field rugged than a GC/MS would also be beneficial. (authors)

  20. 5, 58415874, 2005 Ozone/tracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ACPD 5, 5841­5874, 2005 Ozone/tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller et al. Title Page Discussions Impact of mixing and chemical change on ozone-tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller 1 Commons License. 5841 #12;ACPD 5, 5841­5874, 2005 Ozone/tracer relations in the polar vortex R. M¨uller et

  1. Petroleum characterization by perfluorocarbon tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senum, G.I.; Fajer, R.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Harris, B.R. Jr. (USDOE Naval Petroleum Reserves in California, Tupman, CA (United States)); DeRose, W.E. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Ottaviani, W.L. (Chevron U.S.A., Inc., Bakersfield, CA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs), a class of six compounds, were used to help characterize the Shallow Oil Zone (SOZ) reservoir at the Naval Petroleum Reserve in California (NPRC) at Elk Hills. The SOZ reservoir is undergoing a pilot gas injection program to assess the technical feasibility and economic viability of injecting gas into the SOZ for improved oil recovery. PFTs were utilized in the pilot gas injection to qualitatively assess the extent of the pilot gas injection so as to determine the degree of gas containment within the SOZ reservoir.

  2. Tracers for Characterizing Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen Wright; George Redden; Carl D. Palmer; Harry Rollins; Mark Stone; Mason Harrup; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-02-01

    Information about the times of thermal breakthrough and subsequent rates of thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) is necessary for reservoir management, designing fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting economic return. Thermal breakthrough in heterogeneous porous media can be estimated using conservative tracers and assumptions about heat transfer rates; however, tracers that undergo temperature-dependent changes can provide more detailed information about the thermal profile along the flow path through the reservoir. To be effectively applied, the thermal reaction rates of such temperature sensitive traces must be well characterized for the range of conditions that exist in geothermal systems. Reactive tracers proposed in the literature include benzoic and carboxylic acids (Adams) and organic esters and amides (Robinson et al.); however, the practical temperature range over which these tracers can be applied (100-275°C) is somewhat limited. Further, for organic esters and amides, little is known about their sorption to the reservoir matrix and how such reactions impact data interpretation. Another approach involves tracers where the reference condition is internal to the tracer itself. Two examples are: 1) racemization of polymeric amino acids, and 2) mineral thermoluminescence. In these cases internal ratios of states are measured rather than extents of degradation and mass loss. Racemization of poly-L-lactic acid (for example) is temperature sensitive and therefore can be used as a temperature-recording tracer depending on the rates of racemization and stability of the amino acids. Heat-induced quenching of thermoluminescence of pre-irradiated LiF can also be used. To protect the tracers from alterations (extraneous reactions, dissolution) in geothermal environments we are encapsulating the tracers in core-shell colloidal structures that will subsequently be tested for their ability to be transported and to protect the tracers from incidental reactions. We review the criteria for practical reactive tracers, which serves as the basis for experimental testing and characterization and can be used to identify other potential candidate tracers. We will also discuss the information obtainable from individual tracers, which has implications for using multiple tracers to obtain information about the thermal history of a reservoir. We will provide an update on our progress for conducting proof-of-principle tests for reactive tracers in the Raft River geothermal system.

  3. Tracer Gas as a Practical Field Diagnostic Tool for Assessing Duct System Leaks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummings, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    diagnostic tools for detecting and locating leaks in the air distribution system. The tracer gas tests described are a good complement to these tools in the detection, location, and measurement of duct leakage. Testing for house infiltration once with the air...

  4. Novel Multidimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-Well Diagnostics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs...

  5. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measuring Thermal Evolution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Tracer Interpretation Project Description The concepts and theory behind the use of heat-sensitive tracers to study the thermal evolution of geothermal reservoirs was...

  6. Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending...

  7. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  8. Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternative Combustion Regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mack, John Hunter; Flowers, Daniel L.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    Section B (NIMB) Using Biofuel Tracers to Study Alternativeinjection. We investigate biofuel HCCI combustion, and use

  9. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1996-06-01

    Extensive tracer testing is expected to take place at the C-well complex in the Nevada Test Site as part of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The C-well complex consists of one pumping well, C3, and two injection wells, C1 and C2 into which tracer will be introduced. The goal of this research was to provide USGS with numerous tracers to completed these tests. Several classes of fluorinated organic acids have been evaluated. These include numerous isomers of fluorinated benzoic acids, cinnamic acids, and salicylic acids. Also several derivatives of 2-hydroxy nicotinic acid (pyridone) have been tested. The stability of these compounds was determined using batch and column tests. Ames testing (mutagenicity/carcinogenicity) was conducted on the fluorinated benzoic acids and a literature review of toxicity of the fluorobenzoates and three perfluoro aliphatic acids was prepared. Solubilities were measured and method development work was performed to optimize the detection of these compounds. A Quality Assurance (QA) Program was developed under existing DOE and USGS guidelines. The program includes QA procedures and technical standard operating procedures. A tracer test, using sodium iodide, was performed at the C-well complex. HRC chemists performed analyses on site, to provide real time data for the USGS hydrologists and in the laboratories at UNLV. Over 2,500 analyses were performed. This report provides the results of the laboratory experiments and literature reviews used to evaluate the potential tracers and reports on the results of the iodide C-well tracer test.

  10. Single molecule detection using charge-coupled device array technology. Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denton, M.B.

    1992-07-29

    A technique for the detection of single fluorescent chromophores in a flowing stream is under development. This capability is an integral facet of a rapid DNA sequencing scheme currently being developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. In previous investigations, the detection sensitivity was limited by the background Raman emission from the water solvent. A detection scheme based on a novel mode of operating a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) is being developed which should greatly enhance the discrimination between fluorescence from a single molecule and the background Raman scattering from the solvent. Register shifts between rows in the CCD are synchronized with the sample flow velocity so that fluorescence from a single molecule is collected in a single moving charge packet occupying an area approaching that of a single pixel while the background is spread evenly among a large number of pixels. Feasibility calculations indicate that single molecule detection should be achieved with an excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  11. Carbon nanotube synthesis and detection : limiting the environmental impact of novel technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plata, Desirée L

    2009-01-01

    Driven by commercial promise, the carbon nanotube (CNT) industry is growing rapidly, yet little is known about the potential environmental impacts of these novel materials. In particular, there are no methods to detect ...

  12. Technolog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focuses on multi-scale, multiphysics approaches to understanding natural systems, "engineering the earth" with sensing and drilling technologies and characterizing geomaterials...

  13. Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    Diagnosis of Ocean Mesoscale Eddy Tracer Fluxes Baylor Fox-Kemper U. Colorado-Boulder, with Scott - 10,000 km, yrs->centuries) => resolved · Mesoscale variability (10 - 100 km, mo -> yrs) => resolved) => parameterized Boundary Layer Models Mesoscale resolving models Climate models Submesoscale variability Coupling

  14. Forest Fire Advanced System Technology (FFAST): A Conceptual Design for Detection and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is developing a data system to provide near-real-time forest fire information to fire management at the fire of the Technical Staff, Observational Systems Division. California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion for the scanner units were difficult to find and in some cases had to be custom built. The Fire Logistics

  15. Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. This project will test smartdiffusive tracers for measuring heat exchange.

  16. Constraining ultra large-scale cosmology with multiple tracers in optical and radio surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, David

    2015-01-01

    Multiple tracers of the cosmic density field, with different bias, number and luminosity evolution, can be used to measure the large-scale properties of the Universe. We show how an optimal combination of tracers can be used to detect general-relativistic effects in the observed density of sources. We forecast for the detectability of these effects, as well as measurements of primordial non-Gaussianity and large-scale lensing magnification with current and upcoming large-scale structure experiments. In particular we quantify the significance of these detections in the short term with experiments such as the Dark Energy Survey (DES), and in the long term with the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). We review the main observational challenges that must be overcome to carry out these measurements.

  17. Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source \\Lambda Jinqiao Duan Clemson University sources on the pattern formation and long­time behavior of concentration pro­ files of passive tracers Introduction The dispersion of passive tracers (or passive scalars) occur in various geo­ physical

  18. Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive Tracer Dispersion with Random or Periodic Source Jinqiao Duan Clemson University sources on the pattern formation and long-time behavior of concentration pro- #12;les of passive tracers #12;1 Introduction The dispersion of passive tracers (or passive scalars) occur in various geo

  19. Recover Act. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Matthew W.

    2014-05-16

    The prediction of the geothermal system efficiency is strong linked to the character of the flow system that connects injector and producer wells. If water flow develops channels or “short circuiting” between injection and extraction wells thermal sweep is poor and much of the reservoir is left untapped. The purpose of this project was to understand how channelized flow develops in fracture geothermal reservoirs and how it can be measured in the field. We explored two methods of assessing channelization: hydraulic connectivity tests and tracer tests. These methods were tested at a field site using two verification methods: ground penetrating radar (GPR) images of saline tracer and heat transfer measurements using distributed temperature sensing (DTS). The field site for these studies was the Altona Flat Fractured Rock Research Site located in northeastern New York State. Altona Flat Rock is an experimental site considered a geologic analog for some geothermal reservoirs given its low matrix porosity. Because soil overburden is thin, it provided unique access to saturated bedrock fractures and the ability image using GPR which does not effectively penetrate most soils. Five boreholes were drilled in a “five spot” pattern covering 100 m2 and hydraulically isolated in a single bedding plane fracture. This simple system allowed a complete characterization of the fracture. Nine small diameter boreholes were drilled from the surface to just above the fracture to allow the measurement of heat transfer between the fracture and the rock matrix. The focus of the hydraulic investigation was periodic hydraulic testing. In such tests, rather than pumping or injection in a well at a constant rate, flow is varied to produce an oscillating pressure signal. This pressure signal is sensed in other wells and the attenuation and phase lag between the source and receptor is an indication of hydraulic connection. We found that these tests were much more effective than constant pumping tests in identifying a poorly connected well. As a result, we were able to predict which well pairs would demonstrate channelized flow. The focus of the tracer investigation was multi-ionic tests. In multi-ionic tests several ionic tracers are injected simultaneously and the detected in a nearby pumping well. The time history of concentration, or breakthrough curve, will show a separation of the tracers. Anionic tracers travel with the water but cationic tracer undergo chemical exchange with cations on the surface of the rock. The degree of separation is indicative of the surface area exposed to the tracer. Consequently, flow channelization will tend to decrease the separation in the breakthrough. Estimation of specific surface area (the ration of fracture surface area to formation volume) is performed through matching the breakthrough curve with a transport model. We found that the tracer estimates of surface area were confirmed the prediction of channelized flow between well pairs produced by the periodic hydraulic tests. To confirm that the hydraulic and tracer tests were correctly predicting channelize flow, we imaged the flow field using surface GPR. Saline water was injected between the well pairs which produced a change in the amplitude and phase of the reflected radar signal. A map was produced of the migration of saline tracer from these tests which qualitatively confirmed the flow channelization predicted by the hydraulic and tracer tests. The resolution of the GPR was insufficient to quantitatively estimate swept surface area, however. Surface GPR is not applicable in typical geothermal fields because the penetration depths do not exceed 10’s of meters. Nevertheless, the method of using of phase to measure electrical conductivity and the assessment of antennae polarization represent a significant advancement in the field of surface GPR. The effect of flow character on fracture / rock thermal exchange was evaluated using heated water as a tracer. Water elevated 30 degrees C above the formation water was circulated between two wells pairs. One

  20. Single Well Injection Withdrawl Tracer Tests for Proppant Detection -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 UnlimitedShiftwater vapor andParticle Database of

  1. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar Fuel ProductionRecoverable15/2008Technologies Technologies

  2. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired Solar FuelTechnology /newsroom/_assets/images/s-icon.png Technology

  3. Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexico IndependentMatter and Technologies R&D

  4. Category:Tracer Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID Roadmap ContactRockEuropeTelluricTracer Testing

  5. Tracer Testing at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Pyrene Tetrasulfonate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conducted at the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal reservoir in order to determine fluid-flow processes and to evaluate candidate tracers for use in hydrothermal systems. These...

  6. Validation of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir...

  7. Verification of Geothermal Tracer Methods in Highly Constrained...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wells, much of the reservoir is left untapped. Artificial tracers added to the injected water are used to estimate the potential for short circuiting in geothermal reservoirs,...

  8. Journal of Counter-Ordnance Technology (Sixth International Sym um on Technology and Mine Problem, NPS, 10-13 Uncertainty in Acoustic Mine Detection Due to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    alternative to nuclear submarines. Technological advancements in battery design have resulted in higherJournal of Counter-Ordnance Technology (Sixth International Sym um on Technology and Mine Problem advantage of nuclear submarines is negligible to these countries. Mines come in a multitude of variations

  9. Use of Tracers to Characterize Fractures in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Objectives: Measure interwell fracture surface area and fracture spacing using sorbing tracers; measure fracture surface areas adjacent to a single geothermal well using tracers and injection/backflow techniques; design, fabricate and test a downhole instrument for measuring fracture flow following a hydraulic stimulation experiment.

  10. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  11. Following the flow: tracer particles in astrophysical fluid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genel, Shy; Nelson, Dylan; Sijacki, Debora; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-01-01

    We present two independent numerical schemes for passive tracer particles in the hydrodynamical moving-mesh code Arepo, and compare their performance for various problems, from simple tests to cosmological simulations. The purpose of tracer particles is to allow the flow to be followed in a Lagrangian way, reliably tracing the evolution of the fluid. Such tracer particles can subsequently measure any local instantaneous fluid property, thereby recording the thermodynamical history of individual fluid parcels. We begin by discussing "velocity field tracers", which are advected according to the local velocity field of the fluid, and which have been commonly used in the literature. We find that such tracers do not in general follow the mass flow correctly, particularly in complex flows, and explain why this is the case. This weakness of the method can result in orders-of-magnitude biases in simulations of driven turbulence and in cosmological simulations of structure formation, rendering the velocity field trace...

  12. Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objective: To develop and demonstrate a new class of tracers?semiconductor nanoparticles(quantum dots)?that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs.

  13. Preliminary Investigation of Tracer Gas Reaeration Method for Shallow Bays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Sarah H.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Accurate estimates of surface exchange rates for volatile pollutants in bays are needed to allow predictions of pollutant movement and retention time. The same types of estimates can be used to calculate reaeration rates. The tracer gas technique...

  14. Microfluidic Investigation of Tracer Dye Diffusion in Alumina Nanofluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozturk, Serdar 1979-

    2012-10-05

    on enhanced mass diffusion and the possibility of tailoring mass transport by direct manipulation of molecular diffusion. Therefore, a microfluidic approach capable of directly probing tracer diffusion between nanoparticle-laden fluid streams was developed...

  15. Tracer advection by steady groundwater flow in a stratified aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sposito, Garrison; Weeks, Scott W.

    1997-01-02

    The perfectly stratified aquifer has often been investigated as a simple, tractable model for exploring new theoretical issues in subsurface hydrology. Adopting this approach, we show that steady groundwater flows in the perfectly stratified aquifer are always confined to a set of nonintersecting permanent surfaces, on which both streamlines and vorticity lines lie. This foliation of the flow domain exists as well for steady groundwater flows in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer. In the present model example it is a direct consequence of the existence of a stream function, we then demonstrate that tracer plume advection by steady groundwater flow in a perfectly stratified aquifer is never ergodic, regardless of the initial size of the tracer plume. This nonergodicity, which holds also for tracer advection in any isotropic, spatially heterogeneous aquifer, implies that stochastic theories of purely advective tracer plume movement err in assuming ergodic behavior to simplify probabilistic calculations of plume spatial concentration moments.

  16. A Tracer Test Using Ethanol as a Two-Phase Tracer and 2-Naphthalene

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |RecentSulfonate as a Liquid-Phase Tracer at the

  17. Journal of Counter-Ordnance Technology (Fifth International Symposium on Technology and Mine Problem) 1 Acoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    Problem) 1 Acoustic Mine Detection Using the Navy's CASS/GRAB Model Peter C. Chu, Carlos Cintron, Steven D the Navy's Comprehensive Acoustic Simulation System/Gaussian Ray Bundle (CASS/GRAB) model. Sound speed needs in that region. Index Terms--Acoustic mine hunting, Navy's comprehensive acoustic simulation

  18. Resuspension rates from aged inert-tracer sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1982-11-01

    Wind-caused particle resuspension rates were investigated with molybdenum tracers at two circular resuspension sites in the Hanford area. The tracer particles were calcium molybdate. The radii of each circular tracer-source area were 22.9 m and 29.9 m respectively for tracer deposited on 2 October 1973 and 29 May 1979. Resuspension rates were investigated by sampling resuspended tracer with air sampling equipment mounted as a function of height on a centrally located sampling tower at each site. Sampling equipment was operated as a function of wind speed increments in order to investigate resuspension rates, wind speed dependencies of resuspension rates, and for subsequent comparisons of resuspension rate changes as a function of time for constant wind speed ranges. Experimental results are reported for measurements over several years. Resuspension rates ranged from about 10/sup -13/ to 10/sup -6/ fraction of the tracer source resuspended per second. Resuspension rates tended to increase with increasing wind speed. At one investigation site, resuspension rates were nearly constant, except for seasonal variations, for a four-year time period. Resuspension rates appear higher in the autumn than in the spring and summer.

  19. HYDROGEL TRACER BEADS: THE DEVELOPMENT, MODIFICATION, AND TESTING OF AN INNOVATIVE TRACER FOR BETTER UNDERSTANDING LNAPL TRANSPORT IN KARST AQUIFERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda Laskoskie, Harry M. Edenborn, and Dorothy J. Vesper

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this specific research task is to develop proxy tracers that mimic contaminant movement to better understand and predict contaminant fate and transport in karst aquifers. Hydrogel tracer beads are transported as a separate phase than water and can used as a proxy tracer to mimic the transport of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL). They can be constructed with different densities, sizes & chemical attributes. This poster describes the creation and optimization of the beads and the field testing of buoyant beads, including sampling, tracer analysis, and quantitative analysis. The buoyant beads are transported ahead of the dissolved solutes, suggesting that light NAPL (LNAPL) transport in karst may occur faster than predicted from traditional tracing techniques. The hydrogel beads were successful in illustrating this enhanced transport.

  20. Cancer optical imaging using fluorescent nanoparticles Developing imaging technologies and molecular probes that allow cancer detection at its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Cancer optical imaging using fluorescent nanoparticles Developing imaging technologies in the drug development process very early in the laboratory, during the translation phase from in vitro to the acquisition of molecular information including Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single photon emission

  1. IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 20, NO. 6, MARCH 15, 2008 443 VCSEL Optoelectronic Biosensor for Detection of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Brian

    for developing countries. It often requires sensi- tive tools that can detect and quantify interactions, 2007. This work was developed under the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 USA. B. T. Cunningham is with the Department of Electrical

  2. Initiative for Explosives Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of electromagnetic radiation, or to detect with currently fielded technologies. Approaches to improving detectionInitiative for Explosives Detection Highly Concealed Bulk Explosives Detection This focus area emphasizes the detection of explosives or IEDs hidden in vehicles, buildings or various types of containers

  3. In Situ Tracer method for establishing the presence and predicting the activity of heavy metal-reducing microbes in the subsurface. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatfield, K.

    2003-07-01

    Tracer method to establish presence and distribution of chromium reducing microbes. The primary objective of this research was to establish an in situ tracer method for detecting the presence. distribution. and activity of subsurface heavy metal-reducing microorganisms. Research focused on microbial systems responsible for the reduction of chromium and a suite of biotracers coupled to the reduction process. The tracer method developed may be used to characterize sites contaminated with chromium or expedite bioremediation: and although research focused on chromium. the method can be easily extended to other metals, organics, and radionuclides. This brief final report contains three major sections. The first identifies specific products of the research effort such as students supported and publications. The second section briefly presents major research findings, while the last section summarizes the overall research effort.

  4. COS: A new tracer to constrain photosynthetic CO2 fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    COS: A new tracer to constrain photosynthetic CO2 fluxes Dan Yakir1, Max Berkelhammer2, Hulin Chen2 COS (110-190) Indirect CS2, DMS (149-330) Unknown (~600) Stratosphere COSàSO2 OH uptake (82-110) Global COS Budget (Gg S a-1; Kettle et al., 2002; Montzka et al., 2007; Berry et al., 2013 ) Mean

  5. THE EFFECT OF TRANSVERSE MIXING ON TRACER DISPERSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Hardware Data Acquisition And Analysis Software Experimental Procedure Analysis Procedure Results: Taylor. The theoretical response for linear Taylor dispersion was matched to the data to determine the non-linear Of Tracer Valve Constant-pressure Reservoir Design Schematic Drawing Of Electrode Circuit Results: Run 16

  6. Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    to manage global warming (Wiedinmyer, 2010) As land managers consider increased burning, air quality our understanding of pollutant emission rates associated with prescribed forest burns. Methods Site tracer and pollutant dispersion patterns. Modeling The WindTrax stochastic particle dispersion model

  7. Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

  8. Dispersivity estimates from a tracer experiment in a sandy aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallants, D.; Espino, A.; Van Hoorick, M.; Feyen, J.; Vandenberghe, N.; Loy, W.

    2000-04-01

    The success or failure of transport models in predicting the migration of a contaminant plume is ground water depends to a large extent on the quality of flow and transport parameters used. In this study, the authors investigate the spatial variability in the tracer velocity and dispersivity in a shallow sandy aquifer in northern Belgium. Based on hydraulic conductivity measurements on cores sampled along a vertical profile, the aquifer was found to be mildly heterogeneous, i.e., with the variance of the log-transformed conductivity K, {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnK}, equal to 0.22. By means of a natural gradient tracer experiment, transport of a chloride tracer was investigated in a three-dimensional network of multilevel point samplers (MLS). Least squares fitting of a two-dimensional transport model to the individual breakthrough curves resulted in an average longitudinal dispersivity that was 10 times larger than the transverse dispersivity. The results further showed the existence of a dispersion-scale effect whereby the depth-averaged longitudinal dispersivity increases with increasing travel distance. The average longitudinal dispersivity corresponding to a travel distance of 10 m was equal to 0.2 m. The authors finally show that theoretical expressions for the macroscopic dispersivity tensor, which require input on hydraulic conductivity heterogeneity, could be used here to approximate the observed dispersive behavior. These conceptually simple models are useful to estimate macroscopic dispersivities when no tracer data are available.

  9. High upwind concentrations observed during an upslope tracer event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In February of 1991 the Rocky Flats Plant conducted twelve tracer experiments to validate an emergency response dispersion model known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985). Experimenters released 140 to 260 kilograms of inert tracer gas (sulfur hexafloride) from the plant over an 11 hour period. During each release, one hundred and sixty-five samples, most of which formed concentric rings of 8 and 16 km radius from the plant, recorded cumulative hourly concentrations of the tracer at one meter above ground level (AGL). Figure 1 contains a depiction of the sampler location, the terrain, and the meteorological stations available within the tracer study area. Brown (1991) describes the experimental setup in more detail. The subject of this paper is an event that occurred early in the fifth experiment, on February 9, 1991. In this experiment, tracer material released from 13:00 to 17:00 LST appeared both downwind and upwind of the source, with the highest concentrations upwind. During the fifth experiment, high pressure in Utah produced mostly sunny skis around Rocky Flats. For most of the day, one could find moderate (5 to 10 ms{sup {minus}1}) northerly (from the North) flow within the 700 to 500 mb level of the atmosphere (approximately 3000 to 5500 meters above Mean Sea Level (MSL)). Synoptic scale motions were isolated enough from the surface layer and heating was great enough to produce a 1 km deep upslope flow (flow from the East to the West) by late afternoon. The winds reversed and became downslope at approximately 17:30 LST.

  10. Almost Periodic Passive Tracer Dispersion \\Lambda Hongjun Gao 1 , Jinqiao Duan 2 and Xinchu Fu 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almost Periodic Passive Tracer Dispersion \\Lambda Hongjun Gao 1 , Jinqiao Duan 2 and Xinchu Fu 3 1 the impact of external sources on the pat­ tern formation of concentration profiles of passive tracers Science Foundation Grant DMS­ 9704345 and the UK EPSRC Grant GR/M36335. 1 #12; Key words: Passive tracer

  11. Passive tracer patchiness and particle trajectory stability in incompressible two-dimensional flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olascoaga, Maria Josefina

    Passive tracer patchiness and particle trajectory stability in incompressible two-dimensional flows in Geophysics (2003) 1:1­8 Nonlinear Processes in Geophysics c European Geophysical Society 2003 Passive tracer." This leads to patchiness in the evolution of passive tracer distribu- tions. Also, it is argued

  12. Passive tracer reconstruction as a least-squares problem with a semi-Lagrangian constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Passive tracer reconstruction as a least-squares problem with a semi-Lagrangian constraint-dimensional, nonstationary, passive tracer field in the ocean with open boundaries and a known velocity field. The observations, spatial smoothing terms and passive tracer conservation equation were included as weak

  13. Numerical simulations of radon as an in situ partitioning tracer for quantifying NAPL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semprini, Lewis

    Numerical simulations of radon as an in situ partitioning tracer for quantifying NAPL contamination­pull partitioning tracer tests using radon-222 to quantify non- aqueous phase liquid contamination. J. Contam. Hydrol. 58, 129­146] of push­pull tests using radon as a naturally occurring partitioning tracer

  14. SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    SOURCES AND EFFECTS OF MINING-RELATED AND NATURAL ACID ROCK DRAINAGE QUANTIFIED USING TRACER Acid Rock Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison County, Colorado of Mining-Related and Natural Acid Drainage Quantified Using Tracer Dilution, Coal Creek Watershed, Gunnison

  15. Ring Nebulae: Tracers of the CNO Nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mesa-Delgado, A; García-Rojas, J

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from spectroscopic data in the optical range of the Galactic ring nebulae NGC 6888, G2:4+1:4, RCW 58 and Sh2-308. Deep observations with long exposure times were carried out at the 6.5m Clay Telescope and at the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias. In NGC 6888, recombination lines of C II, O II and N II are detected with signal-to-noise ratios higher than 8. The chemical content of NGC 6888 is discussed within the chemical enrichment predicted by evolution models of massive stars. For all nebulae, a forthcoming work will content in-depth details about observations, analysis and final results (Esteban et al. 2015, in prep.).

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, What is the skill of ocean tracers in reducing uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haran, Murali

    in current Earth system models and (ii) imperfect knowledge of model parameters. Ocean tracers observa- tions

  17. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-08-30

    In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

  18. Utilizing rare earth elements as tracers in high TDS reservoir brines in CCS applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McLing, Travis; Smith, William; Smith, Robert

    2014-12-31

    In this paper we report the result of research associated with the testing of a procedures necessary for utilizing natural occurring trace elements, specifically the Rare Earth Elements (REE) as geochemical tracers in Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) applications. Trace elements, particularly REE may be well suited to serve as in situ tracers for monitoring geochemical conditions and the migration of CO?-charged waters within CCS storage systems. We have been conducting studies to determine the efficacy of using REE as a tracer and characterization tool in the laboratory, at a CCS analogue site in Soda Springs, Idaho, and at amore »proposed CCS reservoir at the Rock Springs Uplift, Wyoming. Results from field and laboratory studies have been encouraging and show that REE may be an effective tracer in CCS systems and overlying aquifers. In recent years, a series of studies using REE as a natural groundwater tracer have been conducted successfully at various locations around the globe. Additionally, REE and other trace elements have been successfully used as in situ tracers to describe the evolution of deep sedimentary Basins. Our goal has been to establish naturally occurring REE as a useful monitoring measuring and verification (MMV) tool in CCS research because formation brine chemistry will be particularly sensitive to changes in local equilibrium caused by the addition of large volumes of CO?. Because brine within CCS target formations will have been in chemical equilibrium with the host rocks for millions of years, the addition of large volumes of CO? will cause reactions in the formation that will drive changes to the brine chemistry due to the pH change caused by the formation of carbonic acid. This CO? driven change in formation fluid chemistry will have a major impact on water rock reaction equilibrium in the formation, which will impart a change in the REE fingerprint of the brine that can measured and be used to monitor in situ reservoir conditions. Our research has shown that the REE signature imparted to the formation fluid by the introduction of CO? to the formation, can be measured and tracked as part of an MMV program. Additionally, this REE fingerprint may serve as an ideal tracer for fluid migration, both within the CCS target formation, and should formation fluids migrate into overlying aquifers. However application of REE and other trace elements to CCS system is complicated by the high salt content of the brines contained within the target formations. In the United States by regulation, in order for a geologic reservoir to be considered suitable for carbon storage, it must contain formation brine with total dissolved solids (TDS) > 10,000 ppm, and in most cases formation brines have TDS well in excess of that threshold. The high salinity of these brines creates analytical problems for elemental analysis, including element interference with trace metals in Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS) (i.e. element mass overlap due to oxide or plasma phenomenon). Additionally, instruments like the ICP-MS that are sensitive enough to measure trace elements down to the parts per trillion level are quickly oversaturated when water TDS exceeds much more than 1,000 ppm. Normally this problem is dealt with through dilution of the sample, bringing the water chemistry into the instruments working range. However, dilution is not an option when analyzing these formation brines for trace metals, because trace elements, specifically the REE, which occur in aqueous solutions at the parts per trillion levels. Any dilution of the sample would make REE detection impossible. Therefore, the ability to use trace metals as in situ natural tracers in high TDS brines environments requires the development of methods for pre-concentrating trace elements, while reducing the salinity and associated elemental interference such that the brines can be routinely analyzed by standard ICP-MS methods. As part of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Project the INL-CAES has developed a rapid, easy to use proces

  19. Utilities Inspection Technologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messock, R. K.

    1993-01-01

    Preventive and predictive maintenance programs are enhanced by using various inspection technologies to detect problems and potential failures before catastrophic failure. This paper discusses successful inspection technologies that have been...

  20. Final Progress Report for Project Entitled: Quantum Dot Tracers for Use in Engineered Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter; Bartl, Michael; Reimus, Paul; Williams, Mark; Mella, Mike

    2015-09-12

    The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate a new class of tracers that offer great promise for use in characterizing fracture networks in EGS reservoirs. From laboratory synthesis and testing through numerical modeling and field demonstrations, we have demonstrated the amazing versatility and applicability of quantum dot tracers. This report summarizes the results of four years of research into the design, synthesis, and characterization of semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots) for use as geothermal tracers.

  1. Novel Multi-dimensional Tracers for Geothermal Inter-wall Diagnostics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. The objective of this project is to develop a matrix of the smart geothermal tracer and its interpretation tools.

  2. Development of Atmospheric Tracer Methods To Measure Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Facilities and Urban Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01

    an urban area is used with crosswind integrated tracerCWI,) and the average crosswind concen- tration of methane (directly, and the crosswind average methane concentration

  3. Inversion of Hydrological Tracer Test Data Using TomogrpahicConstraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linde, Niklas; Finsterle, Stefan; Hubbard, Susan

    2004-11-11

    A reasonable description of the hydraulic conductivity structure is a prerequisite for modeling contaminant transport. However, formulations of hydrogeological inverse problems utilizing hydrogeological data only often fail to reliably resolve features at a resolution required for accurately predicting transport. Incorporation of geophysical data into the inverse problem offers the potential to increase this resolution. In this study, we invert hydrological tracer test data using the shape and relative magnitude variations derived from geophysical tomographic data to regionalize a hydrogeological inverse problem in order to estimate the hydraulic conductivity structure. Our approach does not require that the petrophysical relationship be known a-priori, but that it is linear and stationary within each geophysical anomaly. However, tomograms are imperfect models of geophysical properties and geophysical properties are not necessarily strongly linked to hydraulic conductivity. Therefore, we focus on synthetic examples where the correlation between radar velocity and hydraulic conductivity, as well as the geophysical data acquisition errors, are varied in order to assess what aspects of the hydraulic conductivity structure we can expect to resolve under different conditions. The results indicate that regularization of the tracer inversion procedure using geophysical data improves estimates of hydraulic conductivity. We find that even under conditions of corrupted geophysical data, we can accurately estimate the effective hydraulic conductivity and areas of high and low hydraulic conductivity. However, given imperfect geophysical data, our results suggest that we cannot expect accurate estimates of the variability of the hydraulic conductivity structure.

  4. SENSITIVITY OF A REACTIVE-TRACER BASED ESTIMATE OF THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN AN EGS TO PROPERTIES OF THE RESERVOIR AND TRACER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Laurence C. Hull; Earl D. Mattson

    2010-02-01

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions. Our analyses suggest that modifications to that method, where practical, could provide much greater sensitivity. In particular, if the reaction can be quenched before maximum temperature is reached, the sensitivity is greatly enhanced. Push-pull tracer tests conducted at the injection well demonstrate similar advantages. Other alternatives, such as combinations of tracers, and tracers with parallel or chain decay behavior may offer similar advantages.

  5. Dispersion of passive tracers in closed basins: Beyond the diffusion coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cencini, Massimo

    Dispersion of passive tracers in closed basins: Beyond the diffusion coefficient V. Artale ENEA, 00185 Roma, Italy Received 25 April 1997; accepted 10 July 1997 We investigate the spreading of passive of diffusion and transport of passive tracers in a given velocity field has both theoretical and prac- tical

  6. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  7. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: identify tracers with sorption properties favorable for EGS applications; apply reversibly sorbing tracers to determine the fracture-matrix interface area available for heat transfer; and; explore the feasibility of obtaining fracture-matrix interface area from non-isothermal; single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests.

  8. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  9. ADVANCES IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES, VOL. 25, NO. 5, 2008, 805814 Diagnosing Ocean Tracer Transport from Sellafield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drange, Helge

    applications thereof, idealized releases of passive tracers from the nuclear fuel reprocessing plants are considered; the former being representative of the actual historical discharges from the reprocessing plants tracer concentration from idealized pulse releases from the British nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

  10. L\\'evy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaid, Irwin M; Yeomans, Julia M

    2010-01-01

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer'...

  11. Revolution in Detection Affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern W.

    2013-11-02

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  12. Heat, 10B-Enriched Boric Acid, and Bromide as Recycled Groundwater Tracers for Managed Aquifer Recharge: Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, J F

    2015-01-01

    water tracer. ” Ground Water, Bassett, R. L. (1990). “ Atemperature sensing. ” Ground Water, 51(5), 670–678. Becker,acid as recycled ground- water tracers for managed aquifer

  13. Remote detection of fissile material : Cherenkov counters for gamma detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Anna S

    2011-01-01

    The need for large-size detectors for long-range active interrogation (Al) detection has generated interest in water-based detector technologies. AI is done using external radiation sources to induce fission and to detect, ...

  14. An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, David

    An SF6 Tracer Study of the Flow Dynamics in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel: Implications6) tracer release experi- ment was conducted in the Stockton Deep Water Ship Channel (DWSC. Keywords Dissolved oxygen . Sacramento­San Joaquin delta . Stockton deep water ship channel . SF6 . Tracer

  15. FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilhelm, Steven W.

    FeCycle: Attempting an iron biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment to ocean physics. In summer 2003 we conducted FeCycle, a 10-day mesoscale tracer release in HNLC waters SE biogeochemical budget from a mesoscale SF6 tracer experiment in unperturbed low iron waters, Global Biogeochem

  16. Passive tracers in a general circulation model of the Southern Ocean I. G. Stevens, D. P. Stevens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, David

    Passive tracers in a general circulation model of the Southern Ocean I. G. Stevens, D. P. Stevens: 22 January 1999 / Accepted: 12 February 1999 Abstract. Passive tracers are used in an o-line version and provide information on the inter-ocean exchange of water masses. The use of passive tracers allows

  17. Pre-fire warning system and method using a perfluorocarbon tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Russell N. (Patchogue, NY); Senum, Gunnar I. (Patchogue, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A composition and method for detecting thermal overheating of an apparatus or system and for quickly and accurately locating the portions of the apparatus or system that experience a predetermined degree of such overheating. A composition made according to the invention includes perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) mixed with certain non-reactive carrier compounds that are effective to trap or block the PFTs within the composition at normal room temperature or at normal operating temperature of the coated apparatus or system. When a predetermined degree of overheating occurs in any of the coated components of the apparatus or system, PFTs are emitted from the compositions at a rate corresponding to the degree of overheating of the component. An associated PFT detector (or detectors) is provided and monitored to quickly identify the type of PFTs emitted so that the PFTs can be correlated with the respective PFT in the coating compositions applied on respective components in the system, thereby to quickly and accurately localize the source of the overheating of such components.

  18. Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers and the Dark Energy Equation of State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plionis, M; Basilakos, S; Bresolin, F; Terlevich, E; Melnick, J; Georgantopoulos, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & \\Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII-like starburst galaxies, as an alternative to SNIa, which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of ~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative rute to measure the contribution to the global dynamics, and the e...

  19. Constraining the Dark Energy Equation of State using Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plionis, M; Basilakos, S; Bressolin, F; Terlevich, E; Melnick, J; Chavez, R

    2009-01-01

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII galaxies which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, as an alternative to supernovae type Ia, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of z~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative route to measure the contribution to the global dynamics and the equ...

  20. Hydroxyl as a Tracer of H2 in the Envelope of MBM40

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotten, David L; Wennerstrom, Elizabeth A; Douglas, Kevin A; Onello, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    We observed 51 positions in the OH 1667 MHz main line transitions in the translucent, high latitude cloud MBM40. We detected OH in 8 out of 8 positions in the molecular core of the cloud and 24 out of 43 in the surrounding, lower extinction envelope and periphery of the cloud. Using a linear relationship between the integrated OH line intensity and E(B-V), we estimate the mass in the core, the envelope, and the periphery of the cloud to be 9.1, 13.7, and 1.5 solar masses. As much as 60% of the total cloud mass may be found in the envelope (0.12 \\leq E(B-V) \\leq 0.17 mag) and some molecular mass (6%) in the periphery (E(B-V) < 0.12 mag). The OH 1667 MHz line is an excellent tracers of gas in very low extinction regions and high-sensitivity mapping of the envelopes of molecular clouds may reveal the presence of significant quantities of molecular mass.

  1. Pre-fire warning system and method using a perfluorocarbon tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, R.N.; Senum, G.I.

    1994-11-08

    A composition and method are disclosed for detecting thermal overheating of an apparatus or system and for quickly and accurately locating the portions of the apparatus or system that experience a predetermined degree of such overheating. A composition made according to the invention includes perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) mixed with certain non-reactive carrier compounds that are effective to trap or block the PFTs within the composition at normal room temperature or at normal operating temperature of the coated apparatus or system. When a predetermined degree of overheating occurs in any of the coated components of the apparatus or system, PFTs are emitted from the compositions at a rate corresponding to the degree of overheating of the component. An associated PFT detector (or detectors) is provided and monitored to quickly identify the type of PFTs emitted so that the PFTs can be correlated with the respective PFT in the coating compositions applied on respective components in the system, thereby to quickly and accurately localize the source of the overheating of such components. 4 figs.

  2. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  3. Predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests at the C-Hole complex. Yucca Mountain site characterization project report milestone 4077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, P.W.

    1996-09-01

    This report presents predictions of tracer transport in interwell tracer tests that are to be conducted at the C-Hole complex at the Nevada Test Site on behalf of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. The predictions are used to make specific recommendations about the manner in which the tracer test should be conducted to best satisfy the needs of the Project. The objective of he tracer tests is to study flow and species transport under saturated conditions in the fractured tuffs near Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the site of a potential high-level nuclear waste repository. The potential repository will be located in the unsaturated zone within Yucca Mountain. The saturated zone beneath and around the mountain represents the final barrier to transport to the accessible environment that radionuclides will encounter if they breach the engineered barriers within the repository and the barriers to flow and transport provided by the unsaturated zone. Background information on the C-Holes is provided in Section 1.1, and the planned tracer testing program is discussed in Section 1.2.

  4. Tracers for monitoring the activity of sodium/glucose cotransporters in health and disease

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, Ernest M; Barrio, Jorge R; Hirayama, Bruce A; Kepe, Vladimir

    2014-09-30

    Radiolabeled tracers for sodium/glucose cotransporters (SGLTs), their synthesis, and their use are provided. The tracers are methyl or ethyl pyranosides having an equatorial hydroxyl group at carbon-2 and a C 1 preferred conformation, radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124I, or free hexoses radiolabeled with .sup.18F, .sup.123I, or .sup.124. Also provided are in vivo and in vitro techniques for using these and other tracers as analytical and diagnostic tools to study glucose transport, in health and disease, and to evaluate therapeutic interventions.

  5. Environmental Tracers for Determining Water Resource Vulnerability to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, M

    2009-07-08

    Predicted changes in the climate will have profound impacts on water availability in the Western US, but large uncertainties exist in our ability to predict how natural and engineered hydrological systems will respond. Most predictions suggest that the impacts of climate change on California water resources are likely to include a decrease in the percentage of precipitation that falls as snow, earlier onset of snow-pack melting, and an increase in the number of rain on snow events. These processes will require changes in infrastructure for water storage and flood control, since much of our current water supply system is built around the storage of winter precipitation as mountain snow pack. Alpine aquifers play a critical role by storing and releasing snowmelt as baseflow to streams long after seasonal precipitation and the disappearance of the snow pack, and in this manner significantly impact the stream flow that drives our water distribution systems. Mountain groundwater recharge and, in particular, the contribution of snowmelt to recharge and baseflow, has been identified as a potentially significant effect missing from current climate change impact studies. The goal of this work is to understand the behavior of critical hydrologic systems, with an emphasis on providing ground truth for next generation models of climate-water system interactions by implementing LLNL capabilities in environmental tracer and isotopic science. We are using noble gas concentrations and multiple isotopic tracers ({sup 3}H/{sup 3}He, {sup 35}S, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 2}H/{sup 1}H, {sup 18}O/{sup 16}O, and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in groundwater and stream water in a small alpine catchment to (1) provide a snapshot of temperature, altitude, and physical processes at the time of recharge, (2) determine subsurface residence times (over time scales ranging from months to decades) of different groundwater age components, and (3) deconvolve the contribution of these different groundwater components to alpine stream baseflow. This research is showing that groundwater in alpine areas spends between a few years to several decades in the saturated zone below the surface, before feeding into streams or being pumped for use. This lag time may act to reduce the impact on water resources from extreme wet or dry years. Furthermore, our measurements show that the temperature of water when it reaches the water table during recharge is 4 to 9 degrees higher than would be expected for direct influx of snowmelt, and that recharge likely occurs over diffuse vegetated areas, rather than along exposed rock faces and fractures. These discoveries have implications for how alpine basins will respond to climate effects that lead to more rain than snow and earlier snow pack melting.

  6. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis...

  7. HSS Helps Pioneer “Robot” Patrol Technology MDARS- December 11, 2005

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    HSS Helps Pioneer “Robot” Patrol Technology: Deployment of the DOE Mobile Detection Assessment Response System (MDARS)

  8. Tensor anisotropy as a tracer of cosmic voids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to find voids in cosmological simulations based on the tidal and the velocity shear tensors definitions of the cosmic web. We use the fractional anisotropy (FA) computed from the eigenvalues of each web scheme as a void tracer. We identify voids using a watershed transform based on the local minima of the FA field without making any assumption on the shape or structure of the voids. We test the method on the Bolshoi simulation and report on the abundance and radial averaged profiles for the density, velocity and fractional anisotropy. We find that voids in the velocity shear web are smaller than voids in the tidal web, with a particular overabundance of very small voids in the inner region of filaments/sheets. We classify voids as subcompensated/overcompansated depending on the absence/presence of an overdense matter ridge in their density profile, finding that close to $65\\%$ and $35\\%$ of the total population are classified into each category, respectively. Finally, we find evidence ...

  9. Chemical tracers of episodic accretion in low-mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Ruud; Jorgensen, Jes K

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Accretion rates in low-mass protostars can be highly variable in time. Each accretion burst is accompanied by a temporary increase in luminosity, heating up the circumstellar envelope and altering the chemical composition of the gas and dust. This paper aims to study such chemical effects and discusses the feasibility of using molecular spectroscopy as a tracer of episodic accretion rates and timescales. Methods: We simulate a strong accretion burst in a diverse sample of 25 spherical envelope models by increasing the luminosity to 100 times the observed value. Using a comprehensive gas-grain network, we follow the chemical evolution during the burst and for up to 10^5 yr after the system returns to quiescence. The resulting abundance profiles are fed into a line radiative transfer code to simulate rotational spectra of C18O, HCO+, H13CO+, and N2H+ at a series of time steps. We compare these spectra to observations taken from the literature and to previously unpublished data of HCO+ and N2H+ 6-5 from th...

  10. Tracer diffusion in compacted, water-saturated bentonite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, Ian C.; Sposito, Garrison; Bourg, Alain C.M.

    2005-08-04

    Compacted Na-bentonite clay barriers, widely used in theisolation of solid-waste landfills and other contaminated sites, havebeen proposed for a similar use in the disposal of high-level radioactivewaste. Molecular diffusion through the pore space in these barriers playsa key role in their performance, thus motivating recent measurements ofthe apparent diffusion coefficient tensor of water tracers in compacted,water-saturated Na-bentonites. In the present study, we introduce aconceptual model in which the pore space of water-saturated bentonite isdivided into 'macropore' and 'interlayer nanopore' compartments. Withthis model we determine quantitatively the relative contributions ofpore-network geometry (expressed as a geometric factor) and of thediffusive behavior of water molecules near montmorillonite basal surfaces(expressed as a contristivity factor) to the apparent diffusioncoefficient tensor. Our model predicts, in agreement with experiment,that the mean principal value of the apparent diffusion coefficienttensor follows a single relationship when plotted against the partialmontmorillonite dry density (mass of montmorillonite per combined volumeof montmorillonite and pore space). Using a single fitted parameter, themean principal geometric factor, our model successfully describes thisrelationship for a broad range of bentonite-water system, from dilute gelto highly-compacted bentonite with 80 percent of its pore water ininterlayer nanopores.

  11. Radium isotopes as tracers of coastal circulation pathways in the Mid-Atlantic Blight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Linda L

    2003-01-01

    Pathways of exchange between the shelf and slope in the Mid-Atlantic Bight were investigated using a combination of radiochemical tracer and hydrographic measurements. The motivation was to provide evidence of transport ...

  12. An automated tracer dispersal system for snow accumulation and saltation transport investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratzlaff, Kenneth L.; Braaten, David A.

    1998-02-01

    . This instrument consists of an ultralow power timing system, a pneumatic system, and microsphere generators to periodically disperse a tracer of colored glass microspheres onto the snow surface. Snow sampling must be conducted before melting occurs, and subsequent...

  13. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

    2010-06-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

  14. Inversion of field-scale partitioning tracer response for characterizing oil saturation distribution: a streamline approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliassov, Pavel Alexandrovich

    2000-01-01

    Identifying distribution of remaining oil in the reservoir is vital for evaluation of existing waterflood, design of tertiary recovery projects, and location of infill drilling candidates. In recent years, partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITT...

  15. Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buesseler, Ken

    Author's personal copy Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability 2009 Accepted 6 April 2009 Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment

  16. Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilicaslan, Ufuk

    2013-12-03

    After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for ...

  17. High-resolution quantification of groundwater flux using a heat tracer: laboratory sandbox tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konetchy, Brant Evan

    2014-12-31

    and groundwater flux. In this work, we constructed a sandbox to simulate a sand aquifer and performed a series of heat tracer tests under different flow rates. By analyzing the temperature responses among different tests, we developed a quantitative temperature...

  18. USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  19. The entrainment and homogenization of tracers within the cyclonic gulf stream recirculation gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S

    1987-01-01

    The various distributions of tracer associated with the Northern Recirculation Gyre of the Gulf Stream (NRG) are studied to try to obtain information about the flow. An advective-diffusive numerical model is implemented ...

  20. Technology Assessment TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Technology Assessment 10/14/2004 1 TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT STRATEGIC PLAN MISSION STATEMENT Support the Mission of Texas Tech University and the TTU Information Technology Division by providing timely and relevant information and assistance in current and emerging technologies and their practical applications

  1. Bioscience Technology Bioscience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    Bioscience Technology Bioscience Technology Advantage Business Media 100 Enterprise Drive Rockaway, co-director of George Washington University's Institute for Proteomics Technology and Applications-by-point. Manufacturers have stampeded to offer the new technology. Applied Biosystems got out in front in 2004 when

  2. Lévy Fluctuations and Tracer Diffusion in Dilute Suspensions of Algae and Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Irwin M. Zaid; Jörn Dunkel; Julia M. Yeomans

    2010-09-20

    Swimming microorganisms rely on effective mixing strategies to achieve efficient nutrient influx. Recent experiments, probing the mixing capability of unicellular biflagellates, revealed that passive tracer particles exhibit anomalous non-Gaussian diffusion when immersed in a dilute suspension of self-motile Chlamydomonas reinhardtii algae. Qualitatively, this observation can be explained by the fact that the algae induce a fluid flow that may occasionally accelerate the colloidal tracers to relatively large velocities. A satisfactory quantitative theory of enhanced mixing in dilute active suspensions, however, is lacking at present. In particular, it is unclear how non-Gaussian signatures in the tracers' position distribution are linked to the self-propulsion mechanism of a microorganism. Here, we develop a systematic theoretical description of anomalous tracer diffusion in active suspensions, based on a simplified tracer-swimmer interaction model that captures the typical distance scaling of a microswimmer's flow field. We show that the experimentally observed non-Gaussian tails are generic and arise due to a combination of truncated L\\'evy statistics for the velocity field and algebraically decaying time correlations in the fluid. Our analytical considerations are illustrated through extensive simulations, implemented on graphics processing units to achieve the large sample sizes required for analyzing the tails of the tracer distributions.

  3. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³?U/²³?U (?²³?U), ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio, and ³?S/³²S (?³?S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore »an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The ?²³?U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower ?²³?U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and ?²³?U with an ? of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio and ?³?S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  4. Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization study. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetzenbach, K.; Farnham, I.

    1994-12-31

    The bromide anion has been used extensively as a tracer for mapping the flow of groundwater. It has proven to be both a safe and reliable groundwater tracer. The goal in this study is to find several tracing compounds with characteristics similar to the bromide anion to be used in multiple well tracing tests. Four groups of fluorinated organic acids were selected as candidates for groundwater tracers. These groups include fluorinated benzoic acids (FBA), fluorinated salicylic acids (FSA), fluorinated toluic acids (FTA), and fluorinated cinnamic acids (FCA). These compounds have been shown to move readily with the flow of water and do not adsorb to soil. They are also non-toxic. In this study, the retention of the fluorinated organic acids on to a soil column is compared to that of the bromide ion. The time required for the elution of each analyte from the soil column is measured using a UV-Vis detector. The soils consist of the light, medium, and dark tuffs used in the batch study. The work performed during this quarter consists of the continuation of the batch studies for the fluorinated benzoic acids and column studies for several potential tracer compounds.

  5. The Dark Energy Equation of State using Alternative High-z Cosmic Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Plionis; R. Terlevich; S. Basilakos; F. Bresolin; E. Terlevich; J. Melnick; R. Chavez

    2010-01-18

    We propose to use alternative cosmic tracers to measure the dark energy equation of state and the matter content of the Universe [w(z) & Omega_m]. Our proposed method consists of two components: (a) tracing the Hubble relation using HII galaxies which can be detected up to very large redshifts, z~4, as an alternative to supernovae type Ia, and (b) measuring the clustering pattern of X-ray selected AGN at a median redshift of z~1. Each component of the method can in itself provide interesting constraints on the cosmological parameters, especially under our anticipation that we will reduce the corresponding random and systematic errors significantly. However, by joining their likelihood functions we will be able to put stringent cosmological constraints and break the known degeneracies between the dark energy equation of state (whether it is constant or variable) and the matter content of the universe and provide a powerful and alternative route to measure the contribution to the global dynamics and the equation of state of dark energy. A preliminary joint analysis of X-ray selected AGN (based on the largest to-date XMM survey; the 2XMM) and the currently largest SNIa sample (Hicken et al.), using as priors a flat universe and the WMAP5 normalization of the power-spectrum, provides: Omega_m=0.27+-0.02 and w=-0.96+-0.07. Equivalent and consistent results are provided by the joint analysis of X-ray selected AGN clustering and the latest Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation measures, providing: Omega_m=0.27+-0.02 and w=-0.97+-0.04.

  6. Advancing reactive tracer methods for measuring thermal evolution in CO2-and water-based geothermal reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project aims to develop reactive tracer method for monitoring thermal drawdown in enhanced geothermal systems.

  7. Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2011-01-01

    Stimulations at the European EGS Site Soultz-sous-Forêts,Dual-Tracer Spikings during EGS Creation in Northern Germanenhanced geothermal systems (EGS) in rocks with insufficient

  8. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  9. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  10. Hot scatterers and tracers for the transfer of heat in collisional dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael Lefevere; Lorenzo Zambotti

    2009-03-31

    We introduce stochastic models for the transport of heat in systems described by local collisional dynamics. The dynamics consists of tracer particles moving through an array of hot scatterers describing the effect of heat baths at fixed temperatures. Those models have the structure of Markov renewal processes. We study their ergodic properties in details and provide a useful formula for the cumulant generating function of the time integrated energy current. We observe that out of thermal equilibrium, the generating function is not analytic. When the set of temperatures of the scatterers is fixed by the condition that in average no energy is exchanged between the scatterers and the system, different behaviours may arise. When the tracer particles are allowed to travel freely through the whole array of scatterers, the temperature profile is linear. If the particles are locked in between scatterers, the temperature profile becomes nonlinear. In both cases, the thermal conductivity is interpreted as a frequency of collision between tracers and scatterers.

  11. Results of Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, Jeanette

    2006-02-23

    This is the final report detailing the analyses performed under ORD-FY04-011 "Chemical Analyses for Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies." The work was performed under the University and Community College System of Nevada (UCCSN) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement Number DE-FC28-04RW12232. This task provided method development and analytical support for the Alcove 8/Niche 3 Tracer Studies in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). Concentrations of tracers, as well as major anions and cations, were reported for samples provided by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). Samples were analyzed using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) and Ion Chromatography (IC). Samples were analyzed and controlled according to Implementing Procedures (IP's) written and approved in accordance with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) approved Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) Quality Assurance Program.

  12. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  13. Revolution in nuclear detection affairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, Warren M.

    2014-05-09

    The detection of nuclear or radioactive materials for homeland or national security purposes is inherently difficult. This is one reason detection efforts must be seen as just one part of an overall nuclear defense strategy which includes, inter alia, material security, detection, interdiction, consequence management and recovery. Nevertheless, one could argue that there has been a revolution in detection affairs in the past several decades as the innovative application of new technology has changed the character and conduct of detection operations. This revolution will likely be most effectively reinforced in the coming decades with the networking of detectors and innovative application of anomaly detection algorithms.

  14. An Integrated Approach to Characterizing Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous and Fractured Reservoirs Using Partitioning Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2006-12-31

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling partitioning interwell tracer tests in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Specifically, we utilize the unique features of streamline models to develop an efficient approach for interpretation and history matching of field tracer response. A critical aspect here is the underdetermined and highly ill-posed nature of the associated inverse problems. We have investigated the relative merits of the traditional history matching ('amplitude inversion') and a novel travel time inversion in terms of robustness of the method and convergence behavior of the solution. We show that the traditional amplitude inversion is orders of magnitude more non-linear and the solution here is likely to get trapped in local minimum, leading to inadequate history match. The proposed travel time inversion is shown to be extremely efficient and robust for practical field applications. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. We have also explored the use of a finite difference reservoir simulator, UTCHEM, for field-scale design and optimization of partitioning interwell tracer tests. The finite-difference model allows us to include detailed physics associated with reactive tracer transport, particularly those related with transverse and cross-streamline mechanisms. We have investigated the potential use of downhole tracer samplers and also the use of natural tracers for the design of partitioning tracer tests. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

  15. Atmospheric and soil-gas monitoring for surface leakage at the San Juan Basin CO{sub 2} pilot test site at Pump Canyon New Mexico, using perfluorocarbon tracers, CO{sub 2} soil-gas flux and soil-gas hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. Rodney; Strazisar, Brian R.; Wilson, Thomas; H Stanko, Dennis C.

    2012-05-01

    Near-surface monitoring and subsurface characterization activities were undertaken in collaboration with the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on their San Juan Basin coal-bed methane pilot test site near Navajo City, New Mexico. Nearly 18,407 short tons (1.670 × 107 kg) of CO{sub 2} were injected into 3 seams of the Fruitland coal between July 2008 and April 2009. Between September 18 and October 30, 2008, two additions of approximately 20 L each of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers were mixed with the CO{sub 2} at the injection wellhead. PFC tracers in soil-gas and in the atmosphere were monitored over a period of 2 years using a rectangular array of permanent installations. Additional monitors were placed near existing well bores and at other locations of potential leakage identified during the pre-injection site survey. Monitoring was conducted using sorbent containing tubes to collect any released PFC tracer from soil-gas or the atmosphere. Near-surface monitoring activities also included CO{sub 2} surface flux and carbon isotopes, soil-gas hydrocarbon levels, and electrical conductivity in the soil. The value of the PFC tracers was demonstrated when a significant leakage event was detected near an offset production well. Subsurface characterization activities, including 3D seismic interpretation and attribute analysis, were conducted to evaluate reservoir integrity and the potential that leakage of injected CO{sub 2} might occur. Leakage from the injection reservoir was not detected. PFC tracers made breakthroughs at 2 of 3 offset wells which were not otherwise directly observable in produced gases containing 20–30% CO{sub 2}. These results have aided reservoir geophysical and simulation investigations to track the underground movement of CO{sub 2}. 3D seismic analysis provided a possible interpretation for the order of appearance of tracers at production wells.

  16. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  17. Noise canceling in-situ detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David O.

    2014-08-26

    Technologies applicable to noise canceling in-situ NMR detection and imaging are disclosed. An example noise canceling in-situ NMR detection apparatus may comprise one or more of a static magnetic field generator, an alternating magnetic field generator, an in-situ NMR detection device, an auxiliary noise detection device, and a computer.

  18. Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

  19. Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon-13 Labeled Polymers: An Alternative Tracer for Depth Profiling of Polymer Films profiling of polymer films and multilayers using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Deuterium substitution has traditionally been used in depth profiling of polymers but can affect the phase behavior

  20. Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Controls on soil methane fluxes: Tests of biophysical mechanisms using stable isotope tracers November 2006; published 4 May 2007. [1] Understanding factors that control methane exchange between soils-scale variations in soil methane emissions: (1) consumption of methane by methanotrophic bacteria, (2) quantity

  1. Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    Using chemical tracers in hillslope soils to estimate the importance of chemical denudation under mass. The model includes both sediment transport and chemical denudation. A simplified two-phase model is developed; the two phases are a chemically immobile phase, which has far lower solubility than the bulk soil

  2. Argon as a Tracer of Cross-Isopycnal Mixing in the Thermocline CARA C. HENNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Argon as a Tracer of Cross-Isopycnal Mixing in the Thermocline CARA C. HENNING University (Kelley and Van Scoy 1999), and observations of temperature or velocity microstructure measurements (e 1999), there is a consensus that the local cross-isopycnal diffusivity is on the order of 1­3 ( 10 5 m2

  3. Plumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfillan, Stuart

    to be added to the CO2 at the time of injec- tion. This will marginally increase the cost of storagePlumbing the Depths: Testing Natural Tracers of Subsurface CO2 Origin and Migration, Utah Mark storage of fluid CO2 in porous subsurface rock will re- quire the ability to track, and identify

  4. New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    New Tracers Identify Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids and Accidental Releases from Oil and Gas produced waters sampled from conventional oil and gas wells. We posit that boron isotope geochemistry can tool is validated by examining the composition of effluent discharge from an oil and gas brine

  5. Enhanced tracer transport by the spiral defect chaos state of a convecting fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -H. Chiam; M. C. Cross; H. S. Greenside; P. F. Fischer

    2004-09-23

    To understand how spatiotemporal chaos may modify material transport, we use direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional Boussinesq equations and of an advection-diffusion equation to study the transport of a passive tracer by the spiral defect chaos state of a convecting fluid. The simulations show that the transport is diffusive and is enhanced by the spatiotemporal chaos. The enhancement in tracer diffusivity follows two regimes. For large Peclet numbers (that is, small molecular diffusivities of the tracer), we find that the enhancement is proportional to the Peclet number. For small Peclet numbers, the enhancement is proportional to the square root of the Peclet number. We explain the presence of these two regimes in terms of how the local transport depends on the local wave numbers of the convection rolls. For large Peclet numbers, we further find that defects cause the tracer diffusivity to be enhanced locally in the direction orthogonal to the local wave vector but suppressed in the direction of the local wave vector.

  6. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Reaction Pathways for Propane Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Molybdenum of propane over ZrO2-supported MoOx catalysts. Competitive reactions of C3H6 and CH3 13 CH2CH3 showed combustion of propene, or by direct combustion of propane. A mixture of C3H8 and C3D8 undergoes oxidative

  7. 6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson Jr., James E.

    6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS AND TRACERS OF GALACTIC STRUCTURE A Dissertation Jagadheep Dhanasekara Pandian ALL RIGHTS RESERVED #12;6.7 GHZ METHANOL MASERS: PROPERTIES, ASSOCIATIONS transition of methanol is the strongest of methanol masers, and is the second strongest maser transition ever

  8. Seasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    of indoor air pollution sources. Concurrently, great efforts are made to make buildings energy efficient 1970s, while less attention has been paid to IAQ. Insufficient venting of indoor air pollutantsSeasonal Variation in Monthly Average Air Change Rates Using Passive Tracer Gas Measurements Marie

  9. Chaotic Mixing of Tracer and Vorticity by Modulated Traveling Rossby Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,-- even though the physics of the present case is very different. We have produced two independent of subtler aspects of the mixing. It is shown the chaotic advection produces very nonlocal mixing which cannot be represented by eddy diffusivity. Also, the power spectrum of the tracer field is found to be k

  10. Tracer transport in the presence of steady zonal jets in a forced and viscous barotropic model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collier, Jonathan Craig

    2000-01-01

    to the time since release, and in the long-time limit, to the square root of the time. Tracers released into a fluid which was anisotropic and contained steady zonal jets, exhibited an inhibition of meridional excursion. However, the length scale associated...

  11. Analysis of Pollutant and Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Analysis of Pollutant and Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn Y. Wu1, G. Allwine1, X the potential for catastrophic wildfires and to improve the health of forests, however, emissions of pollutants from prescribed fires contribute to local and regional air quality issues and health impacts. Emissions

  12. TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    TRACER: A Trace Replay Tool to Evaluate Energy-Efficiency of Mass Storage Systems Zhuo Liu1 , Fei for Optoelectronics 1 Key Laboratory of Data Storage Systems,Ministry of Education of China 1 School of Computer Sci://www.eng.auburn.edu/xqin * Corresponding Author: wufei@hust.edu.cn Abstract--Improving energy efficiency of mass storage systems has become

  13. Verification of flow processes in soils with combined sprinkling and dye tracer experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Markus

    1 Verification of flow processes in soils with combined sprinkling and dye tracer experiments. Water flow in soils is influenced by macropores, by the heterogeneity of the soil matrix, and by the exchange of water between macropores and the soil matrix (interaction). The degree of interaction

  14. ADVANCING REACTIVE TRACER METHODS FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; George D. Redden; Laurence C. Hull

    2010-10-01

    Reactive tracers have long been considered a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system, before significant cooling occurs at the extraction well. Here, we examine the sensitivity of the proposed method to evaluate reservoir cooling and demonstrate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may be practical under certain conditions.

  15. Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine processes studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Marine Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA-MEL). There were 26Editorial Marine Chemistry special issue: The renaissance of radium isotopic tracers in marine interpretation and modeling of radium measurements in marine systems as well as perspectives on special

  16. Outlier Detection Rules for Fault Detection in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    . The models must be modified due to different PV capacity, solar cell technology, or installation locationOutlier Detection Rules for Fault Detection in Solar Photovoltaic Arrays Ye Zhao, Brad Lehman Abstract-- Solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays are unique power sources that may have uncleared fault current

  17. A Study Plan for Determining Recharge Rates at the Hanford Site Using Environmental Tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy,, E. M.; Szecsody,, J. E.; Phillips,, S. J.

    1991-02-01

    This report presents a study plan tor estimating recharge at the Hanford Site using environmental tracers. Past operations at the Hanford Site have led to both soil and groundwater contamination, and recharge is one of the primary mechanisms for transporting contaminants through the vadose zone and into the groundwater. The prediction of contaminant movement or transport is one aspect of performance assessment and an important step in the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) process. In the past, recharge has been characterized by collecting lysimeter data. Although lysimeters can generate important and reliable data, their limitations include 1) fixed location, 2) fixed sediment contents, 3) edge effects, 4) low rates, and 5) relatively short duration of measurement. These limitations impact the ability to characterize the spatial distribution of recharge at the Hanford Site, and thus the ability to predict contaminant movement in the vadose zone. An alternative to using fixed lysimeters for determining recharge rates in the vadose zone is to use environmental tracers. Tracers that have been used to study water movement in the vadose zone include total chloride, {sup 36}CI, {sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H/{sup 18}O. Atmospheric levels of {sup 36}CI and {sup 3}H increased during nuclear bomb testing in the Pacific, and the resulting "bomb pulse" or peak concentration can be measured in the soil profile. Locally, past operations at the Hanford Site have resu~ed in the atmospheric release of numerous chemical and isotopic tracers, including nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc. The radionuclides, in particular, reached a well-defined atmospheric peak in 1945. Atmospheric releases of {sup 129}I and {sup 99}Tc were greatly reduced by mid-1946, but nitrogen oxides continued to be released from the uranium separations facilities. As a result, the nitrate concentrations probably peaked in the mid-1950s, when the greatest number of separations facilities were operating. Seven study sites on the Hanford Site have been selected, in two primary soil types that are believed to represent the extremes in recharge, the Quincy sand and the Warden silt loam. An additional background study site upwind of the Hanford facilities has been chosen at the Yakima Firing Center. Study sites at Hanford were chosen close to micrometeorology stations on downwind transects from the operational facilities. Initial testing will be done on sites that lack perennial vegetation. Six tracer techniques (total chlortde, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 3}H, nitrate, {sup 129}I, and {sup 99}Tc) will be tested on at least one site in the Quincy sand, one site in the Warden si~ loam, and the background site, to determine which combination of tracers wortks best for a given soil type. In subsequent years, additional sites will be investigated to determine the effect of vegetation on recharge estimates and on the performance of individual tracers. The use of environmental tracers is perhaps the only cost-effective method for estimating the spatial vartability of recharge at a site as large as Hanford. The tracer techniques used at Hanford have wide applicability at other and sites operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as well as at low-level radioactive waste disposal sites.

  18. Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Curt (Pittsburgh, PA); Wells, Arthur (Bridgeville, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Strazisar, Brian (Venetia, PA)

    2010-04-27

    The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

  19. Colloid and ionic tracer migration within SRS sediments: Final summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, R.N.; Seaman, J.C.; Bertsch, P.M.; Miller, W.P.

    1996-04-09

    The generation of a stable colloidal suspension in geologic materials has a number of environmental implications. Mobile colloids may act as vectors for the transport of adsorbed contaminants through soils and within aquifers and can cause serious problems related to well monitoring and formation permeability in an injections well system. Colloid-facilitated transport has been implicated in the migration of contaminants from seepage basins on the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site (SRS) at a rate greater than was predicted in two- phase transport models. From 1955 to 1988, seepage basins overlying the water-table aquifer received acidic wastes containing high levels of Na+ and nitric acid, as well as trace radionuclides and metals from the nuclear materials processing facilities. Numerical simulations predicted that metal contaminants would not reach the water table, but measurable quantities of these contaminants have been detected in monitoring wells down gradient from the basins. Lack of agreement between predicted and observed contaminant migration in this and other studies has been attributed to both local non equilibrium situation, preferential flow paths within the geologic material, and to transport of the contaminant in association with a mobile solid phase, i.e. dispersed colloids. Additionally, the association of contaminants with a mobile colloidal phase has important ramifications for groundwater sampling on SRS intended to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of a given contaminant. As part of the F- and H-Area reclamation project, the Department of Energy has proposed the capture and treatment of the contaminant plume followed by reinjection of the treated water into the water table and upper confined aquifers. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Nuclear Physics Technology Saves Lives | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Physics Technology Saves Lives January 11, 2006 Listen to this story Ribbon With early detection, breast cancer can often be treated successfully. There are over two...

  1. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  2. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  3. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  4. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-23

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of usingmore »stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.« less

  5. Trends in Energy Management Technology - Part 4: Review of Advanced Applications in Energy Management, Control, and Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yee, Gaymond; Webster, Tom

    2003-01-01

    pdf Trends in Energy Management TechnologyTrends in Energy Management Technology Fault Detection andTrends in Energy Management Technology FEMP/NTDP Technical

  6. Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Martin C

    2014-05-08

    and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

  7. Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, David A.

    Thorium-234 as a tracer of spatial, temporal and vertical variability in particle flux in the North Available online 16 April 2009 Keywords: Thorium-234 Particle flux Sediment trap Scavenging North Pacific

  8. Integrated Approach to Use Natural Chemical and Isotopic Tracers to Estimate Fracture Spacing and Surface Area in EGS Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This objective of this project is to develop an innovative approach to estimate fracture surface area and spacing through interpretation of signals of natural chemical and isotopic tracers.

  9. A Modified Tracer-Gas-Concentration Decay Method for Ventilation Rate Measurements in Large, Long, and Narrow Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    obtained by the CO2-concentration decay method. However, this method requires a large amount of tracer method for ventilation rate measurements in large, long, and narrow spaces," Indoor and Built Environment

  10. Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    EA, Miranda M, Aparicio AM, Fukushima M, Davis RW: MultiplexCN, Jiang H, Palm C, Fukushima M, Bernstein D, Vo KC,Page 10 of 10 12. Hyman RW, Fukushima M, Diamond L, Kumm J,

  11. Semianalytical Solutions of Radioactive or Reactive Tracer Transport in Layered Fractured Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G.J. Moridis; G. S. Bodvarsson

    2001-10-01

    In this paper, semianalytical solutions are developed for the problem of transport of radioactive or reactive tracers (solutes or colloids) through a layered system of heterogeneous fractured media with misaligned fractures. The tracer transport equations in the matrix account for (a) diffusion, (b) surface diffusion (for solutes only), (c) mass transfer between the mobile and immobile water fractions, (d) linear kinetic or equilibrium physical, chemical, or combined solute sorption or colloid filtration, and (e) radioactive decay or first order chemical reactions. Any number of radioactive decay daughter products (or products of a linear, first-order reaction chain) can be tracked. The tracer-transport equations in the fractures account for the same processes, in addition to advection and hydrodynamic dispersion. Additionally, the colloid transport equations account for straining and velocity adjustments related to the colloidal size. The solutions, which are analytical in the Laplace space, are numerically inverted to provide the solution in time and can accommodate any number of fractured and/or porous layers. The solutions are verified using analytical solutions for limiting cases of solute and colloid transport through fractured and porous media. The effect of important parameters on the transport of {sup 3}H, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu (and its daughters) is investigated in several test problems involving layered geological systems of varying complexity. {sup 239}Pu colloid transport problems in multilayered systems indicate significant colloid accumulations at straining interfaces but much faster transport of the colloid than the corresponding strongly sorbing solute species.

  12. Test Plan for the Demonstration of Geophysical Techniques for Single-Shell Tank Leak Detection at the Hanford Mock Tank Site: Fiscal Year 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D. Brent; Gee, Glendon W.; Sweeney, Mark D.

    2001-07-31

    As part of the Leak Detection, Monitoring and Mitigation (LDMM) program conducted by CH2M HILL 105-A during FY 2001. These tests are being conducted to assess the applicability of these methods (Electrical Resistance Tomography [ERT], High Resolution Resistivity [HRR], Cross-Borehole Seismography [XBS], Cross-Borehole Radar [XBR], and Cross-Borehole Electromagnetic Induction [CEMI]) to the detection and measurement of Single Shell Tank (SST) leaks into the vadose zone during planned sluicing operations. The testing in FY 2001 will result in the selection of up to two methods for further testing in FY 2002. In parallel with the geophysical tests, a Partitioning Interwell Tracer Test (PITT) study will be conducted simultaneously at the Mock Tank to assess the effectiveness of this technology in detecting and quantifying tank leaks in the vadose zone. Preparatory and background work using Cone Penetrometer methods (CPT) will be conducted at the Mock Tank site and an adjacent test area to derive soil properties for groundtruthing purposes for all methods.

  13. Characterization of a real-time tracer for Isoprene Epoxydiols-derived Secondary Organic Aerosol (IEPOX-SOA) from aerosol mass spectrometer measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, W. W.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Palm, B. B.; Day, D. A.; Ortega, A. M.; Hayes, P. L.; Krechmer, J. E.; Chen, Q.; Kuwata, M.; Liu, Y. J.; et al

    2015-04-16

    Substantial amounts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) can be formed from isoprene epoxydiols (IEPOX), which are oxidation products of isoprene mainly under low-NO conditions. Total IEPOX-SOA, which may include SOA formed from other parallel isoprene low-NO oxidation pathways, was quantified by applying Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements. The IEPOX-SOA fractions of OA in multiple field studies across several continents are summarized here and show consistent patterns with the concentration of gas-phase IEPOX simulated by the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. During the SOAS study, 78% of IEPOX-SOA is accounted for the measured molecular tracers, making itmore »the highest level of molecular identification of an ambient SOA component to our knowledge. Enhanced signal at C5H6O+ (m/z 82) is found in PMF-resolved IEPOX-SOA spectra. To investigate the suitability of this ion as a tracer for IEPOX-SOA, we examine fC5H6O ( fC5H6O = C5H6O+/OA) across multiple field, chamber and source datasets. A background of ~ 1.7 ± 0.1‰ is observed in studies strongly influenced by urban, biomass-burning and other anthropogenic primary organic aerosol (POA). Higher background values of 3.1 ± 0.8‰ are found in studies strongly influenced by monoterpene emissions. The average laboratory monoterpene SOA value (5.5 ± 2.0‰) is 4 times lower than the average for IEPOX-SOA (22 ± 7‰). Locations strongly influenced by isoprene emissions under low-NO levels had higher fC5H6O (~ 6.5 ± 2.2‰ on average) than other sites, consistent with the expected IEPOX-SOA formation in those studies. fC5H6O in IEPOX-SOA is always elevated (12–40‰) but varies substantially between locations, which is shown to reflect large variations in its detailed molecular composition. The low fC5H6O (< 3‰) observed in non IEPOX-derived isoprene-SOA indicates that this tracer ion is specifically enhanced from IEPOX-SOA, and is not a tracer for all SOA from isoprene. We introduce a graphical diagnostic to study the presence and aging of IEPOX-SOA as a "triangle plot" of fCO2 vs. fC5H6O. Finally, we develop a simplified method to estimate ambient IEPOX-SOA mass concentrations, which is shown to perform well compared to the full PMF method. The uncertainty of the tracer method is up to a factor of ~ 2 if the fC5H6O of the local IEPOX-SOA is not available. When only unit mass resolution data is available, as with the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM), all methods may perform less well because of increased interferences from other ions at m/z 82. This study clarifies the strengths and limitations of the different AMS methods for detection of IEPOX-SOA and will enable improved characterization of this OA component.« less

  14. Heat as a Tracer to Examine Hydraulic Conductance Near the RussianRiver Bank Filtration Facility, Sonoma County, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantz, Jim; Su, Grace; Hatch, Christine

    2004-08-01

    Both the measurement of temperature and the simulation of heat and water transport have benefited from significant recent advances in data acquisition and computer resources. This has afforded the opportunity for routine use of heat as a tracer in a variety of hydrological regimes. Heat is particularly well suited for investigations of stream/groundwater exchanges. Dynamic temperature patterns between the stream and underlying sediments are typical, due to large stream surface area to volume ratios relative to other surface water bodies. Heat is a naturally occurring tracer, free from (real or perceived) issues of contamination associated with use of chemical tracers in stream environments. The use of heat as a tracer relies on the measurement of temperature gradients, and temperature is an extremely robust parameter to monitor. Temperature data is immediately available as opposed to chemical tracers, which often require significant laboratory analysis. In this work, we report on the progress in the use of heat as a tracer to determine the hydraulic conductance of the streambed along the middle reaches of the Russian River, located west of Santa Rosa, CA. The general hydrological setting is described and the unique matter in which the water resources are managed in an environment of increasing population, a rapid shift to agricultural crops requiring more irrigation, and a series of fishery related mandates.

  15. 100-NR-2 Apatite Treatability Test: Fall 2010 Tracer Infiltration Test (White Paper)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Greenwood, William J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Horner, Jacob A.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Szecsody, James E.; Williams, Mark D.

    2011-04-14

    The primary objectives of the tracer infiltration test were to 1) determine whether field-scale hydraulic properties for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford fm. sediments comprising the zone of water table fluctuation beneath the site are consistent with estimates based laboratory-scale measurements on core samples and 2) characterize wetting front advancement and distribution of soil moisture achieved for the selected application rate. These primary objectives were met. The test successfully demonstrated that 1) the remaining 2 to 3 ft of compacted roadbed material below the infiltration gallery does not limit infiltration rates to levels that would be expected to eliminate near surface application as a viable amendment delivery approach and 2) the combined aqueous and geophysical monitoring approaches employed at this site, with some operational adjustments based on lessons learned, provides an effective means of assessing wetting front advancement and the distribution of soil moisture achieved for a given solution application. Reasonably good agreement between predicted and observed tracer and moisture front advancement rates was observed. During the first tracer infiltration test, which used a solution application rate of 0.7 cm/hr, tracer arrivals were observed at the water table (10 to 12 ft below the bottom of the infiltration gallery) after approximately 5 days, for an advancement rate of approximately 2 ft/day. This advancement rate is generally consistent with pre-test modeling results that predicted tracer arrival at the water table after approximately 5 days (see Figure 8, bottom left panel). This agreement indicates that hydraulic property values specified in the model for the compacted roadbed materials and underlying Hanford formation sediments, which were based on laboratory-scale measurements, are reasonable estimates of actual field-scale conditions. Additional work is needed to develop a working relationship between resistivity change and the associated change in moisture content so that 4D images of moisture content change can be generated. Results from this field test will be available for any future Ca-citrate-PO4 amendment infiltration tests, which would be designed to evaluate the efficacy of using near surface application of amendments to form apatite mineral phases in the upper portion of the zone of water table fluctuation.

  16. Exploration Technologies - Technology Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Amanda I.; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Reinhardt, Tim; Solomon, Samantha; James, Mallory

    2011-06-01

    This assessment is a critical component of ongoing technology roadmapping efforts, and will be used to guide the Geothermal Technology Program's research and development.

  17. detonation detection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Satellite Carrying NNSA-provided Nuclear Detonation Detection Sensors http:www.nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesafsatellite

  18. Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 Thermally Activated Technologies Technology Roadmap, May 2003 The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a...

  19. Using {sup 222}Rn as a tracer of geophysical processes in underground environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacerda, T.; Anjos, R. M.; Silva, A. A. R. da; Yoshimura, E. M.

    2014-11-11

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, are reported and analyzed. These mines are today used for touristic visitation. Our goal was to assess the potential use of such radioactive noble gas as tracer of geological processes in underground environments. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used during the winter and summer seasons. The findings show that the significant radon concentrations reported in this environment are subject to large seasonal modulations, due to the strong dependence of natural ventilation on the variations of outside temperature. The results also indicate that radon pattern distribution appear as a good method to localize unknown ducts, fissures or secondary tunnels in subterranean environments.

  20. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  1. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  2. Engineering Development of Slurry Bubble Column Reactor (SBCR) Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puneet Gupta

    2002-07-31

    This report summarizes the procedures used and results obtained in determining radial gas holdup profiles, via gamma ray scanning, and in assessing liquid and gas mixing parameters, via radioactive liquid and gas tracers, during Fischer Tropsch synthesis. The objectives of the study were (i) to develop a procedure for detection of gas holdup radial profiles in operating reactors and (ii) to test the ability of the developed, previously described, engineering models to predict the observed liquid and gas mixing patterns. It was shown that the current scanning procedures were not precise enough to obtain an accurate estimate of the gas radial holdup profile and an improved protocol for future use was developed. The previously developed physically based model for liquid mixing was adapted to account for liquid withdrawal from the mid section of the column. The ability of our engineering mixing models for liquid and gas phase to predict both liquid and gas phase tracer response was established and illustrated.

  3. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings forTitle XVIIof EnergyofTotalSystemsTown

  4. Electron Technology, 2, 213, pp. 139-147. Institute of Electron Technology P.A. Sci., Warsaw 1969 STATISTICAL NATURE OF THE INFRARED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    Electron Technology, 2, 213, pp. 139-147. Institute of Electron Technology P.A. Sci., Warsaw 1969 and the statistical nature of the coherently detected signal at the 10.6 pm C02laser wavelength. Coherent detection

  5. DIVE in the cosmic web: voids with Delaunay Triangulation from discrete matter tracer distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Cheng; Liang, Yu; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Chuang, Chia-Hsun

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel parameter-free cosmological void finder (\\textsc{dive}, Delaunay TrIangulation Void findEr) based on Delaunay Triangulation (DT), which efficiently computes the empty spheres constrained by a discrete set of tracers. We define the spheres as DT voids, and describe their properties, including an universal density profile together with an intrinsic scatter. We apply this technique on 100 halo catalogues with volumes of 2.5\\,$h^{-1}$Gpc side each, with a bias and number density similar to the BOSS CMASS Luminous Red Galaxies, performed with the \\textsc{patchy} code. Our results show that there are two main species of DT voids, which can be characterised by the radius: they have different responses to halo redshift space distortions, to number density of tracers, and reside in different dark matter environments. Based on dynamical arguments using the tidal field tensor, we demonstrate that large DT voids are hosted in expanding regions, whereas the haloes used to construct them reside in collap...

  6. A cubic matrix-fracture geometry model for radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetzabeth Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando Samaniego V.

    1992-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs, with cubic blocks matrix-fracture geometry. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile where dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared under proper simplified conditions to those previously presented in the literature. The coupled matrix to fracture solution in the Laplace space is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., naturally fractured nearly homogeneous) was carried out. The influence of the three of the main dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was carefully investigated. A comparison of results for three different naturally fractured systems, vertical fractures (linear flow), horizontal fractures (radial flow) and the cubic geometry model of this study, is presented.

  7. A Spreadsheet Program for Two-Well Tracer Test Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Guoping [ORNL; Watson, David [ORNL; Parker, Jack C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Two-well tracer tests are often conducted to investigate subsurface solute transport in the field. Analyzing breakthrough curves in extraction and monitoring wells using numerical methods is nontrivial due to highly nonuniform flow conditions. We extended approximate analytical solutions for the advection-dispersion equation for an injection-extraction well doublet in a homogeneous confined aquifer under steady-state flow conditions for equal injection and extraction rates with no transverse dispersion and negligible ambient flow, and implemented the solutions in Microsoft Excel using Visual Basic for Application (VBA). Functions were implemented to calculate concentrations in extraction and monitoring wells at any location due to a step or pulse injection. Type curves for a step injection were compared with those calculated by numerically integrating the solution for a pulse injection. The results from the two approaches are similar when the dispersivity is small. As the dispersivity increases, the latter was found to be more accurate but requires more computing time. The code was verified by comparing the results with published-type curves and applied to analyze data from the literature. The method can be used as a first approximation for two-well tracer test design and data analysis, and to check accuracy of numerical solutions. The code and example files are publicly available.

  8. Genomics-enabled sensor platform for rapid detection of viruses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in goal 1. We generated and characterized suitable primers more for West Nile Virus RNA detection. Both optical and electrochemical transduction technologies were...

  9. High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies High Impact Technology Catalyst: Technology Deployment Strategies The Energy Department released the High Impact...

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The...

  11. AT NORTHWESTERN EARLY CANCER DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    --including lung cancer, pancreatic cancer, and ovarian cancer-- there is simply no screening option available, such as pancreatic, ovarian, and lung cancer. · Improve existing screening techniques, such as those for colon cancer, with the THE CANCER INSTITUTES AT NORTHWESTERN MEDICINE EARLY CANCER DETECTION TECHNOLOGIES INSTITUTE

  12. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  13. Fingerprint detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Saunders, George C. (Rt. 1, Box 428B, Espanola, NM 87532)

    1992-01-01

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  14. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  15. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  16. Detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jay E. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  17. Detection and Imaging of He_2 Molecules in Superfluid Helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. G. Rellergert; S. B. Cahn; A. Garvan; J. C. Hanson; W. H. Lippincott; J. A. Nikkel; D. N. McKinsey

    2007-12-18

    We present data that show a cycling transition can be used to detect and image metastable He$_2$ triplet molecules in superfluid helium. We demonstrate that limitations on the cycling efficiency due to the vibrational structure of the molecule can be mitigated by the use of repumping lasers. Images of the molecules obtained using the method are also shown. This technique gives rise to a new kind of ionizing radiation detector. The use of He$_2$ triplet molecules as tracer particles in the superfluid promises to be a powerful tool for visualization of both quantum and classical turbulence in liquid helium.

  18. Technology Assessment

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    capabilities that are energy efficient, low environmental impact 72 and lower cost and that are employed to manufacture technologies and products for clean energy 73...

  19. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ben Isaac; É. Fodor; P. Visco; F. van Wijland; N. S. Gov

    2015-07-03

    The internal dynamics of active gels, both in artificial (in-vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells, has been extensively studied by experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct non-thermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system, and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures" and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments, and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  20. Modeling the dynamics of a tracer particle in an elastic active gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaac, E Ben; Visco, P; van Wijland, F; Gov, N S

    2015-01-01

    The internal dynamics of active gels, both in artificial (in-vitro) model systems and inside the cytoskeleton of living cells, has been extensively studied by experiments of recent years. These dynamics are probed using tracer particles embedded in the network of biopolymers together with molecular motors, and distinct non-thermal behavior is observed. We present a theoretical model of the dynamics of a trapped active particle, which allows us to quantify the deviations from equilibrium behavior, using both analytic and numerical calculations. We map the different regimes of dynamics in this system, and highlight the different manifestations of activity: breakdown of the virial theorem and equipartition, different elasticity-dependent "effective temperatures" and distinct non-Gaussian distributions. Our results shed light on puzzling observations in active gel experiments, and provide physical interpretation of existing observations, as well as predictions for future studies.

  1. 90Sr liquid scintillation urine analysis utilizing different approaches for tracer recovery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piraner, Olga [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA; Preston, Rose T. [Sandia Staffing Alliance, LLC, Albuquerque, NM; Shanks, Sonoya Toyoko; Jones, Robert [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA

    2010-08-01

    90Sr is one of the isotopes most commonly produced by nuclear fission. This medium lived isotope presents serious challenges to radiation workers, the environment, and following a nuclear event, the general public. Methods of identifying this nuclide have been in existence for a number of years (e.g. Horwitz, E.P. [1], Maxwell, S.L.[2], EPA 905.0 [3]) which are time consuming, requiring a month or more for full analysis. This time frame is unacceptable in the present security environment. It is therefore important to have a dependable and rapid method for the determination of Sr. The purposes of this study are to reduce analysis time to less than half a day by utilizing a single method of radiation measurement while continuing to yield precise results. This paper presents findings on three methods that can meet this criteria; (1) stable Sr carrier, (2) 85Sr by gamma spectroscopy, and (3) 85Sr by LSC. Two methods of analyzing and calculating the 85Sr tracer recovery were investigated (gamma spectroscopy and a low energy window-Sr85LEBAB by LSC) as well as the use of two different types of Sr tracer (85Sr and stable Sr carrier). Three separate stock blank urine samples were spiked with various activity levels of 239Pu, 137Cs, 90Sr /90Y to determine the effectiveness of the Eichrome Sr-spec%C2%AE resin 2mL extractive columns. The objective was to compare the recoveries of 85Sr versus a stable strontium carrier, attempt to compare the rate at which samples can be processed by evaluating evaporation, neutralization, and removing the use of another instrument (gamma spectrometer) by using the LSC spectrometer to obtain 85Sr recovery. It was found that when using a calibration curve comprised of a different cocktail and a non-optimum discriminator setting reasonable results (bias of %C2%B1 25%) were achieved. The results from spiked samples containing 85Sr demonstrated that a higher recovery is obtained when using gamma spectroscopy (89-95%) than when using the LEB window from LSC (120-470%). The high recovery for 85Sr by LSC analysis may be due to the interference/cross talk from the alpha region since alpha counts were observed in all sample sets. After further investigation it was determined that the alpha counts were due to 239Pu breakthrough on the Sr-spec%C2%AE column. This requires further development to purify the Sr before an accurate tracer recovery determination can be made. Sample preparation times varied and ranged from 4-6 hours depending on the specific sample preparation process. The results from the spiked samples containing stable strontium nitrate Sr(NO3)2 carrier demonstrate that gravimetric analysis yields the most consistent high recoveries (97-101%) when evaporation is carefully performed. Since this method did not have a variation on the tracer recovery method, the samples were counted in 1) LEB/Alpha/Beta mode optimized for Sr-90, 2) DPM for Sr-90, and 3) general LEB/Alpha/Beta mode. The results (from the known) ranged from 79-104%, 107-177%, and 85-89% for 1, 2, and 3 respectively. Counting the prepared samples in a generic low energy beta/alpha/beta protocol yielded more accurate and consistent results and also yielded the shortest sample preparation turn-around-time of 3.5 hours.

  2. Passive tracer in a flow corresponding to a two dimensional stochastic Navier Stokes equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Komorowski; Szymon Peszat; Tomasz Szarek

    2012-04-26

    In this paper we prove the law of large numbers and central limit theorem for trajectories of a particle carried by a two dimensional Eulerian velocity field. The field is given by a solution of a stochastic Navier--Stokes system with a non-degenerate noise. The spectral gap property, with respect to Wasserstein metric, for such a system has been shown in [9]. In the present paper we show that a similar property holds for the environment process corresponding to the Lagrangian observations of the velocity. In consequence we conclude the law of large numbers and the central limit theorem for the tracer. The proof of the central limit theorem relies on the martingale approximation of the trajectory process.

  3. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.J.

    1991-10-01

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  4. Green River air quality model development: meteorological and tracer data, July/August 1982 field study in Brush Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiteman, C.D.; Lee, R.N.; Orgill, M.M.; Zak, B.D.

    1984-06-01

    Meteorological and atmospheric tracer studies were conducted during a 3-week period in July and August of 1982 in the Brush Creek Valley of northwestern Colorado. The objective of the field experiments was to obtain data to evaluate a model, called VALMET, developed at PNL to predict dispersion of air pollutants released from an elevated stack located within a deep mountain valley in the post-sunrise temperature inversion breakup period. Three tracer experiments were conducted in the valley during the 2-week period. In these experiments, sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was released from a height of approximately 100 m, beginning before sunrise and continuing until the nocturnal down-valley winds reversed several hours after sunrise. Dispersion of the sulfur hexafluoride after release was evaluated by measuring SF/sub 6/ concentrations in ambient air samples taken from sampling devices operated within the valley up to about 8 km down valley from the source. An instrumented research aircraft was also used to measure concentrations in and above the valley. Tracer samples were collected using a network of radio-controlled bag sampling stations, two manually operated gas chromatographs, a continuous SF/sub 6/ monitor, and a vertical SF/sub 6/ profiler. In addition, basic meteorological data were collected during the tracer experiments. Frequent profiles of vertical wind and temperature structure were obtained with tethered balloons operated at the release site and at a site 7.7 km down the valley from the release site. 10 references, 63 figures, 50 tables.

  5. Thorium isotopes as tracers of particles dynamics and deep water circulation in the Indian sector of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coppola, Laurent

    Thorium isotopes as tracers of particles dynamics and deep water circulation in the Indian sector to study the distribution of thorium isotopes (234 Th, 232 Th and 230 Th) in the water column of the Indian in surface water (0­100 m) and a model was applied to estimate a residence time relative to the thorium

  6. Isolating the role of mesoscale eddies in mixing of a passive tracer in an eddy resolving model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Isolating the role of mesoscale eddies in mixing of a passive tracer in an eddy resolving model February 2008; published 16 May 2008. [1] This study examines the role of mesoscale eddies in distribution was replaced by a down-gradient diffusive parameterization. Our results demonstrate that advection by mesoscale

  7. AMMONIA AS A TRACER OF CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM IN THE T7.5 DWARF GLIESE 570D D. Saumon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AMMONIA AS A TRACER OF CHEMICAL EQUILIBRIUM IN THE T7.5 DWARF GLIESE 570D D. Saumon,1 M. S. Marley March 15; accepted 2006 April 25 ABSTRACT We present the first analysis of an optical to mid order of magnitude from the value obtained with chemical-equilibrium models. We model departures from

  8. Effects from influent boundary conditions on tracer migration and spatial variability features in intermediate-scale experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes, H.R.; Polzer, W.L.; Springer, E.P.

    1987-04-01

    In previous unsaturated transport studies at Los Alamos dispersion coefficients were estimated to be higher close to the tracer source than at greater distances from the source. Injection of tracers through discrete influent outlets could have accounted for those higher dispersions. Also, a lack of conservation of mass of the tracers was observed and suspected to be due to spatial variability in transport. In the present study experiments were performed under uniform influent (ponded) conditions in which breakthrough of tracers was monitored at four locations at each of four depths. All other conditions were similar to those of the unsaturated transport experiments. A comparison of results from these two sets of experiments indicates differences in the parameter estimates. Estimates were made for the dispersion coefficient and the retardation factor by the one-dimensional steady flow computer code, CFITIM. Estimates were also made for mass and for velocity and the dispersion coefficient by the method of moments. The dispersion coefficient decreased with depth under discrete influent application and increased with depth under ponded influent application. Retardation was predicted better under the discrete influent application than under ponded influent application. Differences in breakthroughs and in estimated parameters among locations at the same depth were observed under ponded influent application. Those differences indicate that there is a lack of conservation of mass as well as significant spatial variability across the experimental domain. 14 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Biased swimming cells do not disperse in pipes as tracers: A population model based on microscale behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearon, Rachel

    mask Biomicrofluidics 5, 022204 (2011) Analytical solution on Magnus wind turbine power performanceBiased swimming cells do not disperse in pipes as tracers: A population model based on microscale: A population model based on microscale behaviour R. N. Bearon,1,a) M. A. Bees,2 and O. A. Croze3 1 Department

  10. Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    Isotopic Tracer Studies of Propane Reactions on H-ZSM5 Zeolite Joseph A. Biscardi and Enrique unlabeled products from mixtures of propene and propane-2-13C reactants. Aromatic products of propane-2-13C-Parmer) that allowed differential reactor operation (propane reactions were

  11. May 1999 POV-Ray 3.1g User Documentation Page 1 Persistence of Vision TM Ray-Tracer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    May 1999 POV-Ray 3.1g User Documentation Page 1 Persistence of Vision TM Ray-Tracer POV-Ray TM Version 3.1g User's Documentation May 1999 Copyright 1999 POV-Team TM POV-Ray TM is based on DKBTrace 2

  12. Technology Commercialization Showcase 2008 Vehicle Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, Patrick B.

    2009-06-19

    Presentation illustrating various technology commercialization opportunities and unexploited investment gaps for the Vehicle Technologies Program.

  13. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO CHARACTERIZING BYPASSED OIL IN HETEROGENEOUS AND FRACTURED RESERVOIRS USING PARTITIONING TRACERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akhil Datta-Gupta

    2004-08-01

    We explore the use of efficient streamline-based simulation approaches for modeling and analysis partitioning interwell tracer tests in heterogeneous and fractured hydrocarbon reservoirs. The streamline approach is generalized to model water injection in naturally fractured reservoirs through the use of a dual media approach. The fractures and matrix are treated as separate continua that are connected through a transfer function, as in conventional finite difference simulators for modeling fractured systems. A detailed comparison with a commercial finite difference simulator shows very good agreement. Furthermore, an examination of the scaling behavior of the computation time indicates that the streamline approach is likely to result in significant savings for large-scale field applications. We also propose a novel approach to history matching finite-difference models that combines the advantage of the streamline models with the versatility of finite-difference simulation. In our approach, we utilize the streamline-derived sensitivities to facilitate history matching during finite-difference simulation. The use of finite-difference model allows us to account for detailed process physics and compressibility effects. The approach is very fast and avoids much of the subjective judgments and time-consuming trial-and-errors associated with manual history matching. We demonstrate the power and utility of our approach using a synthetic example and two field examples. Finally, we discuss several alternative ways of using partitioning interwell tracer tests (PITTs) in oil fields for the calculation of oil saturation, swept pore volume and sweep efficiency, and assess the accuracy of such tests under a variety of reservoir conditions.

  14. Anomaly Intrusion Detection in Dynamic Execution Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    of Microsoft's .NET project [10]. These technologies will further decouple hardware and software, allowing intrusion detection with extremely low performance penal- ties. Because each virtual machine (VM to improve intrusion detection[27, 36, 3]. Several such systems have been constructed, many with the idea

  15. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  16. sustainable technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    : · realize continuous improvements in performance (efficiency), cost and manufacturability of PV technologies, transformative PV technologies that circumvent cost/performance trade-offs and maintain compatibility with P the growing demand for energy. Photovoltaics (PV) leverages one of the 20th century's greatest scientific

  17. INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    1 INTERSTATE WASTE TECHNOLOGIES THERMOSELECT TECHNOLOGY AN OVERVIEW Presented to the DELAWARE SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT TECHNICAL WORKING GROUP January 10, 2006 #12;2 INTERSTATE WASTE MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE and maintenance (30 years) ­ Will guarantee performance and Operation and Maintenance ­ Serves solid waste

  18. Formaldehyde Silhouettes Against the Cosmic Microwave Background: A Mass-Limited, Distance-Independent, Extinction-Free Tracer of Star Formation Across the Epoch of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darling, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    We examine the absorption of cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons by formaldehyde (H2CO) over cosmic time. The K-doublet rotational transitions of H2CO become "refrigerated" - their excitation temperatures are driven below the CMB temperature - via collisional pumping by molecular hydrogen (H2). "Anti-inverted" H2CO line ratios thus provide an accurate measurement of the H2 density in molecular clouds. Using a radiative transfer model, we demonstrate that H2CO centimeter wavelength line excitation and detectability are nearly independent of redshift or gas kinetic temperature. Since the H2CO K-doublet lines absorb CMB light, and since the CMB lies behind every galaxy and provides an exceptionally uniform extended illumination source, H2CO is a distance-independent, extinction-free molecular gas mass-limited tracer of dense gas in galaxies. A Formaldehyde Deep Field could map the history of cosmic star formation in a uniquely unbiased fashion and may be possible with large bandwidth wide-field radio inter...

  19. A toolkit for detecting technical surprise.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trahan, Michael Wayne; Foehse, Mark C.

    2010-10-01

    The detection of a scientific or technological surprise within a secretive country or institute is very difficult. The ability to detect such surprises would allow analysts to identify the capabilities that could be a military or economic threat to national security. Sandia's current approach utilizing ThreatView has been successful in revealing potential technological surprises. However, as data sets become larger, it becomes critical to use algorithms as filters along with the visualization environments. Our two-year LDRD had two primary goals. First, we developed a tool, a Self-Organizing Map (SOM), to extend ThreatView and improve our understanding of the issues involved in working with textual data sets. Second, we developed a toolkit for detecting indicators of technical surprise in textual data sets. Our toolkit has been successfully used to perform technology assessments for the Science & Technology Intelligence (S&TI) program.

  20. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelof 12Detecting

  1. Spectroscopic detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Hadidi, Kamal (Cambridge, MA)

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  2. Geothermal Injection Technology Program: Annual progress report, Fiscal Year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    This report summarizes the Geothermal Injection Technology Program major activities in fiscal year 1986. The Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) have been conducting injection research and testing for this program, which was initiated in 1983. Activities at the INEL, representative element nodeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis, dual permeability modeling of flow in a fractured geothermal reservoir, and dual permeability model - laboratory and FRACSL-validation studies, are presented first, followed by the University of Utah Research Institute tracer development - experimental studies, which includes a brief description of activities planned for FY-1987.

  3. Technology Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To reduce solar technology risks, DOE and its partners evaluate the performance and reliability of novel photovoltaic (PV) hardware and systems through laboratory and field testing. The focus of...

  4. Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive Technology R&D Relevant to DOE Power Electronics Cost Targets Technology Roadmap Analysis 2013: Assessing Automotive...

  5. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving...

  6. Final report on isotope tracer investigations in the Forebay of the Orange County groundwater basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M; Woodside, G

    2003-12-13

    California is currently faced with some critical decisions about water resource infrastructure development in highly urbanized regions, whose outcome will dictate the future long-term viability of plentiful water. Among these is developing and safely implementing the reuse of advanced treated waste water. One of the most reliable strategies for this water resource is its indirect reuse via groundwater recharge and storage, with particular emphasis on supplementing annual water demand or during drought relief. The Orange County Water District (District) is currently implementing the first phase of a large-scale water reuse project that will advance-treat up to 60 million gallons per day of waste water and recharge it into existing percolation basins in the Forebay region of the Orange County groundwater basin. In order for the District to protect public health, the fate and potability of this recharged waste water needs to be understood. In particular, the direction and rates of flow into underlying aquifers need to be characterized so that changes in water quality can be quantified between the recharge basins and points of production. Furthermore, to ensure compliance to California Department of Health Services (DHS) draft regulations, the direction and rate of recharged waste water from these basins need to be understood to sufficient detail that small mixtures can be delineated in monitoring and production wells. Under proposed DHS guidelines, consumptive use of recycled water is permissive only if its residence time in an aquifer exceeds a specified six-month time-frame. DHS guidelines also limit the percentage of recycled water at production wells. However, attaining such detail using current hydrogeological and computer-assisted modeling tools is either cost-prohibitive or results in uncertainties too large to achieve regulatory confidence. To overcome this technical barrier, the District funded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1995-2001 to directly measure groundwater ages and perform two artificial tracer studies using isotope methods to quantify flowpath directions, groundwater residence times, and the rate and extent of recharge water and groundwater mixing. In addition, Jordan Clark at University of California, Santa Barbara also performed an artificial tracer experiment using sulfur-hexafluoride, whose results have been integrated into the LLNL findings.

  7. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  8. Smoke detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warmack, Robert J Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-11-05

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  9. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  10. Radon detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacArthur, Duncan W. (Los Alamos, NM); Allander, Krag S. (Ojo Caliente, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  11. Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

    2015-01-01

    The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

  12. Promising Technology: Wireless Lighting Occupancy Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupancy sensors and controls detect human presence, and modulate light settings accordingly. When there is no human presence detected, the system can dim or turn off lights. This technology ensures that lights are not used when there are no occupants present, which can lead to significant energy savings.

  13. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  14. Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revi, Frank

    1992-01-01

    The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

  15. Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-06-26

    This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

  16. Analysis of three sets of SWIW tracer-test data using a two-population complex fracture model for matrix diffusion and sorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, C.; Tsang, C.F.

    2009-08-01

    A complex fracture model employing two populations for diffusion and sorption is proposed to analyze three representative single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests from Forsmark and Laxemar, the two sites under investigation by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One population represents the semi-infinite rock matrix and the other represents finite blocks that can become saturated, thereafter accepting no further diffusion or sorption. The diffusion and sorption parameters of the models are inferred by matching tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs). Three tracers are simultaneously injected, uranine (Ur), which is conservative, and rubidium (Rb) and cesium (Cs), which are non-conservative. For non-sorbing tracer uranine, the finite blocks become saturated with test duration of the order of 10 hours, and both the finite and the semi-infinite populations play a distinct role in controlling BTCs. For sorbing tracers Rb and Cs, finite blocks do not saturate, but act essentially as semi-infinite, and thus BTC behavior is comparable to that obtained for a model containing only a semi-infinite rock matrix. The ability to obtain good matches to BTCs for both sorbing and non-sorbing tracers for these three different SWIW data sets demonstrates that the two-population complex fracture model may be a useful conceptual model to analyze all SWIW tracer tests in fractured rock, and perhaps also usual multiwell tracer tests. One of the two populations should be semi-infinite rock matrix and the other finite blocks that can saturate. The latter can represent either rock blocks or gouge within the fracture, a fracture skin zone, or stagnation zones.

  17. Engineering &Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    Software Technologies Deloitte Dialog Semiconductor ECM Selection EDT-Year in Industry EMC Corporation to join our organisation and be based in our Ferndown, Dorset, location within our product electronics have application, design and manufacturing facilities in Canada, America, Europe and China. We

  18. Manufacturing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Manufacturing Technologies Center is an integral part of Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram engineering and science laboratory, operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) with major facilities at Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Livermore, California. Our Center is at the core of Sandia`s Advanced Manufacturing effort which spans the entire product realization process.

  19. Pyroprocessing Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of pyrochemical processes for the recycle of oxide, carbide and other advanced fuels and laid the foundationPyroprocessing Technologies RECYCLING USED NUCLEAR FUEL FOR A SUSTAINABLE ENERGY FUTURE #12;32 Storing Used Nuclear Fuel is a Real Waste Nuclear power is the most environmentally friendly way

  20. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  1. Vacuum Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biltoft, P J

    2004-10-15

    The environmental condition called vacuum is created any time the pressure of a gas is reduced compared to atmospheric pressure. On earth we typically create a vacuum by connecting a pump capable of moving gas to a relatively leak free vessel. Through operation of the gas pump the number of gas molecules per unit volume is decreased within the vessel. As soon as one creates a vacuum natural forces (in this case entropy) work to restore equilibrium pressure; the practical effect of this is that gas molecules attempt to enter the evacuated space by any means possible. It is useful to think of vacuum in terms of a gas at a pressure below atmospheric pressure. In even the best vacuum vessels ever created there are approximately 3,500,000 molecules of gas per cubic meter of volume remaining inside the vessel. The lowest pressure environment known is in interstellar space where there are approximately four molecules of gas per cubic meter. Researchers are currently developing vacuum technology components (pumps, gauges, valves, etc.) using micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Miniature vacuum components and systems will open the possibility for significant savings in energy cost and will open the doors to advances in electronics, manufacturing and semiconductor fabrication. In conclusion, an understanding of the basic principles of vacuum technology as presented in this summary is essential for the successful execution of all projects that involve vacuum technology. Using the principles described above, a practitioner of vacuum technology can design a vacuum system that will achieve the project requirements.

  2. Well ER-6-1 Tracer Test Analysis: Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2006-09-01

    The ER-6-1 multiple-well aquifer test-tracer test (MWAT-TT) investigated groundwater flow and transport processes relevant to the transport of radionuclides from sources on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) through the lower carbonate aquifer (LCA) hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU). The LCA, which is present beneath much of the NTS, is the principal aquifer for much of southern Nevada. This aquifer consists mostly of limestone and dolomite, and is pervasively fractured. Groundwater flow in this aquifer is primarily in the fractures, and the hydraulic properties are primarily related to fracture frequency and fracture characteristics (e.g., mineral coatings, aperture, connectivity). The objective of the multiple-well aquifer test (MWAT) was to determine flow and hydraulic characteristics for the LCA in Yucca Flat. The data were used to derive representative flow model and parameter values for the LCA. The items of specific interest are: Hydraulic conductivity; Storage parameters; Dual-porosity behavior; and Fracture flow characteristics. The objective of the tracer transport experiment was to evaluate the transport properties and processes of the LCA and to derive representative transport parameter values for the LCA. The properties of specific interest are: Effective porosity; Matrix diffusion; Longitudinal dispersivity; Adsorption characteristics; and Colloid transport characteristics. These properties substantially control the rate of transport of contaminants in the groundwater system and concentration distributions. To best support modeling at the scale of the corrective action unit (CAU), these properties must be investigated at the field scale. The processes represented by these parameters are affected by in-situ factors that are either difficult to investigate at the laboratory scale or operate at a much larger scale than can be reproduced in the laboratory. Measurements at the field scale provide a better understanding of the effective average parameter values. The scale of this tracer test is still small compared to the scale of a CAU, but is of sufficient scale to be generally representative of the processes that affect in-situ transport. The scale of the tracer test undertaken is limited by the rate of transport in the formation and the resultant time frame required for completing such a test. The measurements at the field scale will provide information for relating laboratory measurements for transport processes to the larger scale. This report describes the analysis of the tracer test data and development of a conceptual model of transport in the LCA in Yucca Flat.

  3. Science &Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science &Technology Facilities Council Science &Technology Facilities Council Science and Technology Facilities Council Annual Report and Accounts 2011-2012 Science and Technology Facilities Council Laboratory, Cheshire; UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Edinburgh; Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire; Isaac

  4. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  5. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO sub 2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  6. Isotopic tracer studies of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishna, K.R.

    1992-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process in which CO and H{sub 2} react to give predominantly liquid hydrocarbons. The reaction can be considered a special type of polymerization in which the monomer is produced in situ, and chain growth occurs by a sequence of independently repeated additions of the monomer to the growing chain. A investigation has been conducted to study the CO hydrogenation reaction in order to better understand catalyst deactivation and the elementary surface processes involved in chain growth. Isotopic tracers are used in conjunction with transient-response techniques in this study of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over Ru/TiO{sub 2} catalysts. Experiments are conducted at a total pressure of 1 atmosphere, reaction temperatures of 453--498 K and D{sub 2}/CO (or H{sub 2}/CO) ratios of 2--5. Synthesis products are analyzed by gas chromatography or isotope-ratio gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Rate constants for chain initiation, propagation and termination are evaluated under steady-state reaction conditions by using transients in isotopic composition. The activation energy for chain termination is much higher than that for propagation, accounting for the observed decrease in the chain growth parameter are also estimated. Coverages by reaction intermediates are also estimated. When small amounts of {sup 12}C-labelled ethylene are added to {sup 13}CO/H{sub 2} synthesis gas, ethylene acts as the sole chain initiator. Ethylene-derived carbon also accounts for 45% of the C{sub 1} monomer pool. 102 refs., 29 figs., 11 tabs.

  7. Portal Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Beth Forrest

    2002-03-27

    Portal Technology Beth Forrest Warner Director, KU Digital Library Initiatives bwarner@ku.edu PUAD 839 March 27, 2002 Defining the issue… Today’s government agencies at all levels should note that the citizens they serve are “little concerned... their citizens’ perspectives. Instead of launching online services on a department-by-department basis, they are aggregating services across departments, accessible through a common portal.” (Janet Caldow, “The Quest for Electronic Government: A Defining...

  8. DD22O Detection usingO Detection using UltraUltra--high Qhigh Q ToroidalToroidal MicrocavitiesMicrocavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DD22O Detection usingO Detection using UltraUltra--high Qhigh Q ToroidalToroidal MicrocavitiesMicrocavities A. M. Armani, K. J. Vahala California Institute of Technology #12;DD22O detection methodsO detection Radiation 30 ppmv (0.003%) Annyas, J., et. al. Appl. Spec., 53 3 (1999). · UHQ Microtoroid Resonant

  9. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  10. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y.

    2007-02-15

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  12. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M.; Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J.

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  13. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  14. Information Technology and Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubble, Ann; Murphy, Deborah A.; Perry, Susan Chesley

    2011-01-01

    Sue Chesley Perry 196 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND LIBRARIES |LITA - Library & Information Technology Association). ”Two of the 190 INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND LIBRARIES |

  15. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  16. Available Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass andAtomsVehicles and Fuels VehiclesTechnologies

  17. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    technologies can be designed to utilize the available thermal energy from a combined heat and power (CHP) system. This technology characterization is intended to provide...

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    automotive technologies under development. Research is focused on developing power electronics (PE), electric motor, and traction drive system (TDS) technologies that will reduce...

  19. NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Basic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Technology Transfer" award from the Federal Laboratory Consortium. Application of this technology reduces the costs and energy associated with more conventional scrubbing...

  20. Technology Support Bob Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Support Services · Bob Davis · Associate Director User Support Services 1 #12;Technology Support Services · NUIT Technology Support Services (TSS) helps Northwestern faculty, staff, and students Technologies · Brian Nielsen · Project Manager Faculty Initiatives 8 #12;Support for Teaching & Learning

  1. NREL: Technology Deployment - Technology Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTS -Being Replicated AcrossSolarTechnology

  2. Alternative Neutron Detection Testing Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Erikson, Luke E.; Kernan, Warnick J.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Stromswold, David C.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2010-04-08

    Radiation portal monitors used for interdiction of illicit materials at borders include highly sensitive neutron detection systems. The main reason for having neutron detection capability is to detect fission neutrons from plutonium. Most currently deployed radiation portal monitors (RPMs) use neutron detectors based upon 3He-filled gas proportional counters, which are the most common large area neutron detector. This type of neutron detector is used in the TSA and other RPMs installed in international locations and in the Ludlum and Science Applications International Corporation RPMs deployed primarily for domestic applications. There is a declining supply of 3He in the world and, thus, methods to reduce the use of this gas in RPMs with minimal changes to the current system designs and sensitivity to cargo-borne neutrons are being investigated. Four technologies have been identified as being currently commercially available, potential alternative neutron detectors to replace the use of 3He in RPMs. These technologies are: 1) Boron trifluoride-filled proportional counters, 2) Boron-lined proportional counters, 3) Lithium-loaded glass fibers, and 4) Coated wavelength-shifting plastic fibers. Reported here is a summary of the testing carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on these technologies to date, as well as measurements on 3He tubes at various pressures. Details on these measurements are available in the referenced reports. Sponsors of these tests include the Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory funds.

  3. Technologies de base Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoras, .Romulus

    Technologies de base Architectures Cinquième partie Technologies Web Intergiciels et applications communicantes 1 / 38 #12;Technologies de base Architectures Client-serveur HTTP Présentation Plan 1 Technologies Contenu dynamique 2-tier 3-tier V ­ Technologies Web 2 / 38 #12;Technologies de base Architectures Client

  4. TECHNOLOGY LICENSE APPLICATION Office of Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 TECHNOLOGY LICENSE APPLICATION Office of Technology Transfer UT-Battelle, LLC (UT. One of the functions of UT-BATTELLE's Office of Technology Transfer is to negotiate license agreements for such intellectual property with companies for commercial applications of ORNL-developed technologies. Such licenses

  5. APPROPRIATE HOME TECHNOLOGY: Depending on Dependable Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    penetrate more and more into people's everyday lives and homes, the `design problem' is not so muchAPPROPRIATE HOME TECHNOLOGY: Depending on Dependable Technology Systems Guy Dewsbury, Karen Clarke 2002 #12;Dewsbury et al (2002): Appropriate Home Technology APPROPRIATE HOME TECHNOLOGY: Depending

  6. Conducting Polymers for Neutron Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimblin, Clare; Miller, Kirk; Vogel, Bob; Quam, Bill; McHugh, Harry; Anthony, Glen; Mike, Grover

    2007-12-01

    Conjugated polymers have emerged as an attractive technology for large-area electronic applications. As organic semiconductors, they can be used to make large-area arrays of diodes or transistors using fabrication techniques developed for polymer coatings, such as spraying and screen-printing. We have demonstrated both neutron and alpha detection using diodes made from conjugated polymers and have done preliminary work to integrate a boron carbide layer into the conventional polymer device structure to capture thermal neutrons. The polymer devices appear to be insensitive to gamma rays, due to their small physical thickness and low atomic number.

  7. Portable modular detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, James S. (Rodeo, CA); Singh, Anup (Danville, CA); Throckmorton, Daniel J. (Tracy, CA); Stamps, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  8. Science and Technology Challenges for International Safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Schanfein

    2009-07-01

    The science and technology challenges for international safeguards range from cutting edge physics needs to practical technology solutions for high volume data handling and analysis issues. This paper will take a narrow look at some of the predominant challenges, which include those at high throughput commercial facilities and those in the detection of undeclared facilities. It is hoped that by highlighting these areas it can encourage a concerted effort by scientific institutions and industry to provide robust cost-effective solutions.

  9. 1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-09-23

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

  10. Special Publication 800-94 Guide to Intrusion Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) promotes the U.S. economy and public welfare by providing technical) Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards and Technology KarenScarfone PeterMell #12;Guide to Intrusion Detection and Prevention Systems (IDPS) Recommendations of the National Institute of Standards

  11. Building Fire Emergency Detection and Response Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    1 Building Fire Emergency Detection and Response Using Wireless Sensor Networks Yuanyuan Zeng, Seán technologies. Fire emergency detection and response for building environments is a novel application area for this problem. Then we describe work on the use of WSNs to improve fire evacuation and navigation. Keywords

  12. 241-AY-102 Leak Detection Pit Drain Line Inspection Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boomer, Kayle D. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Engeman, Jason K. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Gunter, Jason R. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Joslyn, Cameron C. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Vazquez, Brandon J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (United States); Garfield, John S. [AEM Consulting (United States)

    2014-01-20

    This document provides a description of the design components, operational approach, and results from the Tank AY-102 leak detection pit drain piping visual inspection. To perform this inspection a custom robotic crawler with a deployment device was designed, built, and operated by IHI Southwest Technologies, Inc. for WRPS to inspect the 6-inch leak detection pit drain line.

  13. Real Time Computational Algorithms for Eddy Current Based Damage Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and improved techniques are constantly being sought to facilitate the detection of hidden corrosion and aws in structures such as airplanes and pipelines. In this paper, we explore the feasibility of detecting technology are components of airplanes, motor vehicles, pipelines, bridges, trains, and power stations

  14. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  15. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  16. Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danner, Andrew

    Bridge Detection By Road Detection Jeff Kaufman cbr@sccs.swarthmore.edu 1 Introduction It is useful, with local min- ima: cells from which there is no direction of descent. A common cause of this is bridges. The area over which a bridge passes shows up in the digital elevation as being of a height greater than

  17. Plasma technology directory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, P.P.; Dybwad, G.L.

    1995-03-01

    The Plasma Technology Directory has two main goals: (1) promote, coordinate, and share plasma technology experience and equipment within the Department of Energy; and (2) facilitate technology transfer to the commercial sector where appropriate. Personnel are averaged first by Laboratory and next by technology area. The technology areas are accelerators, cleaning and etching deposition, diagnostics, and modeling.

  18. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    Industrial DSM programs cannot succeed unless customers learn about and implement new technologies in a timely manner. Why? Because this expeditious transfer of new technologies represents the key challenge for the 1990s. This paper explores...

  19. ITL Bulletins are published by the Information Technology Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intrusion Detection Systems, July 2003 IT Security Metrics, August 2003 Information Technology Security Security Considerations in the Information System Development Life Cycle, December 2003 Computer Security Standard (FIPS) 199, Standards for Security Categorization of Federal Information and Information Systems

  20. PNNL Expert Doug McMakin Discusses Millimeter Wave Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Doug McMakin

    2012-12-31

    Electrical Engineer Doug McMakin discusses Millimeter Wave Holographic technology, which uses non-harmful, ultrahigh-frequency radio waves to penetrate clothing to detect and identify concealed objects, as well as obtain accurate body measurements.

  1. Investigating Heavy Metal Contamination of the Puget Sound Environment with New Isotopic Tracers Rachel Weber, Senior, Earth and Space Sciences, Mary Gates Scholar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winglee, Robert M.

    Sciences Tacoma Smelter Background The Tacoma Smelter operated for approximately 100 years at the southern to calibrate isotopic tracers of heavy metals emitted by the Tacoma Smelter. Preliminary data from lead isotope a clear isotopic fingerprint of Tacoma Smelter Pb. The analytical error is smaller than the data points

  2. POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AS A TRACER OF STAR FORMATION? NASA Ames Research Center, Mail Stop 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035; epeeters@mail.arc.nasa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AS A TRACER OF STAR FORMATION? E. Peeters NASA Ames Research) pumped large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules. As such, these features trace the FUV of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing '50 carbon atoms (Le´ger & Puget 1984; Allamandola et al

  3. Generalized chloride mass balance: Forward and inverse solutions for one-dimensional tracer convection under transient flux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, T.R.; Murphy, E.M.

    1996-12-01

    Forward and inverse solutions are provided for analysis of inert tracer profiles resulting from one-dimensional convective transport under fluxes which vary with time and space separately. The developments are displayed as an extension of conventional chloride mass balance (CMB) techniques to account for transient as well as space-dependent water fluxes. The conventional chloride mass balance has been used over two decades to estimate recharge over large time scales in arid environments. In this mass balance approach, the chloride concentration in the pore water, originating from atmospheric fallout, is inversely proportional to the flux of water through the sediments. The CMB method is especially applicable to arid and semi-arid regions where evapotranspirative enrichment of the pore water produces a distinct chloride profile in the unsaturated zone. The solutions presented allow incorporation of transient fluxes and boundary conditions in CMB analysis, and allow analysis of tracer profile data which is not constant with depth below extraction zone in terms of a rational water transport model. A closed-form inverse solution is derived which shows uniqueness of model parameter and boundary condition (including paleoprecipitation) estimation, for the specified flow model. Recent expressions of the conventional chloride mass balance technique are derived from the general model presented here; the conventional CMB is shown to be fully compatible with this transient flow model and it requires the steady-state assumption on chloride mass deposition only (and not on water fluxes or boundary conditions). The solutions and results are demonstrated on chloride profile data from west central New Mexico.

  4. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01

    study of architecture through references to “Technology andhis new “Architecture for Man” that combines technology withArchitecture and Minarc Architects, two contemporary designers that are pushing prefab technologies

  5. Adoption of New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Bronwyn H.; Khan, Beethika

    2003-01-01

    Firm Diffusion of New Technology: A Real Options Model. ”and the Adoption of New technology: Evidence from the U.S.affect whether or not new technologies are successful, the

  6. Technology & Engineering Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology & Engineering Division High-Temperature Superconducting Magnets for Fusion: New & Engineering Division Contents · Background on Superconductivity · Fusion Magnets ­ Present and Future ­ Vision/15/2014 2Joseph V. Minervini #12;Technology & Engineering Division Superconductivity #12;Technology

  7. Adoption of New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Bronwyn H.; Khan, Beethika

    2003-01-01

    Firm Diffusion of New Technology: A Real Options Model. ”and the Adoption of New technology: Evidence from the U.S.the Diffusion of New Technology in the Banking Industry. ”

  8. Evaluation of Cost Effective Sensor Combinations for a Vehicle Precrash Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birdsong, Charles

    Evaluation of Cost Effective Sensor Combinations for a Vehicle Precrash Detection System John the occurrence of an accident before it occurs. There are many different sensor technologies currently available for pre-crash detection. However no single sensor technology has demonstrated enough information gathering

  9. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Institute for Software Technology Recommender Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardcover 45.90 American fiction, murder, neo-Nazism attributes #12;Institute for Software Technology 4 fiction, murder, neo- Nazism · User profile Title Genre Author Type Price Keywords ... Fiction Brunonia, Barry, Ken Follett Paperback 25.65 Detective, murder, New York · Simple approach · Compute

  11. Plasmonic Technology: Novel Approach to Ultrasensitive Immunoassays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    Plasmonic Technology: Novel Approach to Ultrasensitive Immunoassays Joseph R. Lakowicz,* Joanna­ 16). Different fluorescence detection approaches include polarization (17­21), resonance energy-called surface plasmons comprise an electromagnetic wave con- fined to the interface between the metal film

  12. Technology Readiness Assessment Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of management decisions by identifying key technologies that have been demonstrated to work or by highlighting immature or unproven technologies that might result in increased...

  13. Promising Technologies List

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    about promising new and underutilized energy-saving technologies available for Federal and commercial building sector deployment. To identify promising technologies,...

  14. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use...

  15. Hydropower Program Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01

    New fact sheets for the DOE Office of Power Technologies (OPT) that provide technology overviews, description of DOE programs, and market potential for each OPT program area.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE intends to issue, on behalf of its Fuel Cell Technologies Office, a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled "Fuel Cell Technologies Incubator: Innovations in Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

  17. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Office Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office National Energy Consumption 40% 60% Reducing consumption or improving performance calls for cutting-edge...

  18. Essays on University Technology Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drivas, Kyriakos

    2011-01-01

    of university technology management and their implicationson University Technology Management by Kyriakos Drivas Aon University Technology Management by Kyriakos Drivas

  19. Tracer diffusion of hard-sphere binary mixtures under nano-confinement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Umberto Marini Bettolo Marconi; Paolo Malgaretti; Ignacio Pagonabarraga

    2015-09-29

    The physics of diffusion phenomena in nano and micro channels has attracted a lot of attention in recent years, due to its close connection with many technological, medical and industrial applications. In the present paper we employ a kinetic approach to investigate how the confinement in nanostructured geometries affects the diffusive properties of fluid mixtures and leads to the appearance of properties different from those of bulk systems. In particular, we derive an expression for the friction tensor in the case of a bulk fluid mixture confined to a narrow slit having undulated walls. The boundary roughness leads to a new mechanism for transverse diffusion, and can even lead to an effective diffusion along the channel larger than the one corresponding to a planar channel of equivalent section. Finally we discuss a reduction of the previous equation to a one dimensional effective diffusion equation in which an entropic term encapsulates the geometrical information on the channel shape.

  20. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  1. Assessing vehicle detection utilizing video image processing technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Duane E

    1996-01-01

    -test indicated that passenger car speeds determined by the video image processing system were significantly different when compared to passenger car speeds obtained by a radar speed gun. The results of this thesis research study provide some guidance on the use...

  2. Techniques and Technologies for Field Detection of Asbestos Containing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Asbestos has been used in numerous applications at DOE sites including sprayed-on fireproofing, asphalt and vinyl floor tile, and asbestos-cement(transite) siding.

  3. The Use of Infrared Technology To Detect Heat Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, K.

    1979-01-01

    Infrared refers to electro magnetic energy with a wave length longer than those of visible light. Researchers developed methods to quantify, focus and form real-time images to infrared energy. This spawned the development of infrared Thenrography...

  4. ADVANCES IN SURFACE PENETRATING TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMAGING, DETECTION, AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hero, Alfred O.

    of and collaboration with the U.S. Army's Night Vision and Electronic Sensor Directorate (NVESD). He also wishes are those of the author and should not be interpreted as representing official policies, either expressed support throughout this five year life chapter the author thanks his family: James, Joyce, Jon

  5. Millimeter Wave Sensor Technologies Track Biometrics; Detect Chemicals,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetectionBenchmark Performance ofMilitaryMillerGases, and

  6. PPPL's MINDS Technology Takes Nuclear Detection to the Marketplace |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access| Department ofStephen P riceawards | Princeton PlasmaDepartment of

  7. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 20153Danielthrough theKDesertDesigningCourse

  8. Los Alamos technologies help scientists detect, record & interpret

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to local UnitedtoHOPENew

  9. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    land- based wind energy technology. 2009 Wind TechnologiesRenewable Energy 2009 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT AUGUSTfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.

  10. Technology Licensing | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    License ORNL Technologies Licensing Guidelines NDA(s) and MTA(s) Sample Agreements Technology Innovation Program Technology Assistance Program Licensing Staff Technology Search...

  11. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Faculty Center Verification & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Information Technology ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718

  12. Quantum technology and its applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boshier, Malcolm; Berkeland, Dana; Govindan, Tr; Abo - Shaeer, Jamil

    2010-12-10

    Quantum states of matter can be exploited as high performance sensors for measuring time, gravity, rotation, and electromagnetic fields, and quantum states of light provide powerful new tools for imaging and communication. Much attention is being paid to the ultimate limits of this quantum technology. For example, it has already been shown that exotic quantum states can be used to measure or image with higher precision or higher resolution or lower radiated power than any conventional technologies, and proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating measurement precision below the standard quantum limit (shot noise) are just starting to appear. However, quantum technologies have another powerful advantage beyond pure sensing performance that may turn out to be more important in practical applications: the potential for building devices with lower size/weight/power (SWaP) and cost requirements than existing instruments. The organizers of Quantum Technology Applications Workshop (QTAW) have several goals: (1) Bring together sponsors, researchers, engineers and end users to help build a stronger quantum technology community; (2) Identify how quantum systems might improve the performance of practical devices in the near- to mid-term; and (3) Identify applications for which more long term investment is necessary to realize improved performance for realistic applications. To realize these goals, the QTAW II workshop included fifty scientists, engineers, managers and sponsors from academia, national laboratories, government and the private-sector. The agenda included twelve presentations, a panel discussion, several breaks for informal exchanges, and a written survey of participants. Topics included photon sources, optics and detectors, squeezed light, matter waves, atomic clocks and atom magnetometry. Corresponding applications included communication, imaging, optical interferometry, navigation, gravimetry, geodesy, biomagnetism, and explosives detection. Participants considered the physics and engineering of quantum and conventional technologies, and how quantum techniques could (or could not) overcome limitations of conventional systems. They identified several auxiliary technologies that needed to be further developed in order to make quantum technology more accessible. Much of the discussion also focused on specific applications of quantum technology and how to push the technology into broader communities, which would in turn identify new uses of the technology. Since our main interest is practical improvement of devices and techniques, we take a liberal definition of 'quantum technology': a system that utilizes preparation and measurement of a well-defined coherent quantum state. This nomenclature encompasses features broader than entanglement, squeezing or quantum correlations, which are often more difficult to utilize outside of a laboratory environment. Still, some applications discussed in the workshop do take advantage of these 'quantum-enhanced' features. They build on the more established quantum technologies that are amenable to manipulation at the quantum level, such as atom magnetometers and atomic clocks. Understanding and developing those technologies through traditional engineering will clarify where quantum-enhanced features can be used most effectively, in addition to providing end users with improved devices in the near-term.

  13. Detecting small holes in packages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC); Cadieux, James R. (Aiken, SC)

    1996-01-01

    A package containing a tracer gas, and a method for determining the presence of a hole in the package by sensing the presence of the gas outside the package. The preferred tracer gas, especially for food packaging, is sulfur hexafluoride. A quantity of the gas is added to the package and the package is closed. The concentration of the gas in the atmosphere outside the package is measured and compared to a predetermined value of the concentration of the gas in the absence of the package. A measured concentration greater than the predetermined value indicates the presence of a hole in the package. Measuring may be done in a chamber having a lower pressure than that in the package.

  14. Detecting small holes in packages

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.; Cadieux, J.R.

    1996-03-19

    A package containing a tracer gas, and a method for determining the presence of a hole in the package by sensing the presence of the gas outside the package are disclosed. The preferred tracer gas, especially for food packaging, is sulfur hexafluoride. A quantity of the gas is added to the package and the package is closed. The concentration of the gas in the atmosphere outside the package is measured and compared to a predetermined value of the concentration of the gas in the absence of the package. A measured concentration greater than the predetermined value indicates the presence of a hole in the package. Measuring may be done in a chamber having a lower pressure than that in the package. 3 figs.

  15. Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergy FacilitiesInformationTown700testing in

  16. TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 2005 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 152-8550 2 12 1 E3-3 2005 8 TEL. 03 5734 2975 URL. http://www.titech.ac.jp/ PROFILE #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0201 CONTENTS 03 06 06 08 09 10 15 17 25 31 33 37 41 0201 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE

  17. Predictive Maintenance Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several diagnostic technologies and best practices are available to assist Federal agencies with predictive maintenance programs.

  18. Hydrogen delivery technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-15

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  19. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management and public safety professionals to define and prioritize technology needs. Coordinate and leadNorthwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate

  20. SPACE TECHNOLOGY Actual Estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    technology readiness of new missions, mitigate their technological risks, improve the quality of cost estimates, and thereby contribute to better overall mission cost management..." Space Technology investmentsSPACE TECHNOLOGY TECH-1 Actual Estimate Budget Authority (in $ millions) FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY

  1. Supernova-Driven Outflows in NGC 7552: A Comparison of H-alpha and UV Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Corey M; Calzetti, Daniela; Leitherer, Claus; Chisholm, John; Gallagher, John S

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the supernova-driven galactic wind of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 7552, using both ground-based optical nebular emission lines and far-ultraviolet absorption lines measured with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We detect broad (~300 km/s) blueshifted (-40 km/s) optical emission lines associated with the galaxy's kpc-scale star-forming ring. The broad line kinematics and diagnostic line ratios suggest that the H-alpha emission comes from clouds of high density gas entrained in a turbulent outflow. We compare the H-alpha emission line profile to the UV absorption line profile measured along a coincident sight line and find significant differences. The maximum blueshift of the H-alpha-emitting gas is ~290 km/s, whereas the UV line profile extends to blueshifts upwards of 1000 km/s. The mass outflow rate estimated from the UV is roughly nine times greater than that estimated from H-alpha. We argue that the H-alpha emission traces a cluster-scale outflow of dense, low velocit...

  2. Methanol masers : Reliable tracers of the early stages of high-mass star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Ellingsen

    2005-10-07

    The GLIMPSE and MSX surveys have been used to examine the mid-infrared properties of a statistically complete sample of 6.7 GHz methanol masers. The GLIMPSE point sources associated with methanol masers are clearly distinguished from the majority, typically having extremely red mid-infrared colors, similar to those expected of low-mass class 0 young stellar objects. The intensity of the GLIMPSE sources associated with methanol masers is typically 4 magnitudes brighter at 8.0 micron than at 3.6 micron. Targeted searches towards GLIMPSE point sources with [3.6]-[4.5] > 1.3 and an 8.0 micron magnitude less than 10 will detect more than 80% of class II methanol masers. Many of the methanol masers are associated with sources within infrared dark clouds (IRDC) which are believed to mark regions where high-mass star formation is in its very early stages. The presence of class II methanol masers in a significant fraction of IRDC suggests that high-mass star formation is common in these regions. Different maser species are thought to trace different evolutionary phases of the high-mass star formation process. Comparison of the properties of the GLIMPSE sources associated with class II methanol masers and other maser species shows interesting trends, consistent with class I methanol masers tracing a generally earlier evolutionary phase and OH masers tracing a later evolutionary phase.

  3. Bubble Radiation Detection: Current and Future Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AJ Peurrung; RA Craig

    1999-11-15

    Despite a number of noteworthy achievements in other fields, superheated droplet detectors (SDDs) and bubble chambers (BCs) have not been used for nuclear nonproliferation and arms control. This report examines these two radiation-detection technologies in detail and answers the question of how they can be or should be ''adapted'' for use in national security applications. These technologies involve closely related approaches to radiation detection in which an energetic charged particle deposits sufficient energy to initiate the process of bubble nucleation in a superheated fluid. These detectors offer complete gamma-ray insensitivity when used to detect neutrons. They also provide controllable neutron-energy thresholds and excellent position resolution. SDDs are extraordinarily simple and inexpensive. BCs offer the promise of very high efficiency ({approximately}75%). A notable drawback for both technologies is temperature sensitivity. As a result of this problem, the temperature must be controlled whenever high accuracy is required, or harsh environmental conditions are encountered. The primary findings of this work are listed and briefly summarized below: (1) SDDs are ready to function as electronics-free neutron detectors on demand for arms-control applications. The elimination of electronics at the weapon's location greatly eases the negotiability of radiation-detection technologies in general. (2) As a result of their high efficiency and sharp energy threshold, current BCs are almost ready for use in the development of a next-generation active assay system. Development of an instrument based on appropriately safe materials is warranted. (3) Both kinds of bubble detectors are ready for use whenever very high gamma-ray fields must be confronted. Spent fuel MPC and A is a good example where this need presents itself. (4) Both kinds of bubble detectors have the potential to function as low-cost replacements for conventional neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He tubes. For SDDs, this requires finding some way to get boron into the detector. For BCs, this requires finding operating conditions permitting a high duty cycle.

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and...

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report 2009avtaehvso.pdf More Documents &...

  6. Fast Neutron Detection Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKigney, Edward A.; Stange, Sy

    2014-03-17

    These slides present a summary of previous work, conclusions, and anticipated schedule for the conclusion of our fast neutron detection evaluation.

  7. Assessing Software Engineering Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zelkowitz, Marvin V.

    , and technology infusion, or the adoption of a new technology by an individual organization. 1 #12;Table ¢ ¡ £ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ £ ¤ £ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ £ ¤ £ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ £ ¡ ¢ 15 3.4 Exporting and Infusing Technology ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ £ ¤ £ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ £ ¤ £ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ £ ¡ ¢ 16 4 Infusion of Technology 18 4.1 Technologies of Interest

  8. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  9. Medically relevant ElectroNeedle technology development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Thomas, Michael Loren; McClain, Jaime L.; Harper, Jason C.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2008-11-01

    ElectroNeedles technology was developed as part of an earlier Grand Challenge effort on Bio-Micro Fuel Cell project. During this earlier work, the fabrication of the ElectroNeedles was accomplished along with proof-of-concept work on several electrochemically active analytes such as glucose, quinone and ferricyanide. Additionally, earlier work demonstrated technology potential in the field of immunosensors by specifically detecting Troponin, a cardiac biomarker. The current work focused upon fabrication process reproducibility of the ElectroNeedles and then using the devices to sensitively detect p-cresol, a biomarker for kidney failure or nephrotoxicity. Valuable lessons were learned regarding fabrication assurance and quality. The detection of p-cresol was accomplished by electrochemistry as well as using fluorescence to benchmark ElectroNeedles performance. Results from these studies will serve as a guide for the future fabrication processes involving ElectroNeedles as well as provide the groundwork necessary to expand technology applications. One paper has been accepted for publication acknowledging LDRD funding (K. E. Achyuthan et al, Comb. Chem. & HTS, 2008). We are exploring the scope for a second paper describing the applications potential of this technology.

  10. Formaldehyde as a Tracer of Extragalactic Molecular Gas I. Para-H_2CO Emission From M 82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mühle, S; Henkel, C

    2007-01-01

    Using the IRAM 30-m telescope and the 15-m JCMT, we explore the value of para-formaldehyde (p-H_2CO) as a tracer of density and temperature of the molecular gas in external galaxies. The target of our observations are the lobes of the molecular ring around the center of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxy M 82. It is shown that p-H_2CO provides one of the rare direct molecular thermometers. Reproducing the measured line intensities with a large velocity gradient (LVG) model, we find densities of n_H2 ~ 7 10^3 cm^-3 and kinetic temperatures of T_kin ~ 200 K. The derived kinetic temperature is significantly higher than the dust temperature or the temperature deduced from ammonia (NH_3) lines, but our results agree well with the properties of the high-excitation component seen in CO. We also present the serendipitous discovery of the 4_2 - 3_1 line of methanol (CH_3OH) in the northeastern lobe, which shows -- unlike CO and H_2CO -- significantly different line intensities in the two lobes.

  11. Formaldehyde as a Tracer of Extragalactic Molecular Gas I. Para-H_2CO Emission From M 82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mühle; E. R. Seaquist; C. Henkel

    2007-08-13

    Using the IRAM 30-m telescope and the 15-m JCMT, we explore the value of para-formaldehyde (p-H_2CO) as a tracer of density and temperature of the molecular gas in external galaxies. The target of our observations are the lobes of the molecular ring around the center of the nearby prototypical starburst galaxy M 82. It is shown that p-H_2CO provides one of the rare direct molecular thermometers. Reproducing the measured line intensities with a large velocity gradient (LVG) model, we find densities of n_H2 ~ 7 10^3 cm^-3 and kinetic temperatures of T_kin ~ 200 K. The derived kinetic temperature is significantly higher than the dust temperature or the temperature deduced from ammonia (NH_3) lines, but our results agree well with the properties of the high-excitation component seen in CO. We also present the serendipitous discovery of the 4_2 - 3_1 line of methanol (CH_3OH) in the northeastern lobe, which shows -- unlike CO and H_2CO -- significantly different line intensities in the two lobes.

  12. ISW-Galaxy Cross Correlation:A probe of Dark Energy clustering and distribution of Dark Matter tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khosravi, Shahram; Baghram, Shant

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Sachs Wolfe (ISW) cross correlation with the galaxy distribution in late time is a promising tool to constrain the dark energy properties. In this work we study the effect of dark energy clustering on the ISW-galaxy cross correlation. Indicating the fact that the bias parameter between the distribution of the galaxies and the underlying dark matter introduce a degeneracy and complications. We argue that as the time of the galaxy's host halo formation is different from the observation time, we have to consider the evolution of the halo bias parameter. We indicate that any deviation from $\\Lambda$CDM model will change the evolution of the bias as well. Also we show that the halo bias strongly depends on the sub-sample of galaxies which is chosen for cross correlation. We show that joint kernel of ISW effect and the galaxy distribution have the dominant effect on the observed signal, accordingly we can enhance the signal of a specific dark energy model by choosing an appropriate tracer. More speci...

  13. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  14. Array for detecting microbes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andersen, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd D.

    2014-07-08

    The present embodiments relate to an array system for detecting and identifying biomolecules and organisms. More specifically, the present embodiments relate to an array system comprising a microarray configured to simultaneously detect a plurality of organisms in a sample at a high confidence level.

  15. Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson Jr.,, Ray

    Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training & Technology Solutions 718-997-4875 ~ training@qc.cuny.edu ~ I-Bldg 214 Advisor Center Navigation: Login #12;Training & Technology Solutions Queens College ~ Office of Converging Technologies ~ Training

  16. Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce,Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Miniaturized fluid handling devices have recently attracted considerable interest in many areas of science1. Such microfluidic chips perform a variety of functions, ranging from analysis of biological macromolecules2,3 to catalysis of reactions and sensing in the gas phase4,5. To enable precise fluid handling, accurate knowledge of the flow properties within these devices is important. Due to low Reynolds numbers, laminar flow is usually assumed. However, either by design or unintentionally, the flow characteristic in small channels is often altered, for example by surface interactions, viscous and diffusional effects, or electrical potentials. Therefore, its prediction is not always straight-forward6-8. Currently, most microfluidic flow measurements rely on optical detection of markers9,10, requiring the injection of tracers and transparent devices. Here, we show profiles of microfluidic gas flow in capillaries and chip devices obtained by NMR in the remote detection modality11,12. Through the transient measurement of dispersion13, NMR is well adaptable for non-invasive, yet sensitive determination of the flow field and provides a novel and potentially more powerful tool to profile flow in capillaries and miniaturized flow devices.

  17. First detection of CF+ towards a high-mass protostar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fechtenbaum, S; Schneider, N; Csengeri, T; Duarte-Cabral, A; Herpin, F; Lefloch, B

    2015-01-01

    We report the first detection of the J = 1 - 0 (102.6 GHz) rotational lines of CF+ (fluoromethylidynium ion) towards CygX-N63, a young and massive protostar of the Cygnus X region. This detection occurred as part of an unbiased spectral survey of this object in the 0.8-3 mm range, performed with the IRAM 30m telescope. The data were analyzed using a local thermodynamical equilibrium model (LTE model) and a population diagram in order to derive the column density. The line velocity (-4 km s-1) and line width (1.6 km s-1) indicate an origin from the collapsing envelope of the protostar. We obtain a CF+ column density of 4.10e11 cm-2. The CF+ ion is thought to be a good tracer for C+ and assuming a ratio of 10e-6 for CF+/C+, we derive a total number of C+ of 1.2x10e53 within the beam. There is no evidence of carbon ionization caused by an exterior source of UV photons suggesting that the protostar itself is the source of ionization. Ionization from the protostellar photosphere is not efficient enough. In contras...

  18. The effect of variable atmospheric forcing on oceanic subduction of a passive tracer in a numerical model: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horsfall, F.; Bleck, R.; Hanson, H.P.

    1997-11-01

    This study addresses the issue of the ocean`s response to the changing climate. The objectives is to determine the effect of variable atmospheric forcing on the ocean on decadal time scales, specifically on the subduction of a passive tracer. In the context of the model used in this study, this tracer is {open_quotes}tagged{close_quotes} water that is subducted into the thermocline and into the deep ocean. The model used in this study is the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model which has a realistic Atlantic domain from 20{degrees}S to 60{degrees}N. There are twelve model layers, the first (top) layer being the thermodynamically active mixed layer and the lower eleven layers all having constant potential density ({sigma}{sub {theta}}). The atmospheric forcing changes vary latitudinally, allowing for a maximum increase in wind at midlatitudes and a maximum increase in temperature at the poles. In these experiments, it was found that wind speed and temperature effects dominate in bringing about changes in mixed-layer depth and in tracer penetration at high latitudes, with wind speed effects having the greater weight. It is apparent from the results that the weakening of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation is dependent on the atmospheric changes in air temperature and in the wind field. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The spiral arms of the Milky Way: The relative location of each different arm tracer within a typical spiral arm width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vallée, Jacques P., E-mail: jacques.vallee@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada, National Science Infrastructure portfolio, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, B.C., V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    From the Sun's location in the Galactic disk, different arm tracers (CO, H I, hot dust, etc.) have been employed to locate a tangent to each spiral arm. Using all various and different observed spiral arm tracers (as published elsewhere), we embark on a new goal, namely the statistical analysis of these published data (data mining) to statistically compute the mean location of each spiral arm tracer. We show for a typical arm cross-cut, a separation of 400 pc between the mid-arm and the dust lane (at the inner edge of the arm, toward the Galactic center). Are some arms major and others minor? Separating arms into two sets, as suggested by some, we find the same arm widths between the two sets. Our interpretation is that we live in a multiple (four-arm) spiral (logarithmic) pattern (around a pitch angle of 12°) for the stars and gas in the Milky Way, with a sizable interarm separation (around 3 kpc) at the Sun's location and the same arm width for each arm (near 400 pc from mid-arm to dust lane).

  20. UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE TECHNOLOGY &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    electricity networks and distribution systems, through to using smart grid technologies for more effective of dynamic collaborations delivering productive outcomes. #12;#12;LOW CARBON POWER AND ENERGY FUTURE CITIES Advanced Manufacturing Future Cities Health Technologies Working collaboratively, programmes within

  1. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ChemE Massachusetts Institute of Technology Department of Chemical Engineering Undergraduate technology, chemical engineers play a role in almost every industry and they collaborate with all types, creating and improving pharmaceuticals, fuels, polymers, plastics, cosmetics, cereals and more." Klavs

  2. SIMULATING EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIMULATING EVOLUTION OF TECHNOLOGY: AN AID TO ENERGY POLICY ANALYSIS A CASE STUDY OF STRATEGIES Approval Name: John Nyboer Degree: Doctor of Philosophy Title of Thesis: Simulating Evolution of Technology

  3. Technology Readiness Assessment Guide

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-09-15

    The Guide assists individuals and teams involved in conducting Technology Readiness Assessments (TRAs) and developing Technology Maturation Plans (TMPs) for the DOE capital asset projects subject to DOE O 413.3B. Supersedes DOE G 413.3-4.

  4. Technology Deployment Case Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Find technology deployment case studies below. Click on each individual project link to see the full case study. You can also view a map of technology deployment case studies.

  5. Technology Business Incubation Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Technology Business Incubation Programme Ms. Kimmie Wong Assistant Manager Incubation Admission and organization. Industry Technology Biotechnology Clusters IT & Telecomm. Pharmaceutical Precision Engg. Chinese Lab Premises Technical Support Facilities Technical and Management Assistance Management and Technical

  6. Tag: technology transfer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17all en CNS, UT chemical sensing technology wins R&D 100 Award http:www.y12.doe.govnewspress-releasescns-ut-chemical-sensing-technology-wins-rd-100-award

  7. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Membrane Technology Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Charles Page (Air Products & Chemicals, Inc.) for the Membrane Technology Workshop held July 24, 2012

  9. States & Emerging Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation, given through the DOE's Technical Assitance Program (TAP), provides information on States & Emerging Energy Technologies.

  10. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01

    ?? percent to ?? percent. Water reuse systems treat wastewater by various technologies including ?ltering, bioremediation and ozone exposure. ?ese technologies can involve billions of gallons of wastewater ? such as in a municipal recycling e... Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a behavioral exercise and urge...

  11. Advanced Propulsion Technology Strategy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GM is also developing new classes of electrically driven vehicles, leveraging technology first used in their hybrids.

  12. Do New Technologies Matter?

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Check out a few stories of companies who have taken a breakthrough energy technology and run with it.

  13. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  14. Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)/Technology Maturation Plan...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA)Technology Maturation Plan (TMP) Process Guide This document is a guide for those...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010 Fuel Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuels Technologies subprogram supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D)...

  16. EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstration...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Processing Office of Engineering and Technology April 2008 EM Engineering & Technology Roadmap and Major Technology Demonstrations Introduction Progress made in EM cleanup...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2012 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report The Fuel & Lubricant...

  18. Does Doctrine Drive Technology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasko, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Policy Brief No. 4 September 2010 Does Doctrine DriveTechnology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine? Dennis Blaskoone way. However, technology does not determine strat- egy.

  19. Does Doctrine Drive Technology or Does Technology Drive Doctrine?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blasko, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Brief No. 4 September 2010 Does Doctrine Drive Technology orDoes Technology Drive Doctrine? Dennis Blasko Summary Wthat emphasizes strategy over technology and may hold some

  20. MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OSU Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsOSU Direct Drive Power Generation Buoys Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Oak Ridge Transportation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oak Ridge Transportation Technology Program Annual Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Oak Ridge Transportation Technology Program Annual Report ornlttpreportfy08.pdf More...

  2. Technology Innovations and Experience Curves for Nitrogen Oxides Control Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeh, Sonia; Rubin, Edward S.; Taylor, Margaret R.

    2007-01-01

    including issues of technology and cost un- certainties, areon NO x Control Technologies and Cost Effectiveness forand other factors on technology cost trends (hence, the

  3. Science & Technology Review January/February 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-11-30

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Innovative Materials Rise to the Radiation Challenge - Commentary by Bruce Warner; (2) The Hunt for Better Radiation Detection - New materials will help radiation detectors pick up weak signals and accurately identify illicit radioactive sources; (3) Time-Critical Technology Identifies Deadly Bloodborne Pathogens - A portable device can simultaneously distinguish up to five bloodborne pathogens in just minutes; (4) Defending Computer Networks against Attack - A Laboratory effort takes a new approach to detecting increasingly sophisticated cyber attacks; and (5) Imaging Cargo's Inner Secrets - Livermore-University of California collaborators are modeling a new radiographic technique for identifying nuclear materials concealed inside cargo containers.

  4. Technology Advertising Contact Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    Overview #12;Technology Advertising Contact Information Alex Sheath 8596 4063 asheath Overview Our online Technology section is geared towards an IT professional environment, reaching a range of technology enthusiasts from every day gadget consumers to business decision makers where enterprise solutions

  5. Department of Science, Technology, &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Science, Technology, & Society #12;Understanding the relationship between technology and society is crucial to becoming a successful leader in any field. #12;Our Students The University of Virginia Department of Science, Technology, and Society offers a comprehensive

  6. Responder Technology Alert Monthly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-24014 Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014) January 2015 JF Upton SL Stein #12;#12;PNNL-24014 Responder Technology Alert Monthly (Oct-Nov 2014) JF Upton SL Stein January 2015 Prepared for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate under Contract HSHQPM-14-X-00058. Pacific

  7. PUBLICATIONS BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDEX of PUBLICATIONS by the BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES, 1955-59 Inclusive OF PUBLICATIONS BY THE BRANCH OF TECHNOLOGY BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES 1955-59 Inclusive by F. Bruce Sanford continue s, for the year s 1955- 59, the listing of publications by the Branch of Technology given

  8. Science &Technology Facilities Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science &Technology Facilities Council Accelerator Science and Technology Centre Daresbury Science)1235 445808 www.stfc.ac.uk/astec Head office, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Polaris House, North Newton Group, La Palma: Joint Astronomy Centre, Hawaii. ASTeC Science Highlights 2009 - 2010 Science

  9. Technology Performance Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-01

    To address the need for accessible, high-quality data, the Department of Energy has developed the Technology Performance Exchange (TPEx). TPEx enables technology suppliers, third-party testing laboratories, and other entities to share product performance data. These data are automatically transformed into a format that technology evaluators can easily use in their energy modeling assessments to inform procurement decisions.

  10. NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NORTHWEST REGIONAL TECHNOLOGY CENTER for Homeland Security Northwest Regional Technology Center May 2015 | 1 AROUND THE REGION IN HOMELAND SECURITY The Northwest Regional Technology Center (NWRTC.S. Army Cyber Command; and Michael Echols, Director, Cyber Joint Program Management Office National

  11. Web Technology (elective package)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franssen, Michael

    Web Technology (elective package) Offered by: Department of Mathematics and Computer Science? Computer Science-based approaches and enabling technologies for the web. Course descriptions Human and efficient. Web Technology The web has become the major source of information retrieval and is playing

  12. Transmission Enhancement Technology Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a recommendation of the most cost-effective methods and technologies to enhance electricity transmission from a review of methods and technologies with potential to enhance electricity transmission capability-traditional methods and technologies to increase the capacity of the high voltage electric power transmission system

  13. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, Lewis C. (North Augusta, SC); Stephens, Susan M. (Athens, GA)

    1995-01-01

    A composition for detecting the presence and concentration of a substance such as uranyl, comprising an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for said substance. The composition has at least one active OH site for forming a complex with the substance to be detected. The composition is made by reacting equimolar amounts of the indicator and the organohalide in a polar organic solvent. The absorbance spectrum of the composition-uranyl complex is shifted with respect to the absorbance spectrum of the indicator-uranyl complex, to provide better spectral resolution for detecting uranyl.

  14. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, T.J.

    1989-12-26

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port. 2 figs.

  15. Leak detection aid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeper, Timothy J. (Graniteville, SC)

    1989-01-01

    A leak detection apparatus and method for detecting leaks across an O-ring sealing a flanged surface to a mating surface is an improvement in a flanged surface comprising a shallow groove following O-ring in communication with an entrance and exit port intersecting the shallow groove for injecting and withdrawing, respectively, a leak detection fluid, such as helium. A small quantity of helium injected into the entrance port will flow to the shallow groove, past the O-ring and to the exit port.

  16. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies for radiochemistry (macro to micro levels), biochemistry and biology to imaging principles, tracer kinetics, pharmacokinetics and biochemical assays. New generations of radiochemists will be immersed in the biochemistry and biology for which their labeled probes are being developed for assays of these processes. In this program engineers and radio-chemists integrate the principles of microfluidics and radiolabeling along with proper system design and chemistry rule sets to yield Synthesizers enabling biological and pharmaceutical scientists to develop diverse arrays of probes to pursue their interests. This progression would allow also radiochemists to focus on the further evolution of rapid, high yield synthetic reactions with new enabling technologies, rather than everyday production of radiotracers that should be done by technologists. The invention of integrated circuits in electronics established a platform technology that allowed an evolution of ideas and applications far beyond what could have been imagined at the beginning. Rather than provide a technology for the solution to a single problem, it is hoped that microfluidic radiochemistry will be an enabling platform technology for others to solve many problems. As part of this objective, another program goal is to commercialize the technologies that come from this work so that they can be provided to others who wish to use it.

  17. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies R&D Program Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. karma.sawyer@ee.doe.gov BTO Goal Reduce building energy use by 50% in 2030, compared to the "business-as- usual" energy consumption...

  18. Technology Investment Roadmap 2012 -2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Technology Investment Roadmap 2012 - 2017 20 February 2012 #12;2 Contents Introduction & Overview ............................................................................................ 8 Trend 3: Technology Enabled Learning .................................................................................................... 16 2. Technology enabled learning and teaching

  19. Technology Policy and Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrus, Michael; Stowsky, Jay

    1997-01-01

    economic growth) and the Pentagon’s Technology Reinvestment20 Tassey, Technology and Economic Growth: Implications forTechnology Policy and Economic Growth Michael Borrus Jay

  20. 2008 Solar Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, S.

    2010-01-01

    Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.Concentrating Solar Power—Technology, Cost, and Markets.

  1. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2011 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.Renewable Energy Laboratory’s National Wind Technology

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2010 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Federal Energy

  3. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    land-based wind energy technology. 2012 Wind Technologiesfor a variety of energy technologies, including wind energy.of Energy (DOE) Wind & Water Power Technology Office team

  4. High Impact Technology Hub- Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Highlights, outcomes and activities to support the adoption of High Impact TechnologiesTechnology Highlights preview early results from current technology demonstrations.  Case Studies overview...

  5. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development is the final report for the Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development project (

  6. Technology Innovation Program | Partnerships | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Program SHARE Technology Innovation Program The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) is a 1-year program designed to accelerate selected technologies to commercial...

  7. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  8. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  9. Explosive Detection Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-26

    To standardize and accelerate implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) explosive detection program. DOE N 251.40, dated 5/3/01, extends this directive until 12/31/01.

  10. Energy Detectives (3 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Students explore the classroom as they look and feel for signs of energy. They record the ways they use energy throughout a typical day in an energy detective journal.

  11. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  12. UAS Detection Classification and Neutralization: Market Survey 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birch, Gabriel Carisle; Griffin, John Clark; Erdman, Matthew Kelly

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to briefly frame the challenges of detecting low, slow, and small (LSS) unmanned aerial systems (UAS). The conclusion drawn from internal discussions and external reports is the following; detection of LSS UAS is a challenging problem that can- not be achieved with a single detection modality for all potential targets. Classification of LSS UAS, especially classification in the presence of background clutter (e.g., urban environment) or other non-threating targets (e.g., birds), is under-explored. Though information of avail- able technologies is sparse, many of the existing options for UAS detection appear to be in their infancy (when compared to more established ground-based air defense systems for larger and/or faster threats). Companies currently providing or developing technologies to combat the UAS safety and security problem are certainly worth investigating, however, no company has provided the statistical evidence necessary to support robust detection, identification, and/or neutralization of LSS UAS targets. The results of a market survey are included that highlights potential commercial entities that could contribute some technology that assists in the detection, classification, and neutral- ization of a LSS UAS. This survey found no clear and obvious commercial solution, though recommendations are given for further investigation of several potential systems.

  13. Advanced Oxidation Technology for Pulp Mill Effluent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    TECHNOLOGY FOR PULP MILL EFFLUENT J. ROBERT HART, MANAGER, EPRI PULP & PAPER OFFICE, ATLANTA, GA ABSTRACT The composition of effluent from various pulping processes can exhibit a wide range of physical and chemical parameters. The dissolved solids... and had the necessary accessories to monitor gas and liquid flows, injection and sampling points, and off-gas detection. The ozone was generated with a Griffin Technics HC-l.O ozone generator. This unit is air-cooled and contains two dielectrics...

  14. Science & Technology RoadmapScience & Technology Roadmap 03/24/20063:03 PMSOCD Science & Technology Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuligowski, Bob

    Science & Technology RoadmapScience & Technology Roadmap #12;03/24/20063:03 PMSOCD Science & Technology Roadmap 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ..........................................................................................................................................19 4 ROADMAPS AND LINKAGES

  15. Vibration-Based Damage Detection in Rotating Machinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C.R.; Duffey, T.A.

    1999-06-28

    Damage detection as determined from changes in the vibration characteristics of a system has been a popular research topic for the last thirty years. Numerous damage identification algorithms have been proposed for detecting and locating damage in structural and mechanical systems. To date, these damage-detection methods have shown mixed results. A particular application of vibration-based damage detection that has perhaps enjoyed the greatest success is that of damage detection in rotating machinery. This paper summarizes the state of technology in vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery. The review interprets the damage detection process in terms of a statistical pattern recognition paradigm that encompasses all vibration-based damage detection methods and applications. The motivation for the study reported herein is to identify the reasons that vibration-based damage detection has been successfully applied to rotating machinery, but has yet to show robust applications to civil engineering infrastructure. The paper concludes by comparing and contrasting the vibration-based damage detection applied to rotating machinery with large civil engineering infrastructure applications.

  16. Graz University of Technology Institute for Software Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graz University of Technology Institute for Software Technology Birgit Vogtenhuber Problem Analysis.054, 3 VU Birgit Vogtenhuber Institute for Software Technology Graz University of Technology email: bvogt of Technology Institute for Software Technology Birgit Vogtenhuber Problem Analysis and Complexity Theory, 716

  17. Adam Merkling Major: Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburger, Peter

    #12;Adam Merkling Major: Information Technology Position: Student System Administrator Employed Technology Position: User Technology Services Student Technician Employed Since: February 2011 #12;Gabi Mosquera Major: Electrical/Computer Engineering Position: User Technology Services Student Technician

  18. Image credit: Dreamstime Technology for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through development of superconducting magnet technology. Without that research today's high- resolutionImage credit: Dreamstime Technology for research saves lives Technology developed to advance STFC in particle physics technology not only supported important experiments at CERN but pioneered early

  19. Technology transfer 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This document, Technology Transfer 94, is intended to communicate that there are many opportunities available to US industry and academic institutions to work with DOE and its laboratories and facilities in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. It has seven major sections: Introduction, Technology Transfer Activities, Access to Laboratories and Facilities, Laboratories and Facilities, DOE Office, Technologies, and an Index. Technology Transfer Activities highlights DOE`s recent developments in technology transfer and describes plans for the future. Access to Laboratories and Facilities describes the many avenues for cooperative interaction between DOE laboratories or facilities and industry, academia, and other government agencies. Laboratories and Facilities profiles the DOE laboratories and facilities involved in technology transfer and presents information on their missions, programs, expertise, facilities, and equipment, along with data on whom to contact for additional information on technology transfer. DOE Offices summarizes the major research and development programs within DOE. It also contains information on how to access DOE scientific and technical information. Technologies provides descriptions of some of the new technologies developed at DOE laboratories and facilities.

  20. Reactor Technology | Nuclear Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reactor Technology Advanced Reactor Concepts Advanced Instrumentation & Controls Light Water Reactor Sustainability Safety and Regulatory Technology Small Modular Reactors Nuclear...

  1. Geothermal innovative technologies catalog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenkeremath, D.

    1988-09-01

    The technology items in this report were selected on the basis of technological readiness and applicability to current technology transfer thrusts. The items include technologies that are considered to be within 2 to 3 years of being transferred. While the catalog does not profess to be entirely complete, it does represent an initial attempt at archiving innovative geothermal technologies with ample room for additions as they occur. The catalog itself is divided into five major functional areas: Exploration; Drilling, Well Completion, and Reservoir Production; Materials and Brine Chemistry; Direct Use; and Economics. Within these major divisions are sub-categories identifying specific types of technological advances: Hardware; Software; Data Base; Process/Procedure; Test Facility; and Handbook.

  2. Temperature differential detection device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Girling, Peter M. (Allentown, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  3. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  4. Sequential Bayesian Detection: A Model-Based Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J V

    2008-12-08

    Sequential detection theory has been known for a long time evolving in the late 1940's by Wald and followed by Middleton's classic exposition in the 1960's coupled with the concurrent enabling technology of digital computer systems and the development of sequential processors. Its development, when coupled to modern sequential model-based processors, offers a reasonable way to attack physics-based problems. In this chapter, the fundamentals of the sequential detection are reviewed from the Neyman-Pearson theoretical perspective and formulated for both linear and nonlinear (approximate) Gauss-Markov, state-space representations. We review the development of modern sequential detectors and incorporate the sequential model-based processors as an integral part of their solution. Motivated by a wealth of physics-based detection problems, we show how both linear and nonlinear processors can seamlessly be embedded into the sequential detection framework to provide a powerful approach to solving non-stationary detection problems.

  5. Overview: STEEL Enabling Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle Technologies "Mega" Merit Review 2008 on February 25, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland.

  6. 2016 Technology Innovation Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Projects FY 2016 Technology Innovation Project Briefs Demand Response TIP 292: Advanced Heat Pump Water Heater Research TIP 336: Scaled Deployment and Demonstration of Demand...

  7. Overview of biomass technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The biomass overview of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  8. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  9. Technology transfer issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, C.

    1982-05-31

    Testimony by Lawrence J. Brady, Commerce Assistant Secretary for Trade Administration, at Congressional hearings on the national security issues of technology transfers to the Soviet Union identified steps the US needs to take to deal effectively with the problem. These steps include an understanding of how the Soviet Union has and will benefit militarily by acquiring Western technology and efforts to work with other countries, counterintelligence agencies, and industries to stem the flow of technological information. Brady outlined changes in technology development that complicate the enforcement of transfer rules, and emphasized the importance of a close relationship between the business community and the Commerce Department. (DCK)

  10. Supervisory Information Technology Specialist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be responsible for providing Information Technology (IT) infrastructure, capabilities and technical support to the Department of Energy (DOE),...

  11. Genome Science/Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    primary focus is to develop technologies to obtain near complete genomes from single cells for the purposes of improved taxonomic identification and determining metabolic...

  12. Renewable energy technology characterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1997-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describe the technical and economic status of the major emerging renewable energy options for electricity supply.

  13. TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    efforts conducted within the Carbon Capture program include development of advanced solvents, sorbents, and membranes for both the Post- and Pre-Combustion Technology Areas...

  14. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    managed the overall development and maturation of this Energy Efficiency Technology Roadmap, the effort would not have been possible without the active engagement of a diverse...

  15. Collaborative Transmission Technology Roadmap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Addendum to the Collaborative Transmission Technology Roadmap March 2014 Bonneville Power Administration Enhanced PDF Functionality Functionality of the PDF version of this...

  16. Mobile Technology Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2013-11-21

    The directive will ensure that federal organizations and employees within the Department can use mobile technology to support mission requirements in a safe and secure manner.

  17. Fuel Cell Technologies Budget

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EERE

    2012-03-16

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office receives appropriations from Energy and Water Development. The offices's major activities and budget are outlined in this Web page.

  18. Arc Position Sensing Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (VAR) furnaces for industries that use specialty metals such as nickel, titanium, and zirconium. The technology could be used to help produce materials with stronger chemical and...

  19. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies Relevance: An informed understanding of the consumer allows VTO to achieve petroleum-use reduction goals through: * Robust assumptions for consumer modeling,...

  20. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies. Relevance: An informed understanding of the consumer allows VTO to achieve petroleum-use reduction goals through: * Robust assumptions for consumer modeling,...

  1. Building Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Technologies Office Richard Karney, P.E. May 8, 2014 40% 60% National Energy Consumption Reducing consumption or improving performance calls for cutting-edge...

  2. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Wind and Water Power Program's current approach to supporting the development and deployment of marine and hydrokinetic technologies.

  3. TEAM Technologies, Inc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that by designating TEAM Technologies as one of only a handful of Strategic Suppliers working at the Laboratories," says Sachs. Licensing Partners - Sandia's Stingray...

  4. Solar Energy Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2011, the Energy Department's Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) became the SunShot Initiative, a collaborative national effort that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy...

  5. Design and fabrication of a maneuverable robot for in-pipe leak detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, You, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    Leaks in pipelines have been causing a significant amount of financial losses and serious damages to the community and the environment. The recent development of in-pipe leak detection technologies at Massachusetts Institute ...

  6. Science and Technology Challenges for Homeland Security

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, C A

    2006-03-24

    Preventing and protecting against catastrophic terrorism is a complex and dynamic challenge. Small groups or individuals can use advanced technology to cause massive destruction, and the rapid pace of technology and ease of information dissemination continually gives terrorists new tools. A 100% defense is not possible. It's a numbers problem--there are simply too many possible targets to protect and too many potential attack scenarios and adversaries to defend against. However, science and technology (S&T) is a powerful force multiplier for defense. We must use S&T to get ahead of the game by making terrorist attacks more difficult to execute, more likely to be interdicted, and less devastating in terms of casualties, economic damage, or lasting disruption. Several S&T areas have potential to significantly enhance homeland security efforts with regard to detecting radiation, pathogens, explosives, and chemical signatures of weapons activities. All of these areas require interdisciplinary research and development (R&D), and many critically depend on advances in materials science. For example, the science of nuclear signatures lies at the core of efforts to develop enhanced radiation detection and nuclear attribution capabilities. Current radiation detectors require cryogenic cooling and are too bulky and expensive. Novel signatures of nuclear decay, new detector materials that provide high resolution at ambient temperatures, and new imaging detectors are needed. Such technologies will improve our ability to detect and locate small, distant, or moving sources and to discriminate threat materials from legitimate sources. A more complete understanding of isotopic ratios via secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), NanoSIMS, or yet-to-be-developed technologies is required to elucidate critical characteristics of nuclear materials (e.g., isotopics, age, reprocessing) in order to identify their source and route history. S&T challenges abound in the biodefense arena as well. Improved biodetectors are needed--autonomous instruments that continuously monitor the environment for threat pathogens, promptly alert authorities in the event of a positive detection, and have an extremely low false alarm rate. Because many threat pathogens are endemic to various regions of the world, the natural microbial environment must be characterized so that background detections can be distinguished from a deliberate release. In addition, most current detection approaches require an a priori knowledge of the pathogens of concern and thus won't work in the face of a new, naturally occurring disease, such as a mutated avian influenza that effects humans, or a deliberately manipulated organism. Thus, we must move from species-specific detection to function-based detection based on a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and genetic markers of infectivity, pathogenicity, antibiotic resistance, and other traits that distinguish a harmful organism from an innocuous one. Last but not least, new vaccines and treatments are needed, which in turn require in-depth understanding of cellular surfaces, protein folding, and myriad nano-bio aspects of host-pathogen interactions. Much attention is being devoted to countering weapons-of-mass-destruction terrorism, since Al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups have repeatedly stated their intention to acquire and use nuclear, chemical, or biological weapons. However, terrorists in Iraq and elsewhere continue to wreak havoc using improvised explosive devices. Thus, there is a pressing security need for better methods for detecting explosive materials and devices. Transformational S&T such as pulsed fast-neutron analysis or terahertz spectroscopy for material- and element-specific imaging offer the promise of greatly improved explosive detection. For bioscience-based approaches, the development of highly multiplexed transducer arrays and molecular recognition methods that mimic biological systems would similarly provide the foundation for vastly improved capabilities. Likewise, new materials an

  7. Nucleic acid detection kits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Mast, Andrea L.; Brow, Mary Ann; Kwiatkowski, Robert W.; Vavra, Stephanie H.

    2005-03-29

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of nucleic acid from various viruses in a sample.

  8. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  9. Solar system fault detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Wheatridge, CO); Pruett, Jr., James C. (Lakewood, CO)

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  10. Error detection method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Eric J.

    2013-06-11

    An apparatus, program product, and method that run an algorithm on a hardware based processor, generate a hardware error as a result of running the algorithm, generate an algorithm output for the algorithm, compare the algorithm output to another output for the algorithm, and detect the hardware error from the comparison. The algorithm is designed to cause the hardware based processor to heat to a degree that increases the likelihood of hardware errors to manifest, and the hardware error is observable in the algorithm output. As such, electronic components may be sufficiently heated and/or sufficiently stressed to create better conditions for generating hardware errors, and the output of the algorithm may be compared at the end of the run to detect a hardware error that occurred anywhere during the run that may otherwise not be detected by traditional methodologies (e.g., due to cooling, insufficient heat and/or stress, etc.).

  11. Composition for detecting uranyl

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baylor, L.C.; Stephens, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to an indicator composition for use in spectrophotometric detection of a substance in a solution, and a method for making the composition. Useful indicators are sensitive to the particular substance being measured, but are unaffected by the fluid and other chemical species that may be present in the fluid. Optical indicators are used to measure the uranium concentration of process solutions in facilities for extracting uranium from ores, production of nuclear fuels, and reprocessing of irradiated fuels. The composition comprises an organohalide covalently bonded to an indicator for the substance, in such a manner that the product is itself an indicator that provides increased spectral resolution for detecting the substance. The indicator is preferably arsenazo III and the organohalide is preferably cyanuric chloride. These form a composition that is ideally suited for detecting uranyl.

  12. Intelligent Sensor Placement for Hot Server Detection in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing, Guoliang

    Intelligent Sensor Placement for Hot Server Detection in Data Centers Xiaodong Wang, Xiaorui Wang of many data centers is caused by the inefficient operation of their cooling systems. Without effective technology has recently been adopted for data-center thermal monitoring because of its nonintrusive nature

  13. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finch, Hilvan A. (Schenectady, NY)

    1987-01-01

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics in each of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  14. Brush potential curve tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finch, H.A.

    1985-06-21

    A device for analyzing commutating characteristics of a motor or generator includes a holder for supporting a plurality of probes adjacent a brush of the motor or generator. Measurements of electrical current characteristics of the probes provides information useful in analyzing operation of the machine. Methods for employing a device in accordance with the invention are also disclosed.

  15. Gas hydrates: Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) assumed the responsibility for expanding the knowledge base and for developing methods to recover gas from hydrates. These are ice-like mixtures of gas and water where gas molecules are trapped within a framework of water molecules. This research is part of the Unconventional Gas Recovery (UGR) program, a multidisciplinary effort that focuses on developing the technology to produce natural gas from resources that have been classified as unconventional because of their unique geologies and production mechanisms. Current work on gas hydrates emphasizes geological studies; characterization of the resource; and generic research, including modeling of reservoir conditions, production concepts, and predictive strategies for stimulated wells. Complementing this work is research on in situ detection of hydrates and field tests to verify extraction methods. Thus, current research will provide a comprehensive technology base from which estimates of reserve potential can be made, and from which industry can develop recovery strategies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Relating to ion detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for improving detection of alpha and/or beta emitting sources on items or in locations using indirect means. The emission forms generate ions in a medium surrounding the item or location and the medium is then moved to a detecting location where the ions are discharged to give a measure of the emission levels. To increase the level of ions generated and render the system particularly applicable for narrow pipes and other forms of conduits, the medium pressure is increased above atmospheric pressure. STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

  17. Detection of solar events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2013-08-27

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  18. Detection of neutrinos

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischbach, Ephraim; Jenkins, Jere

    2014-02-04

    A flux detection apparatus can include a radioactive sample having a decay rate capable of changing in response to interaction with a first particle or a field, and a detector associated with the radioactive sample. The detector is responsive to a second particle or radiation formed by decay of the radioactive sample. The rate of decay of the radioactive sample can be correlated to flux of the first particle or the field. Detection of the first particle or the field can provide an early warning for an impending solar event.

  19. TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;06 06 TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0201 CONTENTS 03 08 09 10 15 17 25 31 33 37 41 0201 08 23 TokyoTech #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0403 20 1 5 11 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0605 4 3 2 5 5 4 3 #12;TOKYO INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

  20. Energy and technology review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Three topics are covered: detecting genetic damage in humans, argon x-ray line imaging, and complete cutoff of Middle Eastern oil. Separate abstracts were prepared for each.

  1. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  2. Technology Catalogue. First edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department`s clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD`s applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina).

  3. Emerging Technologies - Capturing Innovation with Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-12-01

    ET team research results are critical to achieving 50% energy savings across U.S. buildings within the next two decades. The ET team focuses on supporting research, development, and tech-to-market opportunities of high impact technologies, or those that demonstrate potential for achieving significant energy savings cost effectively.

  4. Advanced uranium enrichment technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriman, R.

    1983-03-10

    The Advanced Gas Centrifuge and Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation methods are described. The status and potential of the technologies are summarized, the programs outlined, and the economic incentives are noted. How the advanced technologies, once demonstrated, might be deployed so that SWV costs in the 1990s can be significantly reduced is described.

  5. Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Stiegel

    2008-03-26

    NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

  6. Gasification: A Cornerstone Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gary Stiegel

    2010-01-08

    NETL is a leader in the science and technology of gasification - a process for the conversion of carbon-based materials such as coal into synthesis gas (syngas) that can be used to produce clean electrical energy, transportation fuels, and chemicals efficiently and cost-effectively using domestic fuel resources. Gasification is a cornerstone technology of 21st century zero emissions powerplants

  7. Technologies Team Leader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    :(321) 674-8096 Fax: (321) 674-7212 Water Wave Technologies purpose is to develop new renewable energyWater Wave Technologies Team Leader: ­ Khoury Mains (kmains@fit.edu) Members: ­ Sean Cox ­ Michael methods. We chose ocean waves and designed a wing to capture the energy from the wave. The captured energy

  8. Salinity Management Desalination Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water Resources in the Arid West.S. Bureau of Reclamation August, 2008 #12;Salinity Management and Desalination Technology for Brackish Water a practical roadmap forward for achieving sustainable, viable desalination of inland, moderate salinity waters

  9. Detection of counterfeit currency

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, D.A.

    1998-05-26

    A method is disclosed of detecting counterfeit currency by contacting the currency to be tested with near infrared beams in the spectrum below 1,250 nanometers, measuring reflectance of the near infrared beams and comparing the reflectance values with those from genuine currency. 18 figs.

  10. Detection of $^{133}$Xe from the Fukushima nuclear power plant in the upper troposphere above Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simgen, Hardy; Aufmhoff, Heinfried; Baumann, Robert; Kaether, Florian; Lindemann, Sebastian; Rauch, Ludwig; Schlager, Hans; Schlosser, Clemens; Schumann, Ulrich

    2013-01-01

    After the accident in the Japanese Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 large amounts of radioactivity were released and distributed in the atmosphere. Among them were also radioactive noble gas isotopes which can be used as tracers to probe global atmospheric circulation models. This work presents unique measurements of the radionuclide $^{133}$Xe from Fukushima in the upper troposphere above Germany. The measurements involve air sampling in a research jet aircraft followed by chromatographic xenon extraction and ultra-low background gas counting with miniaturized proportional counters. With this technique a detection limit of the order of 100 $^{133}$Xe atoms in liter-scale air samples (corresponding to about 100 mBq/m$^3$) is achievable. Our results proof that the $^{133}$Xe-rich ground level air layer from Fukushima was lifted up to the tropopause and distributed hemispherically. Moreover, comparisons with ground level air measurements indicate that the arrival of the radioactive plume in ...

  11. PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Romano

    2004-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

  12. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  13. Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board 2011 Annual Report of the #12;#12;i 2011 Annual Report of the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Innovation Program March 2012 #12;ii For Information regarding the Technology

  14. The IDA Technology Stan Franklin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memphis, University of

    The IDA Technology Stan Franklin and the `Conscious' Software Research Group #12;FedEx Institute of Technology--The IDA Technology 2 Introducing IDA An intelligent software agent capable of entirely of Technology--The IDA Technology 3 IDA Negotiates IDA negotiates with clients in natural language

  15. APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY Strategic Plan Summary #12;School of Applied Technology Strategic Plan Summary | 1 SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC PLAN SUMMARY MISSION STATEMENT The mission Technology and Management program to achieve national visibility. #12;School of Applied Technology Strategic

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report1538-1950 TimelineUtility-ScaleTechnology|

  17. Technology development productivity : case studies in technology transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taplett, Amanda Kingston

    2007-01-01

    Development of new technology is critical to the growth and success of technology-driven companies. New technology is generated in a number of ways, one of the most important being the company's own internal research and ...

  18. Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayanan, H.

    Indian Institute of Technology Bombay INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY BOMBAY INVITATION Description of work Estimated cost (1) (2) (3) 1 Construction of Institutional/Residential buildings, external development, HVAC, Elevators etc. for Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, at the campus

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2013 Fuel and Lubricant Technologies R&D Annual Progress Report This report describes the...

  20. Robotics Technology Development Program. Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a ``needs-driven`` effort. A lengthy series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination & Dismantlement (D&D). The RTDP Group realized that much of the technology development was common (Cross Cutting-CC) to each of these robotics application areas, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) process urged an additional organizational break-out between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). The RDTP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D&D and CC&AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas.

  1. OHVT technology roadmap [2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, R.A.

    2000-02-01

    The OHVT Technology Roadmap for 2000 presents the multiyear program plan of the U.S. DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT). It is an update of the 1997 plan, reflecting changes in regulations and ongoing discussions with DOE's heavy vehicle customers. The technical plan covers three classes of trucks: (1) class 7-8 (large, on-highway trucks); (2) class 3-6 (medium duty trucks); (3) class 1-2 (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles) as well as enabling and supporting technologies. The Roadmap documents program goals, schedules, and milestones.

  2. Exoplanet Detection Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Debra A; Laughlin, Greg P; Macintosh, Bruce; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Sahlmann, Johannes; Yee, Jennifer C

    2015-01-01

    We are still in the early days of exoplanet discovery. Astronomers are beginning to model the atmospheres and interiors of exoplanets and have developed a deeper understanding of processes of planet formation and evolution. However, we have yet to map out the full complexity of multi-planet architectures or to detect Earth analogues around nearby stars. Reaching these ambitious goals will require further improvements in instrumentation and new analysis tools. In this chapter, we provide an overview of five observational techniques that are currently employed in the detection of exoplanets: optical and IR Doppler measurements, transit photometry, direct imaging, microlensing, and astrometry. We provide a basic description of how each of these techniques works and discuss forefront developments that will result in new discoveries. We also highlight the observational limitations and synergies of each method and their connections to future space missions.

  3. Protein detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fruetel, Julie A. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Bethesda, MD); Kliner, Dahv A. V. (San Ramon, CA); McIlroy, Andrew (Livermore, CA)

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  4. May Gravity detect Tsunami ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fargion, D

    2004-01-01

    The present gravitational wave detectors are reaching lowest metric deviation fields able to detect galactic and extra-galactic gravitational waves, related to Supernova explosions up to Virgo cluster. The same gravitational wave detector are nevertheless almost able to reveal near field gravitational perturbations due to fast huge mass displacements as the ones occurring during largest Earth-Quake or Tsunami as the last on 26th December 2004 in Asiatic area. The prompt gravitational near field deformation by the Tsunami may reach the LIGO threshold sensitivity within 3000-10000 km distances. Their eventual discover (in LIGO data or in future on-line detector arrays) may offer the most rapid warning alarm system on earth. Nevertheless the later continental mass rearrangement and their gravitational field assessment on Earth must induce, for Richter Magnitude 9 Tsunami, a different terrestrial inertia momentum and a different rotation axis, as well as a detectable shrinking of the Earth radius of nearly R =1.7...

  5. Solar neutrino detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lino Miramonti

    2009-01-22

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  6. Cell Phone Detection Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Bunch, Kyle J.; Puzycki, David J.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Good, Morris S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2007-10-01

    A team composed of Rick Pratt, Dave Puczyki, Kyle Bunch, Ryan Slaugh, Morris Good, and Doug McMakin teamed together to attempt to exploit cellular telephone features and detect if a person was carrying a cellular telephone into a Limited Area. The cell phone’s electromagnetic properties were measured, analyzed, and tested in over 10 different ways to determine if an exploitable signature exists. The method that appears to have the most potential for success without adding an external tag is to measure the RF spectrum, not in the cell phone band, but between 240 and 400MHz. Figures 1- 7 show the detected signal levels from cell phones from three different manufacturers.

  7. Termination Detection of Local Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godard, Emmanuel; Tel, Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Contrary to the sequential world, the processes involved in a distributed system do not necessarily know when a computation is globally finished. This paper investigates the problem of the detection of the termination of local computations. We define four types of termination detection: no detection, detection of the local termination, detection by a distributed observer, detection of the global termination. We give a complete characterisation (except in the local termination detection case where a partial one is given) for each of this termination detection and show that they define a strict hierarchy. These results emphasise the difference between computability of a distributed task and termination detection. Furthermore, these characterisations encompass all standard criteria that are usually formulated : topological restriction (tree, rings, or triangu- lated networks ...), topological knowledge (size, diameter ...), and local knowledge to distinguish nodes (identities, sense of direction). These re- sult...

  8. Method for detecting biomolecules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huo, Qisheng (Albuquerque, NM); Liu, Jun (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-08-12

    A method for detecting and measuring the concentration of biomolecules in solution, utilizing a conducting electrode in contact with a solution containing target biomolecules, with a film with controllable pore size distribution characteristics applied to at least one surface of the conducting electrode. The film is functionalized with probe molecules that chemically interact with the target biomolecules at the film surface, blocking indicator molecules present in solution from diffusing from the solution to the electrode, thereby changing the electrochemical response of the electrode

  9. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  10. Shared Investment by NIS and National Labs Develops Cutting-Edge Safeguards Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Williams, Laura S.

    2012-04-01

    This article, regarding a new technology for detecting undeclared enrichment at gas centrifuge enrichment plants, was written for the DOE/NNSA NA-24 Highlights, a newsletter intended for public release.

  11. Nucleic acid detection methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, C.L.; Yaar, R.; Szafranski, P.; Cantor, C.R.

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3{prime}-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated. 18 figs.

  12. Nucleic Acid Detection Methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Cassandra L. (Boston, MA); Yaar, Ron (Brookline, MA); Szafranski, Przemyslaw (Boston, MA); Cantor, Charles R. (Boston, MA)

    1998-05-19

    The invention relates to methods for rapidly determining the sequence and/or length a target sequence. The target sequence may be a series of known or unknown repeat sequences which are hybridized to an array of probes. The hybridized array is digested with a single-strand nuclease and free 3'-hydroxyl groups extended with a nucleic acid polymerase. Nuclease cleaved heteroduplexes can be easily distinguish from nuclease uncleaved heteroduplexes by differential labeling. Probes and target can be differentially labeled with detectable labels. Matched target can be detected by cleaving resulting loops from the hybridized target and creating free 3-hydroxyl groups. These groups are recognized and extended by polymerases added into the reaction system which also adds or releases one label into solution. Analysis of the resulting products using either solid phase or solution. These methods can be used to detect characteristic nucleic acid sequences, to determine target sequence and to screen for genetic defects and disorders. Assays can be conducted on solid surfaces allowing for multiple reactions to be conducted in parallel and, if desired, automated.

  13. Microfluidics without channels: highly-flexible synthesis on a digital-microfluidic chip for production of diverse PET tracers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Dam, Robert Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is used for fundamental studies of living biological organisms and microbial ecosystems in applications ranging from biofuel production to environmental remediation to the study, diagnosis, and treatment monitoring of human disease. Routine access to PET imaging, to monitor biochemical reactions in living organisms in real time, could accelerate a broad range of research programs of interest to DOE. Using PET requires access to short-lived radioactive-labeled compounds that specifically probe the desired living processes. The overall aims of this project were to develop a miniature liquid-handling technology platform (called “microfluidics”) that increases the availability of diverse PET probes by reducing the cost and complexity of their production. Based on preliminary experiments showing that microfluidic chips can synthesis such compounds, we aimed to advance this technology to improve its robustness, increase its flexibility for a broad range of probes, and increase its user-friendliness. Through the research activities of this project, numerous advances were made; Tools were developed to enable the visualization of radioactive materials within microfluidic chips; Fundamental advances were made in the microfluidic chip architecture and fabrication process to increase its robustness and reliability; The microfluidic chip technology was shown to produce useful quantities of an example PET probes, and methods to further increase the output were successfully pursued; A “universal” chip was developed that could produce multiple types of PET probes, enabling the possibility of “on demand” synthesis of different probes; and Operation of the chip was automated to ensure minimal radiation exposure to the operator Based on the demonstrations of promising technical feasibility and performance, the microfluidic chip technology is currently being commercialized. It is anticipated that costs of microfluidic chips can be dramatically reduced in the future by leveraging economies of scale in the microelectronics industry, leading to low cost production of PET probes.

  14. Water Management Technologies from Europe 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woinsky, S. G.

    2000-01-01

    EPRl is cooperating with European companies to apply their know-how and technologies in the United States. One such alliance involves Pell Frischmann (a UK engineering firm) and BG Technology (a UK technology firm). These firms have worked together...

  15. Sandia Energy - A Green Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Green Technology Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC A Green Technology A Green TechnologyTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-11T21:08:32+00:00 Solid-State...

  16. Office of Information Technology Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorke, James

    Office of Information Technology Accomplishments Fiscal Year 2007 #12;Office of Information'scentralinformationtechnologyserviceorganization,itismypleasuretosharewithyou theOfficeofInformationTechnology'spublication,"OITAccomplishmentsFiscalYear2007,"whichfeatures's goal is to take a quantum leap forward in the information technology environmentavailabletostudents

  17. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  18. February 2000 Advanced Technology Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a cost-sharing program designed to partner the federal governmentFebruary 2000 Advanced Technology Program Information Infrastructure for Healthcare Focused Program: A Brief History ADADVANCEDANCED TECHNOLOGY PRTECHNOLOGY PROGRAMOGRAM NISTIR 6477 National Institute

  19. Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is located within Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory. The ETEC occupies 90-acres within the 290 acre site. The Santa Susana Field...

  20. Mapping healthcare information technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, William Charles Richards

    2010-01-01

    In this thesis I have developed a map of Healthcare Information Technology applications used in the United States for care delivery, healthcare enterprise management, clinical support, research and patient engagement. No ...