Sample records for trace gas concentration

  1. ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontentcharacteristics ARM Data

  2. CONTENTS Concentrated Gas Hydrate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 81,Concentrated Gas

  3. Tracing Noble Gas Radionuclides in the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Collon; W. Kutschera; Z. -T. Lu

    2004-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace analysis of radionuclides is an essential and versatile tool in modern science and technology. Due to their ideal geophysical and geochemical properties, long-lived noble gas radionuclides, in particular, 39Ar (t1/2 = 269 yr), 81Kr (t1/2 = 2.3x10^5 yr) and 85Kr (t1/2 = 10.8 yr), have long been recognized to have a wide range of important applications in Earth sciences. In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of practical analytical methods, and has led to applications of these isotopes in the hydrosphere (tracing the flow of groundwater and ocean water). In this article, we introduce the applications of these isotopes and review three leading analytical methods: Low-Level Counting (LLC), Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA).

  4. Background Concentrations of Trace Metals in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of Florida State University System of Florida FLORIDA CENTER FOR SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT 2207 NW for evaluating land application of non-hazardous waste materials and monitoring the mobility of trace metals from 8,000 archived samples. l To validate the sampling protocol used by the Florida Cooperative Soil

  5. The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

  6. Prediction of rainwater acidity using trace element concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vong, R.J.; Peterson, R.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is of interest to be able to estimate the contribution of an anthropogenic emission source to downwind rainwater chemistry. The authors here consider the closure of a large copper smelter which operated in a region where background and other emission sources should contribute smaller amounts of atmospheric sulfur than the smelter. An additional simplification existed in that meteorology associated with rain was relatively well known and consistent. A field experiment was conducted in the winters of 1985 and 1986 to collect rainwater at sites upwind and downwind of the Tacoma, Washington smelter. The smelters SO{sub 2} emissions, their conversion to SO{sub 4}= via three oxidants (O{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} - Fe catalyzed reactions), diffusion, transport, and aerosol/gas scavenging previously have been estimated while adjusting model parameters until the predictions fit the rainwater data. To take advantage of the unique experimental design afforded by the closure of the smelter, statistical analysis was performed on NO{sub 3}-, SO{sub 4}(xs)= (excess of seasalt), and pH data; analysis of variance (ANOVA) confirmed that the smelter had a significant (p < .01) influence on rainwater pH and SO{sub 4}(xs). The analysis presented here extends the ANOVA by applying a multivariate regression technique to new data for trace element concentrations for the same rain samples. To predict rainwater acidity, they derive fingerprints from trace element data, identify a source or process related to that fingerprint, and compare the predicted contributions for pre- and post- closure samples.

  7. Trace gas measurements in the Kuwait oil fire smoke plume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, W.T.; Kok, G.L.; Schillawski, R.D.; Zimmerman, P.R.; Greenberg, J.P.; Kadavanich, M. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report trace gas measurements made both inside and outside the Kuwait oil-fire smoke plume during a flight of an instrumented research aircraft on May 30, 1991. Concentrations of SO{sub 2}, CO, and NO{sub x} averaged vertically and horizontally throughout the plume 80 km downwind of Kuwait City were 106, 127, and 9.1 parts per billion by volume (ppbv), respectively, above background concentrations. With the exception of SO{sub 2}, trace gas concentrations were far below typical US urban levels and primary national ambient air quality standards. Ambient ozone was titrated by NO in the dark, dense core of the smoke plume close to the fires, and photochemical ozone production was limited to the diffuse edge of the plume. Photochemical O{sub 3} production was noted throughout the plume at a distance of 160 km downwind of Kuwait City, and averaged 2.3 ppbv per hour during the first 3 hours of transport. Little additional photochemical production was noted at a downwind range of 340 km. The fluxes of sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, and reactive nitrogen from the roughly 520 fires still burning on May 30, 1991 are estimated at 1.4 x 10{sup 7} kg SO{sub 2}/d, 6.9 x 10{sup 6} kg CO/d, and 2.7 x 10{sup 5} kg N/d, respectively. Generally low concentrations of CO and NO{sub x} indicate that the combustion was efficient and occurred at low temperatures. Low total nonmethane hydrocarbon concentrations suggest that the volatile components of the petroleum were burned efficiently. 37 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace gas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry and Physics Discussions Trace gas measurements from... ., Rinsland, C. P., Stiller, G. P., and Zander, R.: On the assessment and uncertainty of atmospheric trace gas......

  9. Project AIRSTREAM: Trace gas final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leifer, R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of 10 years of sampling for trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. These samples were collected under the auspices of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Almost 1000 whole air samples were collected during the years 1973 to 1983 under Project AIRSTREAM. Project AIRSTREAM was part of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's (EML, at that time called the Health and Safety Laboratory/HASL) research effort to investigate the impact of the injection of radionuclides and stable compounds into the stratosphere. One or more of the following compounds were analyzed: CCl[sub 3]F, CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2], CCl[sub 4], N[sub 2]O, SF[sub 6], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]CCl[sub 3], and COS. Details of the Project's quality assurance program are discussed. Also included in the report are two-dimensional plots of the concentration of CCl[sub 3]F and a complete tabulation of the data.

  10. Project AIRSTREAM: Trace gas final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leifer, R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of 10 years of sampling for trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. These samples were collected under the auspices of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Almost 1000 whole air samples were collected during the years 1973 to 1983 under Project AIRSTREAM. Project AIRSTREAM was part of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML, at that time called the Health and Safety Laboratory/HASL) research effort to investigate the impact of the injection of radionuclides and stable compounds into the stratosphere. One or more of the following compounds were analyzed: CCl{sub 3}F, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, CCl{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SF{sub 6}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}CCl{sub 3}, and COS. Details of the Project`s quality assurance program are discussed. Also included in the report are two-dimensional plots of the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F and a complete tabulation of the data.

  11. Solar limb darkening and ray trace evaluation of solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negi, B.S.; Bhowmik, N.C.; Mathur, S.S.; Kandpal, T.C.

    1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of different correlations commonly used to describe the limb darkening effect is made. A somewhat new correlation is proposed which predicts the values to within +- 1.5% of the experimental values. Using a conventional ray trace technique and assigning proper weight factors to each ray, the distribution of the local concentration ratio over a flat absorber placed in the focal plane of a cylindrical parabolic trough is also determined.

  12. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salomon, R.E.

    1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

  13. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salomon, Robert E. (Philadelphia, PA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

  14. DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steidel, Chuck

    1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS NEUTRAL HYDROGEN Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Quasar Quasar Absorption Lines Keck/HIRES Quasar Spectrum Observer baryons dark matter potential isotropic UV only on and the radiation field intensity... H I #12;5 GOAL: the primordial dark matter power spectrum

  15. Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Gas Source Tracing With a Mobile Robot Using an Adapted Moth Strategy Achim Lilienthal, Denis,reiman,zell}@informatik.uni-tuebingen.de Abstract. As a sub-task of the general gas source localisation problem, gas source tracing is supposed to guide a gas-sensitive mobile system towards a source by using the cues determined from the gas

  16. Wide range radioactive gas concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide range radioactive gas concentration detector and monitor which is capable of measuring radioactive gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude. The device of the present invention is designed to have an ionization chamber which is sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  17. Time Series of Trace Element Concentrations Calculated from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a). A total of 120 samples were collected at sites within the Bay, outside the Golden Gate receives many waste water discharges, especially in areas south of the Dumbarton Bridge, that contain trace

  18. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

  19. Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Role of trace impurities in large-volume noble gas atmospheric-pressure glow discharges Xiaohui. Large-volume APG discharges find numerous applications in processing of material surfaces,1 ozone-purity helium is presented, and the role of trace impurities in such noble gas plasmas is established. Trace

  20. Solar Tracing Sensors for Maximum Solar Concentrator Efficiency

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) relies on thermodynamic processes to convert concentrated light into useful forms of energy. Accurate sun tracking enables higher concentration ratios and improved efficiency through higher temperature processes and lower losses...

  1. Trace gas contaminant control in a space station atmosphere using adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace contaminants enter spacecraft atmospheres through offgassing of spacecraft materials and as products of crew metabolism. The consequences of fire or accidental release of toxic vapors from onboard systems is also a crew safety concern. The purpose of this work was to determine how these contaminants could be limited to safe concentrations in the atmosphere of the proposed space station. Contaminant source models were developed from spacecraft material offgassing and human metabolic production rate measurements. Contaminants were represented with a simplified model of 30 compounds by grouping similar species together. A trace contaminant control process, which consists of chemisorption of ammonia on phosphoric acid-impregnated activated carbon, ambient temperature catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, catalytic conversion of the sulfur in hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans to elemental sulfur, and adsorption of the other contaminants in a regenerable activated carbon adsorber, was proposed. Trace contaminant adsorption rate and equilibrium equations were derived. Various adsorbents were evaluated to determine the optimum sorbents for this application. Removal system performance limits were established, and optimum design ranges for process parameters were developed. Trace gas contaminants can be limited to safe concentrations by the process proposed under normal conditions using as little as 1 Kg/man-year of ammonia chemisorbent. The most likely accidental contaminant releases can be removed in {approximately}20 hours using frequent adsorber regenerations.

  2. "Trace Analysis of Speciality and Electronic Gases," Chapter 4, "Emerging Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques for Gas Analysis"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lascola, R.; McWhorter, S.; Tittel, F.; Lewicki, R.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter covers Laser Absorption Spectroscopic Techniques and Applications of Semiconductor LAS Based Trace Gas Sensor Systems.

  3. Sensoring hydrogen gas concentration using electrolyte made of proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueda, Yoshikatsu [Kyoto University, Japan; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Koyanaka, Hideki [Kyoto University, Japan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen gas promises to be a major clean fuel in the near future. Thus, sensors that can measure the concentrations of hydrogen gas over a wide dynamic range (e.g., 1 99.9%) are in demand for the production, storage, and utilization of hydrogen gas. However, it is difficult to directly measure hydrogen gas concentrations greater than 10% using conventional sensor [1 11]. We report a simple sensor using an electrolyte made of proton conductive manganese dioxide that enables in situmeasurements of hydrogen gas concentration over a wide range of 0.1 99.9% at room temperature.

  4. RAPID COMMUNICATION CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wave thermoelectrically cooled, distributed feedback diode laser will be described. The CW TEC DFB- moelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy

  5. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power Over the last thirty years, moreMineLand Rehabilitation · PowerGeneration · System/PlantOperation andMaintenance · AuxiliaryNaturalGas Combustion · Coal-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. These LCAs have yielded wide-ranging results. Variation could

  6. What does stabilizing greenhouse gas concentrations mean?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Henry D.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Reiner, David M.

    The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is applied to an exploration of the national emissions obligations that would be required to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentrations at levels now under active ...

  7. ``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes'' J. C. Lin,1 C gas fluxes at the land surface is essential for understanding the impact of human activities as they travel over the landscape. Successful Lagrangian experiments depend critically on forecasts of air parcel

  8. JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Laudal

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

  9. Oil and gas exploration system and method for detecting trace amounts of hydrocarbon gases in the atmosphere

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wamsley, Paula R. (Littleton, CO); Weimer, Carl S. (Littleton, CO); Nelson, Loren D. (Evergreen, CO); O'Brien, Martin J. (Pine, CO)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil and gas exploration system and method for land and airborne operations, the system and method used for locating subsurface hydrocarbon deposits based upon a remote detection of trace amounts of gases in the atmosphere. The detection of one or more target gases in the atmosphere is used to indicate a possible subsurface oil and gas deposit. By mapping a plurality of gas targets over a selected survey area, the survey area can be analyzed for measurable concentration anomalies. The anomalies are interpreted along with other exploration data to evaluate the value of an underground deposit. The system includes a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with a spectroscopic grade laser light and a light detector. The laser light is continuously tunable in a mid-infrared range, 2 to 5 micrometers, for choosing appropriate wavelengths to measure different gases and avoid absorption bands of interference gases. The laser light has sufficient optical energy to measure atmospheric concentrations of a gas over a path as long as a mile and greater. The detection of the gas is based on optical absorption measurements at specific wavelengths in the open atmosphere. Light that is detected using the light detector contains an absorption signature acquired as the light travels through the atmosphere from the laser source and back to the light detector. The absorption signature of each gas is processed and then analyzed to determine if a potential anomaly exists.

  10. Deposition of Nitric Acid and Reactive Nitrogen at Harvard Forest The hourly gas-phase HNO3 concentration was measured at the Harvard Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reactive nitrogen trace gas species play an important role in tropospheric photochemistry by stimulating gas-phase HNO3 concentration was measured at the Harvard Forest Environmental Measurement Site during radicals may be regenerated. Thus conversion of NOx radicals to HNO3 and subsequent deposition

  11. Evolution of the geothermal fluids at Los Azufres, Mexico, as traced by noble gas isotopes, 18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    Evolution of the geothermal fluids at Los Azufres, Mexico, as traced by noble gas isotopes, 18 O, D: Noble gases Strontium isotopes Helium isotopes Geothermal energy Los Azufres Araró Mexico Isotopes of noble gases, CO2, H2O and Sr were measured in 10 geothermal wells and 8 hot springs, fumaroles and mud

  12. Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    Validation of a Model of a Resonant Optothermoacoustic Trace Gas Sensor N. Petra1, J. Zweck1, S. E optothermoacoustic sensor is validated by comparison with experiments performed with 0.5% acetylene in nitrogen Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 300.6430, 300.6340. 1. Introduction Quartz-Enhanced Photo

  13. SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are requested in several fields such as applications [1], fuel cell [2], radioactive waste storage and diverse selectivity of a sensor includes the addition of a catalyst to the tin oxide powder. In the case of hydrogen1 SELECTIVE FILTER FOR SnO2 BASED GAS SENSOR : APPLICATION TO HYDROGEN TRACE DETECTION G

  14. Tracing coalbed natural gas-coproduced water using stable isotopes of carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, S.; Frost, C.D. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. for Renewable Resources

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recovery of hydrocarbons commonly is associated with coproduction of water. This water may be put to beneficial use or may be reinjected into subsurface aquifers. In either case, it would be helpful to establish a fingerprint for that coproduced water so that it may be tracked following discharge on the surface or reintroduction to geologic reservoirs. This study explores the potential of using {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) - coproduced water as a fingerprint of its origin and to trace its fate once it is disposed on the surface. Our initial results for water samples coproduced with CBNG from the Powder River Basin show that this water has strongly positive {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) (12 parts per thousand to 22 parts per thousand) that is readily distinguished from the negative {delta}{sup 13}C of most surface and ground water (-8 parts per thousand to -11 parts per thousand). Furthermore, the DIC concentrations in coproduced water samples are also high (more than 100 mg C/L) compared to the 20 to 50 mg C/L in ambient surface and ground water of the region. The distinctively high {delta}{sup 13}C and DIC concentrations allow us to identify surface and ground water that have incorporated CBNG-coproduced water. Accordingly, we suggest that the {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) and DIC concentrations of water can be used for long-term monitoring of infiltration of CBNG-coproduced water into ground water and streams. Our results also show that the {delta} {sup 13}C (DIC) of CBNG-coproduced water from two different coal zones are distinct leading to the possibility of using {delta}{sup 13}C(DIC) to distinguish water produced from different coal zones.

  15. Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  16. Wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.

    1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide-range radioactive-gas-concentration detector and monitor capable of measuring radioactive-gas concentrations over a range of eight orders of magnitude is described. The device is designed to have an ionization chamber sufficiently small to give a fast response time for measuring radioactive gases but sufficiently large to provide accurate readings at low concentration levels. Closely spaced parallel-plate grids provide a uniform electric field in the active region to improve the accuracy of measurements and reduce ion migration time so as to virtually eliminate errors due to ion recombination. The parallel-plate grids are fabricated with a minimal surface area to reduce the effects of contamination resulting from absorption of contaminating materials on the surface of the grids. Additionally, the ionization-chamber wall is spaced a sufficient distance from the active region of the ionization chamber to minimize contamination effects.

  17. Measurement of Trace I-129 Concentrations in CsI Powder and Organic Liquid Scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. J. Dong

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Procedures were devised to measure trace concentrations of I-129 in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) which leads to improvement in sensitivities by several orders of magnitude over other methods. No evidence of their existence in these materials were observed. Limits of scintillator, respectively, were derived.These are the first results in a research program whose goals are to develop techniques to measure trace radioactivity in detector materials by AMS.

  18. Measurement of Trace $^{129}I$ Concentrations in CsI Powder and Organic Liquid Scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, K J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of trace radiopurity in active detector materials is a subject of major concern in low-background experiments. Procedures were devised to measure trace concentrations of I-129 in the inorganic salt CsI as well as in organic liquid scintillator with Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) which leads to improvement in sensitivities by several orders of magnitude over other methods. No evidence of their existence in these materials were observed. Limits of scintillator, respectively, were derived.These are the first results in a research program whose goals are to develop techniques to measure trace radioactivity in detector materials by AMS.

  19. Electrochemical separation and concentration of hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winnick, Jack (Atlanta, GA); Sather, Norman F. (Naperville, IL); Huang, Hann S. (Darian, IL)

    1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4 -- or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S--. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  20. Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

  1. Trace Gas Emissions Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Trace Gas Emissions are organized as Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions, Land-Use CO2 Emissions, Soil CO2 Emissions, and Methane.

  2. Gas Source Localisation by Constructing Concentration Gridmaps with a Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    Gas Source Localisation by Constructing Concentration Gridmaps with a Mobile Robot Achim Lilienthal of a gas distribution by creating concentration gridmaps with a mobile robot equipped with a gas-sensitive system ("mobile nose"). By contrast to metric gridmaps extracted from sonar or laser range scans, a gas

  3. Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García-Berthou, Emili

    29 April 2014 Accepted 12 May 2014 Keywords: Bioaccumulation Heavy metals Llobregat River species in an Iberian river with moderate metal pollution. Al, Fe and Zn were the most abundant metals trace elements (Bervoets and Blust, 2003; Noël et al., 2013). Heavy metals in fish represent a potential

  4. Trace metal concentration in blood of the Kemp's ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys kempii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orvik, Lisa Marie

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterized the level of five trace metals in Kemp's ridleys and compared these levels in headstart and wild cohorts as well as between the sexes. Overall, copper, lead, mercury, silver and zinc levels in the blood of Kemp's ridleys were: copper (range = 215...

  5. Trace Elemental Composition and Concentration of Upstate New York Rainwater Samples Using the Union College Pelletron Particle Accelerator and Proton Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopmann, Rebecca A.

    of environmental pollutants in aerosols, rainwater, and soils. In particular, rainwater samples will be collected that was steered to be incident onto a dried rainwater target and Q = 10-µC of charge was collected. WhenTrace Elemental Composition and Concentration of Upstate New York Rainwater Samples Using the Union

  6. Upward Gas-Liquid Flow in Concentric and Eccentric Annular Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavalcanti de Sousa, Pedro

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    UPWARD GAS-LIQUID FLOW IN CONCENTRIC AND ECCENTRIC ANNULAR SPACES A Thesis by PEDRO CAVALCANTI DE SOUSA Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Copyright 2013 Pedro Cavalcanti de Sousa ii ABSTRACT A limited amount of work exists on upward gas-liquid flow in annular spaces. This is a common scenario in drilling operations, especially in underbalanced drilling, and in high-production wells...

  7. Investigation of trace amounts of gas on microvave water-cut measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jin

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    viscosity, improper separator operation, or poor separator design. Gas carry-under is believed to be one of the major causes of large allocation factors in oil and gas operations. Problems in clearly defining the three-phase stream as to flow regime...

  8. Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar radiation (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    W solar furnace of Solar Energy Laboratory in Odeillo (France). Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 423-426 MARS423 Theoretical study of gas heated in a porous material subjected to a concentrated solar exposed to the solar radiation. These quantities may be expressed in any set consistent units. 1

  9. Adsorption process to recover hydrogen from feed gas mixtures having low hydrogen concentration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Timothy Christopher; Weist Jr., Edward Landis; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Novosat, Paul Anthony

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for selectively separating hydrogen from at least one more strongly adsorbable component in a plurality of adsorption beds to produce a hydrogen-rich product gas from a low hydrogen concentration feed with a high recovery rate. Each of the plurality of adsorption beds subjected to a repetitive cycle. The process comprises an adsorption step for producing the hydrogen-rich product from a feed gas mixture comprising 5% to 50% hydrogen, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas withdrawal steps, a provide purge step resulting in a first pressure decrease, a blowdown step resulting in a second pressure decrease, a purge step, at least two pressure equalization by void space gas introduction steps, and a repressurization step. The second pressure decrease is at least 2 times greater than the first pressure decrease.

  10. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  11. Electrochemical separation and concentration of sulfur containing gases from gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winnick, Jack (3805 Woodrail-on-the-Green, Columbia, MO 65201)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing sulfur oxides of H.sub.2 S from high temperature gas mixtures (150.degree.-1000.degree. C.) is the subject of the present invention. An electrochemical cell is employed. The cell is provided with inert electrodes and an electrolyte which will provide anions compatible with the sulfur containing anions formed at the anode. The electrolyte is also selected to provide inert stable cations at the temperatures encountered. The gas mixture is passed by the cathode where the sulfur gases are converted to SO.sub.4.sup.= or, in the case of H.sub.2 S, to S.sup.=. The anions migrate to the anode where they are converted to a stable gaseous form at much greater concentration levels (>10X). Current flow may be effected by utilizing an external source of electrical energy or by passing a reducing gas such as hydrogen past the anode.

  12. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlosser, Courtney Adam [MIT; Walter-Anthony, Katey [University of Alaska; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Our overall goal was to quantify the potential for threshold changes in natural emission rates of trace gases, particularly methane and carbon dioxide, from pan-arctic terrestrial systems under the spectrum of anthropogenically forced climate warming, and the extent to which these emissions provide a strong feedback mechanism to global climate warming. This goal is motivated under the premise that polar amplification of global climate warming will induce widespread thaw and degradation of the permafrost, and would thus cause substantial changes in the extent of wetlands and lakes, especially thermokarst (thaw) lakes, over the Arctic. Through a coordinated effort of field measurements, model development, and numerical experimentation with an integrated assessment model framework, we have investigated the following hypothesis: There exists a climate-warming threshold beyond which permafrost degradation becomes widespread and thus instigates strong and/or sharp increases in methane emissions (via thermokarst lakes and wetland expansion). These would outweigh any increased uptake of carbon (e.g. from peatlands) and would result in a strong, positive feedback to global climate warming.

  13. Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Timothy E.

    possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

  14. Tunable photonic cavities for in-situ spectroscopic trace gas detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bond, Tiziana; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Compact tunable optical cavities are provided for in-situ NIR spectroscopy. MEMS-tunable VCSEL platforms represents a solid foundation for a new class of compact, sensitive and fiber compatible sensors for fieldable, real-time, multiplexed gas detection systems. Detection limits for gases with NIR cross-sections such as O.sub.2, CH.sub.4, CO.sub.x and NO.sub.x have been predicted to approximately span from 10.sup.ths to 10s of parts per million. Exemplary oxygen detection design and a process for 760 nm continuously tunable VCSELS is provided. This technology enables in-situ self-calibrating platforms with adaptive monitoring by exploiting Photonic FPGAs.

  15. The RCP Greenhouse Gas Concentrations and their Extensions from 1765 to 2300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinshausen, Malte; Smith, Steven J.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Daniel, John S.; Kainuma, M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Matsumoto, Ken ichi; Montzka, S.; Raper, S.; Riahi, Keywan; Thomson, Allison M.; Velders, G.J.M; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the greenhouse gas concentrations for the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their extensions beyond 2100, the Extended Concentration Pathways (ECPs). These projections include all major anthropogenic greenhouse gases and are a result of a multi-year effort to produce new scenarios for climate change research. We first compiled a suite of observations and emissions estimates for greenhouse gases (GHGs) through the historical period (1750-2005). For the 21st century, we start from emissions projected by four different Integrated Assessment Models for 2005-2100. We harmonize these emissions to allow inter-comparability of scenarios and to achieve a smooth transition from historical data. These harmonized emissions are then used to derive future GHG concentrations. We also present the GHG concentrations for one supplementary extension, which illustrates the emissions implications of attempting to go back to ECP4.5 concentration levels after emissions in the 21st century followed RCP6. Corresponding radiative forcing values are also presented for the RCP and ECPs.

  16. Comparison of observed and predicted short-term tracer gas concentrations in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotter, S.J.; Miller, C.W.; Lin, W.C.T.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Laboratory is in the process of conducting a series of atmospheric tracer studies. The inert gas sulfurhexafluoride is released from a height of 62 m for 15 min and concentrations in air are measured on sampling arcs up to 30 km downwind of the release point. Maximum 15 min. air concentrations from 14 of these tracer tests have been compared with the ground-level, centerline air concentration predicted with a Gaussian plume atmospheric transport model using eight different sets of atmospheric dispersion parameters. Preliminary analysis of the results from these comparisons indicates that the dispersion parameters developed at Juelich, West Germany, based on tracers released from a height of 50 m, give the best overall agreement between the predicted and observed values. The median value of the ratio of predicted to observed air concentrations for this set of parameters is 1.3, and the correlation coefficient between the log of the predictions and the log of the observations is 0.72. For the commonly used Pasquill-Gifford dispersion parameters, the values of these same statistics are 4.4 and 0.68, respectively. The Gaussian plume model is widely used to predict air concentrations resulting from short-term radionuclide release to the atmosphere. The results of comparisons such as these must be considered whenever the Gaussian model is used for such purposes. 22 references, 3 tables.

  17. Quantifying Climate Feedbacks from Abrupt Changes in High-Latitude Trace-Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qianlai Zhuang

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    During the three-year project period, Purdue University has specifically accomplished the following: revised the existing Methane Dynamics Model (MDM) to consider the effects of changes of atmospheric pressure; applied the methane dynamics model (MDM) to Siberian region to demonstrate that ebullition estimates could increase previous estimates of regional terrestrial CH{sub 4} emissions 3- to 7-fold in Siberia; Conducted an analysis of the carbon balance of the Arctic Basin from 1997 to 2006 to show that terrestrial areas of the Arctic were a net source of 41.5 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} that increased by 0.6 Tg CH{sub 4} yr{sup ??1} during the decade of analysis, a magnitude that is comparable with an atmospheric inversion of CH{sub 4}; improved the quantification of CH{sub 4} fluxes in the Arctic with inversion methods; evaluated AIRS CH4 retrieval data with a transport and inversion model and surface flux and aircraft data; to better quantify methane emissions from wetlands, we extended the MDM within a biogeochemistry model, the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM), to include a large-scale hydrology model, the variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model; more recently, we developed a single box atmospheric chemistry model involving atmospheric methane (CH{sub 4}), carbon monoxide (CO) and radical hydroxyl (OH) to analyze atmospheric CH{sub 4} concentrations from 1984 to 2008.

  18. Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID (flame ionization)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Determination of Methane Concentration Methane will be measured on the gas chromatogram using a FID to equilibrate the methane between the air and water. · With the syringe pointing down, eject all the water fromL of gas in the syringe · We will now move to the GC lab in Starr 332 to measure methane. · Repeat

  19. Bubble columns for condensation at high concentrations of noncondensable gas: Heat-transfer model and experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, G. Prakash

    Carrier gas based thermodynamic cycles are common in water desalination applications. These cycles often require condensation of water vapor out of the carrier gas stream. As the carrier gas is most likely a noncondensable ...

  20. Final Report - Gas Retention and Release Tests Supporting the Concentrate Receipt Vessel (CRV-VSL-00002A/2B) Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUERRERO, HECTOR

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Retention and Release (GR and R) tests were performed in the scaled Concentrate Receipt Vessel (CRV) Test Stand at the Savannah River National Laboratory to validate the capability of candidate Hybrid-Mixing systems for the CRV to safely release hydrogen during normal and upset conditions. Hydrogen is generated in the radioactive waste as a result of natural and plant processes and must not be allowed to accumulate above flammability limits. Two types of tests were conducted. Gas holdup tests determined the steady state amount of gas accumulated in the simulant under normal PJM only or PJM plus sparging conditions. Gas release tests determined what operating conditions are necessary to fully release gas after a steady state gas fraction of 4 per cent tank volume or more was reached in the simulant.

  1. Laboratory scale studies of Pd/y-Al2O3 sorbents for the removal of trace contaminents from coal-derived fuel gas at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J.; Stanko, Dennis C.

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a promising technology for the use of coal in a clean and efficient manner. In order to maintain the overall efficiency of the IGCC process, it is necessary to clean the fuel gas of contaminants (sulfur, trace compounds) at warm (150-540 C) to hot (>540 C) temperatures. Current technologies for trace contaminant (such as mercury) removal, primarily activated carbon based sorbents, begin to lose effectiveness above 100 C, creating the need to develop sorbents effective at elevated temperatures. As trace elements are of particular environmental concern, previous work by this group has focused on the development of a Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent for Hg removal. This paper extends the research to Se (as hydrogen selenide, H{sub 2}Se), As (as arsine, AsH{sub 3}), and P (as phosphine, PH{sub 3}) which thermodynamic studies indicate are present as gaseous species under gasification conditions. Experiments performed under ambient conditions in He on 20 wt.% Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} indicate the sorbent can remove the target contaminants. Further work is performed using a 5 wt.% Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent in a simulated fuel gas (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) in both single and multiple contaminant atmospheres to gauge sorbent performance characteristics. The impact of H{sub 2}O, Hg and temperature on sorbent performance is explored.

  2. Single-QCL-based absorption sensor for simultaneous trace-gas detection of CH4 and N2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compact multipass gas cell (MGC). This sensor uses a thermoelectrically cooled, continuous wave­8]. A compact mid-infrared absorption spectrometer for N2O and CH4 was developed using thermoelectrically cooled.04 cm-1 ) and N2O (1274.61 cm-1 ) lines at a 1 Hz repetition rate. Wavelength modulation spec- troscopy

  3. Leaf gas exchange and carbohydrate concentrations in Pinus pinaster plants subjected to elevated CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to elevated CO2 and a soil drying cycle Catherine Picon-Cochard Jean-Marc Guehl Unité de recherches en.) were acclimated for 2 years under ambient (350 ?mol mol-1)and elevated (700 ?mol mol-1) CO2 concentrations ([CO2]). In the summer of the second growing season, the plants were subjected to a soil drying

  4. Meta-Analysis of Estimates of Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Concentrating Solar Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale CSP systems, this analysis focuses on clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emission estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough technology and 17 for power tower technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published GHG emission estimates was 83 and 20 g CO2eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively, with medians of 26 and 38 g CO2eq/kWh. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. Compared to the published estimates, IQR was reduced by 69% and median increased by 76% for troughs. IQR was reduced by 26% for towers, and median was reduced by 34%. A second level of harmonization was applied to five well-documented trough LC GHG emission estimates, harmonizing to consistent values for GHG emissions embodied in materials and from construction activities. As a result, their median was further reduced by 5%, while the range increased by 6%. In sum, harmonization clarified previous results.

  5. Review of {sup 222}Rn in natural gas produced from unconventional sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogolak, C.V.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of the literature on trace radioactivity in natural gas and natural gas products has been performed and the consequent radioactivity concentrations and dose rates due to natural radioactive elements in natural gas produced from Devonian shale wells, western tight gas sands, geo-pressurized aquifiers and coal beds have been studied. Preliminary data on {sup 222}Rn concentrations from these energy sources fall within the range observed for more conventional sources. Gas produced from reservoirs with higher than average natural /sup 238/U higher than average levels of {sup 222}Rn. Massive fracturing techniques do not appear to raise the relative concentration of radon in natural gas.

  6. For information regarding the background concentration levels of macro and trace constituents, including elements of regulatory-interest such as arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model And Its Use In Contaminant Transport Modeling 2.1 Introduction The concentration of contaminants and groundwater systems, the reader is referred to Lindsay (1979), Hem (1985), Sposito (1989, 1994), Langmuir in groundwater1 is determined by the amount, concentration, and nature of contaminant present at the source, rate

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

  8. I/I ratios and halogen concentrations in pore waters of the Hydrate Ridge: Relevance for the origin of gas hydrates in ODP Leg 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehn, Udo

    in fluids associated with hydrocarbons, such as oil field brines (Moran et al., 1995) or coal-bed methane association of iodine with methane allows the identification of the organic source material responsible for iodine and methane in gas hydrates. In all cores, iodine concentrations were found to increase strongly

  9. (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 8: Green Bank trip + gas dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    matter (i.e., dark matter). #12; A heretical alternative? A few bold souls have pointed out that once/T. #12; Gas dynamics: a Keplerian example From Herrnstein et al. (1999): water masers tracing orbital, based on the central concentration of luminous matter (stars and gas): #12; Rotation curves

  10. (Astro)Physics 343 Lecture # 8: Green Bank trip; gas dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    matter (i.e., dark matter). #12; A heretical alternative? A few bold souls have pointed out that once/T. #12; Gas dynamics: a Keplerian example From Herrnstein et al. (1999): water masers tracing orbital, based on the central concentration of luminous matter (stars and gas): #12; Rotation curves

  11. Laboratory scale studies of Pd/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbents for the removal of trace contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J. [U.S. DOE; Stanko, Dennis C. [U.S. DOE

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a promising technology for the use of coal in a clean and efficient manner. In order to maintain the overall efficiency of the IGCC process, it is necessary to clean the fuel gas of contaminants (sulfur, trace compounds) at warm (150540 C) to hot (>540 C) temperatures. Current technologies for trace contaminant (such as mercury) removal, primarily activated carbon based sorbents, begin to lose effectiveness above 100 C, creating the need to develop sorbents effective at elevated temperatures. As trace elements are of particular environmental concern, previous work by this group has focused on the development of a Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent for Hg removal. This paper extends the research to Se (as hydrogen selenide, H{sub 2}Se), As (as arsine, AsH{sub 3}), and P (as phosphine, PH{sub 3}) which thermodynamic studies indicate are present as gaseous species under gasification conditions. Experiments performed under ambient conditions in He on 20 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} indicate the sorbent can remove the target contaminants. Further work is performed using a 5 wt.% Pd/?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} sorbent in a simulated fuel gas (H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) in both single and multiple contaminant atmospheres to gauge sorbent performance characteristics. The impact of H{sub 2}O, Hg and temperature on sorbent performance is explored.

  12. Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

  13. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  14. Trace metal uptake and accumulation pathways in Kemp's ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hui-Chen

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Little is known of trace metal concentrations and their possible role in the mortality of critically endangered Kemp??s ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys kempii). Research described herein characterized concentrations of seven trace metals ?? Ag, Cd...

  15. Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garrett, W.R.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components. 9 figs.

  16. Gas concentration measurement instrument based on the effects of a wave-mixing interference on stimulated emissions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garrett, W. Ray (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring partial pressures of gaseous components within a mixture. The apparatus comprises generally at least one tunable laser source, a beam splitter, mirrors, optical filter, an optical spectrometer, and a data recorder. Measured in the forward direction along the path of the laser, the intensity of the emission spectra of the gaseous component, at wavelengths characteristic of the gas component being measured, are suppressed. Measured in the backward direction, the peak intensities characteristic of a given gaseous component will be wavelength shifted. These effects on peak intensity wavelengths are linearly dependent on the partial pressure of the compound being measured, but independent of the partial pressures of other gases which are present within the sample. The method and apparatus allow for efficient measurement of gaseous components.

  17. Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Using noble gas isotopes to develop a mechanistic understanding of shale gas, desorbtion, tracing, migration Overview The discovery of shale gas in UK Shales demonstrates how important and no doubt will vary from shale to shale. An improved understanding of the controls on gas production from

  18. Novel Sorbent-Based Process for High Temperature Trace Metal Removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gokhan Alptekin

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate the efficacy of a novel sorbent can effectively remove trace metal contaminants (Hg, As, Se and Cd) from actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams at high temperature (above the dew point of the gas). The performance of TDA's sorbent has been evaluated in several field demonstrations using synthesis gas generated by laboratory and pilot-scale coal gasifiers in a state-of-the-art test skid that houses the absorbent and all auxiliary equipment for monitoring and data logging of critical operating parameters. The test skid was originally designed to treat 10,000 SCFH gas at 250 psig and 350 C, however, because of the limited gas handling capabilities of the test sites, the capacity was downsized to 500 SCFH gas flow. As part of the test program, we carried out four demonstrations at two different sites using the synthesis gas generated by the gasification of various lignites and a bituminous coal. Two of these tests were conducted at the Power Systems Demonstration Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama; a Falkirk (North Dakota) lignite and a high sodium lignite (the PSDF operator Southern Company did not disclose the source of this lignite) were used as the feedstock. We also carried out two other demonstrations in collaboration with the University of North Dakota Energy Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC) using synthesis gas slipstreams generated by the gasification of Sufco (Utah) bituminous coal and Oak Hills (Texas) lignite. In the PSDF tests, we showed successful operation of the test system at the conditions of interest and showed the efficacy of sorbent in removing the mercury from synthesis gas. In Test Campaign No.1, TDA sorbent reduced Hg concentration of the synthesis gas to less than 5 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and achieved over 99% Hg removal efficiency for the entire test duration. Unfortunately, due to the relatively low concentration of the trace metals in the lignite feed and as a result of the intermittent operation of the PSDF gasifier (due to the difficulties in the handling of the low quality lignite), only a small fraction of the sorbent capacity was utilized (we measured a mercury capacity of 3.27 mg/kg, which is only a fraction of the 680 mg/kg Hg capacity measured for the same sorbent used at our bench-scale evaluations at TDA). Post reaction examination of the sorbent by chemical analysis also indicated some removal As and Se (we did not detect any significant amounts of Cd in the synthesis gas or over the sorbent). The tests at UNDEERC was more successful and showed clearly that the TDA sorbent can effectively remove Hg and other trace metals (As and Se) at high temperature. The on-line gas measurements carried out by TDA and UNDEERC separately showed that TDA sorbent can achieve greater than 95% Hg removal efficiency at 260 C ({approx}200g sorbent treated more than 15,000 SCF synthesis gas). Chemical analysis conducted following the tests also showed modest amounts of As and Se accumulation in the sorbent bed (the test durations were still short to show higher capacities to these contaminants). We also evaluated the stability of the sorbent and the fate of mercury (the most volatile and unstable of the trace metal compounds). The Synthetic Ground Water Leaching Procedure Test carried out by an independent environmental laboratory showed that the mercury will remain on the sorbent once the sorbent is disposed. Based on a preliminary engineering and cost analysis, TDA estimated the cost of mercury removal from coal-derived synthesis gas as $2,995/lb (this analysis assumes that this cost also includes the cost of removal of all other trace metal contaminants). The projected cost will result in a small increase (less than 1%) in the cost of energy.

  19. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  20. 8, 1190911965, 2008 Reactive Trace Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL

  1. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  2. Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trembly, J.P.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal is the United States most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coals availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

  3. Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - angstrom noble gas Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Harry" - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University Collection: Physics 51 DARK MATTER Tracing the "Cosmic Web" with Diffuse Gas Summary: 1 DARK MATTER STARS GAS...

  5. Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    >From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

  6. Molecular gas and AGN fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO emission, tracing the molecular content and distribution in galaxies, is a privileged tool to trace gas towards the nucleus, since the HI tracer is in general depleted there. A review is done of recent CO line observations, with sufficient spatial resolution to indicate the morphology and kinematics of the gas near the nucleus. The puzzling result that nuclei presently observed in an active phase have little sign of fueling, is discussed.

  7. Prediction of Peak Hydrogen Concentrations for Deep Sludge Retrieval in Tanks AN-101 and AN-106 from Historical Data of Spontaneous Gas Release Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Cooley, Scott K.; Meacham, Joseph E.

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive and chemical wastes from nuclear fuel processing are stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Tank Operations Contractor is continuing a program of moving solid wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) to double-shell tanks (DSTs) and preparing for waste feed delivery (WFD). A new mechanism for a large spontaneous gas release event (GRE) in deep sludge sediments has been postulated. The creation of this potential new GRE hazard, deep sludge gas release events (DSGREs), is the retrieval of sludge waste into a single DST that results in a sediment depth greater than operating experience has demonstrated is safe. The Tank Operations Contractor program of moving solid wastes from SSTs to DSTs and preparing for WFD is being negatively impacted by this sediment depth limit.

  8. AN ADVANCED E-PERM SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CONCENTRATIONS OF RADON GAS, RADON PROGENY, EQUILIBRIUM RATIO AND UNATTACHED RADON PROGENY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Ph. D. Stieff; Rick Stieff; Lorin Stieff

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detrimental effects of prolonged exposure to the decay products of radon, is well known and documented in the literature. The USEPA has set a primary standard for radon progeny exposure for the general public at 0.02 WL with a corresponding derived limit of 4 pCi/L for radon gas, assuming an equilibrium ratio of 50%. Because radon gas measurement is simpler and less expensive, more than 90 % of all the currently performed radon measurements in the US, measure radon gas and estimate the actual health risk via the assumed equilibrium factor for a residential structure. However, with increased concerns of radon related exposures in building with high air circulation rates (schools and commercial buildings) the 50 % equilibrium ratio assumption may not allow for proper characterization of the true exposure from radon measurements. In these cases a more rigorous characterization by direct measurements of radon decay products may be useful follow-up measurement after initial radon measurements have identified a potential concern. This paper describes a configuration radon and radon decay product measurement devices that can simultaneously measure radon and its decay products as well as provide an indication of the relative ratio of attached to unattached decay products. This unique combination of devices has numerous applications for designers of complex remediation systems and environmental consultants who have the responsibility of providing cost effective

  9. The interior concentration distribution of a contaminant gas resulting from the ventilating effect of a jet augmented local exhaust (JALE) booth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pazyra, Laurence Paul

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    q I I I y X 229 114 Front View Figure 1 ? Top and front view of the booth. A11 dimensions are in mi 11imeters (mm). FAN 36 2 135 56 46 46 AIR IN I. D. DUCT A 10 cm (4 in. ) B 15 cm (6 in. ) C 23 cm (9 in. ) B e JET ASSEMBLY ROTAMETER... to see if there is any leakage of propane gas, (9) draw another sample from the exhaust, ( 10) note the room temperature, and ( 11) purge the Mi ran and zero. Before an absorbance reading was recorded, the M1ran output had to stabilize. Stabilization...

  10. Analytical instrument with apparatus for sample concentrating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analysis of trace concentrations of contaminants in air includes a portable liquid chromatograph and a preconcentrator for the contaminants to be analyzed. The preconcentrator includes a sample bag having an inlet valve and an outlet valve for collecting an air sample. When the sample is collected the sample bag is connected in series with a sorbing apparatus in a recirculation loop. The sorbing apparatus has an inner gas-permeable container containing a sorbent material and an outer gas-impermeable container. The sample is circulated through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the contaminants in the sorbent material. The sorbent material may be a liquid having the same composition as the mobile phase of the chromatograph for direct injection thereinto. Alternatively, the sorbent material may be a porous, solid body, to which mobile phase liquid is added after preconcentration of the contaminants for dissolving the contaminants, the liquid solution then being withdrawn for injection into the chromatograph.

  11. Solar Tracing Sensors for Maximum Solar Concentrator Efficiency - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSite CulturalDepartment ofatRenewable

  12. Atom trap trace analysis of krypton isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, K.; Chen, C. Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y. M.; Lu, Z.-T.; O'Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    1999-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of ultrasensitive isotope trace analysis has been developed. This method, based on the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms, has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton gas sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. This method is free of contamination from other isotopes and elements and can be applied to several different isotope tracers for a wide range of applications. The demonstrated detection efficiency is 1 x 10{sup {minus}7}. System improvements could increase the efficiency by many orders of magnitude.

  13. Natural gas leak mapper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

  14. In situ measurements of Krypton in Xenon gas with a quadrupole mass spectrometer following a cold-trap at a temporarily reduced pumping speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ethan Brown; Stephan Rosendahl; Christian Huhmann; Christian Weinheimer; Hans Kettling

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for measuring trace amounts of krypton in xenon using a cold trap with a residual gas analyzer has been developed, which achieves an increased sensitivity by temporarily reducing the pumping speed while expending a minimal amount of xenon. By partially closing a custom built butterfly valve between the measurement chamber and the turbomolecular pump, a sensitivity of 40 ppt has been reached. This method has been tested on an ultra-pure gas sample from Air Liquide with an unknown intrinsic krypton concentration, yielding a krypton concentration of $330 \\pm 200$ ppt.

  15. Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

  16. Concentrating collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selected specifications from sixteen concentrating collector manufacturers are tabulated. Eleven are linear parabolic trough collectors, and the others include slats, cylindrical trough, linear Fresnel lens, parabolic cylindrical Fresnel lens, and two point focus parabolic dish collectors. Also included is a brief discussion of the operating temperatures and other design considerations for concentrating collectors. (LEW)

  17. Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chappell, W R

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

  18. Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, R. E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT-TRACED FLUID TRANSFER LINES Robert E. Schilling, P.E. Eaton Corporation Aurora, Ohio This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either steam or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat...

  19. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  20. A method for direct, semi-quantitative analysis of gas phase samples using gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Kimberly E.; Gerdes, Kirk

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new and complete GCICP-MS method is described for direct analysis of trace metals in a gas phase process stream. The proposed method is derived from standard analytical procedures developed for ICP-MS, which are regularly exercised in standard ICP-MS laboratories. In order to implement the method, a series of empirical factors were generated to calibrate detector response with respect to a known concentration of an internal standard analyte. Calibrated responses are ultimately used to determine the concentration of metal analytes in a gas stream using a semi-quantitative algorithm. The method was verified using a traditional gas injection from a GC sampling valve and a standard gas mixture containing either a 1 ppm Xe + Kr mix with helium balance or 100 ppm Xe with helium balance. Data collected for Xe and Kr gas analytes revealed that agreement of 620% with the actual concentration can be expected for various experimental conditions. To demonstrate the method using a relevant unknown gas mixture, experiments were performed for continuous 4 and 7 hour periods using a Hg-containing sample gas that was co-introduced into the GC sample loop with the xenon gas standard. System performance and detector response to the dilute concentration of the internal standard were pre-determined, which allowed semi-quantitative evaluation of the analyte. The calculated analyte concentrations varied during the course of the 4 hour experiment, particularly during the first hour of the analysis where the actual Hg concentration was under predicted by up to 72%. Calculated concentration improved to within 3060% for data collected after the first hour of the experiment. Similar results were seen during the 7 hour test with the deviation from the actual concentration being 1181% during the first hour and then decreasing for the remaining period. The method detection limit (MDL) was determined for the mercury by injecting the sample gas into the system following a period of equilibration. The MDL for Hg was calculated as 6.8 ?g m{sup ? 3}. This work describes the first complete GCICP-MS method to directly analyze gas phase samples, and detailed sample calculations and comparisons to conventional ICP-MS methods are provided.

  1. Trace metal contamination of waters, sediments, and organisms of the Swan Lake area of Galveston Bay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Junesoo

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    facility (Gulf Coast Waste Disposal Authority) is located north of the Wah Chang Ditch. Consequently there have been concerns about possible metal contamination in this area. I determined trace metal concentrations in water, sediments, and organisms (oyster...

  2. Fate of trace elements in UK coals during gasification processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushell, A.J.; Williamson, J. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five UK coals were selected to cover the range of mineral matter and ash contents typically encountered in UK bituminous coals. Trace element analysis was performed on both the whole coals and size separated fractions using ICP analysis for 21 trace elements, including Be, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Cd, Sb, Hg, and Pb, elements deemed to be the most environmentally hazardous. Small quantities of each coal were gasified in a laboratory gasifier in an atmosphere of N{sub 2} containing 15% O{sub 2}. Samples of bed ash, cyclone ash, and a fine gas-filtered ash were collected and analyzed to determine the partition of the trace elements between the gasification products. Mass balance calculations showed that the recovery of the trace elements varied from 20 to 97%; the low recovery of some trace elements highlighting the difficulties of collecting representative samples from a laboratory system. A parallel study on samples taken from a pilot plant gasifier showed significantly higher recovery rates, indicating the value of larger scale trials.

  3. Trace tritium and the H-mode density limit G.F. Matthews a,*, K.-D. Zastrow a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basse, Nils Plesner

    Trace tritium and the H-mode density limit G.F. Matthews a,*, K.-D. Zastrow a , P. Andrew a , B University, Princeton, NJ 08543, USA Abstract Trace amounts of tritium gas have been injected in short pus then saturation of the separatrix density implies clamping of the core density. Short pus of tritium were used

  4. Trace fossil assemblages in selected shelf sandstones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Kathleen Ann

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Harris. Thank you, good luck in the future, and may God bless you all. vi TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Background Objectives Methods . TRACE FOSSIL IDENTIFICATION IN CORES Introduction Description of Selected Trace Fossils TRACE FOSSILS..., the trace foss11 distributions agreed with those of the ichnofacies described by Seilacher (1978) and with the known environmental distributions compiled by Chamberlain (1978), but many trace fossils have widespread occurrences that limit...

  5. HD gas analysis with Gas Chromatography and Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Ohta; S. Bouchigny; J. -P. Didelez; M. Fujiwara; K. Fukuda; H. Kohri; T. Kunimatsu; C. Morisaki; S. Ono; G. Rouille; M. Tanaka; K. Ueda; M. Uraki; M. Utsuro; S. Y. Wang; M. Yosoi

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas analyzer system has been developed to analyze Hydrogen-Deuteride (HD) gas for producing frozen-spin polarized HD targets, which are used for hadron photoproduction experiments at SPring-8. Small amounts of ortho-H$_{2}$ and para-D$_{2}$ gas mixtures ($\\sim$0.01%) in the purified HD gas are a key to realize a frozen-spin polarized target. In order to obtain reliable concentrations of these gas mixtures in the HD gas, we produced a new gas analyzer system combining two independent measurements with the gas chromatography and the QMS. The para-H$_{2}$, ortho-H$_{2}$, HD, and D$_{2}$ are separated using the retention time of the gas chromatography and the mass/charge. It is found that the new gas analyzer system can measure small concentrations of $\\sim$0.01% for the otho-H$_2$ and D$_2$ with good S/N ratios.

  6. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Shiaguo (Champaign, IL); Lu, Yonggi (Urbana, IL); Rostam-Abadi, Massoud (Champaign, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  7. Gas Exploration Software for Reducing Uncertainty in Gas Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun with Big SkyDIII-DRMRGammaEstimates - Energy

  8. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, Jacqueline A.; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT: Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising; however, possible CO2 or CO2-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define to provide a range of concentrations that can be used as the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations. Storage source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from cements and sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, and basalts from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin, Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands, and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution was tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g., pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments because of the presence of CO2. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rocks exceed the MCLs byan order of magnitude, while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the trace element source term for reservoirs and leakage pathways in risk simulations to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  9. An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L. (Univ. of Wyoming Research Corp., Laramie (United States))

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New Albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. The results of the results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage.

  10. Analytical instrument with apparatus and method for sample concentrating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, S.

    1986-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analysis of trace concentrations of contaminants in air includes a portable liquid chromatograph and a preconcentrator for the contaminants to be analyzed. The preconcentrator includes a sample bag having an inlet valve and an outlet valve for collecting an air sample. When the sample is collected the sample bag is connected in series with a sorbing apparatus in a recirculation loop. The sorbing apparatus has an inner gas-permeable container containing a sorbent material and an outer gas-impermeable container. The sample is circulated through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the contaminants in the sorbent material. The sorbent material may be a liquid having the same composition as the mobile phase of the chromatograph for direct injection thereinto. Alternatively, the sorbent material may be a porous, solid body, to which mobile phase liquid is added after preconcentration of the contaminants for dissolving the contaminants, the liquid solution then being withdrawn for injection into the chromatograph.

  11. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  12. Trace determination of lead by helium-4 activation analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargas Bernal, Maria E.

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    glass samples doped with 61 different trace elements at nominal 500 to 1 ppm level concentrations. We evaluated the measurement sensitivities of two methods for alpha counting, i. e. , surface barrier detector and nuclear track detectors. Detection.... An automated system synchronized irradiation, solenoid operation, and data acquisition. Prior to irradiation, the solenoid was energized to position the aluminum sheet in front of the detector. The cyclotron's beam pulser system then began irradiation...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gas annual Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactive trace gas with a current lifetime in the atmosphere of w... gas'. The greenhouse effect of one molecule of CH4 ... Source: USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric gas analyzer Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactive trace gas with a current lifetime in the atmosphere of w... gas'. The greenhouse effect of one molecule of CH4 ... Source: USGS Western Region Coastal and Marine...

  15. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  16. Distributed trace using central performance counter memory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satterfield, David L.; Sexton, James C.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

  17. Measurements and Analyses of Urban Metabolism and Trace Gas Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McManus, J.B.

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Human society has well defined metabolic processes that can be characterized and quantified in the same way that an ecosystems metabolism can be defined and understood [Fischer-Kowalski, 1998.] The study of industrial ...

  18. Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

    2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

  19. Ray Tracing JELLO Brand Paul S. Heckbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treuille, Adrien

    Ray Tracing JELL­O ® Brand Gelatin Paul S. Heckbert Dessert Foods Division Pixar San Rafael, CA ABSTRACT Ray tracing has established itself in recent years as the most general image synthesis algorithm for ray tracing Jell­O ® brand gelatin. We believe the method may have application to other brands

  20. Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multi-Gas Assessment of the Kyoto Protocol John Reilly,* Ronald G. Prinn,* Jochen Harnisch,* Jean in the protocol appear to be an adequate representation of trace gas climatic effects. The principal reason for the success of this simplified GWP approach in our calculations is that the mix of gas emissions resulting

  1. Oxidation of trace amounts of transplutonium elements to the tetravalent state in solutions of mineral acids and their stabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milyukova, M.S.; Varezhkina, N.S.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Malikov, D.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of trace amounts of americium(IV) in sulfuric and nitric acid solutions as a function of the mineral acid, potassium phosphotungstate, and ammonium persulfate concentrations was investigated. The stability of americium(IV) was studied. The optimal conditions and time of oxidation of trace amounts of americium to the tetravalent state were found on the basis of the experimental data obtained.

  2. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, In-situ re-deposition of trace metals mobilized by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .1002/ggge.20104 #12;X - 2 WIGLEY ET AL.: TRACE METAL RE-DEPOSITION Abstract. Mobilization of contaminants by CO2-charged brines is one concern relating to injection of CO2 as part of carbon capture and storage of Green River, Utah (USA), where CO2- charged brines have bleached red sandstones, and concentrated trace

  3. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesac, Larry R [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  4. Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Future trends in environmental mercury concentrations: implications for prevention strategies interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

  5. Trace 700 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd JumpOperationsInformationRowleyIndianaToyon Power StationTrace

  6. evaluation-concentrated-piperazine | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of Concentrated Piperazine for CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Flue Gas Project No.: DE-FE0005654 URS Group, Inc. will investigate the use of concentrated piperazine (PZ) as...

  7. Production of fullerenes using concentrated solar flux

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fields, Clark L. (Greeley, CO); Pitts, John Roland (Lakewood, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Hale, Mary Jane (Golden, CO); Bingham, Carl E. (Denver, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing soot containing high amounts of fullerenes comprising: providing a primary concentrator capable of impingement of a concentrated beam of sunlight onto a carbon source to cause vaporization of carbon and subsequent formation of fullerenes, or providing a solar furnace having a primary concentrator with a focal point that concentrates a solar beam of sunlight; providing a reflective secondary concentrator having an entrance aperture and an exit aperture at the focal point of the solar furnace; providing a carbon source at the exit aperture of the secondary concentrator; supplying an inert gas over the carbon source to keep the secondary concentrator free from vaporized carbon; and impinging a concentrated beam of sunlight from the secondary concentrator on the carbon source to vaporize the carbon source into a soot containing high amounts of fullerenes.

  8. Trace Metal Source Terms in Carbon Sequestration Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamalidis, Athanasios K.; Torres, Sharon G.; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Shao, Hongbo; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Susan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide sequestration in deep saline and depleted oil geologic formations is feasible and promising, however, possible CO{sub 2} or CO{sub 2}-saturated brine leakage to overlying aquifers may pose environmental and health impacts. The purpose of this study was to experimentally define trace metal source terms from the reaction of supercritical CO{sub 2}, storage reservoir brines, reservoir and cap rocks. Storage reservoir source terms for trace metals are needed to evaluate the impact of brines leaking into overlying drinking water aquifers. The trace metal release was measured from sandstones, shales, carbonates, evaporites, basalts and cements from the Frio, In Salah, Illinois Basin Decatur, Lower Tuscaloosa, Weyburn-Midale, Bass Islands and Grand Ronde carbon sequestration geologic formations. Trace metal dissolution is tracked by measuring solution concentrations over time under conditions (e.g. pressures, temperatures, and initial brine compositions) specific to the sequestration projects. Existing metrics for Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs) for drinking water as defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) were used to categorize the relative significance of metal concentration changes in storage environments due to the presence of CO{sub 2}. Results indicate that Cr and Pb released from sandstone reservoir and shale cap rock exceed the MCLs by an order of magnitude while Cd and Cu were at or below drinking water thresholds. In carbonate reservoirs As exceeds the MCLs by an order of magnitude, while Cd, Cu, and Pb were at or below drinking water standards. Results from this study can be used as a reasonable estimate of the reservoir and caprock source term to further evaluate the impact of leakage on groundwater quality.

  9. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

  10. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Trace metal characterization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Trace metal characterization and speciation in geothermal effluent by multiple scanning anodic stripping voltammetry and atomic absorpotion analysis. Annual progress report...

  11. Trace elements in coal by glow discharge mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, M.L.; Wilson, C.R.; Pestovich, J. Jr. [WAL Inc., Wheat Ridge, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A need and a demand exist for determining trace elements in coal and coal related by-products, especially those elements which may potentially be a health hazard. The provisions of the 1990 clean air act require that the EPA evaluate the emissions of electric utilities for trace elements and other potentially hazardous organic compounds. The coal fired electric utility industry supplies roughly 60% of the total generating capacity of 2,882,525 million kilowatt hours (nearly 3 trillion kilowatt hours) generated in the U.S. This is accomplished by 414 power plants scattered across the country that burned 813,508,000 short tons of coal in 1993. The relative volatility of some inorganic constituents in coal makes them more prone to be emitted to the atmosphere following combustion. The production of analytical data for trace elements is known to be a difficult task in coal and by-products of coal combustion (fly ash, bottom ash, gas streams, etc.), in terms of both sample collection and analytical determinations. There are several common analytical methods available to the analyst to determine trace elements in coal and coal by-products. In general analytical germs, the material to be analyzed can be totally solubilized (or extracted), or the elements analytes can be determined in the material as a solid. A relatively new elemental technique, Glow Discharge Mass Spectrometry (GDMS) can be used with solids as well. This new analytical technique had never before been applied directly to coal. The radio frequency-glow discharge quadropole mass spectrometer was used to analyze coal directly for the first time ever by rf-GDMS. The rf-GDMS technique is described.

  12. Reactive trace metals in the stratified central North Pacific

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruland, K.W. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)); Orians, K.J. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)); Cowen, J.P. (Univ. of Hawaii, Manoa, HI (United States))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical concentration profiles of the dissolved and suspended particulate phases were determined for a suite of reactive trace metals, Al, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Cd, during summertime at a station in the center of the North Pacific gyre. During summer the euphotic zone becomes stratified, forming a shallow (0-25 m), oligotrophic, mixed layer overlying a subsurface (25-140 m), strongly-stratified region. The physical, biological, and chemical structure within the euphotic zone during this period enhanced the effect of atmospheric inputs of Al, Fe, and Mn on mixed layer concentrations. For example, the concentration of dissolved Fe in the surface mixed layer was eighteen times that observed at a depth of 100 m. The observed aeolian signature of these metals matched that predicted from estimates of atmospheric input during the period between the onset of stratification and sampling. The distributions of suspended particulate Al, Fe, and Mn all exhibited minima in the euphotic zone and increased with depth into the main thermocline. Particulate Al and Fe were then uniform with depth below 1000 m before increasing in the near bottom nepheloid layer. Average particulate phase concentrations in intermediate and deep waters of the central North Pacific were 1.0, 0.31, and 0.055 nmol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1] for Al, Fe, and Mn, respectively. The distribution of particulate Cd exhibited a maximum within the subsurface euphotic zone. Particulate zinc also exhibited a surface maximum, albeit a smaller one. Concentrations of particulate Zn and Cd in intermediate and deep waters were 17 and 0.2 pmol[center dot]kg[sup [minus]1]. Substantial interbasin differences in particulate trace metals occur. Concentrations of suspended particulate Al, Fe, and Mn were three to four times lower in the central North Pacific than recently reported for the central North Atlantic gyre, consistent with differences in atmospheric input to these two regions.

  13. Point-focus spectral splitting solar concentrator for multiple cells concentrating photovoltaic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maragliano, Carlo; Stefancich, Marco

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present and experimentally validate a low-cost design of a spectral splitting concentrator for the efficient conversion of solar energy. The optical device consists of a dispersive prismatic lens made of polycarbonate designed to simultaneously concentrate the solar light and split it into its spectral components. With respect to our previous implementation, this device concentrates the light along two axes and generates a light pattern compatible with the dimensions of a set of concentrating photovoltaic cells while providing a higher concentration ratio. The mathematical framework and the constructive approach used for the design are presented and the device performance is simulated using ray-tracing software. We obtain spectral separation in the visible range within a 3x1 cm2 area and a maximum concentration of 210x for a single wavelength. The device is fabricated by injection molding and its performance is experimentally investigated. We measure an optical transmissivity above 90% in the...

  14. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

  15. Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural Gas Nitric Oxide/Nitrogen Dioxide Neal Road LandfillThe methane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations ofmethane, 30% nitrogen and 30% carbon dioxide. The recorded

  16. Concentrating Solar Power Forum Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation's summaries: a convenient truth, comparison of three concentrator technologies, value of high efficiency, and status of industry.

  17. Estimating the benefits of greenhouse gas emission reduction from agricultural policy reform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adger, W.N. (Univ. of East Anglia, Norwich (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment); Moran, D.C. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and agricultural activities contribute directly to the increased concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. Economic support in industrialized countries generally increases agriculture's contribution to global greenhouse gas concentrations through fluxes associated with land use change and other sources. Changes in economic support offers opportunities to reduce net emissions, through this so far has gone unaccounted. Estimates are presented here of emissions of methane from livestock in the UK and show that, in monetary terms, when compared to the costs of reducing support, greenhouse gases are a significant factor. As signatory parties to the Climate Change Convection are required to stabilize emissions of all greenhouse gases, options for reduction of emissions of methane and other trace gases from the agricultural sector should form part of these strategies.

  18. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of trace elements in particulate matter using online High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry. Feasibility of the detection of trace elements in particulate matter using online...

  19. atom trap trace: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors Physics Websites Summary: An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring...

  20. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

  1. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

  2. Adaptation of gas tagging for failed fuel identification in light water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Depiante, E.V. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Callis, E.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Egebrecht, P.M. [Commonwealth Edison Company, Downers Grove, IL (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses experience with noble gas tagging and its adaptation to commercial reactors. It reviews the recent incidence of fuel failures in light water reactors, and methods used to identify failures, and concludes that the on-line technique of gas tagging could significantly augment present flux tilting, sipping and ultrasonic testing of assemblies. The paper describes calculations on tag gas stability in-reactor, and tag injection tests that were carried out collaboratively with Commonwealth Edison Company in the Byron-2 pressurized water reactor (P%a) and with Duke Power Company and Babcock and Wilcox Fuel Company in the Oconee-2 PWM. The tests gave information on: (a) noble gas concentration dynamics as the tag gases were dissolved in and eventually removed from subsystems of the RCS; and (b) the suitability of candidate Ar, Ne, Kr and Xe isotopes for tagging PWR fuel. It was found that the activity of Xe{sup 125} (the activation product of the tag isotope Xe{sup 124}) acted as a ``tag of a tag`` and tracked gas through the reactor; measured activities are being used to model gas movement in the RCS. Several interference molecules (trace contaminants normally present at sub-ppM concentrations in RCS samples) and entrained air in the RCS were found to affect mass spectrometer sensitivity for tag isotopes. In all instances the contaminants could be differentiated from the tag isotopes by operating the mass spectrometer at high resolution (2500). Similarly, it was possible to distinguish all the candidate tag gases against a high background of air. The test results suggested, however, that for routine analysis a high resolution static mass spectrometer will be preferable to the dynamic instrument used for the present analyses.

  3. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PROGRAM REVIEW 2013 Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power Principal Investigator: Prof. Gang Chen Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA...

  4. Concentrating Photovoltaics (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar is growing rapidly, and the concentrating photovoltaics industry-both high- and low-concentration cell approaches-may be ready to ramp production in 2009.

  5. RESTRICTED-TRACE APPROXIMATION FOR NUCLEAR ANTIFERROMAGNETISM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1353 RESTRICTED-TRACE APPROXIMATION FOR NUCLEAR ANTIFERROMAGNETISM M. GOLDMAN and G. SARMA Service to predict several properties of nuclear antiferromagnetic structures : sublattice magnetization of nuclear dipolar magnetic ordering, either antiferromagnetic or ferromagnetic, has been reported

  6. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  7. Extraction of trace metals from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

    1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

  8. Trace element analysis of Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahar, Sean

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or in the planning stages, Near surface lignite re- sources are estimated to be 21 billion metric tons in Texas, while deep basin reserves are estimated at 31 billion metric tons. Near (3] surface reserves alone could fulfill Texas' electrical needs for 100 years... for environmental and health concerns trace element characterization of lignites is important. A needed avenue of research is charact- erization of trace element pathways in lignite fired power plants. :hat is to say what percentage of a certain element...

  9. Indriect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Mult-Component Natural Gas By Heating The Gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2004-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a natural gas by heating the gas. In two embodiments, the heating energy is correlated to the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, the model equation can be solved for the nitrogen concentration.

  10. Radionuclides, Trace Metals, and Organic Compounds in Shells of Native Freshwater Mussels Along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River: 6000 Years Before Present to Current Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. L. Tiller; T. E. Marceau

    2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents concentrations of radionuclides, trace metals, and semivolatile organic compounds measured in shell samples of the western pearl shell mussel collected along the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River.

  11. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability zone.

  12. Retained Gas Sampler Calibration and Simulant Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CRAWFORD, B.A.

    2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan provides a method for calibration of the retained gas sampler (RGS) for ammonia gas analysis. Simulant solutions of ammonium hydroxide at known concentrations will be diluted with isotopically labeled 0.04 M ammonium hydroxide solution. Sea sand solids will also be mixed with ammonium hydroxide solution and diluent to determine the accuracy of the system for ammonia gas analysis.

  13. Indirect measurement of diluents in a multi-component natural gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Owen, Thomas E.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of indirectly measuring the diluent (nitrogen and carbon dioxide) concentrations in a natural gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. A set of reference gas mixtures with known molecular weights and diluent concentrations is used to calculate the constant values. For the gas in question, if the speed of sound in the gas is measured at three states, the three resulting expressions of molecular weight can be solved for the nitrogen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the gas mixture.

  14. Mid-infrared gas sensing using a photonic bandgap fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The gas filling process of the air core is described, and qualitative methane concentrations measurements. Introduction Sensing of gas species and their concentrations is widely used for process control [1-proven technique requires a spectrometer and a sensing volume (gas cell) in which the light can interact

  15. Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its concentrating solar power subprogram.

  16. Automated gas chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, C.D.; Blair, D.S.; Rodacy, P.J.; Reber, S.D.

    1999-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for the continuous, near real-time monitoring of low-level concentrations of organic compounds in a liquid, and, more particularly, a water stream. A small liquid volume of flow from a liquid process stream containing organic compounds is diverted by an automated process to a heated vaporization capillary where the liquid volume is vaporized to a gas that flows to an automated gas chromatograph separation column to chromatographically separate the organic compounds. Organic compounds are detected and the information transmitted to a control system for use in process control. Concentrations of organic compounds less than one part per million are detected in less than one minute. 7 figs.

  17. Photovoltaic concentrator initiative: Concentrator cell development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlgemuth, J.H.; Narayanan, S. [Solarex Corp., Frederick, MD (US)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves the development of a large-area, low-cost, high-efficiency concentrator solar cell for use in the Entech 22-sun linear-focus Fresnel lens concentrator system. The buried contact solar cell developed at the University of New South Wales was selected for this project. Both Entech and the University of New South Wales are subcontractors. This annual report presents the program efforts from November 1990 through December 1991, including the design of the cell, development of a baseline cell process, and presentation of the results of preliminary cell processing. Important results include a cell designed for operation in a real concentrator system and substitution of mechanical grooving for the previously utilized laser scribing.

  18. Local trace formulae for commuting Hamiltonians in Tplitz quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Paoletti

    2015-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Let $(M,J,\\omega)$ be a quantizable compact K\\"ahler manifold, with quantizing Hermitian line bundle $(A,h)$, and associated Hardy space $H(X)$, where $X$ is the unit circle bundle. Given a collection of $r$ Poisson commuting quantizable Hamiltonian functions $f_j$ on $M$, there is an induced Abelian unitary action on $H(X)$, generated by certain T\\"oplitz operators naturally induced by the $f_j$'s. As a multi-dimensional analogue of the usual Weyl law and trace formula, we consider the problem of describing the asymptotic clustering of the joint eigenvalues of these T\\"oplitz operators along a given ray, and locally on $M$ the asymptotic concentration of the corresponding joint eigenfunctions. This problem naturally leads to a \\lq directional local trace formula\\rq, involving scaling asymptotics in the neighborhood of certain special loci in $M$. Under natural transversality assumption, we obtain asymptotic expansions related to the local geometry of the Hamiltonian action and flow.

  19. Assessment of hot gas contaminant control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutkowski, M.D.; Klett, M.G.; Zaharchuk, R.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to gather data and information to assist DOE in responding to the NRC recommendation on hot gas cleanup by performing a comprehensive assessment of hot gas cleanup systems for advanced coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) including the status of development of the components of the hot gas cleanup systems, and the probable cost and performance impacts. The scope and time frame of information gathering is generally responsive to the boundaries set by the National Research council (NRC), but includes a broad range of interests and programs which cover hot gas cleanup through the year 2010. As the status of hot gas cleanup is continually changing, additional current data and information are being obtained for this effort from this 1996 METC Contractors` Review Meeting as well as from the 1996 Pittsburgh Coal Conference, and the University of Karlsruhe Symposium. The technical approach to completing this work consists of: (1) Determination of the status of hot gas cleanup technologies-- particulate collection systems, hot gas desulfurization systems, and trace contaminant removal systems; (2) Determination of hot gas cleanup systems cost and performance sensitivities. Analysis of conceptual IGCC and PFBC plant designs with hot gas cleanup have been performed. The impact of variations in hot gas cleanup technologies on cost and performance was evaluated using parametric analysis of the baseline plant designs and performance sensitivity.

  20. Environmental Assessment and Metrics for Solar: Case Study of SolFocus Solar Concentrator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reich-Weiser, Corinne; Dornfeld, David; Horne, Steve

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas analysis of solar-thermal electricity gen-CdTe Concentrator PV Solar Thermal Wind Coal CC Gas Turbinefor the assessment of thermal solar systems, Proceedings of

  1. Trace metals in sediments of coastal Siberia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Esnough, Teresa Elizabeth

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the work described in this thesis, a total of 218 samples from 104 cores from the East Siberian, Laptev, Kara, and Pechora Seas and the Ob and Yenisei Rivers were analyzed for the trace metals Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Zn...

  2. Recovery of Water from Boiler Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward Levy; Harun Bilirgen; Kwangkook Jeong; Michael Kessen; Christopher Samuelson; Christopher Whitcombe

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with use of condensing heat exchangers to recover water vapor from flue gas at coal-fired power plants. Pilot-scale heat transfer tests were performed to determine the relationship between flue gas moisture concentration, heat exchanger design and operating conditions, and water vapor condensation rate. The tests also determined the extent to which the condensation processes for water and acid vapors in flue gas can be made to occur separately in different heat transfer sections. The results showed flue gas water vapor condensed in the low temperature region of the heat exchanger system, with water capture efficiencies depending strongly on flue gas moisture content, cooling water inlet temperature, heat exchanger design and flue gas and cooling water flow rates. Sulfuric acid vapor condensed in both the high temperature and low temperature regions of the heat transfer apparatus, while hydrochloric and nitric acid vapors condensed with the water vapor in the low temperature region. Measurements made of flue gas mercury concentrations upstream and downstream of the heat exchangers showed a significant reduction in flue gas mercury concentration within the heat exchangers. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model was developed for predicting rates of heat transfer and water vapor condensation and comparisons were made with pilot scale measurements. Analyses were also carried out to estimate how much flue gas moisture it would be practical to recover from boiler flue gas and the magnitude of the heat rate improvements which could be made by recovering sensible and latent heat from flue gas.

  3. Behavior of trace and companion elements of ULC-IF steel grades during RH-treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jungreithmeier, A.; Viertauer, A.; Presslinger, H. [Voest-Alpine Stahl Linz GmbH (Austria)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A large number of metallurgical reactions are caused by lowering the partial pressure during vacuum treatment. One of these reactions is the volatilization of elements with high vapor pressure. The concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment mostly changes because of cooling scrap, deoxidation agents and ferro-alloy additions, slag/metal reactions, vaporization and also because of reactions with the RH-vessel lining. These changes in the concentration of trace and companion elements during RH-treatment are exemplified for ULC-IF (ultra low carbon--interstitial free) steel grades. The elements which are considered are chromium, nickel, molybdenum, copper, vanadium, tin, zinc, lead, phosphorus, sulfur and nitrogen. Calculations of the theoretical equilibrium solubility using thermodynamic data--in dependence of pressure and temperature--correspond well with the values obtained during steel production operations. 67 refs.

  4. Concentrated Solar Thermoelectric Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 2325, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  5. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    is a rendering of a scattering solar concentrator. Light collected by a cylindrical Fresnel lens is focused within a curved glass "guide" sheet, where it is redirected into...

  6. Concentrated Solar Power Generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Zhilei

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Solar power generation is the most promising technology to transfer energy consumption reliance from fossil fuel to renewable sources. Concentrated solar power generation is a (more)

  7. Concentrating Solar Power: Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) has the potential to contribute significantly to the generation of electricity by renewable energy resources in the U.S.. Thermal storage can extend the duty cycle of CSP beyond daytime hours to early evening where the value of electricity is often the highest. The potential solar resource for the southwest U.S. is identified, along with the need to add power lines to bring the power to consumers. CSP plants in the U.S. and abroad are described. The CSP cost of electricity at the busbar is discussed. With current incentives, CSP is approaching competiveness with conventional gas-fired systems during peak-demand hours when the price of electricity is the highest. It is projected that a mature CSP industry of over 4 GWe will be able to reduce the energy cost by about 50%, and that U.S. capacity could be 120 GW by 2050.

  8. Effect of oil and gas well drilling fluids on shallow groundwater in western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.C.; Kehew, A.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon completion of an oil and gas well in North Dakota, the drilling fluid is buried in the reserve pit at the site. Reclamation of the drill site is expedited by digging a series of trenches which radiate out from the reserve pit. The majority of buried drilling fluid is ultimately contained within these 5-7-metre deep trenches. These fluids are commonly salt-based, i.e., they contain a concentration of 300,000 +- 20,000 ppM NaCl. In addition, these drilling fluids also contain additives including toxic trace-metal compounds. Four reclaimed oil and gas well sites were chosen for study in western North Dakota. The ages of these sites ranged from 2 to 23 years. A total of 31 piezometers and 22 soil water samplers were installed in and around the drill sites, and quarterly groundwater samples were obtained from these instruments. The local groundwater flow conditions were also determined at these sites. Results of both the water analyses and earth resistivity surveys indicate that leachate is being generated at all of the study sites. Water obtained from the unsaturated zone beneath the buried drilling fluid at all of the four study sites exceeds some of the recommended concentration limits and maximum permissible concentration limits for trace elements and major ions (As, Cl/sup -/, Pb, Se, and NO/sub 3//sup -/). These values are greatly reduced in the unsaturated zone as the depth from the buried drilling fluid increases. This reduction is assumed to be the result of attenuation of these ions by cation exchange on Na montmorillonitic clays. Two of these study sites represent the typical geohydrologic setting for the majority of oil and gas well sites in this area. At these sites the saturated zone was not monitored. The reduction in ion concentration in the unsaturated zone suggests that there would be very little impact on the groundwater from this buried drilling fluid at these two sites. 46 references, 58 figures, 3 tables.

  9. Spatial and temporal variations in trace metal concentrations in sediments and oysters from Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiann, Kuo-Tung

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TBV1 GBT ~ FBHA BEP QBER CJALVETTOh' BAY ~ I 'GB54EBBH Olf INT eQBH ISAAC CITY 5 Cf C LUC5IOH NAHCI J C 5 I' tP pt pet J lraa al ~f I la 5 J C 5 5OJY Fig. 3. Sampling locations where sediments and/or oysters were collected on Trips...

  10. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  11. Coal quality trends and distribution of Title III trace elements in Eastern Kentucky coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eble, C.F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States); Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The quality characteristics of eastern Kentucky coal beds vary both spatially and stratigraphically. Average total sulfur contents are lowest, and calorific values highest, in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Reserve Districts. Average coal thickness is greatest in these two districts as well. Conversely, the thinnest coal with the highest total sulfur content, and lowest calorific value, on average, occurs in the Princess and Southwest Reserve Districts. Several Title III trace elements, notably arsenic, cadmium, lead, mercury, and nickel, mirror this distribution (lower average concentrations in the Big Sandy and Upper Cumberland Districts, higher average concentrations in the Princess and Southwest Districts), probably because these elements are primarily associated with sulfide minerals in coal. Ash yields and total sulfur contents are observed to increase in a stratigraphically older to younger direction. Several Title III elements, notably cadmium, chromium, lead, and selenium follow this trend, with average concentrations being higher in younger coals. Average chlorine concentration shows a reciprocal distribution, being more abundant in older coals. Some elements, such as arsenic, manganese, mercury, cobalt, and, to a lesser extent, phosphorus show concentration spikes in coal beds directly above, or below, major marine zones. With a few exceptions, average Title III trace element concentrations for eastern Kentucky coals are comparable with element distributions in other Appalachian coal-producing states.

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace element Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... 5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals...

  13. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick

    The emphasis of this course is to use Trace Element Geochemistry to understand the origin and evolution of igneous rocks. The approach is to discuss the parameters that control partitioning of trace elements between phases ...

  14. 12.479 Trace-Element Geochemistry, Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Frederick August

    Focuses on element distribution in rocks and minerals using data obtained from natural and experimental systems. Emphasizes models describing trace-element partitioning and applications of trace-element geochemistry to ...

  15. T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

  16. A graphics architecture for ray tracing and photon mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Junyi

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and spatial locality, as well as eliminating unnecessary random memory accesses. A high level abstraction of the combined ray tracing and photon mapping streaming pipeline is introduced. Based on this abstraction, an e?cient ray tracing and photon...

  17. Steam Tracing...New Technologies for the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitzer, R. K.; Barth, R. E.; Bonorden, C.

    For decades, steam tracing has been an accepted practice in the heating of piping, vessels, and equipment. This paper presents recent product innovations such as "burn-safe" and "energy efficient" steam tracing products. For the many applications...

  18. Indirect Measurement Of Nitrogen In A Multi-Component Gas By Measuring The Speed Of Sound At Two States Of The Gas.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A methods of indirectly measuring the nitrogen concentration in a gas mixture. The molecular weight of the gas is modeled as a function of the speed of sound in the gas, the diluent concentrations in the gas, and constant values, resulting in a model equation. Regression analysis is used to calculate the constant values, which can then be substituted into the model equation. If the speed of sound in the gas is measured at two states and diluent concentrations other than nitrogen (typically carbon dioxide) are known, two equations for molecular weight can be equated and solved for the nitrogen concentration in the gas mixture.

  19. Concentration in Green Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shewchuk, Jonathan

    , energy, infrastructure or transport. Participants in this specialization area work closely with the GreenConcentration in Green Design Research and Education Opportunities Carnegie Mellon University Civil and Environmental Engineering www.ce.cmu.edu M.S. Concentration Green Design - Course Only Track As an extension

  20. Ambient methods and apparatus for rapid laser trace constituent analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snyder, Stuart C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jeffery, Charles L. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring trace amounts of constituents in samples by using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser induced fluorescence under ambient conditions. The laser induced fluorescence is performed at a selected wavelength corresponding to an absorption state of a selected trace constituent. The intensity value of the emission decay signal which is generated by the trace constituent is compared to calibrated emission intensity decay values to determine the amount of trace constituent present.

  1. Transport coefficients of a massive pion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Fernandez-Fraile; A. Gomez Nicola

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We review or main results concerning the transport coefficients of a light meson gas, in particular we focus on the case of a massive pion gas. Leading order results according to the chiral power-counting are presented for the DC electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, shear viscosity, and bulk viscosity. We also comment on the possible correlation between the bulk viscosity and the trace anomaly in QCD, as well as the relation between unitarity and a minimum of the quotient $\\eta/s$ near the phase transition.

  2. System and method for detecting gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chow, Oscar Ken (Simsbury, CT); Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton (Windsor, CT); Dreier, Ken Wayne (Madison, CT); Miller, Jacob Andrew (Dexter, MI)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to detect a presence of a specific gas in a mixture of gaseous byproducts comprising moisture vapor is disclosed. The system includes an electrochemical cell, a transport to deliver the mixture of gaseous byproducts from the electrochemical cell, a gas sensor in fluid communication with the transport, the sensor responsive to a presence of the specific gas to generate a signal corresponding to a concentration of the specific gas, and a membrane to prevent transmission of liquid moisture, the membrane disposed between the transport and the gas sensor.

  3. Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

  4. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis Preliminary calculations assuming pure CaCl 2 solutions were carried out to investigate relationships between salt concentration, HCl gas fugacity (? partial pressure), and condensate

  5. Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

    1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

  6. Methods developed for detecting hazardous elements in produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chao, S.; Attari, A. (Inst. of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States))

    1995-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, Ill. has been developing sampling and analytical methods to detect in natural gas various trace constituents that may pose health, safety, or operational risks. The constituents of interest include paraffinic and aromatic hydrocarbons, H[sub 2]S, organic sulfur compounds, arsenic, mercury, radon, and others. Better sampling and analytical techniques for produced natural gas, similar to those developed by IGT for processed gas, will enhance producers and processors' abilities to monitor undesirable constituents in raw gas streams and improve their clean-up processes. The methods developed at IGT were modifications of air sampling and analytical methods that are commonly used for air toxic substances. These monitoring methods, when applied to natural gas, present special challenges because gas has a much more complex matrix than the air. Methods for the analysis of the following are discussed: arsenic, mercury, radon, sulfur compounds, hydrocarbons, and aromatics including BTEX and PAHs.

  7. Greenhouse Gas Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect."

  8. Maximally concentrating optics for photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1985-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a two-stage concentrator with a fresnel lens primary and a nonimaging dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary, has unique advantages for photovoltaic concentration. Some preliminary ray trace studies have shown that with planar lenses, an increase in angular acceptance for a given geometric concentration to about 2/3 of the maximum theoretical limit can be achieved. To demonstrate this, two preprototype concentrators, each having a geometric concentration of 248:1 for a 0.635cm (0.25 inch) diameter cell, have been designed, built, and tested. Measurements of the angular response show an acceptance of 8[degrees] (full angle) which is drastically better than the 1[degrees]--2[degrees] achievable without a secondary, and is in excellent agreement with the ray trace predictions. For these preprototypes, passive cooling was sufficient to prevent any thermal problems for both the cell and secondary. No problems associated with nouuniform cell illumination were found, as evidenced by the fill factor of 71%--73% measured under concentration. Initial measurements of the system electrical efficiency lie in the range 7.5%--9.9% for a variety of individual cells.

  9. Digital imaging tracing technology for print media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milne, Stewart William

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    decade. Everyday, major newspapers and magazines digitally alter photographs running in their publications. Michael Morse of the National Press Photographers Association noted that, "When you' re looking at the Redbook or Mademoiselle or Sports.... . TIME and Newsweek Covers. . Page 10 12 13 14 20 22 23 Photo Enhancement . 24 10 Public Key Encryption 38 11 Digital Signature 39 12 Secure Digital Camera 40 13 Verification Software . . 41 14 Tracing Technology. . 43 INTRODUCTION Since...

  10. Trace Assignment Adam Leroy, AY 203

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backer, Don

    Trace Assignment Adam Leroy, AY 203 VLT Optics I tracked down optical components for the VLT on the web and came up with the following speci­ fication: Quantity Value r p 28800 mm k p \\Gamma1:004616 r s \\Gamma4553:57 mm k s \\Gamma1:66926 The primary has an effective inner radius of 1000 mm and and outer

  11. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  12. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

  13. GAS EXPLORATION Winter 2006 GasTIPS 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    discriminate between economic and non-eco- nomic concentrations of gas. This is primarily because having 25% porosity and brine salinity of 0.07 ppm. The relation- ship between Rbulk and Sg has detection/mapping of hydrocarbon. A marine CSEM system consists of a ship- towed electric dipole source

  14. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

  15. Reducing PM Concentrations in Simulated High Temperature Gas Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luehrs, Daniel R

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . This characteristic is referred to as char having a low eutectic point. Biomasses with low eutectic points cannot be used in a combustion process because the char will result in slagging and fouling. We have used fluidized bed gasification (FBG) to control...

  16. The relation of seismic activity and radon concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulali, Feride, E-mail: feridekulali@gmail.com, E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr; Akkurt, ?skender, E-mail: feridekulali@gmail.com, E-mail: iskender@fef.sdu.edu.tr [Suleyman Demirel University, Science and Art Faculty, Isparta-Turkey (Turkey); Vogiannis, Efstratios, E-mail: svog@env.aegean.gr [Department of Environmental Studies, University of the Aegean,Mytilene (Greece)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radon, which is the largest source of natural ionizing radiation, reaches to surface as gas or dissolved form in the ground water. Emanation of radon can has a profile is disposed to increasing or decreasing depending on the effects of meteorological events or crust movements. In this work, the radon concentration in soil gas, which is transported from soil to AlphaGUARD, is continuously measured in Mytilene (Greece). A graph of radon concentration is prepared for comparison with simultaneous earthquake data. As a consequence of comparison, we determined that the radon concentration indicates anomalies before the earthquakes.

  17. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  18. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  19. Concentrator silicon cell research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, M.A.; Wenham, S.R.; Zhang, F.; Zhao, J.; Wang, A. [New South Wales Univ., Kensington (Australia). Solar Photovoltaic Lab.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project continued the developments of high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cells with the goal of achieving a cell efficiency in the 26 to 27 percent range at a concentration level of 150 suns of greater. The target efficiency was achieved with the new PERL (passivated emitter, rear locally diffused) cell structure, but only at low concentration levels around 20 suns. The PERL structure combines oxide passivation of both top and rear surfaces of the cells with small area contact to heavily doped regions on the top and rear surfaces. Efficiency in the 22 to 23 percent range was also demonstrated for large-area concentrator cells fabricated with the buried contact solar cell processing sequence, either when combined with prismatic covers or with other innovative approaches to reduce top contact shadowing. 19 refs.

  20. Joined concentric tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeJonghe, Lutgard; Jacobson, Craig; Tucker, Michael; Visco, Steven

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tubular objects having two or more concentric layers that have different properties are joined to one another during their manufacture primarily by compressive and friction forces generated by shrinkage during sintering and possibly mechanical interlocking. It is not necessary for the concentric tubes to display adhesive-, chemical- or sinter-bonding to each other in order to achieve a strong bond. This facilitates joining of dissimilar materials, such as ceramics and metals.

  1. Multipass optical device and process for gas and analyte determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bernacki, Bruce E. (Kennewick, WA)

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A torus multipass optical device and method are described that provide for trace level determination of gases and gas-phase analytes. The torus device includes an optical cavity defined by at least one ring mirror. The mirror delivers optical power in at least a radial and axial direction and propagates light in a multipass optical path of a predefined path length.

  2. Trace water vapor determination in nitrogen and corrosive gases using infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinoza, L.H.; Niemczyk, T.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Stallard, B.R.; Garcia, M.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The generation of particles in gas handling systems as a result of corrosion is a major concern in the microelectronics industry. The corrosion can be caused by the presence of trace quantities of water in corrosive gases such as HCl or HBr. FTIR spectroscopy has been shown to be a method that can be made compatible with corrosive gases and is capable of detecting low ppb levels of water vapor. In this report, the application of FTIR spectroscopy combined with classical least squares multivariate calibration to detect trace H{sub 2}O in N{sub 2}, HCl and HBr is discussed. Chapter 2 discusses the gas handling system and instrumentation required to handle corrosive gases. A method of generating a background spectrum useful to the measurements discussed in this report, as well as in other application areas such as gas phase environmental monitoring, is discussed in Chapter 3. Experimental results obtained with the first system are presented in Chapter 4. Those results made it possible to optimize the design options for the construction of a dedicate system for low ppb water vapor determination. These designs options are discussed in Chapter 5. An FTIR prototype accessory was built. In addition, a commercially available evacuable FTIR system was obtained for evaluation. Test results obtained with both systems are discussed in Chapter 6. Experiments dealing with the interaction between H{sub 2}O-HCl and potential improvements to the detection system are discussed in Chapter 7.

  3. Characteristic emission enhancement in the atmosphere with Rn trace using metal assisted LIBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemi, M. M. [Physics Department, Doctorate Technical Center of PNU, P.O. Box 19536-33511, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parvin, P., E-mail: parvin@aut.ac.ir; Moosakhani, A. [Physics Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mortazavi, S. Z.; Reyhani, A. [Physics Department, Imam Khomeini International University, P.O. Box 34149-16818, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Majdabadi, A. [Laser and Optics Research School, NSTRI, P.O. Box 11155-3486, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abachi, S. [Physics Department, University of California, Irvin, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several characteristic emission lines from the metal targets (Cu, Zn and Pb) were investigated in trace presence of radon gas in the atmospheric air, using Q-SW Nd:YAG laser induced plasma inside a control chamber. The emission lines of metal species are noticeably enhanced in (Rn+air), relative to those in the synthetic air alone. Similar spectra were also taken in various sub-atmospheric environments in order to determine the optimum pressure for enhancement. Solid-state nuclear track detectors were also employed to count the tracks due to alpha particles for the activity assessment.

  4. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  5. Airborne agent concentration analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gelbard, Fred

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for inferring airborne contaminant concentrations in rooms without contaminant sensors, based on data collected by contaminant sensors in other rooms of a building, using known airflow interconnectivity data. The method solves a least squares problem that minimizes the difference between measured and predicted contaminant sensor concentrations with respect to an unknown contaminant release time. Solutions are constrained to providing non-negative initial contaminant concentrations in all rooms. The method can be used to identify a near-optimal distribution of sensors within the building, when then number of available sensors is less than the total number of rooms. This is achieved by having a system-sensor matrix that is non-singular, and by selecting that distribution which yields the lowest condition number of all the distributions considered. The method can predict one or more contaminant initial release points from the collected data.

  6. NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

  7. Consideration of Grain Size Distribution in the Diffusion of Fission Gas to Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul C. Millett; Yongfeng Zhang; Michael R. Tonks; S. B. Biner

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the accumulation of fission gas on grain boundaries in a polycrystalline microstructure with a distribution of grain sizes. The diffusion equation is solved throughout the microstructure to evolve the gas concentration in space and time. Grain boundaries are treated as infinite sinks for the gas concentration, and we monitor the cumulative gas inventory on each grain boundary throughout time. We consider two important cases: first, a uniform initial distribution of gas concentration without gas production (correlating with post-irradiation annealing), and second, a constant gas production rate with no initial gas concentration (correlating with in-reactor conditions). The results show that a single-grain-size model, such as the Booth model, over predicts the gas accumulation on grain boundaries compared with a polycrystal with a grain size distribution. Also, a considerable degree of scatter, or variability, exists in the grain boundary gas accumulation when comparing all of the grain boundaries in the microstructure.

  8. Gas energy meter for inferential determination of thermophysical properties of a gas mixture at multiple states of the gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Kelner, Eric (San Antonio, TX); Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas energy meter that acquires the data and performs the processing for an inferential determination of one or more gas properties, such as heating value, molecular weight, or density. The meter has a sensor module that acquires temperature, pressure, CO2, and speed of sound data. Data is acquired at two different states of the gas, which eliminates the need to determine the concentration of nitrogen in the gas. A processing module receives this data and uses it to perform a "two-state" inferential algorithm.

  9. Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stachniss, Cyrill

    Gas Distribution Modeling using Sparse Gaussian Process Mixture Models Cyrill Stachniss1 Christian-- In this paper, we consider the problem of learning a two dimensional spatial model of a gas distribution with a mobile robot. Building maps that can be used to accurately predict the gas concentration at query

  10. Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Rock-physics Models for Gas-hydrate Systems Associated with Unconsolidated Marine Sediments Diana associated with unconsolidated marine sediments. The goals are to predict gas-hydrate concentration from intercalated with unconsolidated sediments. We show that the geometrical details of how gas hy- drates

  11. The distribution of ten trace elements and minerals in three lignite seams from the Mae Moh Mine, Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, B.; Powell, M.P.; Fyfe, W.S. [Univ. of Ontario (Canada)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the association of major, minor and trace elements in lignites and their accompanying strata is important from a number of perspectives which include: potential health problems from environmental pollutants, rehabilitation after mining, combustion for power etc. The material which follows represents some preliminary observations on the mineralogy and distribution of 10 trace elements in lignites and accompanying sediments from the Mae Moh mine, Thailand. Samples collected from freshly exposed mine faces were air dried and analyzed for moisture and ash. Trace element concentrations were determined on {open_quotes}whole{close_quotes} coals and sediments by NAA and XRF. All chemical analyses are expressed as a fraction of the total dry sediment. Mineralogy of both LTA and sediments was determined by XRD. The chemistry and morphology of individual particles were examined by the Electron microprobe. The analyses are used to make some conclusions about the spatial occurrence of these elements within the seam and their partitioning between organic and inorganic phases.

  12. Cleaning of municipal-waste incinerator flue gas in Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brna, T.G.; Ellison, W.; Jorgensen, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives an overview of a substantial ongoing air-pollution-control program in West Germany, as it relates to emission of acid gases and other pollutants from municipal-refuse incineration. It details emission regulations, control means used, and technical advancements accomplished and foreseen. It gives results and the approximate effectiveness of various controls in reducing acid gas, trace organic, trace heavy metal, and particulate-matter emissions. Available data indicate that lime spray dryer/electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems can attain 70-90% acid-gas removal and 97% or more control of dioxins and furans, while limiting mercury emissions to about 0.01-0.07 mg/N-cu m (dry). In comparison, some wet-scrubber systems can attain 90-plus % acid-gas removal with substantial removal of NOx and comparable control of dioxins and furans, while possibly providing consistently lower mercury emissions.

  13. Molecular Gas in Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the molecular component of the ISM is fundamental to understand star formation. The H2 component appears to dominate the gas mass in the inner parts of galaxies, while the HI component dominates in the outer parts. Observation of the CO and other lines in normal and starburst galaxies have questioned the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, and detection of CO in dwarfs have shown how sensitive the conversion f actor is to metallicity. Our knowledge has made great progress in recent years, because of sensitivity and spatial resolution improvements. Large-scale CO maps of nearby galaxies are now available, which extend our knowledge on global properties, radial gradients, and spiral structure of the molecular ISM. Millimetric interferometers reveal high velocity gradients in galaxy nuclei, and formation of embedded structures, like bars within bars. Galaxy interactions are very effective to enhance gas concentrations and trigger starbursts. Nuclear disks or rings are frequently observed, that concentrate the star formation activity. Since the density of starbursting galaxies is strongly increasing with redshift, the CO lines and the mm dust emission are a privileged tool to follow evolution of galaxies and observe the ISM dynamics at high redshift: they could give an answer about the debated question of the star-formation history, since many massive remote starbursts could be dust-enshrouded.

  14. Altering Wettability in Gas Condensate Sandstone Reservoirs for Gas Mobillity Improvement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez Martinez, Ruth Gabriela

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    study on Berea sandstone rocks treated with a fluorinated polymer. Various concentrations of the polymer are investigated to obtain the optimum alteration in wettability to intermediate gas-wet. This wetting condition is achieved with an 8% polymer...

  15. Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

  16. Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting...

  17. Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional...

  18. The Effects of Trace Contaminants on Catalytic Processing of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Processing of Biomass-Derived Feedstocks . Abstract: Trace components in biomass feedstocks are potential catalyst poisons when catalytically processing these materials to...

  19. Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dix, Alan

    Towards a Ubiquitous Semantics of Interaction: phenomenology, scenarios and traces Alan Dix does not attempt to address the whole question, but focuses on a phenomenological semantics

  20. Concentric micro-nebulizer for direct sample insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassel, V.A.; Rice, G.W.; Lawrence, K.E.

    1984-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A concentric micro-nebulizer and method for introducing liquid samples into a plasma established in a plasma torch including a first tube connected to a source of plasma gas. The concentric micro-nebulizer has inner and outer concentric tubes extending upwardly within the torch for connection to a source of nebulizer gas and to a source of liquid solvent and to a source of sample liquid. The inner tube is connected to the source of liquid solvent and to the source of sample liquid and the outer tube is connected to the source of nebulizer gas. The outer tube has an orifice positioned slightly below the plasma when it is established, with the inner and outer tubes forming an annulus therebetween with the annular spacing between the tubes at said orifice being less than about 0.05mm. The dead volume of the inner tube is less than about 5 microliters.

  1. 1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenstrom, Michael K.

    1.0 GAS TRANSFER An important process used in water and wastewater treatment. Also very important = CL (CL + HcVG) (6) where CL = liquid phase concentration, VL = liquid volume, CG = gas phase concentration, VG = gas volume, Hc = dimensionless Henry's law coefficient and M = mass of gas. Now use two

  2. Gas sensing with acoustic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, S.J.; Frye, G.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Spates, J.J. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Butler, M.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey is made of acoustic devices that are suitable as gas and vapor sensors. This survey focuses on attributes such as operating frequency, mass sensitivity, quality factor (Q), and their ability to be fabricated on a semiconductor substrate to allow integration with electronic circuitry. The treatment of the device surface with chemically-sensitive films to detect species of interest is discussed. Strategies for improving discrimination are described, including sensor arrays and species concentration and separation schemes. The advantages and disadvantages of integrating sensors with microelectronics are considered, along with the effect on sensitivity of scaling acoustic gas sensors to smaller size.

  3. CONTENTS Gas Hydrate Assessment in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route BTRICGEGR-N Goods PO 1 of 81,Concentrated GasGas

  4. Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

  5. Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

  6. Can the trace formula describe weak localisation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert S. Whitney; Igor V. Lerner; Robert A. Smith

    1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We attempt to systematically derive perturbative quantum corrections to the Berry diagonal approximation of the two-level correlation function (TLCF) for chaotic systems. To this end, we develop a ``weak diagonal approximation'' based on a recent description of the first weak localisation correction to conductance in terms of the Gutzwiller trace formula. This semiclassical method is tested by using it to derive the weak localisation corrections to the TLCF for a semiclassically disordered system. Unfortunately the method is unable to correctly reproduce the ``Hikami boxes'' (the relatively small regions where classical paths are glued together by quantum processes). This results in the method failing to reproduce the well known weak localisation expansion. It so happens that for the first order correction it merely produces the wrong prefactor. However for the second order correction, it is unable to reproduce certain contributions, and leads to a result which is of a different form to the standard one.

  7. Fixed Space of Positive Trace-Preserving Super-Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansis Rosmanis

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the fixed space of positive trace-preserving super-operators. We describe a specific structure that this space must have and what the projection onto it must look like. We show how these results, in turn, lead to an alternative proof of the complete characterization of the fixed space of completely positive trace-preserving super-operators.

  8. Accuracy of Memory Reference Traces of Parallel Computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holliday, Mark A.

    , the trace-driven simulator uses the intrinsic traces and the sequence of loads and stores before the current cy- cle, to determine the next address. The mapping between load and store sequences and next addresses to issue, sometimes, requires partial program reexecution. Programs that do not require partial

  9. Initial conditions for paraxial ray tracing in inhomogeneous anisotropic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    , theoretical seismology, seismic anisotropy, wave propagation 1 Introduction By standard kinematic ray tracing and in numerical modelling and interpretation of high-frequency seismic wave #12;elds propagating in inhomogeneous to such important quantities as geometrical spreading and ray amplitudes. The limitations of kinematic ray tracing

  10. Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Antony

    Evaluating regional emission estimates using the TRACE-P observations G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1. Wang,6 D. R. Blake,7 E. Atlas,8 A. Fried,8 B. Potter,9 M. A. Avery,10 G. W. Sachse,10 S. T. Sandholm,11 the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) experiment are used in conjunction

  11. A Feasibility Study: Mining Daily Traces for Home Heating Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehouse, Kamin

    A Feasibility Study: Mining Daily Traces for Home Heating Control Dezhi Hong and Kamin Whitehouse savings as well as 14.9%59.2% reduction in miss time. Keywords Energy, home heating, daily traces, prediction 1. INTRODUCTION Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) contributes most to a home's energy bills

  12. Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Looking For Traces of Pharmaceuticals in Drinking Water By Daniel D. Snow, Ph.D. Director traces of drugs in the public drinking water supplies of 24 major U.S. metropolitan areas. This has in drinking water supplies is not new, but the classes of contaminants being tested for are. Pharmaceuticals

  13. Optical oxygen concentration monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kebabian, Paul (Acton, MA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring and monitoring the concentration of oxygen uses as a light source an argon discharge lamp, which inherently emits light with a spectral line that is close to one of oxygen's A-band absorption lines. In a preferred embodiment, the argon line is split into sets of components of shorter and longer wavelengths by a magnetic field of approximately 2000 Gauss that is parallel to the light propagation from the lamp. The longer wavelength components are centered on an absorption line of oxygen and thus readily absorbed, and the shorter wavelength components are moved away from that line and minimally absorbed. A polarization modulator alternately selects the set of the longer wavelength, or upshifted, components or the set of the shorter wavelength, or downshifted, components and passes the selected set to an environment of interest. After transmission over a path through that environment, the transmitted optical flux of the argon line varies as a result of the differential absorption. The system then determines the concentration of oxygen in the environment based on the changes in the transmitted optical flux between the two sets of components. In alternative embodiments modulation is achieved by selectively reversing the polarity of the magnetic field or by selectively supplying the magnetic field to either the emitting plasma of the lamp or the environment of interest.

  14. TCgen 2.0: A Tool to Automatically Generate Lossless Trace Compressors Martin Burtscher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burtscher, Martin

    TCgen 2.0: A Tool to Automatically Generate Lossless Trace Compressors Martin Burtscher Computer of TCgen, a tool for generating portable lossless trace compressors based on user-provided trace format, making it ideal for trace-based research and teaching environments as well as for trace archives. Version

  15. Development and application of an analysis methodology for interpreting ambiguous historical pressure data in the WIPP gas-generation experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felicione, F. S.

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for generation of gases in transuranic (TRU) waste by microbial activity, chemical interactions, corrosion, and radiolysis was addressed in the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) Gas-Generation Experiments (GGE). Data was collected over several years by simulating the conditions in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) after the eventual intrusion of brine into the repository. Fourteen test containers with various actual TRU waste immersed in representative brine were inoculated with WIPP-relevant microbes, pressurized with inert gases, and kept in an inert-atmosphere environment for several years to provide estimates of the gas-generation rates that will be used in computer models for future WIPP Performance Assessments. Modest temperature variations occurred during the long-term ANL-West experiments. Although the experiment temperatures always remained well within the experiment specifications, the small temperature variation was observed to affect the test container pressure far more than had been anticipated. In fact, the pressure variations were so large, and seemingly erratic, that it was impossible to discern whether the data was even valid and whether the long-term pressure trend was increasing, decreasing, or constant. The result was that no useful estimates of gas-generation rates could be deduced from the pressure data. Several initial attempts were made to quantify the pressure fluctuations by relating these to the measured temperature variation, but none was successful. The work reported here carefully analyzed the pressure measurements to determine if these were valid or erroneous data. It was found that a thorough consideration of the physical phenomena that were occurring can, in conjunction with suitable gas laws, account quite accurately for the pressure changes that were observed. Failure of the earlier attempts to validate the data was traced to the omission of several phenomena, the most important being the variation in the headspace volume caused by thermal expansion and contraction within the brine and waste. A further effort was directed at recovering useful results from the voluminous archived pressure data. An analytic methodology to do this was developed. This methodology was applied to each archived pressure measurement to nullify temperature and other effects to yield an adjusted pressure, from which gas-generation rates could be calculated. A review of the adjusted-pressure data indicated that generated-gas concentrations among these containers after approximately 3.25 years of test operation ranged from zero to over 17,000 ppm by volume. Four test containers experienced significant gas generation. All test containers that showed evidence of significant gas generation contained carbon-steel in the waste, indicating that corrosion was the predominant source of gas generation.

  16. Fuel gas conditioning process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

  17. Autothermal production of synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, J.L.

    1987-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An autothermal reactor is described for the production of a synthesis gas in which both primary reforming and secondary reforming are achieved at a high level of efficiency. The method comprises a heat exchange chamber having a first portion and a second portion, a first inlet connected to the heat exchange chamber for the introduction of steam and feed gas to the heat exchange chamber, reaction tubes mounted within the first portion of the heat exchanger chamber at a location spaced longitudinally from the first inlet in communication with the first inlet and in non-concentric relationship therewith so as to provide a flow path for the steam and feed gas from the first inlet through the plurality of reaction tubes.

  18. 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change on trace gases and the biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, J.A.; Moore, B. III

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This proposal seeks multi-agency funding to conduct an international, multidisciplinary 1988 Pilot Institute on Global Change to take place from August 7 through 21, 1988, on the topic: Trace Gases and the Biosphere. The institute, to be held in Snowmass, Colorado, is envisioned as a pilot version of a continuing series of institutes on Global Change (IGC). This proposal seeks support for the 1988 pilot institute only. The concept and structure for the continuing series, and the definition of the 1988 pilot institute, were developed at an intensive and multidisciplinary Summer Institute Planning Meeting in Boulder, Colorado, on August 24--25, 1987. The theme for the 1988 PIGC, Trace Gases and the Biosphere, will focus a concerted, high-level multidisciplinary effort on a scientific problem central to the Global Change Program. Dramatic year-to-year increases in the global concentrations of radiatively-active trace gases such as methane and carbon dioxide are now well documented. The predicted climatic effects of these changes lend special urgency to efforts to study the biospheric sources and sinks of these gases and to clarify their interactions and role in the geosphere-biosphere system.

  19. Gas hydrate research in the Gulf of Mexico: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennet, R.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high energy seismic sections on the continental slope showed no evidence of a Bottom Simulating Reflector (BSR), which would indicate the presence of gas hydrates. There was no indication of metastable hydrates in continental shelf or slope sediments outside of the conventionally accepted temperature and pressure environment. Tracing the path of migrating gas from the source is much more straight forward than intercepting gas being transported and tracing it back to the source. Our study of low and medium energy seismic methods has shown that they could identify migrating gas. We feel strongly that there are hydrate zones in the Gulf of Mexico that are decomposing; they build up pressure and periodically release the trapped hydrocarbon gases. The released gases migrate vertically and/or laterally to mix with other types of gas or to form discrete pockets. Some of this gas may be emitted from underwater seeps into the overlying water column where it could be identified by a geochemical survey. The ratio of isobutane to normal butane determined by the geochemical survey can be used to assess the probability of the hydrocarbons emanating from a hydrate source. (The more the ratio exceeds 1.0 the greater the probability that the gas could be from a hydrate source.) As no indications of a hydrate zone (e.g., a BSR) were located, we were not able to establish a geophysical signature for gas hydrates; but the records indicate there are large volumes of gas migrating up the continental slope, some of which may have originated from a decomposing hydrate zone or from gas trapped below the hydrate cap. 20 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. MOLECULAR GAS AND STAR FORMATION IN NEARBY DISK GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leroy, Adam K.; Munoz-Mateos, Juan-Carlos [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Walter, Fabian; Sandstrom, Karin; Meidt, Sharon; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bigiel, Frank [Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Brinks, Elias [Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); De Blok, W. J. G. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre, Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, Kelowna, BC (Canada); Schuster, Karl-Friedrich [IRAM, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 St. Martin d'Heres (France); Usero, Antonio [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, C/ Alfonso XII, 3, E-28014 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare molecular gas traced by {sup 12}CO (2-1) maps from the HERACLES survey, with tracers of the recent star formation rate (SFR) across 30 nearby disk galaxies. We demonstrate a first-order linear correspondence between {Sigma}{sub mol} and {Sigma}{sub SFR} but also find important second-order systematic variations in the apparent molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}. At the 1 kpc common resolution of HERACLES, CO emission correlates closely with many tracers of the recent SFR. Weighting each line of sight equally, using a fixed {alpha}{sub CO} equivalent to the Milky Way value, our data yield a molecular gas depletion time, {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol}={Sigma}{sub mol}/{Sigma}{sub SFR}{approx}2.2 Gyr with 0.3 dex 1{sigma} scatter, in very good agreement with recent literature data. We apply a forward-modeling approach to constrain the power-law index, N, that relates the SFR surface density and the molecular gas surface density, {Sigma}{sub SFR}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub mol}{sup N}. We find N = 1 {+-} 0.15 for our full data set with some scatter from galaxy to galaxy. This also agrees with recent work, but we caution that a power-law treatment oversimplifies the topic given that we observe correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and other local and global quantities. The strongest of these are a decreased {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} in low-mass, low-metallicity galaxies and a correlation of the kpc-scale {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} with dust-to-gas ratio, D/G. These correlations can be explained by a CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor ({alpha}{sub CO}) that depends on dust shielding, and thus D/G, in the theoretically expected way. This is not a unique interpretation, but external evidence of conversion factor variations makes this the most conservative explanation of the strongest observed {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} trends. After applying a D/G-dependent {alpha}{sub CO}, some weak correlations between {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and local conditions persist. In particular, we observe lower {tau}{sub dep}{sup mol} and enhanced CO excitation associated with nuclear gas concentrations in a subset of our targets. These appear to reflect real enhancements in the rate of star formation per unit gas, and although the distribution of {tau}{sub dep} does not appear bimodal in galaxy centers, {tau}{sub dep} does appear multivalued at fixed {Sigma}{sub H2}, supporting the idea of ''disk'' and ''starburst'' modes driven by other environmental parameters.

  1. Extractable trace elements in the soil profile after years of biosolids application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbarick, K.A.; Ippolito, J.A.; Westfall, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and some state agencies regulate trace element additions to soil from land application of biosolids. The authors generally consider trace elements added in biosolids (sewage sludge) to accumulate in the soil surface without significant transport below the plow layer. They used 11 yr of field-study information from biosolids addition to dryland hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Vona or TAM107) to determine the distribution of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA)-extractable Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn in 0 to 20 (plow layer), 20 to 60, 60 to 100, and 100 to 150 cm depth increments. This study is unique since it involves multiple biosolids application in a dryland summer fallow agroecosystem. The authors applied five or six applications of biosolids from the cities of Littleton and Englewood, CO, to Weld loam or Platner loam at four locations. This paper focuses on the 0 (control), the 56 or 67 kg of N ha{sup {minus}1} fertilizer rates, and the 6.7 and 26.8 dry Mg of biosolids ha{sup {minus}1} rates that they added every crop year. The authors observed significant (P < 0.10) accumulations of the trace elements in the plow layer of the biosolids-amended soils. Only Zn showed consistent increases in extractable levels below the plow layer at all four sites. The biosolids Zn concentration was larger than any other trace element resulting in larger loading of this element.

  2. Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    1 Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future Penn State Natural Gas Utilization Workshop Bradley Hall sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ FossilMMBtuEquivalent Wellhead Gas Price, $/MMBtu Monthly US Spot Oil Price, $/MMBtu* U.S. Crude Oil vs. Natural Gas Prices, 2005

  3. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  4. Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

    2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

  5. Larval Behavior and Natural Trace Element Signatures as Indicators of Crustacean Population Connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Seth Haylen

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    variability in an atlas of trace element signatures forin creating a trace element atlas, our results show thatstage to create a trace element atlas in 2009 (Table 4.2),

  6. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  7. ACTION CONCENTRATION FOR MIXTURES OF VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS (VOC) & METHANE & HYDROGEN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARUSICH, R.M.

    2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste containers may contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs), methane, hydrogen and possibly propane. These constituents may occur individually or in mixtures. Determining if a waste container contains a flammable concentration of flammable gases and vapors (from VOCs) is important to the safety of the handling, repackaging and shipping activities. This report provides the basis for determining the flammability of mixtures of flammable gases and vapors. The concentration of a mixture that is at the lowest flammability limit for that mixture is called the action concentration. The action concentration can be determined using total VOC concentrations or actual concentration of each individual VOC. The concentrations of hydrogen and methane are included with the total VOC or individual VOC concentration to determine the action concentration. Concentrations below this point are not flammable. Waste containers with gas/vapor concentrations at or above the action concentration are considered flammable.

  8. Concentric tube support assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubio, Mark F.; Glessner, John C.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly (45) includes a plurality of separate pie-shaped segments (72) forming a disk (70) around a central region (48) for retaining a plurality of tubes (46) in a concentrically spaced apart configuration. Each segment includes a support member (94) radially extending along an upstream face (96) of the segment and a plurality of annularly curved support arms (98) transversely attached to the support member and radially spaced apart from one another away from the central region for receiving respective upstream end portions of the tubes in arc-shaped spaces (100) between the arms. Each segment also includes a radial passageway (102) formed in the support member for receiving a fluid segment portion (106) and a plurality of annular passageways (104) formed in the support arms for receiving respective arm portions (108) of the fluid segment portion from the radial passageway and for conducting the respective arm portions into corresponding annular spaces (47) formed between the tubes retained by the disk.

  9. Simultaneous sweetening and dehydration of natural gas using a mixed solvent solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Jaime Javier

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed solvent solutions of Solvent X in TEG at various concentrations were developed to simultaneously sweeten and dehydrate a wet, sour natural gas stream. An experimental apparatus consisting of a high pressure gas circulation loop and a low...

  10. Gas Storage Act (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any corporation which is engaged in or desires to engage in, the distribution, transportation or storage of natural gas or manufactured gas, which gas, in whole or in part, is intended for ultimate...

  11. Gas Utilities (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter regulates natural gas utilities in the State of New York, and describes standards and procedures for gas meters and accessories, gas quality, line and main extensions, transmission and...

  12. Industrial Gas Turbines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A gas turbine is a heat engine that uses high-temperature, high-pressure gas as the working fluid. Part of the heat supplied by the gas is converted directly into mechanical work. High-temperature,...

  13. Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules regarding the production, sale, and transfer of manufactured gas will also apply to natural gas. This section regulates natural gas utilities that serve ten or more customers, more than one...

  14. Algorithms and analysis for underwater vehicle plume tracing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrne, Raymond Harry; Savage, Elizabeth L. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hurtado, John Edward (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Eskridge, Steven E.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research was to develop and demonstrate cooperative 3-D plume tracing algorithms for miniature autonomous underwater vehicles. Applications for this technology include Lost Asset and Survivor Location Systems (L-SALS) and Ship-in-Port Patrol and Protection (SP3). This research was a joint effort that included Nekton Research, LLC, Sandia National Laboratories, and Texas A&M University. Nekton Research developed the miniature autonomous underwater vehicles while Sandia and Texas A&M developed the 3-D plume tracing algorithms. This report describes the plume tracing algorithm and presents test results from successful underwater testing with pseudo-plume sources.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Nelson; David Green; Paul Box; Raghubir Gupta; Gennar Henningsen

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Regenerable sorbents based on sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) can be used to separate carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal-fired power plant flue gas. Upon thermal regeneration and condensation of water vapor, CO{sub 2} is released in a concentrated form that is suitable for reuse or sequestration. During the research project described in this report, the technical feasibility and economic viability of a thermal-swing CO{sub 2} separation process based on dry, regenerable, carbonate sorbents was confirmed. This process was designated as RTI's Dry Carbonate Process. RTI tested the Dry Carbonate Process through various research phases including thermogravimetric analysis (TGA); bench-scale fixed-bed, bench-scale fluidized-bed, bench-scale co-current downflow reactor testing; pilot-scale entrained-bed testing; and bench-scale demonstration testing with actual coal-fired flue gas. All phases of testing showed the feasibility of the process to capture greater than 90% of the CO{sub 2} present in coal-fired flue gas. Attrition-resistant sorbents were developed, and these sorbents were found to retain their CO{sub 2} removal activity through multiple cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The sodium carbonate-based sorbents developed by RTI react with CO{sub 2} and water vapor at temperatures below 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and/or Wegscheider's salt. This reaction is reversed at temperatures greater than 120 C to release an equimolar mixture of CO{sub 2} and water vapor. After condensation of the water, a pure CO{sub 2} stream can be obtained. TGA testing showed that the Na{sub 2}CO3 sorbents react irreversibly with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and hydrogen chloride (HCl) (at the operating conditions for this process). Trace levels of these contaminants are expected to be present in desulfurized flue gas. The sorbents did not collect detectable quantities of mercury (Hg). A process was designed for the Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-based sorbent that includes a co-current downflow reactor system for adsorption of CO{sub 2} and a steam-heated, hollow-screw conveyor system for regeneration of the sorbent and release of a concentrated CO{sub 2} gas stream. An economic analysis of this process (based on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory's [DOE/NETL's] 'Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines') was carried out. RTI's economic analyses indicate that installation of the Dry Carbonate Process in a 500 MW{sub e} (nominal) power plant could achieve 90% CO{sub 2} removal with an incremental capital cost of about $69 million and an increase in the cost of electricity (COE) of about 1.95 cents per kWh. This represents an increase of roughly 35.4% in the estimated COE - which compares very favorable versus MEA's COE increase of 58%. Both the incremental capital cost and the incremental COE were projected to be less than the comparable costs for an equally efficient CO{sub 2} removal system based on monoethanolamine (MEA).

  16. Preliminary simulations of planned experiments to study the impact of trace gases on the capacity of the Weyburn-Midale field to store carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} stream injecting into the Weyburn-Midale field can be generally classified as a reducing stream with residual H{sub 2}S and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons. The composition of the CO{sub 2} gas stream from the Dakota Gasification Company is reported to be 95% CO{sub 2}, 4% hydrocarbons, and 1% H{sub 2}S by volume (Huxley 2006). In addition to the H{sub 2}S introduced at the injection wells, significant concentrations of H{sub 2}S are thought to have been produced in-situ by sulfate reducing bacteria from previous water floods for enhanced oil production. Produced gas compositions range in H{sub 2}S concentrations from 1 to 6 volume percent. The produced gas, including the trace impurities, is re-injected into the field. Although there is no evidence for inorganic reduction of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} to H{sub 2}S at the Weyburn-Midale field, Sitchler and Kazuba (2009) suggest that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} can be inorganically reduced to elemental sulfur in highly reducing environments based on a natural analog study of the Madison Formation in Wyoming. They propose that elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} dissolve anhydrite to produce the sulfate that is then reduced. Oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams with residual O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} typical of streams captured from oxyfuel and post combustion processes are not presently an issue at the Weyburn-Midale field. However it is possible that the oxidizing CO{sub 2} streams may be injected in the future in carbonate reservoirs similar to the Weyburn-Midale field. To date there are few modeling and experimental studies that have explored the impact of impurity gases in CO{sub 2} streams targeted for geologic storage (Gale 2009). Jacquemet et al (2009) reviewed select geochemical modeling studies that explored the impact of SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S impurities in the waste streams (Gunter et al., 2000, Knauss et al., 2005, Xu et al., 2007). These studies collectively show that SO{sub 2} significantly reduces the pH when oxidized to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} causing enhanced dissolution of carbonate minerals and some sulfate mineral precipitation. Low pH results in higher mineral solubility and faster dissolution rates and is thought to enhance porosity and permeability near the injection well when trace amounts of SO{sub 2} is injected with CO{sub 2}. The impact of H{sub 2}S on storage reservoir performance appears to more subtle. Knauss et al (2005) report no significant impacts of injection of CO{sub 2} gas streams with and without H{sub 2}S (1 M Pascal H{sub 2}S + 8.4 M Pascal CO{sub 2}) in simulations of CO{sub 2} storage in the Frio sandstone formation. Geochemical reactions for H{sub 2}S impurities include enhance field alkalinity and reaction with iron bearing minerals that may delay breakthrough of H{sub 2}S relative to CO{sub 2}. Emberley et al. (2005) report that half of the alkalinity measured at monitoring wells at the Weyburn-Midale field is due to HS{sup -}. Schoonen and Xu (2004) report that H{sub 2}S can be sequestered as pyrite in sandstones and carbonates by dissolving iron hydroxides and iron-bearing clays. Similarly, Gunter et al (2000) propose the that siderite converts to iron sulfides when it is reacted with H{sub 2}S. The geochemical reactions between H{sub 2}S and iron bearing minerals together with the high solubility of H{sub 2}S relative to CO{sub 2} may contribute to the delayed break though of H{sub 2}S in experiments. A few core flood experiments have shown that the injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} into carbonate aquifers has the potential to significantly alter the porosity in the absence of trace gases such as SO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S. Luquot and Gouze (2009) documented a 2% porosity increase in carbonate cores when rock-water interactions were transport limited and solution concentrations were closer to equilibrium and a 4% porosity increase when rock-water interactions were reaction limited and solution compositions were further from equilibrium. Similarly Le Guen et al (2007) used x-ray micro-tomography and geochemistry to show that porosity signific

  17. System and method to determine thermophysical properties of a multi-component gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B.; Behring II, Kendricks A.

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method to characterize natural gas hydrocarbons using a single inferential property, such as standard sound speed, when the concentrations of the diluent gases (e.g., carbon dioxide and nitrogen) are known. The system to determine a thermophysical property of a gas having a first plurality of components comprises a sound velocity measurement device, a concentration measurement device, and a processor to determine a thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the concentration measurements, wherein the number of concentration measurements is less than the number of components in the gas. The method includes the steps of determining the speed of sound in the gas, determining a plurality of gas component concentrations in the gas, and determining the thermophysical property as a function of a correlation between the thermophysical property, the speed of sound, and the plurality of concentrations.

  18. Gas Production Tax (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A tax of 7.5 percent of the market value of natural gas produced in the state of Texas is imposed on every producer of gas.

  19. Natural gas dehydration apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans, Johannes G; Ng, Alvin; Mairal, Anurag P

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and corresponding apparatus for dehydrating gas, especially natural gas. The process includes an absorption step and a membrane pervaporation step to regenerate the liquid sorbent.

  20. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  1. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  2. Historical Natural Gas Annual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  3. ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY AND SCIENCE (TECS) Biological Engineering (BE) Biomedical Engineering (BME) ChemicalENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS, DEGREES AND CONCENTRATIONS DEPARTMENT DEGREE CONCENTRATION (optional) BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING (BAE) BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (BME) CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR

  4. Project Approval Form Concentration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Project Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Undergraduate of Graduation:____________________________ Instructions: Please check one of the following ways in which you Plan to complete the project as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology. Depending upon

  5. Tracing spiral density waves in M81

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kendall; R. C. Kennicutt; C. Clarke; M. D. Thornley

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We use SPITZER IRAC 3.6 and 4.5micron near infrared data from the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey (SINGS), optical B, V and I and 2MASS Ks band data to produce mass surface density maps of M81. The IRAC 3.6 and 4.5micron data, whilst dominated by emission from old stellar populations, is corrected for small-scale contamination by young stars and PAH emission. The I band data are used to produce a mass surface density map by a B-V colour-correction, following the method of Bell and de Jong. We fit a bulge and exponential disc to each mass map, and subtract these components to reveal the non-axisymmetric mass surface density. From the residual mass maps we are able to extract the amplitude and phase of the density wave, using azimuthal profiles. The response of the gas is observed via dust emission in the 8micron IRAC band, allowing a comparison between the phase of the stellar density wave and gas shock. The relationship between this angular offset and radius suggests that the spiral structure is reasonably long lived and allows the position of corotation to be determined.

  6. Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acevedo, Lillian Esther

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lignites and largest individual deposits in Texas occur in the Wilcox group north of the Colorado River; the lowest quality lignite occurs in the Jackson group (2). A comparison between the elemental composition of lignite from the wilcox formation..., Rb, Sc, Th, U, V, Y, Yb, Zn and Zr are positively correlated and B decreases 10 in concentration with increasing levels of ash (15) Combustion. Texas can supply a large portion of its energy needs with its near surface lignite sources (21...

  7. SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION BELOW FREE OVERFALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    SEDIMENT CONCENTRATION BELOW FREE OVERFALL By O. R. Stein,~Associate Member, ASCE, and P. Y. Julien and sediment concentration, which may affect downstream morphology and water quality as well as the structure is to determine relationships between time, scour depth, scour-hole volume, and sediment concentration generated

  8. Modeling of modification experiments involving neutral-gas release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernhardt, P.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many experiments involve the injection of neutral gases into the upper atmosphere. Examples are critical velocity experiments, MHD wave generation, ionospheric hole production, plasma striation formation, and ion tracing. Many of these experiments are discussed in other sessions of the Active Experiments Conference. This paper limits its discussion to: (1) the modeling of the neutral gas dynamics after injection, (2) subsequent formation of ionosphere holes, and (3) use of such holes as experimental tools.

  9. Laboratory measurements and modeling of trace atmospheric species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheehy, Philip M. (Philip Michael)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace species play a major role in many physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere. Improving our understanding of the impact of each species requires a combination of laboratory exper- imentation, field measurements, ...

  10. Sodium storage facility trace heat system design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, D.D.

    1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the SSF PLC Ladder Logic, Cross references, and the software that was used to control the amount of power applied to the SSF Trace Heated components.

  11. Affine braids, Markov traces and the category O Rosa Orellana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ram, Arun

    , affine BMW algebras, cyclotomic BMW algebras, Markov traces, Jacobi-Trudi type identities, dual pairs [Ze of affine braid groups of type A, (d) We define the affine BMW algebra (Birman-Murakami-Wenzl) and show

  12. The Fidelity and Trace Norm Distances for Quantifying Coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lian-He Shao; Zhengjun Xi; Heng Fan; Yongming Li

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the coherence measures induced by fidelity and trace norm, based on the recent proposed coherence quantification in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401, 2014]. We show that the fidelity of coherence does not in general satisfy the monotonicity requirement as a measure of coherence under the subselection of measurements condition. We find that the trace norm of coherence can act as a measure of coherence for qubit case and some special class of qutrits.

  13. Solar Coronal Structures and Stray Light in TRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. DeForest; P. C. H. Martens; M. J. Wills-Davey

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the 2004 Venus transit of the Sun to constrain a semi-empirical point-spread function for the TRACE EUV solar telescope, we have measured the effect of stray light in that telescope. We find that 43% of 171A EUV light that enters TRACE is scattered, either through diffraction off the entrance filter grid or through other nonspecular effects. We carry this result forward, via known-PSF deconvolution of TRACE images, to identify its effect on analysis of TRACE data. Known-PSF deconvolution by this derived PSF greatly reduces the effect of visible haze in the TRACE 171A images, enhances bright features, and reveals that the smooth background component of the corona is considerably less bright (and hence much more rarefied) than commonly supposed. Deconvolution reveals that some prior conlclusions about the Sun appear to have been based on stray light in the images. In particular, the diffuse background "quiet corona" becomes consistent with hydrostatic support of the coronal plasma; feature contrast is greatly increased, possibly affecting derived parameters such as the form of the coronal heating function; and essentially all existing differential emission measure studies of small features appear to be affected by contamination from nearby features. We speculate on further implications of stray light for interpretation of EUV images from TRACE and similar instruments, and advocate deconvolution as a standard tool for image analysis with future instruments such as SDO/AIA.

  14. Gas Feedback on Stellar Bar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingo Berentzen; Isaac Shlosman; Inma Martinez-Valpuesta; Clayton Heller

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze evolution of live disk-halo systems in the presence of various gas fractions, f_gas less than 8% in the disk. We addressed the issue of angular momentum (J) transfer from the gas to the bar and its effect on the bar evolution. We find that the weakening of the bar, reported in the literature, is not related to the J-exchange with the gas, but is caused by the vertical buckling instability in the gas-poor disks and by a steep heating of a stellar velocity dispersion by the central mass concentration (CMC) in the gas-rich disks. The gas has a profound effect on the onset of the buckling -- larger f_gas brings it forth due to the more massive CMCs. The former process leads to the well-known formation of the peanut-shaped bulges, while the latter results in the formation of progressively more elliptical bulges, for larger f_gas. The subsequent (secular) evolution of the bar differs -- the gas-poor models exhibit a growing bar while gas-rich models show a declining bar whose vertical swelling is driven by a secular resonance heating. The border line between the gas-poor and -rich models lies at f_gas ~ 3% in our models, but is model-dependent and will be affected by additional processes, like star formation and feedback from stellar evolution. The overall effect of the gas on the evolution of the bar is not in a direct J transfer to the stars, but in the loss of J by the gas and its influx to the center that increases the CMC. The more massive CMC damps the vertical buckling instability and depopulates orbits responsible for the appearance of peanut-shaped bulges. The action of resonant and non-resonant processes in gas-poor and gas-rich disks leads to a converging evolution in the vertical extent of the bar and its stellar dispersion velocities, and to a diverging evolution in the bulge properties.

  15. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J. (Edgemere, MD); Wozniak, John J. (Columbia, MD)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  16. OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

  17. Noble gas magnetic resonator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

  18. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fuels (eg diesel, compressed natural gas). Electricity (infossil fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied

  19. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization. Quarterly report, January 1, 1997--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the quarterly report dated January 1-March 31, 1997 for the Naturally Fractured Tight Gas Reservoir Detection Optimization project. Topics covered in this report include AVOA modeling using paraxial ray tracing, AVOA modeling for gas- and water-filled fractures, 3-D and 3-C processing, and technology transfer material. Several presentations from a Geophysical Applications Workshop workbook, workshop schedule, and list of workshop attendees are also included.

  20. Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ..........................................51 6 Water Fracture Fluid Description ..............................................................56 7 Gel Fracture Fluid Description ..................................................................56 8 Proppant Description... Based on Proppant Concentration ........................66 24 Cumulative Frequency Distribution for 3-Year Cumulative Gas Production for Both Groups and Both Treatments (Carthage...

  1. High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakir, Dan

    High precision measurements of atmospheric concentrations and plant exchange rates of carbonyl K I R * *Environmental Sciences and Energy Research, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot. The results were consistent with those of nononline gas chromatography­mass spectrometry for COS and IR gas

  2. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the Natural Gas Monthly features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information.

  3. Effect of Sawtooth Activity on Tritium and Beam Deuterium Evolution in Trace Tritium Experiments on JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effect of Sawtooth Activity on Tritium and Beam Deuterium Evolution in Trace Tritium Experiments on JET

  4. New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Safety and Technical Challenges and Operational Experience on the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

  5. The evaluation of waterfrac technology in low-permeability gas sands in the East Texas basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tschirhart, Nicholas Ray

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The petroleum engineering literature clearly shows that large proppant volumes and concentrations are required to effectively stimulate low-permeability gas sands. To pump large proppant concentrations, one must use a viscous fluid. However, many...

  6. Chemical Potential Jump during Evaporation of a Quantum Bose Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Bedrikova; A. V. Latyshev

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of the chemical potential jump coefficient on the evaporation coefficient is analyzed for the case in which the evaporating component is a Bose gas. The concentration of the evaporating component is assumed to be much lower than the concentration of the carrier gas. The expression for the chemical potential jump is derived from the analytic solution of the problem for the case in which the collision frequency of molecules of the evaporating component is constant.

  7. Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romalis, Mike

    Hybrid Optical Pumping of Optically Dense Alkali-Metal Vapor without Quenching Gas M. V. Romalis; published 7 December 2010) Optical pumping of an optically thick atomic vapor typically requires a quenching the atoms. We show that optical pumping of a trace contamination of Rb present in K metal results in a 4

  8. PARKS, RECREATION & TOURISM Concentration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    PARKS, RECREATION & TOURISM Concentration in Conservation Law Enforcement School Experience in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism 1 Semester 5 Semester 6 SFR 434/534 - Recreation Site Planning

  9. Concentrated solar power on demand .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel Shawn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten (more)

  10. Chemical composition and some trace element contents in coals and coal ash from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje Coal Field, Serbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vukasinovic-Pesic, V.; Rajakovic, L.J. [University of Montenegro, Podgorica (Montenegro)

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemical compositions and trace element contents (Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd, As, B, Hg, Sr, Se, Be, Ba, Mn, Th, V, U) in coal and coal ash samples from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje coal field in Serbia were studied. The coal from this field belongs to lignite. This high volatility coal has high moisture and low S contents, moderate ash yield, and high calorific value. The coal ash is abundant in alumosilicates. Many trace elements such as Ni > Cd > Cr > B > As > Cu > Co > Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal and Ni > Cr > As > B > Cu > Co = Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal ash are enriched in comparison with Clarke concentrations.

  11. Model for trace metal exposure in filter-feeding flamingos at alkaline Rift Valley Lake, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Y.M.; DiSante, C.J.; Lion, L.W. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Thampy, R.J.; Raini, J.A. [Worldwide Fund for Nature, Nakuru (Kenya). Lake Nakuru Conservation and Development Project; Motelin, G.K. [Egerton Univ., Njoro (Kenya). Dept. of Animal Health

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxic trace metals have been implicated as a potential cause of recent flamingo kills at Lake Nakuru, Kenya. Chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) have accumulated in the lake sediments as a result of unregulated discharges and because this alkaline lake has no natural outlet. Lesser flamingos (Phoeniconaias minor) at Lake Nakuru feed predominantly on the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis, and because of their filter-feeding mechanism, they are susceptible to exposure to particle-bound metals. Trace metal adsorption isotherms to lake sediments and S. platensis were obtained under simulated lake conditions, and a mathematical model was developed to predict metal exposure via filter feeding based on predicted trace metal phase distribution. Metal adsorption to suspended solids followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cr > Cu, and isotherms were linear up to 60 {micro}g/L. Adsorption to S. platensis cells followed the trend Pb {much_gt} Zn > Cu > Cr and fit Langmuir isotherms for Cr, Cu and Zn and a linear isotherm for Pb. Predicted phase distributions indicated that Cr and Pb in Lake Nakuru are predominantly associated with suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn are distributed more evenly between the dissolved phase and particulate phases of both S. platensis and suspended solids. Based on established flamingo feeding rates and particle size selection, predicted Cr and Pb exposure occurs predominantly through ingestion of suspended solids, whereas Cu and Zn exposure occurs through ingestion of both suspended solids and S. platensis. For the lake conditions at the time of sampling, predicted ingestion rates based on measured metal concentrations in lake suspended solids were 0.71, 6.2, 0.81, and 13 mg/kg-d for Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn, respectively.

  12. ADVANCED HOT GAS FILTER DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew R. June; John L. Hurley; Mark W. Johnson

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron aluminide hot gas filters have been developed using powder metallurgy techniques to form seamless cylinders. Three alloys were short-term corrosion tested in simulated IGCC atmospheres with temperatures between 925 F and 1200 F with hydrogen sulfide concentrations ranging from 783 ppm{sub v} to 78,300 ppm{sub v}. Long-term testing was conducted for 1500 hours at 925 F with 78,300 ppm{sub v}. The FAS and FAL alloys were found to be corrosion resistant in the simulated environments. The FAS alloy has been commercialized.

  13. Process for concentrated biomass saccharification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hennessey, Susan M. (Avondale, PA); Seapan, Mayis (Landenberg, PA); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO)

    2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes for saccharification of pretreated biomass to obtain high concentrations of fermentable sugars are provided. Specifically, a process was developed that uses a fed batch approach with particle size reduction to provide a high dry weight of biomass content enzymatic saccharification reaction, which produces a high sugars concentration hydrolysate, using a low cost reactor system.

  14. Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Declaration of Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Undergraduate Records:____________________________ Instructions: ENG students declaring a Concentration in Nanotechnology should complete this form, obtain REQUIRED COURSES (Choose 1) 1. ENG EC 481­ Fundamentals of Nanomaterials and Nanotechnology 4.0 ELECTIVES

  15. Traceable measurements of the activity concentration in air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul, A; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Mller, A; Marcos, A

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear reactions induced by high energetic protons in heavy targets such as UC/sub 2/ and ThC cause a particular, complex radiation protection task at facilities like ISOLDE: the measurement of a mixture of different isotopes of the radioactive noble gas radon and the radon progenies in air. The knowledge of their respective activity concentration is fundamental for exposure assessments. Due to the complex mixture of activity concentrations in air, its precise determination is quite difficult. Therefore, a new procedure for taking reference samples was developed and implemented for the traceable measurement of the activity concentration of radioactive ions (e.g., radon progenies) in air. This technique is combined by measuring alpha -particles with a multi-wire ionization chamber for the parallel on-line determination of the activity concentration of different radon isotopes. (10 refs).

  16. Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports...

  17. Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V. [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand). Faculty of Science

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

  18. AN OVERVIEW OF TOOL FOR RESPONSE ACTION COST ESTIMATING (TRACE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FERRIES SR; KLINK KL; OSTAPKOWICZ B

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tools and techniques that provide improved performance and reduced costs are important to government programs, particularly in current times. An opportunity for improvement was identified for preparation of cost estimates used to support the evaluation of response action alternatives. As a result, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company has developed Tool for Response Action Cost Estimating (TRACE). TRACE is a multi-page Microsoft Excel{reg_sign} workbook developed to introduce efficiencies into the timely and consistent production of cost estimates for response action alternatives. This tool combines costs derived from extensive site-specific runs of commercially available remediation cost models with site-specific and estimator-researched and derived costs, providing the best estimating sources available. TRACE also provides for common quantity and key parameter links across multiple alternatives, maximizing ease of updating estimates and performing sensitivity analyses, and ensuring consistency.

  19. Enhanced membrane gas separations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, R.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved membrane gas separation process is described comprising: (a) passing a feed gas stream to the non-permeate side of a membrane system adapted for the passage of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, and for the passage of the feed gas stream in a counter current flow pattern relative to the flow of purge gas on the permeate side thereof, said membrane system being capable of selectively permeating a fast permeating component from said feed gas, at a feed gas pressure at or above atmospheric pressure; (b) passing purge gas to the permeate side of the membrane system in counter current flow to the flow of said feed gas stream in order to facilitate carrying away of said fast permeating component from the surface of the membrane and maintaining the driving force for removal of the fast permeating component through the membrane from the feed gas stream, said permeate side of the membrane being maintained at a subatmospheric pressure within the range of from about 0.1 to about 5 psia by vacuum pump means; (c) recovering a product gas stream from the non-permeate side of the membrane; and (d) discharging purge gas and the fast permeating component that has permeated the membrane from the permeate side of the membrane, whereby the vacuum conditions maintained on the permeate side of the membrane by said vacuum pump means enhance the efficiency of the gas separation operation, thereby reducing the overall energy requirements thereof.

  20. Imaging Molecular Gas in the Luminous Merger NGC 3256 : Detection of High-Velocity Gas and Twin Gas Peaks in the Double Nucleus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazushi Sakamoto; Paul T. P. Ho; Alison B. Peck

    2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular gas in the merging starburst galaxy NGC 3256 has been imaged with the Submillimeter Array at a resolution of 1'' x 2'' (170 x 340 pc at 35 Mpc). This is the first interferometric imaging of molecular gas in the most luminous galaxy within z=0.01. There is a large disk of molecular gas (r > 3 kpc) in the center of the merger with a strong gas concentration toward the double nucleus. The gas disk having a mass of ~3*10^9 Msun in the central 3 kpc rotates around a point between the two nuclei that are 850 pc apart on the sky. The molecular gas is warm and turbulent and shows spatial variation of the intensity ratio between CO isotopomers. High-velocity molecular gas is discovered at the galactic center. Its velocity in our line of sight is up to 420 km/s offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy; the terminal velocity is twice as large as that due to the rotation of the main gas disk. The high-velocity gas is most likely due to a molecular outflow from the gas disk, entrained by the starburst-driven superwind in the galaxy. The molecular outflow is estimated to have a rate of ~10 Msun/yr and to play a significant role in the dispersal or depletion of molecular gas from the galactic center. A compact gas concentration and steep velocity gradient are also found around each of the twin nuclei. They are suggestive of a small gas disk rotating around each nucleus. If these are indeed mini-disks, their dynamical masses are ~10^9 Msun within a radius of 170 pc.

  1. Natural gas fueling of a Catepillar 3406 diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, G.E.; Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a Caterpillar 3406 turbocharged diesel engine which was converted to operate in a natural gas with diesel pilot ignition mode and was evaluated for performance and emission characteristics for both diesel and natural gas operation. Full-load power was achieved with natural gas fueling without knock. Similar fuel efficiencies were obtained with natural gas fueling at high loads, but efficiencies were lower for low loads. Bosch smoke numbers were reduced by over 50 percent with natural gas fueling for all cases investigated. NO[sub x] emissions were found to be lower at low loads and at high speeds under high load. CO emissions were significantly increased for natural gas fueling while CO[sub 2] concentrations in the exhaust were reduced for natural gas fueling.

  2. Inferential determination of various properties of a gas mixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrow, Thomas B. (San Antonio, TX); Behring, II, Kendricks A. (Torrance, CA)

    2007-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for inferentially determining various properties of a gas mixture, when the speed of sound in the gas is known at an arbitrary temperature and pressure. The method can be applied to natural gas mixtures, where the known parameters are the sound speed, temperature, pressure, and concentrations of any dilute components of the gas. The method uses a set of reference gases and their calculated density and speed of sound values to estimate the density of the subject gas. Additional calculations can be made to estimate the molecular weight of the subject gas, which can then be used as the basis for heating value calculations. The method may also be applied to inferentially determine density and molecular weight for gas mixtures other than natural gases.

  3. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  4. LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    LONG-TERM DETERMINATION OF AIRBORNE RADON PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS USING LR 115 DETECTORS dose in the lung is mainly due to short-lived radon progeny, i.e. 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi and 214 Po, but not the radon (222 Rn) gas itself. Accordingly, long-term measure- ments of the concentrations of radon progeny

  5. Gas separation using ultrasound and light absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for separating a chosen gas from a mixture of gases having no moving parts and utilizing no chemical processing is described. The separation of particulates from fluid carriers thereof has been observed using ultrasound. In a similar manner, molecular species may be separated from carrier species. It is also known that light-induced drift may separate light-absorbing species from carrier species. Therefore, the combination of temporally pulsed absorption of light with ultrasonic concentration is expected to significantly increase the efficiency of separation by ultrasonic concentration alone. Additionally, breaking the spatial symmetry of a cylindrical acoustic concentrator decreases the spatial distribution of the concentrated particles, and increases the concentration efficiency.

  6. Natural Gas & Local Governments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    -trailers New business ventures Frac services Water hauling Brine water remediation Pipeline Group #12;2. Sublette County, Wyoming Largest gas-producing county in Wyoming (44% of states gas

  7. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph (.mu.GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode.

  8. Microminiature gas chromatograph

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, C.M.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A microminiature gas chromatograph ({mu}GC) comprising a least one silicon wafer, a gas injector, a column, and a detector. The gas injector has a normally closed valve for introducing a mobile phase including a sample gas in a carrier gas. The valve is fully disposed in the silicon wafer(s). The column is a microcapillary in silicon crystal with a stationary phase and is mechanically connected to receive the mobile phase from the gas injector for the molecular separation of compounds in the sample gas. The detector is mechanically connected to the column for the analysis of the separated compounds of sample gas with electronic means, e.g., ion cell, field emitter and PIN diode. 7 figs.

  9. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, J.F.

    1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

  10. Recirculating rotary gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

  11. Oil and Gas Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tingley, Joseph V.

    Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal Exploration Development Mining Processing Nevada, oil and gas, and geothermal activities and accomplishments in Nevada: production statistics, exploration and development including drilling for petroleum and geothermal resources, discoveries of ore

  12. Gas and Oil (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of the Environment has the authority to enact regulations pertaining to oil and gas production, but it cannot prorate or limit the output of any gas or oil well. A permit from the...

  13. Natural gas annual 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

  14. Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Purchased Gas Adjustment Rules are implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority). Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA) Rules are intended to permit the company/LDC (local gas...

  15. COMPUTATIONAL OPTIMIZATION OF GAS COMPRESSOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 26, 2015 ... When considering cost-optimal operation of gas transport net- works ..... The four most frequently used drive types are gas turbines, gas driven.

  16. Residual gas analysis device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thornberg, Steven M. (Peralta, NM)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  17. Natural gas annual 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  18. Natural gas annual 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  19. Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Reaction and Transformation of Hg and Trace Metals in Combustion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Helble; Clara Smith; David Miller

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project was to produce a working dynamic model to predict the transformation and partitioning of trace metals resulting from combustion of a broad range of fuels. The information provided from this model will be instrumental in efforts to identify fuels and conditions that can be varied to reduce metal emissions. Through the course of this project, it was determined that mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As) would be the focus of the experimental investigation. Experiments were therefore conducted to examine homogeneous and heterogeneous mercury oxidation pathways, and to assess potential interactions between arsenic and calcium. As described in this report, results indicated that the role of SO{sub 2} on Hg oxidation was complex and depended upon overall gas phase chemistry, that iron oxide (hematite) particles contributed directly to heterogeneous Hg oxidation, and that As-Ca interactions occurred through both gas-solid and within-char reaction pathways. Modeling based on this study indicated that, depending upon coal type and fly ash particle size, vaporization-condensation, vaporization-surface reaction, and As-CaO in-char reaction all play a role in arsenic transformations under combustion conditions.

  20. Gas Cylinders: Proper Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    Compressed Gas Cylinders: Proper Management And Use Published by the Office of Environment, Health;1 Introduction University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) departments that use compressed gas cylinders (MSDS) and your department's Job Safety Analyses (JSAs). Talk to your gas supplier about hands

  1. Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

  2. Static gas expansion cooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guzek, J.C.; Lujan, R.A.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a cooler for television cameras and other temperature sensitive equipment. The cooler uses compressed gas ehich is accelerated to a high velocity by passing it through flow passageways having nozzle portions which expand the gas. This acceleration and expansion causes the gas to undergo a decrease in temperature thereby cooling the cooler body and adjacent temperature sensitive equipment.

  3. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, C.A.; Rurbage, C.H.

    1982-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is pneumatically operated valve assembly for simulatenously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two on the lines so closed. The value assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  4. Concentrated Thermoelectric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Concentrated Thermoelectric Power This fact sheet describes a concentrated solar hydroelectric power project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D...

  5. Design of inflatable solar concentrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrasquillo, Omar (Omar Y. Carrasquillo De Armas)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar concentrators improve the performance of solar collection systems by increasing the amount of usable energy available for a given collector size. Unfortunately, they are not known for their light weight and portability, ...

  6. Optimal concentrations in nectar feeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Wonjung

    Nectar drinkers must feed quickly and efficiently due to the threat of predation. While the sweetest nectar offers the greatest energetic rewards, the sharp increase of viscosity with sugar concentration makes it the most ...

  7. Concentrated solar power on demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel Shawn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes a new concentrating solar power central receiver system with integral thermal storage. Hillside mounted heliostats direct sunlight into a volumetric absorption molten salt pool, which also functions ...

  8. Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Doug

    Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade control, cogeneration, gas turbine, model based control, feed forward, cascade ABSTRACT Presented is a model based strategy for controlling the NOX concentration of natural gas turbine emissions

  9. Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combined-cycle solarised gas turbine with steam, organic and CO2 bottoming cycles John Pye, Keith of the technical feasibility a solarised combined-cycle gas turbines with a dish concentrator, with several, optimised for the new SG4 collector. This study aims to determine whether a combined-cycle gas turbine (CCGT

  10. Gas separations using ceramic membranes. Final report, September 1988--February 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, C.L.; Wu, J.C.S.; Gallaher, G.R.; Smith, G.W.; Flowers, D.L.; Gerdes, T.E.; Liu, P.K.T.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study covers a comprehensive evaluation of existing ceramic membranes for high temperature gas separations. Methodology has been established for microporous characterization stability and gas separation efficiency. A mathematical model was developed to predict gas separations with existing membranes. Silica and zeolitic modifications of existing membranes were pursued to enhance its separation efficiency. Some of which demonstrate unique separations properties. Use of the dense-silica membranes for hydrogen enrichment was identified as a promising candidate for future development. In addition, the decomposition of trace ammonia contaminant via a catalytic membrane reactor appears feasible. A further economic analysis is required to assess its commercial viability.

  11. Trace species detection: Spectroscopy and molecular energy transfer at high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring the concentration of trace species such as atomic and molecular free radicals is essential in forming predictive models of combustion processes. LIF-based techniques have the necessary sensitivity for concentration and temperature measurements but have limited accuracy due to collisional quenching in combustion applications. The goal of this program is to use spectroscopic and kinetic measurements to quantify nonradiative and collisional effects on LIF signals and to develop new background-free alternatives to LIF. The authors have measured the natural linewidth of several OH A-X (3,0) rotational transitions to determine predissociation lifetimes in the upper state, which were presumed to be short compared to quenching lifetimes, and as a result, quantitative predictions about the applicability of predissociation fluorescence methods at high pressures are made. The authors are investigating collisional energy transfer in the A-state of NO. Quenching rates which enable direct corrections to NO LIF quantum yields at high temperature were calculations. These quenching rates are now being used in studies of turbulence/chemistry interactions. The authors have measured the electric dipole moment {mu} of excited-state NO using Stark quantum-beat spectroscopy. {mu} is an essential input to a harpoon model which predicts quenching efficiencies for NO (A) by a variety of combustion-related species. The authors are developing new coherent multiphoton techniques for measurements of atomic hydrogen concentration in laboratory flames to avoid the quenching problems associated with previous multiphoton LIF schemes.

  12. Auto-Generation of Communication Benchmark Traces Vivek Deshpande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    Auto-Generation of Communication Benchmark Traces Vivek Deshpande North Carolina State University.edu Frank Mueller North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC, USA mueller@cs.ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Benchmarks creation is a tedious manual process. As a result, benchmarks tend to lag behind the development of complex

  13. GROUP TESTING MEETS TRAITOR TRACING Peter Meerwald and Teddy Furon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the restriction of M to K. Many papers have proposed bounds on the minimal num- ber of tests or practical designs noise (q is the false positive test probability) [2]. Sejdinovic and Johnson recently considered bothGROUP TESTING MEETS TRAITOR TRACING Peter Meerwald and Teddy Furon INRIA Rennes Bretagne Atlantique

  14. PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

  15. ANIMAL TRACING: BENEFITS IN CATTLE INDUSTRY AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES The economic implications of foreign animal diseases and their mitigation options haveANIMAL TRACING: BENEFITS IN CATTLE INDUSTRY AND PRIVATE INCENTIVES LEVAN ELBAKIDZE Assistant Research Professor Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX, 77843

  16. Execution Trace-Driven Automated Attack Signature Generation Susanta Nanda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiueh, Tzi-cker

    Execution Trace-Driven Automated Attack Signature Generation Susanta Nanda Symantec Research Labs In its most general form, an attack signature is a program that can correctly determine if an input network packet se- quence can successfully attack a protected network appli- cation. Filter rules used

  17. Age of Neoproterozoic Bilatarian Body and Trace Fossils, White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Age of Neoproterozoic Bilatarian Body and Trace Fossils, White Sea, Russia: Implications-bearing, shallow marine siliciclastic rocks in the Zimnie Gory section of the White Sea region indicates Ranges, South Australia (18); in the Poleta Formation in the White-Inyo Mountains and Upper Wood Canyon

  18. Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirth, Thierry

    Traces of Human Migrations in Helicobacter pylori Populations Daniel Falush,1 Thierry Wirth,1 Bodo Reichard,1 Elena Katzowitsch,8 Xiaoyan Wang,1 Mark Achtman,1 * Sebastian Suerbaum8 Helicobacter pylori tuberculosis (2), Haemophilus influenzae (3), and Helicobac- ter pylori (4­8). H. pylori, a Gram

  19. Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genaud, Stéphane

    1 Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing in a Global Earth Model Marc Grunberg * , Stéphane Genaud of the Earth interior, and seismic tomogra- phy is a means to improve knowledge in this #28;eld. In order present in this paper the de- sign of a software program implement- ing a fast seismic ray

  20. Interactive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo

    projects dealing with entire cars, ships, buildings, and processing plants. The complexity of such modelsInteractive Distributed Ray Tracing of Highly Complex Models Ingo Wald, Philipp Slusallek, Carsten- ulation of huge and complex 3D environments. Examples include large structural and mechanical engineering

  1. From transformation traces to transformation rules: Assisting Model Driven Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From transformation traces to transformation rules: Assisting Model Driven Engineering approach. In this paper we are interested in semi-automatically gen- erating labelled graph (model) transformations conform to a particu- lar syntax (meta-model). Those transformations are basic operations in model driven

  2. Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

  3. Welcome FUPWG- Natural Gas Overview

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentationgiven at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) Fall 2008 meetingprovides an overview of natural gas, including emissions, compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, and landfill gas supplement for natural gas system.

  4. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, Kwan H. (Lisle, IL); Ahluwalia, Rajesh K. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for removing sulfur oxide from combustion gas to form Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 and for reducing the harmful effects of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 on auxiliary heat exchangers in which a sodium compound is injected into the hot combustion gas forming liquid Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 in a gas-gas reaction and the resultant gas containing Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 is cooled to below about 1150.degree. K. to form particles of Na.sub.2 SO.sub.4 prior to contact with at least one heat exchanger with the cooling being provided by the recycling of combustion gas from a cooled zone downstream from the introduction of the cooling gas.

  5. Gas Hydrate Storage of Natural Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudy Rogers; John Etheridge

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental and economic benefits could accrue from a safe, above-ground, natural-gas storage process allowing electric power plants to utilize natural gas for peak load demands; numerous other applications of a gas storage process exist. A laboratory study conducted in 1999 to determine the feasibility of a gas-hydrates storage process looked promising. The subsequent scale-up of the process was designed to preserve important features of the laboratory apparatus: (1) symmetry of hydrate accumulation, (2) favorable surface area to volume ratio, (3) heat exchanger surfaces serving as hydrate adsorption surfaces, (4) refrigeration system to remove heat liberated from bulk hydrate formation, (5) rapid hydrate formation in a non-stirred system, (6) hydrate self-packing, and (7) heat-exchanger/adsorption plates serving dual purposes to add or extract energy for hydrate formation or decomposition. The hydrate formation/storage/decomposition Proof-of-Concept (POC) pressure vessel and supporting equipment were designed, constructed, and tested. This final report details the design of the scaled POC gas-hydrate storage process, some comments on its fabrication and installation, checkout of the equipment, procedures for conducting the experimental tests, and the test results. The design, construction, and installation of the equipment were on budget target, as was the tests that were subsequently conducted. The budget proposed was met. The primary goal of storing 5000-scf of natural gas in the gas hydrates was exceeded in the final test, as 5289-scf of gas storage was achieved in 54.33 hours. After this 54.33-hour period, as pressure in the formation vessel declined, additional gas went into the hydrates until equilibrium pressure/temperature was reached, so that ultimately more than the 5289-scf storage was achieved. The time required to store the 5000-scf (48.1 hours of operating time) was longer than designed. The lower gas hydrate formation rate is attributed to a lower heat transfer rate in the internal heat exchanger than was designed. It is believed that the fins on the heat-exchanger tubes did not make proper contact with the tubes transporting the chilled glycol, and pairs of fins were too close for interior areas of fins to serve as hydrate collection sites. A correction of the fabrication fault in the heat exchanger fin attachments could be easily made to provide faster formation rates. The storage success with the POC process provides valuable information for making the process an economically viable process for safe, aboveground natural-gas storage.

  6. Gas turbine alternative fuels combustion characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollbuhler, R.J.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain combustion performance and exhaust pollutant concentrations for specific synthetic hydrocarbon fuels. Baseline comparison fuels used were gasoline and diesel fuel number two. Testing was done over a range of fuel to air mass ratios, total mass flow rates, and input combustion air temperatures in a flame-tube-type gas turbine combustor. Test results were obtained in terms of released heat and combustion gas emission values. The results were comparable to those obtained with the base fuels with variations being obtained with changing operating conditions. The release of carbon particles during the tests was minimal. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Evaluating impacts of CO2 gas intrusion into a confined sandstone aquifer: Experimental results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Shao, Hongbo; Wang, Guohui; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate potential risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Sediments from the High Plains aquifer in Kansas, United States, were used in this investigation, which is part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership Program sponsored by the US Department of Energy. This aquifer was selected to be representative of consolidated sand and gravel/sandstone aquifers overlying potential CO2 sequestration repositories within the continental US. In this paper, we present results from batch experiments conducted at room temperature and atmospheric pressure with four High Plains aquifer sediments. Batch experiments simulate sudden, fast, and short-lived releases of the CO2 gas as would occur in the case of well failure during injection. Time-dependent release of major, minor, and trace elements were determined by analyzing the contacting solutions. Characterization studies demonstrated that the High Plains aquifer sediments were abundant in quartz and feldspars, and contained about 15 to 20 wt% montmorillonite and up to 5 wt% micas. Some of the High Plains aquifer sediments contained no calcite, while others had up to about 7 wt% calcite. The strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the High Plains aquifer sediments had appreciable amounts of As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which potentially may be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. However, the results from the batch experiments showed that the High Plains sediments mobilized only low concentrations of trace elements (potential contaminants), which were detected occasionally in the aqueous phase during these experiments. Importantly, these occurrences were more frequent in the calcite-free sediment. Results from these investigations provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological CO2 storage and sequestration.

  8. Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced Projects Offering Low LCOE Opportunities Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced...

  9. Zevenhoven & Kilpinen TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    air pollutants), "known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects" (see also, in part stemming from anthropogenic sources, i.e. pollution. In wastes and waste-derived fuels the "trace to fouling of turbine blades (mainly Ca)or pollute or poison catalysts (mainly As) or sorbents downstream

  10. Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Brenda

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic (more)

  11. Carbon sequestration in natural gas reservoirs: Enhanced gas recovery and natural gas storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas reservoirs for carbon sequestration and enhanced gasproduction and carbon sequestration, Society of Petroleumfeasibiilty of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas

  12. Flue gas desulfurization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Im, K.H.; Ahluwalia, R.K.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves a combustion process in which combustion gas containing sulfur oxide is directed past a series of heat exchangers to a stack and in which a sodium compound is added to the combustion gas in a temparature zone of above about 1400 K to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Preferably, the temperature is above about 1800 K and the sodium compound is present as a vapor to provide a gas-gas reaction to form Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as a liquid. Since liquid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ may cause fouling of heat exchanger surfaces downstream from the combustion zone, the process advantageously includes the step of injecting a cooling gas downstream of the injection of the sodium compound yet upstream of one or more heat exchangers to cool the combustion gas to below about 1150 K and form solid Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. The cooling gas is preferably a portion of the combustion gas downstream which may be recycled for cooling. It is further advantageous to utilize an electrostatic precipitator downstream of the heat exchangers to recover the Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. It is also advantageous in the process to remove a portion of the combustion gas cleaned in the electrostatic precipitator and recycle that portion upstream to use as the cooling gas. 3 figures.

  13. Trace Reduction for Virtual Memory Simulations Scott F. Kaplan, Yannis Smaragdakis, and Paul R. Wilson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smaragdakis, Yannis

    Trace Reduction for Virtual Memory Simulations Scott F. Kaplan, Yannis Smaragdakis, and Paul R reduction. Neither requires that the simulator be modi ed to accept the reduced trace. This research

  14. Combining sedimentological, trace metal (Mn, Mo) and molecular evidence for reconstructing past water-column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Combining sedimentological, trace metal (Mn, Mo) and molecular evidence for reconstructing past online 22 June 2013 Abstract Here, we present sedimentological, trace metal, and molecular evidence underscores the value of combining sedimentological, geochemical, and microbiological approaches

  15. Molecular Gas in Early-type Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alatalo, Katherine Anne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and trace the same underlying interstellar medium. The Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy ATLAS

  16. External combustor for gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Santanam, Chandran B. (Indianapolis, IN); Thomas, William H. (Indianapolis, IN); DeJulio, Emil R. (Columbus, IN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An external combustor for a gas turbine engine has a cyclonic combustion chamber into which combustible gas with entrained solids is introduced through an inlet port in a primary spiral swirl. A metal draft sleeve for conducting a hot gas discharge stream from the cyclonic combustion chamber is mounted on a circular end wall of the latter adjacent the combustible gas inlet. The draft sleeve is mounted concentrically in a cylindrical passage and cooperates with the passage in defining an annulus around the draft sleeve which is open to the cyclonic combustion chamber and which is connected to a source of secondary air. Secondary air issues from the annulus into the cyclonic combustion chamber at a velocity of three to five times the velocity of the combustible gas at the inlet port. The secondary air defines a hollow cylindrical extension of the draft sleeve and persists in the cyclonic combustion chamber a distance of about three to five times the diameter of the draft sleeve. The hollow cylindrical extension shields the drive sleeve from the inlet port to prevent discharge of combustible gas through the draft sleeve.

  17. Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    From towers to dishes to linear mirrors to troughs, concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies reflect and collect solar heat to generate electricity. A single CSP plant can generate enough power for about 90,000 homes. This video explains what CSP is, how it works, and how systems like parabolic troughs produce renewable power. For more information on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's CSP research, see the Solar Energy Technology Program's Concentrating Solar Power Web page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/csp_program.html.

  18. Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From towers to dishes to linear mirrors to troughs, concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies reflect and collect solar heat to generate electricity. A single CSP plant can generate enough power for about 90,000 homes. This video explains what CSP is, how it works, and how systems like parabolic troughs produce renewable power. For more information on the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's CSP research, see the Solar Energy Technology Program's Concentrating Solar Power Web page at http://www1.eere.energy.gov/solar/csp_program.html.

  19. Hydrodynamics and flue gas desulfurization characteristics of a three-phase, gas-continuous, cocurrent semifluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaver, L.E.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrodynamic characteristics of a gas-liquid-solid, gas-continuous, cocurrent semifluidized bed were defined. Five different particle types were used to characterize the hydrodynamics. Air and water were used as the gas and liquid streams, respectively. Six flow regimes were observed in the constrained gas-continuous, three-phase bed. These regimes are described in terms of the solids properties and the gas and liquid superficial velocities. The heights of the packed and fluidized beds and the solids holdup in the fluidized section of the semifluidized bed are discussed in terms of the superficial gas and liquid velocities, the solids density and diameter and the initial quantity of particles in the bed. The desulfurization characteristics of the gas-liquid-solid semifluidized bed were determined using a calcium carbonate slurry. Gas side mass transfer coefficients and the ratio of liquid side to gas side mass transfer coefficients were measured and correlated in terms of gas flow rate, liquid flow rate, bed height, calcium carbonate concentration and sulfur dioxide pressure for both the fluidized and packed sections of the semifluidized bed. The hydrodynamic and mass transfer characteristics were used to construct a mathematical model that predicted overall removal of sulfur dioxide from the simulated flue gas.

  20. Tracing And Quantifying Magmatic Carbon Discharge In Cold Groundwaters...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Isotopic Analysis- Gas At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Water Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Evans, Et Al.,...

  1. .I. Phys. Gem. Solids Pergamon Press 1968. Vol. 29, pp. 1093-1098. Printed in Great Britain. THE VACANCY CONCENTRATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    . THE VACANCY CONCENTRATION AND DIFFUSION IN RARE GAS SOLIDS H.R. GLYDE and J. A. VRNABLRS School properties, the vacancy concentration p. and self-diffusion coefficient D are calculated for the rare gas that either the recent data on p,, and D are conflicting or diffusion is not via the usual vacancy mechanism

  2. Matrix Optimization for the MALDI-TOF-MS Analysis of Trace Biodiesel Components (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpin, C. R.; Voorhees, K. J.; Alleman, T. L.; McCormick, R. L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace biodiesel components that could reduce the fuel's operability in cold weather are analyzed using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

  3. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  4. STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulman, Jason

    STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power There is a large literature on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest

  5. STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulman, Jason

    STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest results is due to Diaconis

  6. LES BIG DATA ET LA RELATION CLIENT Quand les traces numriques organisent l'change marchand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LES BIG DATA ET LA RELATION CLIENT Quand les traces numériques organisent l'échange marchand Auteur traces numériques organisent l'échange marchand Résumé : Avec le mouvement de digitalisation du commerce marchands font des comportements des consommateurs. Ces traces numériques doivent donc permettre aux

  7. CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nottingham, University of

    CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE? By: Emily courtesy LTSN Bioscience. http://bio.ltsn.ac.uk/imagebank/ Just as trace metals are important to humans to the structural stability of molecules and membranes. For these reasons, incorrect trace metal levels can

  8. A Thesis for the Degree of Master Design of Fair Tracing E-cash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kwangjo

    A Thesis for the Degree of Master Design of Fair Tracing E-cash System based on Blind Signature Tracing E-cash System based on Blind Signature #12;Design of Fair Tracing E-cash System based on Blind and Communications University A thesis submitted to the faculty of Information and Com- munications University

  9. TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    TRACE METAL CONTENT OF COAL AND ASH AS DETERMINED USING SCANNINGELECTRON MICROSCOPYWITE WAVELENGTH Grand Forks, ND 58202-9018 Keywords: scanning electron microscopy, trace metals, coal analysis ABSTRACT Scanningelectron microscopy with wavelength-dispersive spectrometry has been used to measure trace metals in coal

  10. Valve for gas centrifuges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hahs, Charles A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burbage, Charles H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a pneumatically operated valve assembly for simultaneously (1) closing gas-transfer lines connected to a gas centrifuge or the like and (2) establishing a recycle path between two of the lines so closed. The valve assembly is especially designed to be compact, fast-acting, reliable, and comparatively inexpensive. It provides large reductions in capital costs for gas-centrifuge cascades.

  11. Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

  12. ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Vadim

    ACCELERATED IMPROVEMENT A CONCENTRATED APPROACH FOR CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT #12;Accelerated.quality.wisc.edu O F F I C E O F Q U A L I T Y I M P R O V E M E N T Accelerated Improvement This guide to improving resources. You will find helpful information needed to conduct an Accelerated Improvement project

  13. Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    Physics and Astronomy Geophysics Concentration Strongly recommended courses Credits Term Dept. to Geophysics 3 PHY 3230 Thermal Physics 3 CHE 1101 Introductory Chemistry - I 3 CHE 1110 Introductory Chemistry Laboratory - I 1 GLY 1101 Intro. to Physical Geology 4 GLY 2250 Evolution of the Earth 4 GLY 4705 Adv

  14. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 168, 2011, pp. 805815. doi: 10.1144/0016-76492010-132. Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Ganqing

    .1144/0016-76492010-132. 805 Hydrothermal origin of elevated iron, manganese and redox-sensitive trace elements in the c. 635 Ma Doushantuo cap carbonate JING HUANG1,2 , XUELEI CHU1,2 *, GANQING JIANG3 , LIANJUN FENG1 & HUAJIN, including REE, concentrations of the Doushantuo cap carbonate (c. 635 Ma) in South China show enrichment

  15. Ammonia synthesis gas purification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuderer, A.

    1986-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes the purification of a reformed gas mixture following water gas shift conversion to produce a purified ammonia synthesis gas stream. The improved processing sequence consisting essentially of: (A) Selectively catalytically oxidizing the residual carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to carbon dioxide so as to reduce the carbon monoxide content of the gas mixture to less than about 20 ppm, the selective catalytic oxidation being carried out with an excess of air, with the excess oxygen being catalytically reacted with a small amount of hydrogen so that the residual oxygen level is reduced to less than about 3 ppm; (B) removing the bulk of the carbon dioxide content of the gas mixture by liquid absorption; (C) Removing residual amounts of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water by selective adsorption on the fixed beds of a thermal swing adsorption system, a dry, purified ammonia ammonia synthesis gas stream containing less than a total of 10 ppm of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide being recovered from the thermal swing adsorption system; (D) Passing the resulting dry, purified ammonia synthesis gas stream having a low content of methane to an ammonia production operation without intermediate passage of the ammonia synthesis gas stream to a methanation unit or to a cryogenic unit for removal of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide therefrom; whereby the efficiency of the overall purification operation and the effective utilization of hydrogen are enhanced.

  16. Liquefied Natural Gas (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document adopts the standards promulgated by the National Fire Protection Association as rules for the transportation, storage, handling, and use of liquefied natural gas. The NFPA standards...

  17. Reversible Acid Gas Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dave Heldebrant

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist David Heldebrant demonstrates how a new process called reversible acid gas capture works to pull carbon dioxide out of power plant emissions.

  18. Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

  19. String Gas Baryogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Alberghi

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a possible realization of the spontaneous baryogenesis mechanism in the context of extra-dimensional string cosmology and specifically in the string gas scenario.

  20. Polyport atmospheric gas sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guggenheim, S. Frederic (Teaneck, NJ)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric gas sampler with a multi-port valve which allows for multi, sequential sampling of air through a plurality of gas sampling tubes mounted in corresponding gas inlet ports. The gas sampler comprises a flow-through housing which defines a sampling chamber and includes a gas outlet port to accommodate a flow of gases through the housing. An apertured sample support plate defining the inlet ports extends across and encloses the sampling chamber and supports gas sampling tubes which depend into the sampling chamber and are secured across each of the inlet ports of the sample support plate in a flow-through relation to the flow of gases through the housing during sampling operations. A normally closed stopper means mounted on the sample support plate and operatively associated with each of the inlet ports blocks the flow of gases through the respective gas sampling tubes. A camming mechanism mounted on the sample support plate is adapted to rotate under and selectively lift open the stopper spring to accommodate a predetermined flow of gas through the respective gas sampling tubes when air is drawn from the housing through the outlet port.

  1. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

  2. Oil and Gas (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This division of the Indiana Department of Natural Resources provides information on the regulation of oil and gas exploration, wells and well spacings, drilling, plugging and abandonment, and...

  3. Oil and Gas Outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Outlook For Independent Petroleum Association of America November 13, 2014 | Palm Beach, FL By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Recent...

  4. Natural gas annual 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

  5. Gas venting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, Amjad; Dreier, Ken Wayne; Moulthrop, Lawrence Clinton; White, Erik James

    2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system to vent a moist gas stream is disclosed. The system includes an enclosure and an electrochemical cell disposed within the enclosure, the electrochemical cell productive of the moist gas stream. A first vent is in fluid communication with the electrochemical cell for venting the moist gas stream to an exterior of the enclosure, and a second vent is in fluid communication with an interior of the enclosure and in thermal communication with the first vent for discharging heated air to the exterior of the enclosure. At least a portion of the discharging heated air is for preventing freezing of the moist gas stream within the first vent.

  6. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter R. Jaffe, John Komlos, Derick Brown

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Trace-metal and/or radionuclide bioremediation schemes require that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer. Tools are therefore needed to identify the terminal electron acceptor processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer. Dissolved hydrogen (H2) concentrations have been shown to correlate with specific TEAPs during bioremediation in an aquifer. Theoretical analysis has shown that these steady-state H2 levels are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, with H2 concentrations increasing as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The objective of this research was to determine if H2 can still be used as an indicator of TEAPs during a uranium bioremediation scheme where an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and organisms may consume H2 and carbon simultaneously. In addition, the effect of iron bioavailability on H2 concentrations during iron reduction was observed. The first phase of research determined the effect of a competing electron donor (acetate) on the kinetics of H2 utilization by Geobacter sulfurreducens in batch cultures under iron reducing conditions. The results indicate that, though the Monod kinetic coefficients describing the rate of H2 utilization under iron-reducing conditions correlate energetically with the coefficients found in previous experiments under methanogenic and sulfate-reducing conditions, conventionally measured growth kinetics do not predict the steady state H2 levels typical for each TEAP. In addition, with acetate and H2 as simultaneous electron donors, there is slight inhibition between the two electron donors for G. sulfurreducens, and this can be modeled through competitive inhibition terms in the classic Monod formulation, resulting in slightly higher H2 concentrations under steady state conditions in the presence of acetate. This dual-donor model indicates that the steady state H2 concentration in the presence of an organic as electron donor is not only dependent on the biokinetic coefficients of the TEAP, but also the concentration of the organic substrate, and that the H2 concentration does not start to change very dramatically as long as the organic substrate concentration remains below the half saturation constant. The results for this phase of research are provided in Section 1. The second phase of research measured steady-state H2 concentrations under iron reducing conditions using NABIR Field Research Center background soil in a simulated bioremediation scenario involving acetate injection to stimulate indigenous microbial activity in a flow-through column. Steady-state H2 concentrations measured during this long-term (500 day) column experiment were higher than observed for iron-reducing conditions in the field even though evidence suggests that iron reduction was the dominant TEAP in the column. Additional column experiments were performed to determine the effect of iron bioavailability on steady-state H2 concentrations using the humics analogue, AQDS (9,10-anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonic acid). The iron reduction rate in the column with AQDS was double the rate in a parallel column without AQDS and lower steady state H2 levels were observed in the presence of AQDS, indicating that even though iron reduction does occur, a decreased bioavailability of iron may inhibit iron reduction such that H2 concentrations increase to levels that are more typical for less energetically favorable reactions (sulfate-reduction, methanogenigesis). The results for this phase of research are in Section 2. A final phase of research measured the effect of carbon concentration and iron bioavailability on surface bound iron reduction kinetics and steady-state H2 levels using synthetic iron oxide coated sand (IOCS). Results show a significant decrease in the microbial iron reduction and acetate oxidation rates for systems with surface bound Fe(III) (IOCS) compared to soluble Fe(III) (ferric citrate). The addition of AQDS did not affect the rate of iron r

  7. Ray tracing a three dimensional scene using a grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo; Ize, Santiago; Parker, Steven G; Knoll, Aaron

    2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. One example embodiment is a method for ray tracing a three-dimensional scene using a grid. In this example method, the three-dimensional scene is made up of objects that are spatially partitioned into a plurality of cells that make up the grid. The method includes a first act of computing a bounding frustum of a packet of rays, and a second act of traversing the grid slice by slice along a major traversal axis. Each slice traversal includes a first act of determining one or more cells in the slice that are overlapped by the frustum and a second act of testing the rays in the packet for intersection with any objects at least partially bounded by the one or more cells overlapped by the frustum.

  8. 47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

  9. Control of Trace Metal Emissions During Coal Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Ho

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emissions of toxic trace metals in the form of metal fumes or submicron particulate from a coal-fired combustion source have received greater environmental and regulatory concern over the past years. Current practice of controlling these emissions is to collect them at the cold-end of the process by air-pollution control devices (APCDS) such as electrostatic precipitators and baghouses. However, trace metal fumes may not always be effectively collected by these devices because the formed fumes are extremely small. The proposed research is to explore the opportunities for improved control of toxic trace metal emissions, alternatively, at the hot-end of the coal combustion process, i.e., in the combustion chamber. The technology proposed is to prevent the metal fumes from forming during the process, which would effectively eliminate the metal emission problems. Specifically, the technology is to employ suitable sorbents to (1) reduce the amount of metal volatilization during combustion and (2) capture volatilized metal vapors. The objectives of the project are to demonstrate the technology and to characterize the metal capture process during coal combustion in a fluidized bed combustor.

  10. Gas mixing in the wall layer of a CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterneus, J.; Johnsson, F. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Energy Conversion

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer-gas measurements were carried out in the transport zone of a 12 MW CFB boiler with special emphasis on the wall-layer flow. Helium (He) was used as tracer gas and a mass spectrometer was used to determine the He-concentrations. The primary gas velocity, U{sub 0}, was 1.2, 2.6 and 4.3 m/s (no secondary air) and the bed material was silica sand with an average particle diameter of 0.32 mm. Tracer gas was injected at different distances from one of the furnace walls and sampled above and below the injection level. In the wall layer, tracer-gas concentrations were detected above (C{sub above}) as well as below (C{sub below}) the injection height for all operating conditions, i.e., the gas flows both up and down from the injection point. The data show that the net flow of tracer gas in the wall layer depends on the operating conditions, and the concentration ratio of the down- and up-flowing gas, {psi} = C{sub below}/C{sub above}, decreases with increased gas velocity ({psi} > 1 for U{sub 0} = 1.2 m/s, {psi} {approx} 1 for U{sub 0} = 2.6 m/s and {psi} < 1 for U{sub 0} = 4.3 m/s). There exists a gas exchange between the core region and the wall-layer. A plug flow model applied to the core region gives a radial dispersion coefficient, D{sub r}, in the range of 0.015--0.025 m{sup 2}/s which is higher than the D{sub r} values reported in literature which are below 0.01 m{sup 2}/x. However, the latter values were obtained in tall and narrow risers.

  11. Molecular gas and the dynamics of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this review, I discuss some highlights of recent research on molecular gas in galaxies; large-scale CO maps of nearby galaxies are being made, which extend our knowledge on global properties, radial gradients, and spiral structure of the molecular ISM. Very high resolution are provided by the interferometers, that reveal high velocity gradients in galaxy nuclei, and formation of embedded structures, like bars within bars. Observation of the CO and other lines in starburst galaxies have questioned the H2-to-CO conversion factor. Surveys of dwarfs have shown how the conversion factor depends on metallicity. The molecular content is not deficient in galaxy clusters, as is the atomic gas. Galaxy interactions are very effective to enhance gas concentrations and trigger starbursts. Nuclear disks or rings are frequently observed, that concentrate the star formation activity. Since the density of starbursting galaxies is strongly increasing with redshift, the CO lines are a privileged tool to follow evolution of galaxies and observe the ISM dynamics at high redshift: due to the high excitation of the molecular gas, the stronger high-$J$ CO lines are redshifted into the observable band, which facilitates the detection.

  12. Hydrogen as an Indicator to Assess Biological Activity During Trace-Metal Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaffe, Peter R.; Lovley, Derek; Komlos, John; Brown, Derick

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and operation of a trace-metal or radionuclide bioremediation scheme requires that specific redox conditions be achieved at given zones of an aquifer for a pre-determined duration. Tools are therefore needed to identify and quantify the terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs) that are being achieved during bioremediation in an aquifer, and that this be done at a high spatial resolution. Dissolved hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations have been shown to correlate with specific TEAPs during bioremediation in an aquifer (Table 1). Theoretical analysis has shown that these steady-state hydrogen levels are solely dependent upon the physiological parameters of the hydrogen-consuming microorganisms, with hydrogen concentrations increasing as each successive TEAP yields less energy for bacterial growth. The assumptions for this statement may not hold during a bioremediation scheme in which an organic substrate is injected into the subsurface and where organisms may consume hydrogen and carbon simultaneously. This research examines the effects of simultaneous hydrogen and carbon utilization through obtaining kinetic parameters of both hydrogen and carbon consumption under iron reducing conditions in batch experiments. A dual-donor model was formulated and compared to flow-through column experiments.

  13. Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

  14. Development of concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

  15. Cylindrical acoustic levitator/concentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM); Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power, inexpensive acoustic apparatus for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and small liquid/solid samples having particulates up to several millimeters in diameter in air or other fluids is described. It is constructed from a commercially available, hollow cylindrical piezoelectric crystal which has been modified to tune the resonance frequency of the breathing mode resonance of the crystal to that of the interior cavity of the cylinder. When the resonance frequency of the interior cylindrical cavity is matched to the breathing mode resonance of the cylindrical piezoelectric transducer, the acoustic efficiency for establishing a standing wave pattern in the cavity is high. The cylinder does not require accurate alignment of a resonant cavity. Water droplets having diameters greater than 1 mm have been levitated against the force of gravity using; less than 1 W of input electrical power. Concentration of aerosol particles in air is also demonstrated.

  16. ARM - Measurement - Particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Relatedcontent ARMnumber concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse

  17. Fission gas detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colburn, Richard P. (Pasco, WA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for collecting fission gas released by a failed fuel rod which device uses a filter to pass coolant but which filter blocks fission gas bubbles which cannot pass through the filter due to the surface tension of the bubble.

  18. Illinois Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  19. Montana Natural Gas Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Withdrawals NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2014 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 2007-2014...

  20. Gas Kick Mechanistic Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubairy, Raheel

    2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    -gain and temperature profile in the annulus. This research focuses on these changes in these parameters to be able to detect the occurrence of gas kick and the circulation of the gas kick out from the well. In this thesis, we have developed a model that incorporates...

  1. Spectrometer for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid stream and method for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durham, M.D.; Stedman, D.H.; Ebner, T.G.; Burkhardt, M.R.

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method are described for measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid stream. Preferably, the fluid stream is an in-situ gas stream, such as a fossil fuel fired flue gas in a smoke stack. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The need for a reference intensity is eliminated. 15 figures.

  2. Photovoltaic concentrator module improvements study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, S.L.; Kerschen, K.A. (Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States)); Hutchison, G. (Solar Kinetics, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)); Nowlan, M.J. (Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of a project to design and fabricate an improved photovoltaic concentrator module. Using previous work as a baseline, this study conducted analyses and testing to select major module components and design features. The lens parquet and concentrator solar cell were selected from the highest performing, available components. A single 185X point-focus module was fabricated by the project team and tested at Sandia. Major module characteristics include a 6 by 4 compression-molded acrylic lens parquet (0.737 m{sup 2} area), twenty-four 0.2 ohms-cm, FZ, p-Si solar cells (1.56 cm{sup 2} area) soldered to ceramic substrates and copper heat spreaders, and an aluminized steel housing with corrugated bottom. This project marked the first attempt to use prismatic covers on solar cells in a high-concentration, point-focus application. Cells with 15 percent metallization were obtained, but problems with the fabrication and placement of prismatic covers on these cells lead to the decision not to use covers in the prototype module. Cell assembly fabrication, module fabrication, and module optical design activities are presented here. Test results are also presented for bare cells, cell assemblies, and module. At operating conditions of 981 watts/m{sup 2} DNI and an estimated cell temperature of 65{degrees}C, the module demonstrated an efficiency of 13.9 percent prior to stressed environmental exposure. 12 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. COLD DUST BUT WARM GAS IN THE UNUSUAL ELLIPTICAL GALAXY NGC 4125

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C. D.; Cridland, A.; Foyle, K.; Parkin, T. J.; Cooper, E. Mentuch [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Roussel, H. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7095, F-75014 Paris (France)] [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 7095, F-75014 Paris (France); Sauvage, M.; Lebouteiller, V.; Madden, S. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Bt. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Bt. 709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Smith, M. W. L.; Gear, W. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Baes, M.; De Looze, I. [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Sterrenkundig Observatorium, Universiteit Gent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Bendo, G. [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [UK ALMA Regional Centre Node, Jodrell Bank Center for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Boquien, M.; Boselli, A.; Ciesla, L. [Aix-Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France)] [Aix-Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Clements, D. L. [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)] [Astrophysics Group, Imperial College London, Blackett Laboratory, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Cooray, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Galametz, M. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); and others

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the Herschel Space Observatory have revealed an unusual elliptical galaxy, NGC 4125, which has strong and extended submillimeter emission from cold dust but only very strict upper limits to its CO and H I emission. Depending on the dust emissivity, the total dust mass is 2-5 10{sup 6} M {sub ?}. While the neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is extremely low (<12-30), including the ionized gas traced by [C II] emission raises this limit to <39-100. The dust emission follows a similar r {sup 1/4} profile to the stellar light and the dust to stellar mass ratio is toward the high end of what is found in nearby elliptical galaxies. We suggest that NGC 4125 is currently in an unusual phase where evolved stars produced in a merger-triggered burst of star formation are pumping large amounts of gas and dust into the interstellar medium. In this scenario, the low neutral gas-to-dust mass ratio is explained by the gas being heated to temperatures ?10{sup 4} K faster than the dust is evaporated. If galaxies like NGC 4125, where the far-infrared emission does not trace neutral gas in the usual manner, are common at higher redshift, this could have significant implications for our understanding of high redshift galaxies and galaxy evolution.

  4. Trace-element geochemistry of gradient hole cuttings: Beowawe geothermal area, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, O.D.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multielement geochemical analysis of drill cuttings from 26 shallow temperature-gradient drill holes and of surface rock samples reveals trace element distributions developed within these rocks as a consequence of chemical interaction with thermal fluid within the Beowawe geothermal area. The presently discharging thermal fluids are dilute in all components except silica, suggesting that the residence time of these fluids within the thermal reservoir has been short and that chemical interaction with the reservoir rock minimal. Interaction between these dilute fluids and rocks within the system has resulted in the development of weak chemical signatures. The absence of stronger signatures in rocks associated with the present system suggests that fluids have had a similar dilute chemistry for some time. The spatial distribution of elements commonly associated with geothermal systems, such as As, Hg and Li, and neither laterally nor vertically continuous. This suggests that there is not now, nor has there been in the past, pervasive movement of thermal fluid throughout the sampled rock but, instead, that isolated chemical anomalies represent distinct fluid-flow chanels. Discontinuous As, Li and Hg concentrations near White Canyon to the east of the presently active surface features record the effects of chemical interaction of rocks with fluids chemically unlike the presently discharging fluids. The observed trace element distributions suggest that historically the Beowawe area has been the center of more than one hydrothermal event and that the near-surface portion of the present hot-water geothermal system is controlled by a single source fracture, the Malpais Fault, or an intersection of faults at the sinter terrace.

  5. Gas pump with movable gas pumping panels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Osher, John E. (Alamo, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for pumping gas continuously a plurality of articulated panels of getter material, each of which absorbs gases on one side while another of its sides is simultaneously reactivated in a zone isolated by the panels themselves from a working space being pumped.

  6. Challenges, uncertainties and issues facing gas production from gas hydrate deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moridis, G.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Gas Price ($/Mscf) for Offshore Gas Hydrate StudyEvaluation of deepwater gas-hydrate systems. The Leadingfor Gas Production from Gas Hydrates Reservoirs. J. Canadian

  7. Supersonic gas compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lawlor, Shawn P. (Bellevue, WA); Novaresi, Mark A. (San Diego, CA); Cornelius, Charles C. (Kirkland, WA)

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas compressor based on the use of a driven rotor having a compression ramp traveling at a local supersonic inlet velocity (based on the combination of inlet gas velocity and tangential speed of the ramp) which compresses inlet gas against a stationary sidewall. In using this method to compress inlet gas, the supersonic compressor efficiently achieves high compression ratios while utilizing a compact, stabilized gasdynamic flow path. Operated at supersonic speeds, the inlet stabilizes an oblique/normal shock system in the gasdyanamic flow path formed between the rim of the rotor, the strakes, and a stationary external housing. Part load efficiency is enhanced by the use of a pre-swirl compressor, and using a bypass stream to bleed a portion of the intermediate pressure gas after passing through the pre-swirl compressor back to the inlet of the pre-swirl compressor. Inlet guide vanes to the compression ramp enhance overall efficiency.

  8. Cryogenic treatment of gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bravo, Jose Luis (Houston, TX); Harvey, III, Albert Destrehan (Kingwood, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods of treating a gas stream are described. A method of treating a gas stream includes cryogenically separating a first gas stream to form a second gas stream and a third stream. The third stream is cryogenically contacted with a carbon dioxide stream to form a fourth and fifth stream. A majority of the second gas stream includes methane and/or molecular hydrogen. A majority of the third stream includes one or more carbon oxides, hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2, one or more sulfur compounds, or mixtures thereof. A majority of the fourth stream includes one or more of the carbon oxides and hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 2. A majority of the fifth stream includes hydrocarbons having a carbon number of at least 3 and one or more of the sulfur compounds.

  9. Underground Storage of Natural Gas and Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute declares underground storage of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas to be in the public interest if it promotes the conservation of natural gas and permits the accumulation of...

  10. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OSullivan, Francis Martin

    Estimates of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from shale gas production and use are controversial. Here we assess the level of GHG emissions from shale gas well hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States during ...

  11. Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas- Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas Natural Gas Savings Programs are offering the following bonus rebates (in addition to the joint utilities bonus rebate). For both offers below, installation must...

  12. Intermountain Gas Company (IGC)- Gas Heating Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Intermountain Gas Company's (IGC) Gas Heating Rebate Program offers customers a $200 per unit rebate when they convert to a high efficiency natural gas furnace that replaces a heating system...

  13. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

  14. Optically pumped alkali laser and amplifier using helium-3 buffer gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beach, Raymond J. (Livermore, CA); Page, Ralph (Castro Valley, CA); Soules, Thomas (Livermore, CA); Stappaerts, Eddy (San Ramon, CA); Wu, Sheldon Shao Quan (Livermore, CA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment, a laser oscillator is provided comprising an optical cavity, the optical cavity including a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas, the buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Additionally, an optical excitation source is provided. Furthermore, the laser oscillator is capable of outputting radiation at a first frequency. In another embodiment, an apparatus is provided comprising a gain medium including an alkali vapor and a buffer gas including .sup.3He gas, wherein if .sup.4He gas is also present in the buffer gas, the ratio of the concentration of the .sup.3He gas to the .sup.4He gas is greater than 1.37.times.10.sup.-6. Other embodiments are also disclosed.

  15. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Morrison

    2005-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. During this time period efforts were directed toward (1) GSTC administration changes, (2) participating in the American Gas Association Operations Conference and Biennial Exhibition, (3) issuing a Request for Proposals (RFP) for proposal solicitation for funding, and (4) organizing the proposal selection meeting.

  16. Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

  17. A microfabricated dielectrophoretic micro-organism concentrator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, Rikky, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the development of a micro-organism concentrator. Pathogen detection, particularly MEMS based detection, is often limited by sample concentration. The proposed concentrator will interface with a ...

  18. NSTX High Field Side Gas Fueling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.W. Kugel; M. Anderson; G. Barnes; M. Bell; W. Blanchard; L. Dudek; D. Gates; R. Gernhardt; R. Maingi; D. Mueller; T. Provost; R. Raman; V. Soukhanovskii; J. Winston

    2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fueling National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) plasmas with gas injected from the high field side (HFS) has produced earlier, more reliable transitions to the H-mode, longer H-mode durations, higher toroidal rotation, and higher edge electron temperature compared with similar discharges using the low field side (LFS) gas fueling injectors. The HFS gas fueling system consists of a Center Stack midplane injector, and an injector at the inner, upper corner of the Center Stack. The challenging design and installation constraints for the HFS gas system involved placing the control components as close as possible to the machine-vacuum interface, devising a special feed-through flange, traversing through vessel regions whose temperatures during bake-out range from 150 to 350 degrees Centigrade, adapting the gas transport tubing size and route to the small instrumentation wire channels behind the existing graphite plasma facing component tiles on the Center Stack, and providing output orifices shielded from excessive plasma power depositions while concentrating the output flow to facilitate fast camera viewing and analysis. Design, recent performance, and future upgrades will be presented.

  19. Minimization of steam requirements and enhancement of water-gas shift reaction with warm gas temperature CO2 removal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V; Fisher, II, James C

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure utilizes a hydroxide sorbent for humidification and CO.sub.2 removal from a gaseous stream comprised of CO and CO.sub.2 prior to entry into a water-gas-shift reactor, in order to decrease CO.sub.2 concentration and increase H.sub.2O concentration and shift the water-gas shift reaction toward the forward reaction products CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The hydroxide sorbent may be utilized for absorbtion of CO.sub.2 exiting the water-gas shift reactor, producing an enriched H.sub.2 stream. The disclosure further provides for regeneration of the hydroxide sorbent at temperature approximating water-gas shift conditions, and for utilizing H.sub.2O product liberated as a result of the CO.sub.2 absorption.

  20. The Physics Analysis of a Gas Attenuator with Argon as a Working Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryutov,, D.D.

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas attenuator is an important element of the LCLS facility. The attenuator must operate in a broad range of x-ray energies, provide attenuation coefficient between 1 and 10{sup 4} with the accuracy of 1% and, at the same time, be reliable and allow for many months of un-interrupted operation. S. Shen has recently carried out a detailed design study of the attenuator based on the use of nitrogen as a working gas. In this note we assess the features of the attenuator based on the use of argon. We concentrate on the physics issues, not the design features.

  1. natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    natural gas+ condensing flue gas heat recovery+ water creation+ CO2 reduction+ cool exhaust gases+ Energy efficiency+ commercial building energy efficiency+ industrial energy...

  2. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

  3. ,"New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2262015 9:43:21 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)"...

  4. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program (Idaho)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders who incorporate energy efficiency into new construction. Rebates are provided for energy efficient gas equipment placed into new construction....

  5. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders to construct energy efficient homes. Rebates are provided for energy efficient gas equipment. Builders can also receive whole house rebates for...

  6. Questar Gas- Home Builder Gas Appliance Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Questar Gas provides incentives for home builders to construct energy efficient homes. Rebates are provided for both energy efficient gas equipment and whole home Energy Star certification. All...

  7. Exploring Light's Interactions with Bubbles and Light Absorbers in Photoelectrochemical Devices using Ray Tracing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, John

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ray tracing was used to perform optical optimization of arrays of photovoltaic microrods and explore the interaction between light and bubbles of oxygen gas on the surface of the microrods. The incident angle of light was varied over a wide range. The percent of incident light absorbed by the microrods and reflected by the bubbles was computed over this range. It was found that, for the 10 ?m diameter, 100 ?m tall SrTiO{sub 3} microrods simulated in the model, the optimal center-?to-?center spacing was 14 ?m for a square grid. This geometry produced 75% average and 90% maximum absorbance. For a triangular grid using the same microrods, the optimal center-?to-?center spacing was 14 ?m. This geometry produced 67% average and 85% maximum absorbance. For a randomly laid out grid of 5 ?m diameter, 100 ?m tall SrTiO! microrods with an average center-?to-?center spacing of 20 ?m, the average absorption was 23% and the maximum absorption was 43%. For a 50% areal coverage fraction of bubbles on the absorber surface, between 2%-?20% of the incident light energy was reflected away from the rods by the bubbles, depending upon incident angle and bubble morphology.

  8. The Gas/Electric Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

    The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase...

  9. Oil and Gas Program (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oil and Gas section of the Tennessee Code, found in Title 60, covers all regulations, licenses, permits, and laws related to the production of natural gas. The laws create the Oil and Gas...

  10. Oil and Gas Production (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A State Oil and Gas Council regulates and oversees oil and gas production in Missouri, and conducts a biennial review of relevant rules and regulations. The waste of oil and gas is prohibited. This...

  11. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule1, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description...

  12. Oil and Gas Supply Module

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Onshore Lower 48 Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Offshore Oil and Gas Supply Submodule, Oil Shale Supply Submodule, and Alaska Oil and Gas Supply Submodule. A detailed description of...

  13. Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR?¢????s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument?¢????s robustness in a real-world situation.

  14. Exhaust gas recirculation apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egnell, R.A.; Hansson, B.L.

    1981-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for recirculating combustion exhaust gases to the burner region of a Stirling cycle hot-gas engine to lower combustion temperature and reduct NO/sub x/ formation includes a first wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the inlet air stream, a second wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the burner region, and low flow resistance ejectors formed in the first and second walls for admitting the inlet air to the burner region and for entraining and mixing with the inlet air portion of the exhaust gas stream. In a preferred embodiment the ejectors are arranged around the periphery of a cylindrical burner region and oriented to admit the air/exhaust gas mixture tangentially to promote mixing. In another preferred embodiment a single annular ejector surrounds and feeds the air/exhaust gas mixture to a cylindrical burner region. The annular ejector includes an annular plate with radially-directed flow passages to provide an even distribution of the air/exhaust gas mixture to the burner region.

  15. Concentration Averaging | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmart Grid RFI:Fresno U.S.Energy Order issuedConcentration

  16. Trace Metal Bioremediation: Assessment of Model Components from Laboratory and Field Studies to Identify Critical Variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Jaffe; Herschel Rabitz

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to gain an insight into the modeling support needed for the understanding, design, and operation of trace metal/radionuclide bioremediation. To achieve this objective, a workshop was convened to discuss the elements such a model should contain. A ''protomodel'' was developed, based on the recommendations of the workshop, and was used to perform sensitivity analysis as well as some preliminary simulations in support for bioremediation test experiments at UMTRA sites. To simulate the numerous biogeochemical processes that will occur during the bioremediation of uranium contaminated aquifers, a time-dependent one-dimensional reactive transport model has been developed. The model consists of a set of coupled, steady state mass balance equations, accounting for advection, diffusion, dispersion, and a kinetic formulation of the transformations affecting an organic substrate, electron acceptors, corresponding reduced species, and uranium. This set of equations is solved numerically, using a finite element scheme. The redox conditions of the domain are characterized by estimating the pE, based on the concentrations of the dominant terminal electron acceptor and its corresponding reduced specie. This pE and the concentrations of relevant species are passed to a modified version of MINTEQA2, which calculates the speciation and solubilities of the species of interest. Kinetics of abiotic reactions are described as being proportional to the difference between the actual and equilibrium concentration. A global uncertainty assessment, determined by Random Sampling High Dimensional Model Representation (RS-HDMR), was performed to attain a phenomenological understanding of the origins of output variability and to suggest input parameter refinements as well as to provide guidance for field experiments to improve the quality of the model predictions. Results indicated that for the usually high nitrate contents found ate many DOE sites, overall bioremediation of trace metals was highly sensitive to the formulation of the denitrification process. Simulations were performed to illustrate the effect of biostimulation on the transport and precipitation of uranium in the subsurface, at conditions equivalent to UMTRA sites. These simulations predicted that uranium would precipitate in bands that are located relatively close to the acetate injection well. The simulations also showed the importance of properly determining U(IV) oxidative dissolution rates, in order to assess the stability of precipitates once oxygenated water reenters the aquifer after bioremediation is discontinued. The objective of this project was to provide guidance to NABIR's Systems Integration Element, on the development of models to simulate the bioremediation of trace metals and radionuclides. Such models necessarily need to integrate hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological processes. In order to gain a better understanding of the key processes that such a model should contain, it was deemed desirable to convene a workshop with experts from these different fields. The goal was to obtain a preliminary consensus on the required level of detail for the formulations of these different chemical, physical, and microbiological processes. The workshop was held on December 18, 1998.

  17. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

  18. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission & distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1 to June 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: (1) Develop and process subcontract agreements for the eight projects selected for cofunding at the February 2006 GSTC Meeting; (2) Compiling and distributing the three 2004 project final reports to the GSTC Full members; (3) Develop template, compile listserv, and draft first GSTC Insider online newsletter; (4) Continue membership recruitment; (5) Identify projects and finalize agenda for the fall GSTC/AGA Underground Storage Committee Technology Transfer Workshop in San Francisco, CA; and (6) Identify projects and prepare draft agenda for the fall GSTC Technology Transfer Workshop in Pittsburgh, PA.

  19. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

  20. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January 1, 2006 through March 31, 2006. Activities during this time period were: (1) Organize and host the 2006 Spring Meeting in San Diego, CA on February 21-22, 2006; (2) Award 8 projects for co-funding by GSTC for 2006; (3) New members recruitment; and (4) Improving communications.

  1. Understanding reservoir mechanisms using phase and component streamline tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Sarwesh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    some important signatures of reservoir dynamics, such as dominant phase in flow, appearance and disappearance of phases (e.g. gas), and flow of components like CO2. In the work being presented, we demonstrate the benefits of visualizing phase...

  2. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  3. Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

    2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

  4. Gas only nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bechtel, William Theodore (15 Olde Coach Rd., Scotia, NY 12302); Fitts, David Orus (286 Sweetman Rd., Ballston Spa, NY 12020); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (60 St. Stephens La., Glenville, NY 12302)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozzle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

  5. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, D.D.

    1985-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  6. Gas ampoule-syringe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Don D. (Aiken, SC)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas ampoule for the shipment and delivery of radioactive gases. The gas ampoule having a glass tube with serum bottle stopper on one end and a plunger tip in the opposite end all fitting in a larger plastic tube threaded on each end with absorbent between the tubes, is seated onto the internal needle assembly via a bushing associated with the plunger and locked into the syringe barrel via barrel-bushing locking caps. The design practically eliminates the possibility of personnel contamination due to an inadvertent exposure of such personnel to the contained radioactive gas.

  7. Commercialization Development of Oxygen Fired CFB for Greenhouse Gas Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Given that fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic (i.e., man-made) CO{sub 2} emissions. In 2001, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) began a two-phase program to investigate the feasibility of various carbon capture technologies. This program was sponsored under a Cooperative Agreement from the US Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE). The first phase entailed a comprehensive study evaluating the technical feasibility and economics of alternate CO{sub 2} capture technologies applied to Greenfield US coal-fired electric generation power plants. Thirteen cases, representing various levels of technology development, were evaluated. Seven cases represented coal combustion in CFB type equipment. Four cases represented Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. Two cases represented advanced Chemical Looping Combined Cycle systems. Marion, et al. reported the details of this work in 2003. One of the thirteen cases studied utilized an oxygen-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler. In this concept, the fuel is fired with a mixture of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (mainly CO{sub 2}). This combustion process yields a flue gas containing over 80 percent (by volume) CO{sub 2}. This flue gas can be processed relatively easily to enrich the CO{sub 2} content to over 96 percent for use in enhanced oil or gas recovery (EOR or EGR) or simply dried for sequestration. The Phase I study identified the O{sub 2}-fired CFB as having a near term development potential, because it uses conventional commercial CFB technology and commercially available CO{sub 2} capture enabling technologies such as cryogenic air separation and simple rectification or distillation gas processing systems. In the long term, air separation technology advancements offer significant reductions in power requirements, which would improve plant efficiency and economics for the oxygen-fired technology. The second phase consisted of pilot-scale testing followed by a refined performance and economic evaluation of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. As a part of this workscope, ALSTOM modified its 3 MW{sub th} (9.9 MMBtu/hr) Multiuse Test Facility (MTF) pilot plant to operate with O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures of up to 70 percent O{sub 2} by volume. Tests were conducted with coal and petroleum coke. The test objectives were to determine the impacts of oxygen firing on heat transfer, bed dynamics, potential agglomeration, and gaseous and particulate emissions. The test data results were used to refine the design, performance, costs, and economic models developed in Phase-I for the O{sub 2}-fired CFB with CO{sub 2} capture. Nsakala, Liljedahl, and Turek reported results from this study in 2004. ALSTOM identified several items needing further investigation in preparation for large scale demonstration of the oxygen-fired CFB concept, namely: (1) Operation and performance of the moving bed heat exchanger (MBHE) to avoid recarbonation and also for cost savings compared to the standard bubbling fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE); (2) Performance of the back-end flash dryer absorber (FDA) for sulfur capture under high CO{sub 2}/high moisture flue gas environment using calcined limestone in the fly ash and using fresh commercial lime directly in the FDA; (3) Determination of the effect of recarbonation on fouling in the convective pass; (4) Assessment of the impact of oxygen firing on the mercury, other trace elements, and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions; and (5) Develop a proposal-level oxygen-fired retrofit design for a relatively small existing CFB steam power plant in preparation for a large-scale demonstration of the O{sub 2} fired CFB concept. Hence, ALSTOM responded to a DOE Solicitation to address all these issues with further O{sub 2} fired MTF pilot testing and a subsequent retrofit design study of oxygen firing and CO{s

  8. Landfill Gas Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of landfill gas energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply landfill gas energy within the Federal sector.

  9. Citizens Gas- Residential Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Citizens Gas of Indiana offers rebates to its residential customers for the installation of several types of efficient natural gas appliances. Rebates are generally available for residential homes...

  10. Regulations For Gas Companies (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regulations for Gas Companies, implemented by the Tennessee Regulatory Authority (Authority) outline the standards for metering, distribution and electricity generation for utilities using gas....

  11. Historical Natural Gas Annual 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

  12. Natural Gas | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fossil Natural Gas Natural Gas September 15, 2014 NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study The National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a technical report on the...

  13. Calculation of material properties and ray tracing in transformation media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurig, D; Smith, D R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex and interesting electromagnetic behavior can be found in spaces with non-flat topology. When considering the properties of an electromagnetic medium under an arbitrary coordinate transformation an alternative interpretation presents itself. The transformed material property tensors may be interpreted as a different set of material properties in a flat, Cartesian space. We describe the calculation of these material properties for coordinate transformations that describe spaces with spherical or cylindrical holes in them. The resulting material properties can then implement invisibility cloaks in flat space. We also describe a method for performing geometric ray tracing in these materials which are both inhomogeneous and anisotropic in their electric permittivity and magnetic permeability.

  14. Ultra-Trace Forensics Science Center (UFSC) | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layeredof2014 EIA Energy40081A UmtedGrishamMARCUgoUltra-Trace

  15. ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas- Bonus Rebate Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ComEd, Nicor Gas, Peoples Gas and North Shore Gas are offering a Complete System Replacement Rebate Program to residential customers. The program is a bundled promotion in partnership with ComEd...

  16. Gas Pipelines (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter applies to any entity that owns, manages, operates, leases, or controls a pipeline for the purpose of transporting natural gas in the state for sale or compensation, as well as any...

  17. Gas-Saving Tips

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Properly Tuned Fixing a car that is noticeably out of tune or has failed an emis- sions test can improve its gas mileage by an average of 4 percent. However, results vary based on...

  18. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  19. Natural gas repowering experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bautista, P.J.; Fay, J.M. [Gas Research Institute, Chicago, IL (United States); Gerber, F.B. [BENTEK Energy Research, DeSoto, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Research Institute has led a variety of projects in the past two years with respect to repowering with natural gas. These activities, including workshops, technology evaluations, and market assessments, have indicated that a significant opportunity for repowering exists. It is obvious that the electric power industry`s restructuring and the actual implementation of environmental regulations from the Clean Air Act Amendments will have significant impact on repowering with respect to timing and ultimate size of the market. This paper summarizes the results and implications of these activities in repowering with natural gas. It first addresses the size of the potential market and discusses some of the significant issues with respect to this market potential. It then provides a perspective on technical options for repowering which are likely to be competitive in the current environment. Finally, it addresses possible actions by the gas industry and GRI to facilitate development of the repowering market.

  20. Gas Separation Using Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koros, W. J.; Paul, D. R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial membrane-based gas separator systems based upon high-flux, asymmetric polysulfone hollow fibers were first introduced in 1977 by Monsanto. These systems were packaged in compact modules containing large amounts of permeation surface area...

  1. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  2. Holographic Chaplygin gas model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M R Setare

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and Chaplygin gas energy density in FRW universe. Then we reconstruct the potential and the dynamics of the scalar field which describe the Chaplygin cosmology.

  3. Gas Pipeline Securities (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes that entities engaged in the transmission of gas by pipelines are not required to obtain the consent of the Utility Regulatory Commission for issuance of stocks,...

  4. Natural Gas Regulations (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Kentucky Administrative Regulation title 805 promulgates the rules and regulations pertaining to natural gas production in Kentucky. In addition to KAR title 405, chapter 30, which pertains to any...

  5. Natural gas monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Data presented include volume and price, production, consumption, underground storage, and interstate pipeline activities.

  6. Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute sets goals for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions by at least 15 percent by 2015, 30 percent by 2025, and 80 percent by 2050, calculated relative to 2005 levels. These...

  7. Maximally concentrating optics for photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Technical progress report, [July 1, 1984--January 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Gallagher, J.J.

    1985-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of a two-stage concentrator with a fresnel lens primary and a nonimaging dielectric totally internally reflecting secondary, has unique advantages for photovoltaic concentration. Some preliminary ray trace studies have shown that with planar lenses, an increase in angular acceptance for a given geometric concentration to about 2/3 of the maximum theoretical limit can be achieved. To demonstrate this, two preprototype concentrators, each having a geometric concentration of 248:1 for a 0.635cm (0.25 inch) diameter cell, have been designed, built, and tested. Measurements of the angular response show an acceptance of 8{degrees} (full angle) which is drastically better than the 1{degrees}--2{degrees} achievable without a secondary, and is in excellent agreement with the ray trace predictions. For these preprototypes, passive cooling was sufficient to prevent any thermal problems for both the cell and secondary. No problems associated with nouuniform cell illumination were found, as evidenced by the fill factor of 71%--73% measured under concentration. Initial measurements of the system electrical efficiency lie in the range 7.5%--9.9% for a variety of individual cells.

  8. Home Safety: Radon Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Denny, Monica L.

    1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Every home should be tested for radon, an invisible, odorless, radioactive gas that occurs naturally. Radon is estimated to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States. However, with proper equipment, radon is easy to detect... poten- tial for radon (Fig. 1), homes in Texas have been found to have radon levels that exceed U.S. Environ- mental Protection Agency (EPA) recommendations. Every home is susceptible to a radon gas problem. Health/cancer risks Radon produces...

  9. U-GAS process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schora, F.C.; Patel, J.G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed an advanced coal gasification process. The U-GAS process has been extensively tested in a pilot plant to firmly establish process feasibility and provide a large data base for scale-up and design of the first commercial plant. The U-GAS process is considered to be one of the more flexible, efficient, and economical coal gasification technologies developed in the US during the last decade. The U-GAS technology is presently available for licensing from GDC, Inc., a wholly-owned subsidiary of IGT. The U-GAS process accomplishes four important functions in a single-stage, fluidized-bed gasifier: It decakes coal, devolatilizes coal, gasifies coal, and agglomerates and separates ash from char. Simultaneously with coal gasification, the ash is agglomerated into spherical particles and separated from the bed. Part of the fluidizing gas enters the gasifier through a sloping grid. The remaining gas flows upward at a high velocity through the ash agglomerating device and forms a hot zone within the fluidized bed. High-ash-content particles agglomerate under these conditions and grow into larger and heavier particles. Agglomerates grow in size until they can be selectively separated and discharged from the bed into water-filled ash hoppers where they are withdrawn as a slurry. In this manner, the fluidized bed achieves the same low level of carbon losses in the discharge ash generally associated with the ash-slagging type of gasifier. Coal fines elutriated from the fluidized bed are collected in two external cyclones. Fines from the first cyclone are returned to the bed and fines from the second cyclone are returned to the ash agglomerating zone, where they are gasified, and the ash agglomerated with bed ash. The raw product gas is virtually free of tar and oils, thus simplifying ensuing heat recovery and purification steps.

  10. Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shale gas production: potential versus actual greenhouse gas emissions* Francis O, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 044030 (6pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044030 Shale gas production: potential

  11. Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Coupled flow of water and gas during hydraulic fracture in shale The University of Oxford http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/people/profiles/academic/joec Key Words Shale gas, hydraulic fracture, groundwater contamination, transport in porous media Overview Recovery of natural gas from mudstone (shale

  12. TRACE/PARCS modelling of rips trip transients for Lungmen ABWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C. Y. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ., No.101, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, H. T.; Wang, J. R. [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research, No. 1000, Wenhua Rd., Longtan Township, Taoyuan County 32546, Taiwan (China); Shih, C. [Inst. of Nuclear Engineering and Science, Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ., No.101, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study are to examine the performances of the steady-state results calculated by the Lungmen TRACE/PARCS model compared to SIMULATE-3 code, as well as to use the analytical results of the final safety analysis report (FSAR) to benchmark the Lungmen TRACE/PARCS model. In this study, three power generation methods in TRACE were utilized to analyze the three reactor internal pumps (RIPs) trip transient for the purpose of validating the TRACE/PARCS model. In general, the comparisons show that the transient responses of key system parameters agree well with the FSAR results, including core power, core inlet flow, reactivity, etc. Further studies will be performed in the future using Lungmen TRACE/PARCS model. After the commercial operation of Lungmen nuclear power plant, TRACE/PARCS model will be verified. (authors)

  13. Gas Storage Technology Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

  14. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

  15. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

  16. Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates World's Largest Concentrating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    curbs greenhouse gas emissions, and fosters American innovation." Ivanpah has the capacity to generate 392 megawatts (MW) of clean electricity -- enough to power 94,400 average...

  17. A method of tracing sediment movement on the Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Michael

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    57 60 65 70 81 90 V. CONCLUSIONS AND RZCOlIPirJVDATIONS . . . . . 97 Conclusions. Recommendations. REFERENCES. APPZNDICES- 1. Coating Technique. 2. Equipment Used ~ 97 100 . 10$ 109 110 112 LIST OF TABLES Table 1. Radioactive... investigations are those associ-. ated with measuring amounts of material trapped by natural 'or artificial barriers along the shoreline. Qualitative studies include tracing of radioactive sediments, tracing of natural heavy minerals, and tracing...

  18. Homeotropic alignment and Frster resonance energy transfer: The way to a brighter luminescent solar concentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tummeltshammer, Clemens; Taylor, Alaric; Kenyon, Anthony J.; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis, E-mail: i.papakonstantinou@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate homeotropically aligned fluorophores and Frster resonance energy transfer (FRET) for luminescent solar concentrators using Monte-Carlo ray tracing. The homeotropic alignment strongly improves the trapping efficiency, while FRET circumvents the low absorption at homeotropic alignment by separating the absorption and emission processes. We predict that this design doped with two organic dye molecules can yield a 82.9% optical efficiency improvement compared to a single, arbitrarily oriented dye molecule. We also show that quantum dots are prime candidates for absorption/donor fluorophores due to their wide absorption band. The potentially strong re-absorption and low quantum yield of quantum dots is not a hindrance for this design.

  19. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Underground Storage Technology Dept.; Giles, H.N. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Strategic Petroleum Reserve

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  20. REVISED NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION REVISED NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT In Support of the 2007's natural gas market. It covers natural gas demand, supply, infrastructure, price, and possible alternative and the related Scenarios Project, and additional updated information. California natural gas demand growth

  1. Gas releases from salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

  2. Gas cleaning system and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newby, Richard Allen

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas cleaning system for removing at least a portion of contaminants, such as halides, sulfur, particulates, mercury, and others, from a synthesis gas (syngas). The gas cleaning system may include one or more filter vessels coupled in series for removing halides, particulates, and sulfur from the syngas. The gas cleaning system may be operated by receiving gas at a first temperature and pressure and dropping the temperature of the syngas as the gas flows through the system. The gas cleaning system may be used for an application requiring clean syngas, such as, but not limited to, fuel cell power generation, IGCC power generation, and chemical synthesis.

  3. Interactive influences of bioactive trace metals on biological production in oceanic waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruland, K.W.; Donat, J.R.; Hutchins, D.A. (Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States))

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present an overview of the oceanic chemistries of the bioactive trace metals, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn; the authors combine field data with results from laboratory phytoplankton culture-trace metal studies and speculate on the potential influences of these trace metals on oceanic plankton production and species composition. Most field studies have focused on the effects of single metals. However, they propose that synergistic and antagonistic interactions between multiple trace metals could be very important in the oceans. Trace metal antagonisms that may prove particularly important are those between Cu and the potential biolimiting metals Fe, Mn, and Zn. These antagonistic interactions could have the greatest influence on biological productivity in areas of the open ocean isolated from terrestrial inputs, such as the remote high nutrient regions of the Pacific and Antarctic Oceans. The emerging picture of trace metal-biota interactions in these oceanic areas is one in which biology strongly influences distribution and chemical speciation of all these bioactive trace metals. It also seems likely that many of these bioactive trace metals and their speciation may influence levels of primary productivity, species composition, and trophic structure. Future investigations should give more complete consideration to the interactive effects of biologically important trace metals.

  4. TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TRACING THE CONTAMINANT HISTORY OF AN URBAN WATERSHED THROUGH AN EXAMINATION OF AQUATIC SEDIMENTS. A smaller organic contaminant database indicates sediment PAH levels exceed probable effect level criteria

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace metals Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 2 Chapter 1: Modelling Past Environmental Changes Using Lake Sediment Records Summary: of the anthropogenic fluxes of many potentially toxic trace metals...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic trace metal Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences and Ecology 3 Chapter 1: Modelling Past Environmental Changes Using Lake Sediment Records Summary: of the anthropogenic fluxes of many potentially toxic trace metals...

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - anterograde tracing study Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine 27 Perirhinal and Postrhinal Cortices of the Rat: Interconnectivity and Summary: ., 1983). Subsequent histochemical and tract tracing studies,...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne trace element Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search Sample search results for: airborne trace element Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: pollution in Lake...

  9. Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen, and Ingo Wald

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wald, Ingo

    Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 Email: {knolla1 Coherent Multiresolution Isosurface Ray Tracing Aaron Knoll, Charles Hansen, and Ingo Wald

  10. The ATLAS 3D project - XVI. Physical parameters and spectral line energy distributions of the molecular gas in gas-rich early-type galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayet, Estelle; Davis, Timothy A; Young, Lisa M; Crocker, Alison F; Alatalo, Katherine; Blitz, Leo; Bois, Maxime; Bournaud, Frdric; Cappellari, Michele; Davies, Roger L; de Zeeuw, P T; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Emsellem, Eric; Khochfar, Sadegh; Krajnovi?, Davor; Kuntschner, Harald; McDermid, Richard M; Morganti, Raffaella; Naab, Thorsten; Oosterloo, Tom; Sarzi, Marc; Scott, Nicholas; Serra, Paolo; Weijmans, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    [Abridged] We present a detailed study of the physical properties of the molecular gas in a sample of 18 molecular gas-rich early-type galaxies (ETGs) from the ATLAS$ 3D sample. Our goal is to better understand the star formation processes occurring in those galaxies, starting here with the dense star-forming gas. We use existing integrated $^{12}$CO(1-0, 2-1), $^{13}$CO(1-0, 2-1), HCN(1-0) and HCO$^{+}$(1-0) observations and present new $^{12}$CO(3-2) single-dish data. From these, we derive for the first time the average kinetic temperature, H$_{2}$ volume density and column density of the emitting gas, this using a non-LTE theoretical model. Since the CO lines trace different physical conditions than of those the HCN and HCO$^{+}$ lines, the two sets of lines are treated separately. We also compare for the first time the predicted CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) and gas properties of our molecular gas-rich ETGs with those of a sample of nearby well-studied disc galaxies. The gas excitation con...

  11. Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baseload Solar Power for California? Ammonia-based Solar Energy Storage Using Trough Concentrators to eventually optimise the reactor geometry for ammonia-based solar energy storage with troughs, which.1. Storing Solar Energy with Ammonia H2 / N2 gas liquid NH3 Heat Exchangers Power Generation (Steam Cycle

  12. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Shahab D. Mohaghegh Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA. Keywords: Gas Storage, Natural Gas, Storage, Deliverability, Inventory

  13. GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Watson

    2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period July 1, 2004, through September 30, 2004. During this time period there were three main activities. First was the ongoing negotiations of the four sub-awards working toward signed contracts with the various organizations involved. Second, an Executive Council meeting was held at Penn State September 9, 2004. And third, the GSTC participated in the SPE Eastern Regional Meeting in Charleston, West Virginia, on September 16th and 17th. We hosted a display booth with the Stripper Well Consortium.

  14. Optimization of condensing gas drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lofton, Larry Keith

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - cal, undersaturated reservoir with gas being injected into the crest and oil being produced from the base of the structure. Fractional oil re- covery at gas breakthrough proved to be less sensitive to changes in oil withdrawal rates as the gas... injection pressure was increased. The validity of the model was established by accurately simulating several low pressure gas drives conducted in the laboratory. Oil recoveries at gas breakthrough using the model compared closely with those recoveries...

  15. Gas separation membrane module assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

  16. Concentrating Solar Power (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet the nation's goal of making solar energy cost competitive with other energy sources by the end of the decade. The DOE SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national initiative to make solar energy technologies cost-competitive with other forms of energy by reducing the cost of solar energy systems by about 75% by the end of the decade. Reducing the total installed cost for utility-scale solar electricity to roughly 6 cents per kilowatt hour without subsidies will result in rapid, large-scale adoption of solar electricity across the United States. Reaching this goal will re-establish American technological leadership, improve the nation's energy security, and strengthen U.S. economic competitiveness in the global clean energy race. SunShot will work to bring down the full cost of solar - including the costs of solar cells and installation by focusing on four main pillars: (1) Technologies for solar cells and arrays that convert sunlight to energy; (2) Electronics that optimize the performance of the installation; (3) Improvements in the efficiency of solar manufacturing processes; and (4) Installation, design, and permitting for solar energy systems.

  17. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, C.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor. 5 figs.

  18. Planar photovoltaic solar concentrator module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chiang, Clement J. (New Brunswick, NJ)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A planar photovoltaic concentrator module for producing an electrical signal from incident solar radiation includes an electrically insulating housing having a front wall, an opposing back wall and a hollow interior. A solar cell having electrical terminals is positioned within the interior of the housing. A planar conductor is connected with a terminal of the solar cell of the same polarity. A lens forming the front wall of the housing is operable to direct solar radiation incident to the lens into the interior of the housing. A refractive optical element in contact with the solar cell and facing the lens receives the solar radiation directed into the interior of the housing by the lens and directs the solar radiation to the solar cell to cause the solar cell to generate an electrical signal. An electrically conductive planar member is positioned in the housing to rest on the housing back wall in supporting relation with the solar cell terminal of opposite polarity. The planar member is operable to dissipate heat radiated by the solar cell as the solar cell generates an electrical signal and further forms a solar cell conductor connected with the solar cell terminal to permit the electrical signal generated by the solar cell to be measured between the planar member and the conductor.

  19. Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

  20. Determining the optical quality of focusing collectors without laser ray tracing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bendt, P.; Gaul, H.; Rabl, A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a novel alternative to the laser ray trace technique for evaluating the optical quality of focusing solar collectors. The new method does not require any equipment beyond what is used for measuring collector efficiency; it could therefore become part of routine collector testing. The total optical errors resulting from imperfect specularity and from inaccuracies in reflector position or slope are characterized by an angular standard deviation sigma/sub optical/, the rms deviation of the reflected rays from the design direction. The method is based on the fact that the off-axis performance of a concentrator depends on sigma/sub optical/. An angular scan is performed, i.e., the collector output is measured as a function of misalignment angle over the entire range of angles for which there is measurable output (typically a few degrees). This test should be carried out on a very clear day, with receiver close to ambient temperature (if the latter conditions cannot be satisfied, appropriate corrections are necessary). The parameter sigma/sub optical/ is then determined by a least-squares fit between the measured and the calculated angular scan. We tested the method on a parabolic trough collector manufactured by Hexcel, but it is suitable for parabolic dishes as well. The method appears to be accurate enough to determine sigma/sub optical/ within about 10%.