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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Trace Element Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis Trace Element Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Trace Element Analysis Details Activities (8) Areas (8) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Reconstructing the fluid circulation of a hydrothermal system Thermal: Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / element Median Estimate (USD): 18.001,800 centUSD 0.018 kUSD 1.8e-5 MUSD 1.8e-8 TUSD / element High-End Estimate (USD): 106.0010,600 centUSD 0.106 kUSD 1.06e-4 MUSD 1.06e-7 TUSD / element

2

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

3

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

4

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to determine which of the faults in these regions were active and open to hydrothermal fluid circulation, we have employed selective ion geochemistry that is a new geochemical method capable of detecting anomalous concentrations for up to 47 elements transported to soils by geochemical cells or low pressure vapors. Enzyme leach and Terrasol leach are two such techniques. This method has to datae been mostly applied to

5

Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa

6

Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Christensen, Et Al., Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Roosevelt Hot Springs Area (Christensen, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Roosevelt Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Three of the recognized trace-element suites are characteristic of the surface and near-surface environment. These are: (1) concentrations of As, Sb, Be and Hg associated with siliceous material at the location of liquid discharge, fluid mixing, or at boiling interfaces; (2) deposits of Mn and Fe oxides containing concentrations of Ba, W, Be, Co, Cu, As, Sb and Hg formed by the oxidation of cooled brines; and (3) high concentrations of Hg

7

Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

8

Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klusman & Landress, Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This study involved the field collection and laboratory analysis of Al-horizon soil samples in the vicinity of a known geothermal source at Long Valley, California. The samples were analyzed for several constituents known to have influence on Hg retention by soils, including pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, as well as Hg. The data compiled for these secondary parameters and the field-determined parameters of geology, soil

9

Application of synchrotron radiation to x-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of synchrotron radiation x-ray sources has provided the means to greatly extend the capabilities of x-ray fluorescence analysis for determinations of trace element concentrations. A brief description of synchrotron radiation properties provides a background for a discussion of the improved detection limits compared to existing x-ray fluorescence techniques. Calculated detection limits for x-ray microprobes with micrometer spatial resolutions are described and compared with experimental results beginning to appear from a number of laboratories. The current activities and future plans for a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented.

Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Trace element content of magnetohydrodynamic coal combustion effluents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element contents from effluents of a simulated coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) combustion process have been determined using thermal neutron activation analysis techniques. The quality control consi...

M. S. Akanni; V. O. Ogugbuaja; W. D. James

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Determination of selected trace elements in human head hair by neutron activation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the scope of this discussion. The final category of data contains barium and strontium. There was no data in the literature to use as a comparison, therefore the values of 49 ppm for barium and 87 ppm for strontium must stand on their own merit...) in Japan and of course, the current work in Texas. The results of the correlation analysis were that there were no significant correlations between any of the elements except in the case of strontium and barium which yielded a Pearson correlation coef...

Courson, Leonard Austin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

On the determination of trace elements in cocoa and coffee by instrumental neutron activation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Charlene Helton for her helpful and productive suggestions, and, of course, for undertaking the laborious task or. typing the final manuscript. DEDICATION To mv parents. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter ~Pa e INTRODUCTION THEORY Neutron Activation..., commercial cocoa. CHAPTER II THEORY Neutron Activation Analysis Neutron Activation Analysis was proposed by Von Hevesy and Levi in 1936 (32). hey irradiated a yttrium sample with neutrons from a radium-beryllium source and determined the im urity...

Adanuvor, Prosper Kwasi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

Trace element partitioning between type B CAI melts and melilite and spinel: Implications for trace element distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Partition coefficients between intermediate composition melilites and CAI melt are the following: Li, 0.5 size energetics analysis is used to assess isovalent partitioning into the different cation sites, interpreta- tion of the trace element and isotope compositions of CAIs, particularly the light elements Li

Mcdonough, William F.

14

Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Amounts of Trace Elements in Marine Cephalopods T. Ueda * M. Nakahara...H. Suzuki ** * Division of Marine Radioecology, National Institute...Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Cooperation, Tokyo...Co and Cs in 5 species of marine cephalopods were determined......

T. Ueda; M. Nakahara; T. Ishii; Y. Suzuki; H. Suzuki

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

Zevenhoven, Ron

16

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

17

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilh, Toledo District, Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

uranium, and the rare earth elements (REE) can readilyof uranium and the rare earth elements are extremely low andconsumed in vivo. The rare earth element lanthanum, like

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Trace element partitioning in Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), but collected from the one of the secondary tanks which contains the slurry that exits the scrubber tower and is either recycled or sent to the thickener tank. 10. Bag house FGD (flue gas desulfurization system) fly ash fines (BHA): white-gray, dry, fine... Station. Concentrations of 41 elements were determined by neutron activation analysis. The particle size distribution was determined by Coulter counter analysis for the fly ash collected from the electrostatic precipitator outlets and from the flue...

Acevedo, Lillian Esther

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Uncertainty Measurement for Trace Element Analysis of Uranium and Plutonium Samples by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurement uncertainty estimatino associated with trace element analysis of impurities in U and Pu was evaluated using the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty Measurement (GUM). I this evalution the uncertainty sources were identified and standard uncertainties for the components were categorized as either Type A or B. The combined standard uncertainty was calculated and a coverage factor k = 2 was applied to obtain the expanded uncertainty, U. The ICP-AES and ICP-MS methods used were deveoped for the multi-element analysis of U and Pu samples. A typical analytical run consists of standards, process blanks, samples, matrix spiked samples, post digestion spiked samples and independent calibration verification standards. The uncertainty estimation was performed on U and Pu samples that have been analyzed previously as part of the U and Pu Sample Exchange Programs. Control chart results and data from the U and Pu metal exchange programs were combined with the GUM into a concentration dependent estimate of the expanded uncertainty. Comparison of trace element uncertainties obtained using this model was compared to those obtained for trace element results as part of the Exchange programs. This process was completed for all trace elements that were determined to be above the detection limit for the U and Pu samples.

Gallimore, David L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

Trace elements in oil shale. Progress report, 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research program is to understand the potential impact of an oil shale industry on environmental levels of trace contaminants in the region. The program involves a comprehensive study of the sources, release mechanisms, transport, fate, and effects of toxic trace chemicals, principally the trace elements, in an oil shale industry. The overall objective of the program is to evaluate the environmental and health consequences of the release of toxic trace elements by shale and oil production and use. The baseline geochemical survey shows that stable trace elements maps can be constructed for numerous elements and that the trends observed are related to geologic and climatic factors. Shale retorted by above-ground processes tends to be very homogeneous (both in space and in time) in trace element content. Leachate studies show that significant amounts of B, F, and Mo are released from retorted shales and while B and Mo are rapidly flushed out, F is not. On the other hand, As, Se, and most other trace elements are not present in significant quantities. Significant amounts of F and B are also found in leachates of raw shales. Very large concentrations of reduced sulfur species are found in leachates of processed shale. Very high levels of B and Mo are taken up in some plants growing on processed shale with and without soil cover. There is a tendency for some trace elements to associate with specific organic fractions, indicating that organic chelation or complexation may play an important role. Many of the so-called standard methods for analyzing trace elements in oil shale-related materials are inadequate. A sampling manual is being written for the environmental scientist and practicing engineer. A new combination of methods is developed for separating the minerals in oil shale into different density fractions. Microbial investigations have tentatively identified the existence of thiobacilli in oil shale materials such as leachates. (DC)

Chappell, W R

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric trace element Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: 6 2.0 Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals Trace elements enter the atmosphere via both natural... 5 Chapter 2: Sources and Deposition of Trace Metals...

22

Larval Behavior and Natural Trace Element Signatures as Indicators of Crustacean Population Connectivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

variability in an atlas of trace element signatures forin creating a trace element atlas, our results show thatstage to create a trace element atlas in 2009 (Table 4.2),

Miller, Seth Haylen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A study on some trace elements in Chilean seafood  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Levels of essential and toxic trace elements in six marine species greatly in demand in the international market (canned pink clams, razor clams, clams, king crab, sardines, and frozen albacore tuna fish) were...

N. Gras; L. Munoz; M. Thieck

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

25

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Title Trace element fingerprinting of ancient Chinese gold with femtosecond laser ablation-inductivity coupled mass spectrometry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors Brostoff, Lynn B., Jhanis J. Gonzalez, Paul Jett, and Richard E. Russo Journal Journal of Archeological Science Volume 36 Start Page 461 Issue 2 Pagination 461-466 Date Published 02/2009 Keywords Ancient gold, femtosecond, la-icp-ms, Trace element Abstract In this collaborative investigation, femtosecond laser ablation-inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was applied to the study of a remarkable group of ancient Chinese gold objects in the Smithsonian's Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery. Taking advantage of the superior ablation characteristics and high precision of a femtosecond 266 nm Ti:sapphire laser at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, major, minor and trace element concentrations in the gold fragments were quantified. Results validate use of femtosecond LA-ICP-MS for revealing ''fingerprints'' in minute gold samples. These fingerprints allow us to establish patterns based on the association of silver, palladium and platinum that support historical, technical and stylistic relationships, and shed new light on these ancient objects.

26

Automation of organic elemental analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automation of organic elemental analysis ... Describes the development and design of an apparatus for automated organic elemental analysis. ...

Velmer B. Fish

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Trace elements in co-combustion of solid recovered fuel and coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element partitioning in co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was studied in an entrained flow reactor. The experiments were carried out at conditions similar to pulverized coal combustion, with SRF shares of 7.9wt.% (wet basis), 14.8wt.% and 25.0wt.%. In addition, the effect of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on trace element partitioning was investigated. The trace elements studied were As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn, since these elements were significantly enriched in SRF as compared to coal. During the experiments, bottom ash was collected in a chamber, large fly ash particles were collected by a cyclone with a cut-off diameter of ~2.5?m, and the remaining fly ash particles were gathered in a filter. It was found that when coal was co-fired with SRF, the As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn content in filter ash/cyclone ash increased almost linearly with their content in fuel ash. This linear tendency was affected when the fuels were mixed with additives. The volatility of trace elements during combustion was assessed by applying a relative enrichment (RE) factor, and TEMEDS analysis was conducted to provide qualitative interpretations. The results indicated that As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were highly volatile when co-firing coal and SRF, whereas the volatility of Cr was relatively low. Compared with coal combustion, co-firing of coal and SRF slightly enhanced the volatility of Cd, Pb and Zn, but reduced the volatility of Cr and Sb. The Cl-based additives increased the volatility of Cd, Pb and As, whereas addition of ammonium sulphate generally decreased the volatility of trace elements. Addition of kaolinite reduced the volatility of Pb, while the influence on other trace elements was insignificant. The results from the present work imply that trace element emission would be significantly increased when coal is co-fired with SRF, which may greatly enhance the toxicity of the dusts from coal-fired power plant. In order to minimize trace element emission in co-combustion, in addition to lowering the trace element content in SRF, utilizing SRF with low Cl content and coal with high S and aluminosilicates content would be desirable.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power There is a large literature on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest

Fulman, Jason

29

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEIN'S METHOD, HEAT KERNEL, AND TRACES OF POWERS OF ELEMENTS OF COMPACT LIE GROUPS JASON FULMAN Abstract. Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power on the traces of powers of random elements of compact Lie groups. One of the earliest results is due to Diaconis

Fulman, Jason

30

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

Walter, M.Todd

31

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(XRF). The samples were made into thin sections as well as ground in a tungsten carbide grinding mill. A table of trace elements and amounts found during the analysis is...

32

Engineering development of selective agglomeration: Trace element removal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Southern Company Services, Inc., (SCS) was contracted in 1989 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a commercially acceptable selective agglomeration technology to enhance the use of high-sulfur coals by 1993. The project scope involved development of a bench-scale process and components, as well as the design, testing, and evaluation of a proof-of-concept (POC) facility. To that end, a two-ton-per-hour facility was constructed and tested near Wilsonville, Alabama. Although it was not the primary focus of the test program, SCS also measured the ability of selective agglomeration to remove trace elements from coal. This document describes the results of that program.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Investigation on thermal and trace element characteristics during co-combustion biomass with coal gangue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The thermochemical behaviors during co-combustion of coal gangue (CG), soybean stalk (SS), sawdust (SD) and their blends prepared at different ratios have been determined via thermogravimetric analysis. The simulate experiments in a fixed bed reactor were performed to investigate the partition behaviors of trace elements during co-combustion. The combustion profiles of biomass was more complicated than that of coal gangue. Ignition property and thermal reactivity of coal gangue could be enhanced by the addition of biomass. No interactions were observed between coal gangue and biomass during co-combustion. The volatilization ratios of trace elements decrease with the increasing proportions of biomass in the blends during co-combustion. Based on the results of heating value, activation energy, base/acid ratio and gaseous pollutant emissions, the blending ratio of 2030% biomass content is regarded as optimum composition for blending and could be applied directly at current combustion application with few modifications.

Chuncai Zhou; Guijian Liu; Ting Fang; Paul Kwan Sing Lam

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne trace element Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Sample search results for: airborne trace element Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 AIR-DEPOSITED POLLUTION IN THE ANACOSTIA RIVER WATERSHED Summary: pollution in Lake...

35

Application of neutron activation analysis and high resolution x-ray spectrometry for the determination of trace quantities of elements with short-lived activation products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion Interferences and Errors 3, PROCEDURES AND EXPERIMENTAL SETUP Sample Preparation Pneumatic Sample Transfer System Sample Irradiation X-ray Spectrometry Data Reduction 4. DISCUSSION AND RESULTS System Analysis Analysis Problems.... C. Roentgen made the classic observation that a highly penatrative radiation, unknown at that time, was produced when fast electrons impinged on matter. This radiation, which h called x-rays, was being studied in all parts of the world less than...

Marshall, John Richard

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Trace analysis of atmospheric organic bases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis of atmospheric organic bases were investigated; the study included (1) the analysis of submarine charcoal filter bed samples for nitrogen bases and (2) the use of metallic tetraphenylporphines (TPP) as specific adsorbents for atmospheric... gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The isolation procedure provided acceptable reproducibi lity in the determination of trace amounts of nitrogen bases in the submarine environment. Several metallic TPP adsorbents were...

Clark, Dwayne C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New Albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. The results of the results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage.

Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L. (Univ. of Wyoming Research Corp., Laramie (United States))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Trace element partitioning between baddeleyite and carbonatite melt at high pressures and high temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the heavy rare earth elements (HREE) prefer to enter baddeleyite rather than carbonate melts (D>1), whereas the light rare earth elements (LREE) and other trace elements behave incompatibly (D in carbonatite melts. Baddeleyite is known to accumulate the high field strength elements (HFSE) and some rare

39

Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Trace element behavior in the fluidized bed gasification of solid recovered fuels A thermodynamic study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gasification of biomass and recycled fuels is of particular interest for the efficient production of power and heat. Trace elements present as impurities in the product gas should be removed very efficiently. The objective of this work has been to develop and test thermodynamic models for the reactions of trace elements with chlorine and sulfur in the gasification processes of recycled fuels. In particular, the chemical reactions of trace elements with main thermochemical conversion products, main ash components, and bed and sorbent material are implemented into the model. The possibilities of gas cleaning devices in condensing and removing the trace element compounds are studied by establishing the volatilization tendency of trace element compounds in reducing gases. The results obtained with the model are compared with the measured data of trace elements of gasification experiments using solid recovered fuel as feedstock. Some corresponding studies in the literature are also critically reviewed and compared. The observed discrepancies may be attributed to differences in thermodynamic databases applied and experimental arrangements. The method of removing gaseous trace elements by condensation is already in use in the 160MWth waste gasification plant in Lahti, Finland.

Jukka Konttinen; Rainer Backman; M. Hupa; Antero Moilanen; Esa Kurkela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Chemical interaction of thermal fluids with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah, has resulted in the development of characteristic trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional perspective of chemical redistribution within this structurally-controlled hot-water geothermal system. Five distinctive elemental suites of chemical enrichment are

42

Trace element analysis of Texas lignite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or in the planning stages, Near surface lignite re- sources are estimated to be 21 billion metric tons in Texas, while deep basin reserves are estimated at 31 billion metric tons. Near (3] surface reserves alone could fulfill Texas' electrical needs for 100 years... or in the planning stages, Near surface lignite re- sources are estimated to be 21 billion metric tons in Texas, while deep basin reserves are estimated at 31 billion metric tons. Near (3] surface reserves alone could fulfill Texas' electrical needs for 100 years...

Mahar, Sean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Time Series of Trace Element Concentrations Calculated from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a). A total of 120 samples were collected at sites within the Bay, outside the Golden Gate receives many waste water discharges, especially in areas south of the Dumbarton Bridge, that contain trace

44

Comparative bioaccumulation of trace elements between Nautilus pompilius and N.1 macromphalus (Cephalopoda: Nautiloidea) from Vanuatu and New-Caledonia2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clearly highlighted that the digestive gland32 played a key role in the bioaccumulation and storage of Ag are exposed to trace elements that are present in their diet and dissolved in49 seawater. This double exposure bioavailability of53 the metal in diet and seawater (Rainbow and Wang, 2001). Comparative analysis of trace54

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

45

Trace element mineral transformations associated with hydration and recarbonation of retorted oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hydration and recarbonation on the solidphase distribution of trace elements in retorted oil shale. The oil shale samples were retorted by the Paraho ...

M. E. Essington

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - aristotelis trace elements Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: aristotelis trace elements Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Examen LA207 Matlab: applications en mecanique Summary: en imposant la vue de dessus avec la fonction...

47

Trace element geochemical zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil samples, shallow temperature-gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cuttings provides a three-dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distributions suggests that Li, followed by As and Hg, are progressively deposited by outward flowing, cooling, thermal fluids. Hg, in contrast to As and Li, is distributed only within the outer portions of the thermal system where temperatures are less than about 225/sup 0/C. Heating experiments indicate that extensive Hg remobilization in Roosevelt samples occurs at temperatures as low as 200/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. This suggests that the distribution of Hg largely reflects the present system thermal configuration and that this distribution may be a useful soild geothermometer.

Christensen, O.D.; Moore, J.N.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procedure for Cleaning Bottles for Trace Metal Analysis Initial cleaning: Supplies LDPE 60ml bottles (nalgene) ACS grade Hydrochloric acid Trace metal grade nitric acid Day 1 1. Submerge 60ml bottles for up to three uses) 2. Rinse 3x in milli-q (DI) water 3. Fill bottles with 2% trace metal grade nitric

Paytan, Adina

49

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen TRACE ELEMENTS, ALKALI METALS 19.6.2001 8-1 Chapter 8 Trace elements,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollutants), "known or suspected of causing cancer or other serious health effects" (see also, in part stemming from anthropogenic sources, i.e. pollution. In wastes and waste-derived fuels the "trace to fouling of turbine blades (mainly Ca)or pollute or poison catalysts (mainly As) or sorbents downstream

Zevenhoven, Ron

50

Observations on the incorporation of trace elements in halite of Oligocene salt beds, Bourg-en-Bresse Basin, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is common practice to employ trace elements found in chloride salts as indicators of the conditions of deposition. Because some halite contains abundant fluid inclusions, it is necessary to separate the salt from the inclusions before analysis. This study presents the data derived from the use of a simple preparative technique which permits analysis of the trace elements in solid halite, and provides a guide to test the success in elimination of the contaminants contained in the fluid inclusions. The differentiation is accomplished simply by crushing the salt in alcohol followed by separate analysis of the fluid and solid components, thus yielding accurate trace element concentrations in the solids (crystal lattice, dislocations, and grain boundaries) and the fluids. Br and K are present both in the solid and liquid phases of the halite, but Mg is exclusively in the fluid inclusions. The elimination of the Mg from the analysis of the solid phase may thus be employed as a monitor to indicate the degree of purification of the samples being analyzed.

Moretto, R. (Universite de Nancy I, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Trace elements in brown coal and its products of combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Concentrations of 38 elements in brown coal, bottom ash and size fractionated ESP coal ash from the Belchatw I Power Plant were determined by INAA. Based on enrichment factors calculated relatively to iron an...

U. Tomza; P. Kaleta

1986-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Trace element emissions. Semi-annual report, October 1994--February 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many trace elements can exist in raw coal gas either in the form of metallic vapors or gaseous compounds which, besides their action on potentially ``very clean`` advanced power generating systems such as fuel cells and gas turbines, can also be detrimental to plant and animal life when released into the atmosphere. Therefore, volatile trace contaminants from coal which can also be toxic must be removed before they become detrimental to both power plant performance/endurance and the environment. Five trace elements were selected in this project based on: abundance in solid coal, volatility during gasification, effects on downstream systems and toxicity to plant and animal life. An understanding was sought in this investigation of the interactions of these five trace elements (and their high temperature species) with the different components in integrated cleanup and power generating systems, as well as the ultimate effects with respect to atmospheric emissions. Utilizing thermodynamic calculations and various experimental techniques, it was determined that a number of trace contaminants that exist in coal may be substantially removed by flyash, and after that by different sorbent systems. High temperature cleanup of contaminants by sorbents such as zinc titanate, primarily to remove sulfur, can also absorb some metallic contaminants such as cadmium and antimony. Further polishing will be required, however, to eliminate trace contaminant species incorporating the elements arsenic, selemium, lead, and mercury.

Pigeaud, A.; Maru, H.; Wilemski, G.; Helble, J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Washability of trace elements in product coals from Illinois mines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing trace element washability data on Illinois coals are based on float-sink methods, and these data are not applicable to modern froth flotation or column flotation processes. Particularly, there is a lack of washability data on samples from modern preparation plants, as well as other product (as-shipped) coals. The goal of this project is to provide the needed trace element washability data on as-shipped coals that were collected during 1992--1993 from Illinois mines. The results generated by this project will promote Illinois coals for such prospective new markets as feed materials for advanced gasification processes, for synthetic organic chemicals, and to meet new environmental requirements for their use in utility steam generation. During the first quarter, each of 34 project samples were ground to about {approximately}100 mesh size and cleaned by use of a special froth flotation technique (release analysis). The flotation products were analyzed for ash, moisture, and heating value (BTU). The data were then used to construct a series of different-washability curves. For example, these curves can show variation in BTU or combustible recovery as a function of the amount of ash or S rejected, or as a function of the weight of the flotation products. From the relationship between %cumulative BTU and %cumulative weight, nine composite samples each having 80% of the total BTU were prepared from the individual flotation products and submitted for trace element analysis.

Demir, I.; Ruch, R.R.; Harvey, R.D.; Steele, J.D. [Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States). Geological Survey

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Correlations of trace elements in breast human tissues: Evaluation of spatial distribution using {mu}-XRF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to investigate microscopic correlations between trace elements in breast human tissues. A synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microprobe system ({mu}-XRF) was used to obtain two-dimensional distribution of trace element Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in normal (6 samples) and malignant (14 samples) breast tissues. The experiment was performed in X-ray Fluorescence beam line at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS), Campinas, Brazil. The white microbeam was generated with a fine conical capillary with a 20 {mu}m output diameter. The samples were supported on a XYZ table. An optical microscope with motorized zoom was used for sample positioning and choice the area to be scanned. Automatic two-dimensional scans were programmed and performed with steps of 30 {mu}m in each direction (x, y) on the selected area. The fluorescence signals were recorded using a Si(Li) detector, positioned at 90 degrees with respect to the incident beam, with a collection time of 10 s per point. The elemental maps obtained from each sample were overlap to observe correlation between trace elements. Qualitative results showed that the pairs of elements Ca-Zn and Fe-Cu could to be correlated in malignant breast tissues. Quantitative results, achieved by Spearman correlation tests, indicate that there is a spatial correlation between these pairs of elements (p < 0.001) suggesting the importance of these elements in metabolic processes associated with the development of the tumor.

Piacenti da Silva, Marina; Silva, Deisy Mara da; Ribeiro-Silva, Alfredo; Poletti, Martin Eduardo [Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Patologia, HCFM/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, FFCLRP/USP, Av. dos Bandeirantes n. 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto - SP (Brazil)

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

56

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

57

Distribution of trace elements in waters and sediments of the Seversky Donets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution of trace elements in waters and sediments of the Seversky Donets transboundary sources in the transboundary watershed of the Seversky Donets River (Ukraine/Russia). Bed sediments, V) and Th were measured in stream water and sediments. The low levels and variability of Th

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

58

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare high levels of selenium and may be useful bioindicators in agricultural and coal ash-impacted habitats

Hopkins, William A.

59

Trace Elements in Tree Rings: Evidence of Recent and Historical Air Pollution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or both. Tree rings have been used to construct records of climate (1), document heavy metal pollution (2Trace Elements in Tree Rings: Evidence of Recent and Historical Air Pollution C. F. Baes III and S and Historical Air Pollution Abstract. Annual growth rinks from short-leaf pine trees in the Great Smoky

Baes, Fred

60

Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1 *, John considering the land application of wastewater sludges. The effects of pelletization/drying, composting compared. A single day's production of dewatered anaerobically-digested sludge (Syracuse, NY) was used

Walter, M.Todd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Method for quantitative determination and separation of trace amounts of chemical elements in the presence of large quantities of other elements having the same atomic mass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photoionization via autoionizing atomic levels combined with conventional mass spectroscopy provides a technique for quantitative analysis of trace quantities of chemical elements in the presence of much larger amounts of other elements with substantially the same atomic mass. Ytterbium samples smaller than 10 ng have been detected using an ArF* excimer laser which provides the atomic ions for a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Elemental selectivity of greater than 5:1 with respect to lutetium impurity has been obtained. Autoionization via a single photon process permits greater photon utilization efficiency because of its greater absorption cross section than bound-free transitions, while maintaining sufficient spectroscopic structure to allow significant photoionization selectivity between different atomic species. Separation of atomic species from others of substantially the same atomic mass is also described.

Miller, C.M.; Nogar, N.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

62

Extractable trace elements in the soil profile after years of biosolids application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and some state agencies regulate trace element additions to soil from land application of biosolids. The authors generally consider trace elements added in biosolids (sewage sludge) to accumulate in the soil surface without significant transport below the plow layer. They used 11 yr of field-study information from biosolids addition to dryland hard red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Vona or TAM107) to determine the distribution of NH{sub 4}HCO{sub 3} diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (AB-DTPA)-extractable Cd, Cr, Cu, Mo, Ni, Pb, and Zn in 0 to 20 (plow layer), 20 to 60, 60 to 100, and 100 to 150 cm depth increments. This study is unique since it involves multiple biosolids application in a dryland summer fallow agroecosystem. The authors applied five or six applications of biosolids from the cities of Littleton and Englewood, CO, to Weld loam or Platner loam at four locations. This paper focuses on the 0 (control), the 56 or 67 kg of N ha{sup {minus}1} fertilizer rates, and the 6.7 and 26.8 dry Mg of biosolids ha{sup {minus}1} rates that they added every crop year. The authors observed significant (P < 0.10) accumulations of the trace elements in the plow layer of the biosolids-amended soils. Only Zn showed consistent increases in extractable levels below the plow layer at all four sites. The biosolids Zn concentration was larger than any other trace element resulting in larger loading of this element.

Barbarick, K.A.; Ippolito, J.A.; Westfall, D.G. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Soil and Crop Sciences

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Stein's method, heat kernel, and traces of powers of elements of compact Lie groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining Stein's method with heat kernel techniques, we show that the trace of the jth power of an element of U(n,C), USp(n,C) or SO(n,R) has a normal limit with error term of order j/n. In contrast to previous works, here j may be growing with n. The technique should prove useful in the study of the value distribution of approximate eigenfunctions of Laplacians.

Jason Fulman

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

The distribution and association of trace elements in the bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution and association of trace elements in bitumen, kerogen and pyrolysates from New Albany oil shale were investigated using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe x-ray fluorescence (EMP-XRF), liquid chromatography, ultra-violet spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The kerogen was found to contain several HCl/HF resistant minerals (determined by XRD), including pyrite, marcasite, chalcopyrite, rutile, and anatase, and the neoformed mineral ralstonite. Kerogens (prepared at UNOCAL, CA) which were fractionated in an aqueous ZnBr[sub 2] solution were found to contain [approximately]20% less acid-resistant minerals than traditional' HCl/HF isolated kerogens and were contaminated with Zn and Br. Kerogens (prepared at the University of Munich) treated with SnCl[sub 2]/H[sub 3]PO[sub 4] at 150-270[degrees]C (Kiba) and/or SnCl[sub 2]/HCl at 110[degrees]C were found to contain <10% of their original pyrite/marcasite (FeS[sub 2]), but were contaminated with large amounts of Sn. The Kiba treatment also appeared to demetallate Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins. The inorganic and organic associations of trace elements in New Albany kerogen were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue ([approximately]85% FeS[sub 2]) obtained through density separations. The degree of association of several elements (As, Co, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sb, and Se) with FeS[sub 2] was determined through the analysis of individual mineral grains by EMP-XRF and by analysis of the mineral residue treated with dilute HNO[sub 3] to remove FeS[sub 2]. These studies indicated that essentially all of the V and [approximately]95% of the Ni present in New Albany kerogen is organically associated. Methods which are designed to account for the inorganic associations of trace elements in kerogens, including methods based on physical methods of separation, chemical removal of FeS[sub 2], EMP-XRF and low temperature ashing, are compared.

Mercer, G.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Minor and Trace Element Determination of Food Spices and Pulses of Different Origins by NAA and PAA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

INAA, RNAA and IPAA were employed to determine upto 26 trace elements in 32 spices of 18 species and 16 pulses of 8 species originating from different localities. The results are compared with each other and t...

Y. Miyamoto; A. Kajikawa; J. H. Zaidi

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Trace element mobility during sub-seafloor alteration of basaltic glass from Ocean Drilling Program site 953 (off Gran Canaria)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element concentrations of altered basaltic glass shards (layer silicates) and zeolites in volcaniclastic sediments drilled in the volcanic apron northeast of Gran Canaria during Ocean Drilling Program (ODP)...

A. Utzmann; T. Hansteen; H.-U. Schmincke

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Trace determination of lead by helium-4 activation analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glass samples doped with 61 different trace elements at nominal 500 to 1 ppm level concentrations. We evaluated the measurement sensitivities of two methods for alpha counting, i. e. , surface barrier detector and nuclear track detectors. Detection.... An automated system synchronized irradiation, solenoid operation, and data acquisition. Prior to irradiation, the solenoid was energized to position the aluminum sheet in front of the detector. The cyclotron's beam pulser system then began irradiation...

Vargas Bernal, Maria E.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

68

Multiple stirred-flow chamber assembly for simultaneous automatic fractionation of trace elements in fly ash samples using a multisyringe-based flow system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a current trend in automation of leaching tests for trace elements in solid matrixes by use of flow injection based column approaches. However, as a result of the downscaled dimensions of the analytical manifold and execution of a single extraction at a time, miniaturized flow-through column approaches have merely found applications for periodic investigations of trace element mobility in highly homogeneous environmental solids. A novel flow-based configuration capitalized on stirred-flow cell extraction is proposed in this work for simultaneous fractionation of trace elements in three solid wastes with no limitation of sample amount up to 1.0 g. A two-step sequential extraction scheme involving water and acetic acid (or acetic acid/acetate buffer) is utilized for accurate assessment of readily mobilizable fractions of trace elements in fly ash samples. The W automated extraction system features high tolerance to flow rates ({<=} 6 mL min{sup -1}) and, as opposed to operationally defined batchwise methods, the solid to liquid ratio is not a critical parameter for, determination of overall readily leachable trace elements provided that exhaustive extraction is ensured. Analytical performance of the dynamic extractor is evaluated for fractionation analysis of a real coal fly ash and BCR-176R fly ash certified reference material. No significant differences were found at the 0.05 significance level between summation of leached concentrations in each fraction plus residue and concentration values of BCR-176R, thus revealing the accuracy of the automated method. Overall extractable pools of trace metals in three samples are separated in less than 115 min, even for highly contaminated ashes, versus 18-24 h per fraction in equilibrium leaching tests. The multiple stirred-flow cell assembly is thus suitable for routine risk assessment studies of industrial solid byproduct.

Boonjob, W.; Miro, M.; Cerda, V. [Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand). Faculty of Science

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Heterogeneous distribution of trace elements and fluorine in phosphogypsum by-product  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum (PG), a by-product from phosphate fertilizer production, is composed mainly of gypsum (CaSO42H2O) but also contains minor quantities of trace elements (TE), rare earth elements (REE) and F. Some elements may be elevated in quantities to be of environmental concern. This study determined the distribution of TE, REE and F among three size fractions (53 ?m) in \\{PGs\\} derived from three different phosphate rock sources. Fine fraction PG (<20 ?m) composed of <10% of total PG mass but was highly enriched in TE, REE and F compared to unfractionated PG. For PG derived from Idaho rock, Se in the fine fraction was enriched 830 times over soil and 415 times over shale while Cd was enriched in the fine fraction 70-fold over shale and soil. Fluorine was elevated 37 times in the fine fraction compared to shale. The same trends were observed for PG derived from Togo and Florida rocks. Elevated elemental concentrations in fine particles and particle sorting during PG deposition may contribute to chemical heterogeneity of PG repositories, and make elements more susceptible to mobilization processes, such as leaching and erosion. Removal of fines will improve the utilization of PG in other industries, such as for use as an amendment to agricultural soils.

J.M. Arocena; P.M. Rutherford; M.J. Dudas

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Long-term leaching of trace elements in a heavily sludge-amended silty clay loam soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis by ICP-MS of shallow groundwater collected at a field site in New York that had been heavily loaded with sewage sludge more than 15 years earlier revealed elevated concentrations of Cu, Zn, Sr, Rb, Mo, Cd, As, Cr, Ni, Sb, W, Ag, Hg, and Sn compared with a nearby control site. Enhanced leaching of some elements from this near-neutral, fine-textured (silty clay loam) soil could be explained by exchange of soil-bound elements by components of the added sludge. For most of the heavy metals, however, increased leaching was a response to the high metal loadings in the soil, probably facilitated by higher dissolved organic matter in the leachate. Laboratory-determined distribution coefficients, K{sub D}, for the metals in newly prepared sludge/soil mixtures were lower than K{sub D} values of the field-aged sludge-treated soil, suggesting that metal mobility may have been substantially higher shortly after sludge application than many years later. Cumulative losses of certain trace elements from the topsoil have been estimated relative to Cr, a comparatively immobile element. These suggest that relative long-term losses range from 20 to 80%, with the order being: Sr, Mo, Sb {gt} Ni, Cd, Cu {gt} Zn, Ag. Generally, those elements with the smallest K{sub D} values (most soluble) measured recently in the soil had the largest loss estimates. However, present leaching loss rates are too slow to explain the estimated relative losses of several of these elements from the topsoil over the 15 or more years since sludge application.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

The distribution of ten trace elements and minerals in three lignite seams from the Mae Moh Mine, Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the association of major, minor and trace elements in lignites and their accompanying strata is important from a number of perspectives which include: potential health problems from environmental pollutants, rehabilitation after mining, combustion for power etc. The material which follows represents some preliminary observations on the mineralogy and distribution of 10 trace elements in lignites and accompanying sediments from the Mae Moh mine, Thailand. Samples collected from freshly exposed mine faces were air dried and analyzed for moisture and ash. Trace element concentrations were determined on {open_quotes}whole{close_quotes} coals and sediments by NAA and XRF. All chemical analyses are expressed as a fraction of the total dry sediment. Mineralogy of both LTA and sediments was determined by XRD. The chemistry and morphology of individual particles were examined by the Electron microprobe. The analyses are used to make some conclusions about the spatial occurrence of these elements within the seam and their partitioning between organic and inorganic phases.

Hart, B.; Powell, M.P.; Fyfe, W.S. [Univ. of Ontario (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10) 10) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At NW Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa

73

Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Compound and Elemental Analysis Details Activities (104) Areas (69) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / compound Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD

74

Emission factors for particles, elemental carbon, and trace gases from the Kuwait oil fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emission factors are presented for particles, elemental carbon (i.e., soot), total organic carbon in particles and vapor, and for various trace gases from the 1991 Kuwait oil fires. Particle emissions accounted for {approximately} 2% of the fuel burned. In general, soot emission factors were substantially lower than those used in recent {open_quotes}nuclear winter{close_quotes} calculations. Differences in the emissions and appearances of some of the individual fires are discussed. Carbon budget data for the composite plumes from the Kuwait fires are summarized; most of the burned carbon in the plumes was in the form of CO{sub 2}. Fluxes are presented for several combustion products. 26 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

Laursen, K.K.; Ferek, R.J.; Hobbs, P.V. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Rasmussen, R.A. [Oregon Graduate Institute of Science and Technology, Beaverton, OR (United States)

1992-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Environmental impact assessment of radionuclides and trace elements at the Kurday U mining site, Kazakhstan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Kurday uranium mining site in Kazakhstan operated from 1954 to 1965 as part of the USSR nuclear weapon programme. To assess the environmental impact of radionuclides and trace elements associated with the Kurday mining site, field expeditions were performed in 2006. In addition to in situ gamma and 220Rn dose rate measurements, sampling included at site fractionation of water as well as sampling of water, fish, sediment, soils and vegetation. The concentrations of U and associated trace metals were enriched in the Pit Lake and in the artesian water (U exceeding the WHO guideline value for drinking water), and decreased downstream from the mining area. Uranium, As, Mo and Ni were predominantly present as mobile low molecular mass species in waters, while a significant proportion of Cr, Mn and Fe were associated with colloids and particles. Due to oxidation of divalent iron in the artesian ground water upon contact with air, Fe served as scavenger for other elements, and peak concentrations of U-, Ra-isotopes, As and Mn were seen. Most radionuclides and trace elements were contained in minerals in soils and sediments, and good correlations were obtained between U and As, Cd, Mo and 226Ra. Based on sequential extractions, a significant fraction of U, Pb and Cd could be considered mobile. Radioactive particles carrying significant amount of trace metals may represent a hazard during strong wind events. The transfer of radionuclides and metals from soils or sediments to water was in general low. The Kd levels varied with the element in question, ranging from 0.5 to 3נ102L/kg d.w. for 238U being relatively mobile, 103 for 226Ra, As, Cd, Ni, to 104L/kg d.w. for Cu, Cr and Pb being rather inert The transfer of radionuclides and metals from soils to vegetation (TF) was low, while higher if the transfer to vegetation, especially underwater mosses, occurred via water (e.g., BCF 37L/kg w.w. for 238U and 3נ103L/kg w.w. for 226Ra). The transfer of Cd, Pb and As from water to fish liver (BCF) was rather high, showing \\{BCFs\\} in the range of 102103L/kg w.w., and may, if eaten, represent a health risk. Furthermore, the high Hg level in fish filet reaching 0.3mg/kg w.w. muscle and the tendency of biomagnification call for dietary restrictions. Total gamma and Rn dose rate to man amounted to about 6mSv/y, while the highest calculated dose rate for non-human species based on the ERICA Assessment Tool were obtained in aquatic plants, with calculated mean doses of 700 ?Gy/hr, mostly due to the U exposure. Overall, it is concluded that measures such as restricted access to the Pit Lake as well as dietary restrictions with respect to drinking water and intake of fish should be taken to reduce the environmental risk to man and biota.

B. Salbu; M. Burkitbaev; G. Strmman; I. Shishkov; P. Kayukov; B. Uralbekov; B.O. Rosseland

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Turtle With Mad Input (trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A Computer Program For Simulating Charged Particle Beam Transport Systems And Decay Turtle Including Decay Calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turtle With Mad Input (trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A Computer Program For Simulating Charged Particle Beam Transport Systems And Decay Turtle Including Decay Calculations

Carey, D C

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Trace Analysis of Agrochemicals in Food  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Trace Analysis of Agrochemicals in Food ... Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) is applied to the rapid, in situ, direct qualitative and quantitative (ultra)trace analysis of agrochemicals in foodstuffs. ... The results proved that DESI allows the detection and confirmation of traces of agrochemicals in actual market-purchased samples. ...

Juan F. Garca-Reyes; Ayanna U. Jackson; Antonio Molina-Daz; R. Graham Cooks

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

78

POSTER INSTRUCTIONS International Symposium on Trace Elements in Man & Animals (TEMA 15) June 22-26, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTER INSTRUCTIONS 15th International Symposium on Trace Elements in Man & Animals (TEMA 15) June 22-26, 2014 Orlando, Florida The B Resort in Walt Disney Poster Specifications Posters as during lunches on Monday and Tuesday. Posters will be limited to 4 feet high x 3 feet wide (1.22M high x

Jawitz, James W.

79

Correlation of mineralogy and trace element leaching behavior in modified in situ spent shales from Logan Wash, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oil shale retorting induces mineral and chemical reactions to occur on the macroscopic and microscopic levels in the kerogen-bearing marlstone. The nature and extent of the reactions is dependent upon process variables such as maximum temperature, time at temperature, atmosphere, and raw shale composition. This report describes the investigation of the mineral, chemical, and trace element release properties of spent shales retrieved from an experimental in situ retort at Occidental Oil Shale, Inc.'s Logan Wash site in Garfield County, Colorado. Correlation between mineralogy of the spent materials and the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements are indicated, and relationships with important process parameters are discussed. The progress of carbonate decomposition reactions and silication reactions is indicative of the processing conditions experienced by the shale materials and influences the mobility of major, minor, and trace elements when the solids are contacted by water. Shale minerals that are exposed to the extreme conditions reached in underground retorting form high temperature product phases including akermanite-gehlenite and diopside-augite solid solutions, kalsilite, monticellite, and forsterie. The persistence of relatively thermally stable phases, such as quartz, orthoclase, and albite provide insight into the extremes of processing conditions experienced by the spent shales. Leachate compositions suggest that several trace elements, including vanadium, boron, fluoride, and arsenic are not rendered immobile by the formation of the high-temperature silicate product phase akermanite-gehlenite.

Peterson, E.J.; O'Rourke, J.A.; Wagner, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity...

82

Trace element and isotope geochemistry of geothermal fluids, East Rift Zone, Kilauea, Hawaii  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A research program has been undertaken in an effort to better characterize the composition and the precipitation characteristic of the geothermal fluids produced by the HGP-A geothermal well located on the Kilauea East Rift Zone on the Island of Hawaii. The results of these studies have shown that the chemical composition of the fluids changed over the production life of the well and that the fluids produced were the result of mixing of at least two, and possibly three, source fluids. These source fluids were recognized as: a sea water composition modified by high temperature water-rock reactions; meteoric recharge; and a hydrothermal fluid that had been equilibrated with high temperature reservoir rocks and magmatic volatiles. Although the major alkali and halide elements show clearly increasing trends with time, only a few of the trace transition metals show a similar trend. The rare earth elements, were typically found at low concentrations and appeared to be highly variable with time. Studies of the precipitation characteristics of silica showed that amorphous silica deposition rates were highly sensitive to fluid pH and that increases in fluid pH above about 8.5 could flocculate more than 80% of the suspended colloidal silica in excess of its solubility. Addition of transition metal salts were also found to enhance the recovery fractions of silica from solution. The amorphous silica precipitate was also found to strongly scavenge the alkaline earth and transition metal ions naturally present in the brines; mild acid treatments were shown to be capable of removing substantial fractions of the scavenged metals from the silica flocs yielding a moderately pure gelatinous by-product. Further work on the silica precipitation process is recommended to improve our ability to control silica scaling from high temperature geothermal fluids or to recover a marketable silica by-product from these fluids prior to reinjection.

West, H.B.; Delanoy, G.A.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Inst. of Geophysics); Gerlach, D.C. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Chen, B.; Takahashi, P.; Thomas, D.M. (Hawaii Univ., Honolulu, HI (United States) Evans (Charles) and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Distribution of arsenic, selenium, and other trace elements in high pyrite Appalachian coals: Evidence for multiple episodes of pyrite formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pennsylvanian coals in the Appalachian Basin host pyrite that is locally enriched in potentially toxic trace elements such as As, Se, Hg, Pb, and Ni. A comparison of pyrite-rich coals from northwestern Alabama, eastern Kentucky, and West Virginia reveals differences in concentrations and mode of occurrence of trace elements in pyrite. Pyrite occurs as framboids, dendrites, or in massive crystalline form in cell lumens or crosscutting veins. Metal concentrations in pyrite vary over all scales, from microscopic to mine to regional, because trace elements are inhomogeneously distributed in the different morphological forms of pyrite, and in the multiple generations of sulfide mineral precipitates. Early diagenetic framboidal pyrite is usually depleted in As, Se, and Hg, and enriched in Pb and Ni, compared to other pyrite forms. In dendritic pyrite, maps of As distribution show a chemical gradient from As-rich centers to As-poor distal branches, whereas Se concentrations are highest at the distal edges of the branches. Massive crystalline pyrite that fills veins is composed of several generations of sulfide minerals. Pyrite in late-stage veins commonly exhibits As-rich growth zones, indicating a probable epigenetic hydrothermal origin. Selenium is concentrated at the distal edges of veins. A positive correlation of As and Se in pyrite veins from Kentucky coals, and of As and Hg in pyrite-filled veins from Alabama coals, suggests coprecipitation of these elements from the same fluid. In the Kentucky coal samples (n=18), As and Se contents in pyrite-filled veins average 4200ppm and 200ppm, respectively. In Alabama coal samples, As in pyrite-filled veins averages 2700ppm (n=34), whereas As in pyrite-filled cellular structures averages 6470ppm (n=35). In these same Alabama samples, Se averages 80ppm in pyrite-filled veins, but was below the detection limit in cell structures. In samples of West Virginia massive pyrite, As averages 1700ppm, and Se averages 270ppm (n=24). The highest concentration of Hg (?102ppm) is in Alabama pyrite veins. Improved detailed descriptions of sulfide morphology, sulfide mineral paragenesis, and trace-element concentration and distribution allow more informed predictions of: (1) the relative rate of release of trace elements during weathering of pyrite in coals, and (2) the relative effectiveness of various coal-cleaning procedures of removing pyrite. For example, trace element-rich pyrite has been shown to be more soluble than stoichiometric pyrite, and fragile fine-grained pyrite forms such as dendrites and framboids are more susceptible to dissolution and disaggregation but less amenable to removal during coal cleaning.

S.F. Diehl; M.B. Goldhaber; A.E. Koenig; H.A. Lowers; L.F. Ruppert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.06.037 Effect of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coefficients for the rare earth elements and for Th, Nb, and Ta reveal a strong influence of melt composition amounts of rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE), it may significantly affectdoi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.06.037 Effect of melt composition on the partitioning of trace elements

85

Association of trace elements with mineral species in the New Albany oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

X-Ray diffraction (XRD), electron microprobe (EMP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and neutron activation analysis (NAA) were used to identify mineral species in the New Albany shale and kerogen isolates. Elemental abundances were determined by NAA and distributions of Ni, V, As, and other elements with-in mineral grains were determined by EMP-XRF. Vanadium in the New Albany shale was found to be associated primarily with clay minerals (illite, montmorrillonite). In the New Albany kerogen, Ni and V were shown to be predominantly associated with the organic matrix. Pyrite (and/or marcasite) was shown to occur in two forms, a euhedral variety and as framboidal clusters. The Ni content of the framboidal variety was found to be higher than that of the euhedral pyrite.

Fitzgerald, S.L.; Day, J.W.; Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium deposits." References

87

Distribution of hazardous air pollutant trace elements, total sulfur, and ash in coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arithmetic mean values of the contents of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) trace elements named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium), ash, and total sulfur were statistically compared on a whole-coal basis for Paleocene coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region. The study of proximate and elemental analyses indicate a relationship between trace element contents and paleogeography.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Computer analysis of holographic systems by means of vector ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes a computer program based on Welford's vector analysis approach capable of ray tracing through hybrid optical systems containing both conventional and diffractive...

Holloway, H W; Ferrante, R A

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Integrating local action elements for action analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a framework for human action analysis from video footage. A video action sequence in our perspective is a dynamic structure of sparse local spatial-temporal patches termed action elements, so the problems of action analysis ... Keywords: Action classification, Action distance function, Action matching, Action retrieval, Generalized Hough Transform, Implicit Shape Model, Multi-dimensional density estimation, Sparse Bayesian classifier, Spatial temporal feature

Tuan Hue Thi; Li Cheng; Jian Zhang; Li Wang; Shinichi Satoh

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Chemical composition and some trace element contents in coals and coal ash from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje Coal Field, Serbia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical compositions and trace element contents (Zn, Cu, Co, Cr, Ni, Pb, Cd, As, B, Hg, Sr, Se, Be, Ba, Mn, Th, V, U) in coal and coal ash samples from Tamnava-Zapadno Polje coal field in Serbia were studied. The coal from this field belongs to lignite. This high volatility coal has high moisture and low S contents, moderate ash yield, and high calorific value. The coal ash is abundant in alumosilicates. Many trace elements such as Ni > Cd > Cr > B > As > Cu > Co > Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal and Ni > Cr > As > B > Cu > Co = Pb > V > Zn > Mn in the coal ash are enriched in comparison with Clarke concentrations.

Vukasinovic-Pesic, V.; Rajakovic, L.J. [University of Montenegro, Podgorica (Montenegro)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Reasoning by Assumption: Formalisation and Analysis of Human Reasoning Traces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the traces acquired in experiments undertaken. 1 Introduction Practical reasoning processes are often not limited to single reasoning steps, but extend to traces or trajectories of a number of interrelated by assumption'. This (non-deductive) practical reasoning pattern in- volves a number of interrelated reasoning

Treur, Jan

92

Application of synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a synchrotron storage ring as a high brightness source for production of monoergic, variable energy, and highly polarized x-ray beams promises to revolutionize the field of elemental analysis. The results of exploratory work using the Cornell synchrotron facility, CHESS, will be described. Design considerations and features of the new X-Ray Microprobe Facility now under construction at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source will be presented. This facility will be used for bulk analysis and for microanalysis with an initial spatial resolution of the order of 30 ..mu..m.

Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Hastings, J.B.; Howells, M.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Chen, J.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Statistical analysis of aerosol species, trace gasses, and meteorology in Chicago  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible pollutant sources. Keywords Atmospheric aerosols . Canonical correlation analysis . Chicago air pollution studies involve collection and anal- ysis of atmospheric aerosols and concurrent meteorol- ogy) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to atmospheric aerosol and trace gas concentrations

O'Brien, Timothy E.

94

Trace element partitioning between apatite and silicate melts Stefan Prowatke a,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The experiments were conducted at pressures of 1.0 GPa and temperatures of 1250 °C. The rare earth elements (La polymerisation of the melt, apatite/melt partition coefficients for the rare earth elements increase for about occurring apatites contain large amounts of the rare earth elements and Sr, it has been well known

95

Precise lattice location of trace elements within minerals and at their surfaces with x?ray standing waves (abstract)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using x?ray standing waves (XSW) generated by dynamical Bragg diffraction we have precisely measured lattice locations of trace elements within and at the surface of mineral single crystals. Natural calcite samples were cleaved along the (1014) plane to obtain pristine surfaces. After cleavage some samples were reacted with a dilute aqueous Pb solution to obtain Pb?sorbed surfaces. XSW measurements were then performed on both unreacted and reacted samples using the calcite (1014) Bragg reflection. Results of these XSW measurements show that the naturally occurring trace element M substitutes for C. On the Pb?reacted calcite sample Pb was located on the calcite (1014) lattice plane where C atoms also reside. Our measurements clearly demonstrate a new and powerful application of synchrotron radiation in earth and environmental sciences to provide element?specific atomic?scale structural information within and at the surface of minerals. The XSW measurements were made at the NSLS X15A and X25 beamlines.

Y. Qian

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

JV Task-123 Determination of Trace Element Concentrations at an Eastern Bituminous Coal Plant Employing an SCR and Wet FGD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), in partnership with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) and with funding from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducting tests to prove that a high level of mercury control (>90%) can be achieved at a power plant burning a high-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. With funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), DOE, and Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates Program, the EERC completed an additional sampling project to provide data as to the behavior of a number of trace elements across the various pollution control devices, with a special emphasis on the wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system. Results showed that the concentrations of almost all the elements of interest leaving the stack were very low, and a high percentage of the trace elements were captured in the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) (for most, >80%). Although, with a few exceptions, the overall mass balances were generally quite good, the mass balances across the wet FGD were more variable. This is most likely a result of some of the concentrations being very low and also the uncertainties in determining flows within a wet FGD.

Dennis Laudal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Effect of agricultural use of phosphogypsum on trace elements in soils and vegetation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the disposal of phosphogypsum, one of the main industrial wastes of phosphorus fertilizer production, is reviewed, from the point of view of element pollution of phosphate raw materials, when it is introduced to soil. When phosphogypsum from different phosphorus producing plants in the USSR is used in agriculture, the main element-pollutants are fluorine, sulphur, strontium and rare earth elements. Their concentration in soils and vegetation exceeds Clark values by 20100 times. The necessity for complex biogeochemical investigations to identify the hazards from these chemical elements in the environment is discussed.

A.V. Gorbunov; M.V. Frontasyeva; S.F. Gundorina; T.L. Onischenko; B.B. Maksjuta; Chen Sen Pal

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Trace Elemental Variation in Dosidicus Gigas Statoliths Using LA-ICP-MS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

classified as distinct group for the first time using these methods. Elemental fingerprint signatures were found to be significantly different at multiple ontogenic growth regions of the statolith. Seattle and California paralarvae exhibited similar...

Arbuckle, Nancy 1980-

2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

99

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Atom Trap Trace Analysis at ANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Atom Trap Trace Analysis (ATTA) to determine isotopic abundances. Developed at: Argonne National Laboratory Developed in: 1999-current

100

Realistic Performance Analysis of WSN Protocols Through Trace Based Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Generic network simulators are often used, but they tend to rely on synthetic models. Because WSN enable trace based WSN simulation by first enhancing an existing WSN profiler that automates. These include simulation area, node density, radio model, noise model, etc. These parameters are used

Han, Qi "Chee"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Trace Environmental Quantitative Analysis: Principles, Techniques and Applications, 2nd  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, California State UniVersity, Los Angeles JA0599418 10.1021/ja0599418 CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics and field- based techniques. Loconto's book does a superlative job of introducing the concept of trace edition of this famous handbook continues to provide up-to-date, critically evaluated chemical

Zubarev, Eugene

102

Finite element analysis of multilayer coextrusion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multilayer coextrusion has become a popular commercial process for producing complex polymeric products from soda bottles to reflective coatings. A numerical model of a multilayer coextrusion process is developed based on a finite element discretization and two different free-surface methods, an arbitrary-Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) moving mesh implementation and an Eulerian level set method, to understand the moving boundary problem associated with the polymer-polymer interface. The goal of this work is to have a numerical capability suitable for optimizing and troubleshooting the coextrusion process, circumventing flow instabilities such as ribbing and barring, and reducing variability in layer thickness. Though these instabilities can be both viscous and elastic in nature, for this work a generalized Newtonian description of the fluid is used. Models of varying degrees of complexity are investigated including stability analysis and direct three-dimensional finite element free surface approaches. The results of this work show how critical modeling can be to reduce build test cycles, improve material choices, and guide mold design.

Hopkins, Matthew Morgan; Schunk, Peter Randall; Baer, Thomas A. (Proctor & Gamble Company, West Chester, OH); Mrozek, Randy A. (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Lenhart, Joseph Ludlow (Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, MD); Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Collins, Robert (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Mondy, Lisa Ann

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Measurement of particulate matter and trace elements from a coal-fired power plant with electrostatic precipitators equipped the low temperature economizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The particulate matter and trace elements from a 660MW coal-fired power plant boiler which equipped with a novel electrostatic precipitator were sampled and analyzed. To promote the thermal efficiency of power plants, a low temperature economizer was installed at the inlet of electrostatic precipitator to collect the heat generated from flue gas. The low temperature economizer can reduce flue gas temperature, and then affect the operation of electrostatic precipitator. Therefore, this experiment was carried out to investigate the collection characteristics of this novel electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter. In addition, the distribution of trace elements in solid combustion residues was also studied. The results indicate that the low temperature economizer can markedly decrease the amount of particulate matter at the outlet of electrostatic precipitator. The collection efficiency of electrostatic precipitator on particulate matter is significantly improved by the low temperature economizer, whereby the collection efficiencies of PM2.5 and PM1.0 can reach 99.7% and 99.2%, respectively. Most of the trace elements remain in the fly ash collected by the electrostatic precipitator, and less than 10% remain in the bottom ash, but very rare emit from the electrostatic precipitator. The low temperature economizer not only reduces the emission of particulate matter, but also diminishes the emissions of trace elements in flue gas. The enrichment characteristics of trace elements in submicron particles were also studied.

Chao Wang; Xiaowei Liu; Dong Li; Junping Si; Bo Zhao; Minghou Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Trace, isotopic analysis of micron-sized grains -- Mo, Zr analysis of stardust (SiC and graphite grains).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry using resonant laser ionization can provide for both high useful yields and high discrimination while maintaining high lateral and depth resolutions. An example of the power of the method is measurement of the isotopic composition of Mo and Zr in 1-5 {micro}m presolar SiC and graphite grains isolated from the Murchison CM2 meteorite for the first time. These grains have survived the formation of the Solar System and isotopic analysis reveals a record of the stellar nucleosynthesis present during their formation. Mo and Zr, though present at less than 10 ppm in some grains, are particularly useful in that among their isotopes are members that can only be formed by distinct nucleosynthetic processes known as s-, p-, and r-process. Successful isotopic analysis of these elements requires both high selectivity (since these are trace elements) and high efficiency (since the total number of atoms available are limited). Resonant Ionization Spectroscopy is particularly useful and flexible in this application. While the sensitivity of this t.edmique has often been reported in the past, we focus hereon the very low noise properties of the technique. We further demonstrate the efficacy of noise removal by two complimentary methods. First we use the resonant nature of the signal to subtract background signal. Second we demonstrate that by choosing the appropriate resonance scheme background can often be dramatically reduced.

Pellin, M. J.; Nicolussi, G. K.

1998-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

105

Trace element chemistry of Apollo 14 lunar soil from Fra Mauro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Analytical data are presented for Apollo 14 fines ( Mauro Formation, possessed high concentrations (100200 chondrites) for many elements, prior to the excavation of the mare basins. A correlation may exist between Gd/Eu and Zr/Hf ratios in lunar materials.

S.R. Taylor; Patricia Muir; Maureen Kaye

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and elemental analysis is a process where a sample of some material (e.g., soil, waste or drinking water, bodily fluids, minerals, chemical compounds) is analyzed for its elements and compounds and sometimes its isotopic composition. Elemental analysis can be qualitative (determining what elements are present), and it can also be quantitative (determining how much of each type are present).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elemental_analysis Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

107

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

108

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA...

109

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal...

110

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date - 1983 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from...

111

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring...

112

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Redondo Geothermal Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

113

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir...

114

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

115

Crystal Site Location of Iron and Trace Elements in a Magnesium-Iron Olivine by a New Crystallographic Technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...element A can be shown to depend only on Ns;, NMg, and NA as obtained from the two spectra. The analysis used to determine CFe, CMn, and CN, in Table 1 is essentially as described above. However, in order to improve the statistical accuracy, three...

J. TAFT; J. C. H. SPENCE

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Changes in trace element contents in ashes of oil shale fueled PF and CFB boilers during operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two oil shale combustion technologies, pulverized firing (PF) and circulated fluidized bed (CFB) were compared with respect to partitioning of selected elements (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Sr, Th, Tl, U, V, and Zn) in the ashes along the flue gas ducts. The ash samples were characterized by high-resolution ICP-MS. The average contents of toxic heavy metals in fly ash samples from the CFB boiler are lower compared to the PF boiler. Main differences in trace element contents between combustion technologies were as follows: Cd content in the fly ash samples of PF boiler was up to 0.9mg/kg while in CFB boiler it remained below 0.1mg/kg in all analyzed ash samples; Hg was observed in the ashes of electrostatic precipitator (ESP) of CFB boiler while in the PF boiler it was close to or below detection limit. In the PF boiler content of Sn was detected only in the ashes of ESPs, while in CFB boiler it was evenly distributed between bottom and fly ash samples. Highest content among heavy metals in ash samples was observed for Pb in the last field of ESP of the PF boiler (142mg/kg).

Janek Reinik; Natalya Irha; Eiliv Steinnes; Gary Urb; Jekaterina Jefimova; Eero Piirisalu; Jri Loosaar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Finite element training before real analysis: A personal view  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In finite element structural analysis, we have the dilemma that an engineer can solve a very complex problem using multi-million dollar software on high-technology hardware with beautifully coloured pictures of the results, without knowing the fundamentals of the finite element method. In this paper the author presents a personal view of how this dilemma should be resolved. His solution emphasises the crucial importance of standards, quality assurance, reliability and, above all, education and training in finite element analysis.

John Robinson

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Simultaneous mobilization of trace elements and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds from soil with a nonionic surfactant and [S,S]-EDDS in admixture: Metals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluated the efficacy of soil washing with a nonionic surfactant (Brij98) in combination with a complexing reagent (ethylenediaminedisuccinic acid, [S,S]-EDDS) for the simultaneous mobilization of macro- and trace elements (MTEs) and PAH compounds from a field-contaminated soil. Soil fractionation studies indicated that an appreciable fraction of the Al, Ca, Cu, Fe and Mn was associated with the residual fraction but that much of the other trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn) might be susceptible to soil washing. Ultrasonically aided mixing of the field contaminated soil with Brij98 and a sparing quantity (2mmol) of [S,S]-EDDS, simultaneously mobilized virtually all of the benzo[?]pyrene {B(a)P} and chrysene (CRY) and appreciable quantities of the trace elements (Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) burdens. The recovery of both \\{PAHs\\} and trace elements were increased from the soil organic matter (SOM)-rich soil. This report concerns the fate of \\{MTEs\\} during soil washing. Multiple ultra-sonically aided washes (five or nine) with the same dosage of reagents mobilized virtually all of \\{PAHs\\} and decreased the levels of Cd, Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn to comply with recommended maxima. By contrast, the levels of As and Cu remained excessive after the treatments.

Yuexiang Wen; William D. Marshall

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

TTG magmatism in the Congo craton; a view from major and trace element geochemistry, RbSr and SmNd systematics: case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TTG magmatism in the Congo craton; a view from major and trace element geochemistry, Rb­Sr and Sm of the Sangmelima region (Ntem complex, Congo craton) in southern Cameroon range in modal composition from rocks. TTG intrusions in the Sangmelima region represent a major Archaean accretion event in the Congo craton

Siebel, Wolfgang

120

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR Site References D. G. Brookins, A. W. Laughlin (1983) Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Brookins_%26_Laughlin,_1983)&oldid=511281"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The evolution of a complex type B allende inclusion: An ion microprobe trace element study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

USNM 5241 is a Type B1 refractory inclusion from Allende, first described by El Goresy et al. (1985), that consists of a 1.2 mm-thick melilite-rich and spinel-poor mantle enclosing a 0.6 cm-radius spinel-rich core; the inclusion contains xenoliths of spinel-free fassaite {plus minus} melilite {plus minus} anorthite incorporated within the spinel-rich core. Detailed ion microprobe analyses of individual phases in 5241 show that the rare earth element (REE) concentrations in mantle melilite vary irregularly with increasing distance from the rim of the inclusion, at first decreasing immediately below the rim and then remaining constant between {approximately}0.4 and 1.0 mm. More than 1.0 mm from the rim, the REE concentrations again decrease. Although counterintuitive in the context of traditional fractional crystallization models, these REE variations are in fact broadly consistent with such a model in light of recent experimental measurements of D{sub REE3+ (mel)}, that show a strong inverse correlation of D with the akermanite content of the melilite. Local variations, over distances of <20 {mu}m, in the akermanite content of mantle melilite--as much as 5-10 mol% Ak--with accompanying fluctuations in REE contents, are due to reaction of gehlenitic melilite with tiny inclusions of fassaite, producing narrow zones of more akermanitic melilite surrounding more fassaitic pyroxene. The authors interpret 5241 as having formed largely by fractional crystallization during the first {approximately}40% of its solidification; this was followed by fractional crystallization + xenolith assimilation during the last 60%.

MacPherson, G.J. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (USA)); Crozaz, G.; Lundberg, L.L. (Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion ... In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. ... The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles:? fine particles approximately 0.1?1 ?m in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 ?m in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels (4). ...

Terttaliisa Lind; Jouni Hokkinen; Jorma K. Jokiniemi; Sanna Saarikoski; Risto Hillamo

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

123

TRACE/PARCS Core Modeling of a BWR/5 for Accident Analysis of ATWS Events  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TRACE/PARCS computational package [1, 2] isdesigned to be applicable to the analysis of light water reactor operational transients and accidents where the coupling between the neutron kinetics (PARCS) and the thermal-hydraulics and thermal-mechanics (TRACE) is important. TRACE/PARCS has been assessed for itsapplicability to anticipated transients without scram(ATWS) [3]. The challenge, addressed in this study, is to develop a sufficiently rigorous input model that would be acceptable for use in ATWS analysis. Two types of ATWS events were of interest, a turbine trip and a closure of main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). In the first type, initiated by turbine trip, the concern is that the core will become unstable and large power oscillations will occur. In the second type,initiated by MSIV closure,, the concern is the amount of energy being placed into containment and the resulting emergency depressurization. Two separate TRACE/PARCS models of a BWR/5 were developed to analyze these ATWS events at MELLLA+ (maximum extended load line limit plus)operating conditions. One model [4] was used for analysis of ATWS events leading to instability (ATWS-I);the other [5] for ATWS events leading to emergency depressurization (ATWS-ED). Both models included a large portion of the nuclear steam supply system and controls, and a detailed core model, presented henceforth.

Cuadra A.; Baek J.; Cheng, L.; Aronson, A.; Diamond, D.; Yarsky, P.

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis There has been invented a process for analyzing ambient air in a microwave induced plasma without use of an additional carrier gas. There has also been invented an apparatus for analyzing ambient air, other sample gas, or nebulized and desolvated liquids wherein a novel arrangement of plasma gas and sample gas conduits is used to enhance dependability of the plasma. This apparatus embodiment of the invention has a concentric arrangement of

125

Laser Enables Inexpensive Elemental Analysis | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laser Enables Inexpensive Elemental Analysis Sep 2014 Aug 2014 Jul 2014 June 2014 May 2014 Apr 2014 Mar 2014 Feb 2014 Jan 2014 Dec 2013 Nov 2013 Oct 2013 Sep 2013 Aug 2013 Jul 2013...

126

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this paper, we present and evaluate a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3_, SO42_, Cl_, and F_ in rivers draining YNP for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001). Weekly to

127

Oxidation of trace amounts of transplutonium elements to the tetravalent state in solutions of mineral acids and their stabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of trace amounts of americium(IV) in sulfuric and nitric acid solutions as a function of the mineral acid, potassium phosphotungstate, and ammonium persulfate concentrations was investigated. The stability of americium(IV) was studied. The optimal conditions and time of oxidation of trace amounts of americium to the tetravalent state were found on the basis of the experimental data obtained.

Milyukova, M.S.; Varezhkina, N.S.; Kuzovkina, E.V.; Malikov, D.A.; Myasoedov, B.F.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PCB, PAH and trace element exposure in barn swallows nesting on the Grand Calumet River, IN, watershed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Grand Calumet River/Indiana Harbor Canal (GCR/IHC) is an International Joint Commission Area of Concern (AOC) and is heavily contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and trace elements. Barn swallow hatchlings and nestlings were collected from four bridges which span the GCR/IHC and a reference location. PCB and PAH concentrations in hatchlings and nestlings were significantly higher in colonies along the GCR/IHC than the reference colony. For example, mean PCB concentrations in hatchlings and nestlings were significantly higher in colonies along the GCR/IHC than the reference colony. For example, mean PCB concentrations in hatchlings were 0.04 {micro}g/g wet weight at the reference colony and 20.42 {micro}g/g at one colony on the GCR/IHC; mean concentrations of PAHs were 0.05 {micro}g/g at the reference colony and 0.15 {micro}g/g at one colony on the GCR/IHC. PCBs accumulated in nestlings at a rate of 18.2 {micro}g/day at one colony on the GCR/IHC compared to 0.03 {micro}g/day at the reference colony. These data suggest that contaminants in the water and sediment of the GCR/IHC are being incorporated into the vertebrate food chain via aquatic insects. Because the contaminant data in the barn swallow hatchlings and nestlings seem to reflect the sediment chemistry nearby the colony, this study suggests that barn swallows are a useful biomonitoring species for this AOC.

Custer, T.W.; Sparks, D.W. [National Biological Service, La Crosse, WI (United States). Upper Mississippi Science Center; [Fish and Wildlife Service, Bloomington, IN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Finite element analysis of substation composite insulators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Composite insulators are rapidly replacing their porcelain counterparts in electrical substation applications. These insulators consist of a glass-reinforced polymer (GRP) rod, with two metal end fittings radially crimped onto the ends of the rod during assembly. In this paper, axisymmetric finite element models are developed to evaluate the mechanical performance of composite insulators under externally applied axial compression. The analyses are performed by assuming both a perfectly bonded interface between the composite rod and the end fittings, and an imperfect interface which permits large relative sliding with Coulomb friction. Results indicate that the perfect interface model is unrealistic since it predicts singular stresses at the interface comer and an overall linear structural response. On the other hand, the imperfect interface model is found to simulate accurately the structural non-linearity caused by relative sliding of the GRP rod within the end fittings. The imperfect interface model has therefore been used to evaluate the effects of interface friction, and the extent of crimping, on the maximum load-bearing capacity of substation composite insulators.

A. Bansal; A. Schubert; M.V. Balakrishnan; M. Kumosa

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

132

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510462

133

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510466

134

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511285

135

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

136

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=51046

137

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

138

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Mexico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful in developing management procedures for geothermal fields characterized by

139

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1992) 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

140

Elemental analysis of cotton by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the elemental characterization of unprocessed cotton. This research is important in forensic and fraud detection applications to establish an elemental fingerprint of U.S. cotton by region, which can be used to determine the source of the cotton. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a LIBS method for the elemental analysis of cotton. The experimental setup consists of a Nd:YAG laser that operates at the fundamental wavelength as the LIBS excitation source and an echelle spectrometer equipped with an intensified CCD camera. The relative concentrations of elements Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, and Sr from both nutrients and environmental contributions were determined by LIBS. Principal component analysis was used to visualize the differences between cotton samples based on the elemental composition by region in the U.S. Linear discriminant analysis of the LIBS data resulted in the correct classification of >97% of the cotton samples by U.S. region and >81% correct classification by state of origin.

Schenk, Emily R.; Almirall, Jose R.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Trace element and REE composition of five samples of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. Special report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The attached materials document the results of part of a recent effort of geochemical sampling and analysis at Yucca Mountain and nearby regions. The efforts come as a result of interest in comprehensive analyses of rare earth elements (REE), lanthanum (La) through lutecium (Lu). Several additional, non-REE analyses were obtained as well. Commercially available REE analyses have proved to be insufficiently sensitive for geochemical purposes. Dr. Roman Schmitt at the Radiation Center at Oregon State University in Corvallis was sent five samples as a trial effort. The results are very encouraging. The purpose of compiling Dr. Schmitt`s report and the other materials is to inform the sponsor of his independent observations of these results and other information that sent to him. To provide a more complete appreciation of the utility of REE analyses a copy of Dave Vaniman`s recent article is included in which he notes that REE analyses from Yucca Mountain indicate the occurrence of two distinctly different REE patterns as do several other chemical parameters of the calcite-silica deposits. Our four samples with high equivalent CaCO{sub 3} were collected from sites we believe to be spring deposits. One sample, 24D, is from southern Crater Flat which is acknowledged by U.S.G.S. investigators to be a spring deposit. All four of these samples have REE patterns similar to those from the saturated zone reported by Vaniman.

Livingston, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

143

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines (Wood, 2002) Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

144

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Breitenbush Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

145

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1) 1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 1991 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the fluid origin by looking at variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids Notes Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the

146

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

147

Trace elements found in the fuel and in-furnace fine particles collected from 80MW BFB combusting solid recovered fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main fine particle (dpSRF) combustion the main elements were found to be: Ba, Br, Cr, Cu, Fe, Pb, Sb, Sn and Zn. Fine particle composition is presented for 6 different furnace heights of a bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) boiler. As the fine particles are formed of vaporized ash species the experimental results are discussed with the support of thermodynamic equilibrium modeling for estimating the forms of the gaseous elements in the furnace. The occurrence of bromine was found to be similar to chlorine as the main forms of bromine in the furnace were estimated to be KBr(g) and NaBr(g) complemented with CuBr3(g). It is proposed that the trace elements mentioned originate mainly from plastics and rubber where they are used as production additives, stabilisers, dyes, colorants and flame retardants. Cr, Cu and Zn may originate to a large extent from alloys and other metallic impurities. SEM-EDS analyses carried out for the SRF supports the postulated origin of the elements.

P. Vainikka; D. Lindberg; A. Moilanen; H. Ollila; M. Tiainen; J. Silvennoinen; M. Hupa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Thermodynamic evaluation of the compounds of gold, silver, and other trace elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermodynamically most probable main compounds of Ag, Au, Ge, Se, Sr, U, and ash-forming elements formed upon the combustion of brown coal, which was close in the composition of organic and mineral matter ...

M. Ya. Shpirt; A. A. Lavrinenko; I. N. Kuznetsova

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements. Over 25% of the raw shale gas five groups productsthe oil, in the raw oil shale gas, consequence of retortinggood product raw oil shale and input gases that is accounted

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Rotordynamic analysis with shell elements for the transfer matrix method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee) Al B. elazzo1o (Member) John T. Tielki g (Member) Michael J. Rabins (Head of Department) August 1989 111 ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transi'er Matrix Method. (August 1989) Edward Anthony L'Antigua, B. M... theory. There have been recent publications proposing various methods for solving this problem of inaccuracy due to the beam modeling used in the transfer matrix approach. Rouch and Kao (1979), Nelson (1980), To (1981), Greenhill et al. , (1985...

L'Antigua, Edward Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

151

Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

air for the presence of minor amounts of elements, particularly transition metals, rare earth elements, actinides, and alkali and alkaline earth elements. The invention apparatus...

152

Trace element disequilibria and magnesium isotope heterogeneity in 3655A: Evidence for a complex multi-stage evolution of a typical Allende Type B1 CAI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used the Panurge ion microprobe to measure concentrations of the rare earth elements (REEs), Ba, Hf, and Sr in melilite, clinopyroxene. plagioclase, and perovskite and Mg isotopes in plagioclase, spinel, melilite, fassaite, hibonite, grossular, and monticellite from the Allende Type B1 calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI), USNM 3655A. The distribution and concentration of Ba and the REE in melilite from the melilite-rich mantle of 3655A are unlike those predicted from melilite-melt REE partitioning experiments for closed system crystal fractionation. REE concentrations are lower than expected in the first crystallized gehlenitic melilite, increase rapidly to higher than expected concentrations in melilite with intermediate akermanite contents (Ak30-Ak40), and decrease as expected only during the late stage of mantle crystallization. Barium concentrations in melilite are 10-50 times those expected, and the LREE/HREE ratio increases continuously rather than remaining constant. The unexpected distribution of trace elements in melilite reflects a progressive enrichment of trace elements in the melt during the early stages of crystallization. A partial explanation for this observation is the dissolution of precursor perovskite that contained half or more of the total REE budget of the inclusion. The Mg isotope record of 3655A is distinguished by four salient features: (1) large {sup 26}Mg excesses correlated with the respective Al/Mg ratios in plagioclase, melilite, and hibonite, (2) F{sub Mg}, the mass-dependent fractionation of Mg, is positive. with enrichment of the heavier Mu isotopes in all primary phases, (3) a heterogeneous distribution of F{sub Mg} values. with F{sub Mg} in melilite systematically greater than in either spinel or fassaite, and (4) isotopically normal Mg in the secondary alteration phases, grossular and monticellite. 81 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs.

Kennedy, A.K.; Hutcheon, I.D.; Beckett, J.R. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); and others

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Partitioning of radionuclides and trace elements in phosphogypsum and its source materials based on sequential extraction methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phosphogypsum is a waste produced by the phosphate fertilizer industry. Although phosphogypsum is mainly calcium sulphate dihydrate, it contains elevated levels of impurities, which originate from the source phosphate rock used in the phosphoric acid production. Among these impurities, radionuclides from 238U and 232Th decay series are of most concern due to their radiotoxicity. Other elements, such as rare earth elements (REE) and Ba are also enriched in the phosphogypsum. The bioavailability of radionuclides (226Ra, 210Pb and 232Th), rare earth elements and Ba to the surrounding aquatic system was evaluated by the application of sequential leaching of the phosphogypsum samples from the Brazilian phosphoric acid producers. The sequential extraction results show that most of the radium and lead are located in the iron oxide (non-CaSO4) fraction, and that only 1318% of these radionuclides are distributed in the most labile fraction. Th, REE and Ba were found predominantly in the residual phase, which corresponds to a small fraction of the phosphate rock or monazite that did not react and to insoluble compounds such as sulphates, phosphates and silicates. It can be concluded that although all these elements are enriched in the phosphogypsum samples they are not associated with CaSO4 itself and therefore do not represent a threat to the surrounding aquatic environment.

A.J.G. Santos; B.P. Mazzilli; D.I.T. Fvaro; P.S.C. Silva

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Implementation of finite element analysis into the athletic shoe design process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite element analysis is used by companies throughout the world as a substitution for manually testing prototypes. With the assistance of finite element analysis many companies and industries have decreased the time and ...

Hidalgo, Maria E. (Maria Estela), 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- Stateactivation: Archaeometry, oil-shale analysis v. 11, p.

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

An atom trap trace analysis system for measuring krypton contamination in xenon dark matter detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed an atom trap trace analysis (ATTA) system to measure Kr in Xe at the part per trillion (ppt) level, a prerequisite for the sensitivity achievable with liquid xenon dark matter detectors beyond the current generation. Since Ar and Kr have similar laser cooling wavelengths, the apparatus has been tested with Ar to avoid contamination prior to measuring Xe samples. A radio-frequency plasma discharge generates a beam of metastable atoms which is optically collimated, slowed, and trapped using standard magneto-optical techniques. Based on the measured overall system efficiency of 1.2 10{sup ?8} (detection mode), we expect the ATTA system to reach the design goal sensitivity to ppt concentrations of Kr in Xe in <2 h.

Aprile, E.; Yoon, T.; Loose, A.; Goetzke, L. W.; Zelevinsky, T. [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027-5255 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027-5255 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass Interaction During Cable Shear Test.................................................................................................................... 9 Cable Types

158

Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

Strickert, R.G.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Fenton Hill Hdr Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each core. Standard petrographic techniques were used to identify constituent minerals and to obtain modal analyses. The number of points counted varied from about 500 to several thousand, depending upon the grain size of the rock. Whole-rock chemical analysis was performed by John Husler, University of New Mexico, using a variety of techniques (Laughlin and Eddy, 1977). The precision for SiO2 is + 1% relative; for the other oxides it is + 2% relative. Accuracy was monitored by using USGS standard rock samples. Where

160

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as fission product other or actinide other. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PARTITIONING OF MAJOR, MINOR, AND TRACE ELEMENTS DURING SIMULATED IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORTING IN A CONTROLLED-STATE RETORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

retorted and wet with oil, and shale sections 18 through 24V. , 1979, Analysis of oil shale of products and effluents:In- Situ Retorting of Oil Shale in a Controlled- State

Fox, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

LASER SPECTROSCOPY AND TRACE ELEMENT ANALYSIS Chapter from the Energy and Environment Division Annual Report 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Solar Energy, Photovoltaic Energy Systems Division, U.S.methods for energy conversion such as photovoltaic solar

Various, Authors

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips from Coso well 83-16 were analyzed, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by the CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions. Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Fig. 4), and interpreted. Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that were earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein

165

On Smoothing Surfaces in Voxel Based Finite Element Analysis of Trabecular Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-)finite element analysis based on three-dimen- sional computed tomography (CT) data of human bone takes place finite element (FE) analysis. The approach based on the FE analysis leads to linear systems of equations analysis the computational domain is composed of a multitude of tiny cubes, so-called voxels

Frey, Pascal

166

Thermochemical and trace element behavior of coal gangue, agricultural biomass and their blends during co-combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The thermal decomposition behavior of coal gangue, peanut shell, wheat straw and their blends during combustion were determined via thermogravimetric analysis. The coal gangue/agricultural biomass blends were prepared in four weight ratios and oxidized under dynamic conditions from room temperature to 1000C by various heating rates. Kinetic models were carried out to evaluate the thermal reactivity. The overall mass balance was performed to assess the partition behavior of coal gangue, peanut shell and their blends during combustion in a fixed bed reactor. The decomposition processes of agricultural biomass included evaporation, release of volatile matter and combustion as well as char oxidation. The thermal reactivity of coal gangue could be improved through the addition of agricultural biomass in suitable proportion and subsequent appropriate heating rate during combustion. In combination with the heating value and base/acid ratio limitations, a blending ratio of 30% agricultural biomass is conservatively selected as optimum blending.

Chuncai Zhou; Guijian Liu; Siwei Cheng; Ting Fang; Paul Kwan Sing Lam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Isotope and trace element evolution of the Naica aquifer (Chihuahua, Mexico) over the past 60,000yr revealed by speleothems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The espada speleothems of Cueva de las Espadas (Naica Mine, Chihuahua, Mexico) comprise a high-purity selenite core overlain by successive deposits of calcite, gypsum and aragonite. Gypsum precipitated under water from a hydrothermal solution (~58C) when the water table was above the cave level ca. 57ka, during the last glaciation, and some intervals during deglaciation and the Holocene. Aragonite was deposited at lower temperatures (~26C) in a perched lake occupying the cave bottom, when the water table dropped below the cave level during brief dry intervals during deglaciation and the early Holocene. The isotopic composition of gypsum water of crystallization shows that the deglaciationHolocene aquifer water was enriched in deuterium by 12.88.7 relative to water from the last glaciation. This is attributed to an increased relative moisture contribution from the Gulf of Mexico during deglaciation and the Holocene compared to the last glaciation. This indicates that drier conditions occurred in the Naica area during the Holocene than around 57ka. Furthermore, trace element analyses of gypsum served to deduce the circulation regime of the Naica aquifer during the past 60,000yr, and also suggest that higher aquifer recharge occurred during the last glaciation.

Fernando Gzquez; Jos-Mara Calaforra; Heather Stoll; Laura Sanna; Paolo Forti; Stein-Erik Lauritzen; Antonio Delgado; Fernando Rull; Jess Martnez-Fras

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis methodology for determination of boron from trace to major contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) is an isotope specific online nuclear analytical technique for non-destructive determination of elements in diverse matrices [15...]. Though in principle all ...

R. Acharya

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in this paper as "Snively Hot Springs" References Scott A. Wood (2002) Behavior Of Rare Earth Element In Geothermal Systems, A New Exploration-Exploitation Tool Additional...

171

Abstracts from a workshop on processes determining the input, behavior and fate of radionuclides and trace elements in continental shelf environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstracts of workshop presentations concerning input, behavior, and fate of trace metals and radionuclides in the marine system are presented. (ACR)

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides an implementation analysis of the linear discontinuous finite element method (LD-FEM) that spans the space of (l, x, y, z). A practical implementation of LD includes 1) selecting a computationally efficient algorithm to solve the 4 x 4 matrix system Ax = b that describes the angular flux in a mesh element, and 2) choosing how to store the data used to construct the matrix A and the vector b to either reduce memory consumption or increase computational speed. To analyze the first of these, three algorithms were selected to solve the 4 x 4 matrix equation: Cramer's rule, a streamlined implementation of Gaussian elimination, and LAPACK's Gaussian elimination subroutine dgesv. The results indicate that Cramer's rule and the streamlined Gaussian elimination algorithm perform nearly equivalently and outperform LAPACK's implementation of Gaussian elimination by a factor of 2. To analyze the second implementation detail, three formulations of the discretized LD-FEM equations were provided for implementation in a transport solver: 1) a low-memory formulation, which relies heavily on 'on-the-fly' calculations and less on the storage of pre-computed data, 2) a high-memory formulation, which pre-computes much of the data used to construct A and b, and 3) a reduced-memory formulation, which lies between the low - and high-memory formulations. These three formulations were assessed in the Jaguar transport solver based on relative memory footprint and computational speed for increasing mesh size and quadrature order. The results indicated that the memory savings of the low-memory formulation were not sufficient to warrant its implementation. The high-memory formulation resulted in a significant speed advantage over the reduced-memory option (10-50%), but also resulted in a proportional increase in memory consumption (5-45%) for increasing quadrature order and mesh count; therefore, the practitioner should weigh the system memory constraints against any required runtime constraints to determine which option is more suitable for his or her specific applications. (authors)

Becker, T. L. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, P.O. Box 1072, Schenectady, NY 12301-1072 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Atmospheric Trace Gases from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication, Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. The collections under the CDIAC heading of Atmospheric Trace Gases include: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide, Atmospheric Methane, Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide, Atmospheric Hydrogen, Isotopes in Greenhouse Gases, Radionuclides, Aerosols, and Other Trace Gases.

174

Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Investigation of elemental analysis using neutron-capture gamma ray spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluated the potential of neutron-capture gamma rays in elemental analysis. A large portion of the work was devoted to the development of a method for the analysis of weak peaks in gamma ray spectra. This was ...

Hamawi, John Nicholas

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wear 258 (2005) 17871793 Finite element analysis and experiments of metal/metal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this simulation. © 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Wear modeling; Finite element analysis 1 Published by Elsevier B.V. doi:10.1016/j.wear.2004.12.014 #12;1788 N.H. Kim et al. / Wear 258 (2005) 1787Wear 258 (2005) 1787­1793 Finite element analysis and experiments of metal/metal wear

Sawyer, Wallace

177

Measurement and finite element analysis of temperature distribution in arc welding process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This presentation describes both the experimental measurement and finite element analysis used to study the temperature distribution during a metal inert gas (MIG) welding process, including the cooling down period. Welding was carried out on ... Keywords: FEA, MIG welding, arc welding, cracking, finite element analysis, metal inert gas welding, residual stress, simulation, temperature distribution, weldment temperature

C. K. Lee; J. Candy; C. P. H. Tan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Multiscale finite element analysis of elastic wave scattering from localized defects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the use of a multiscale finite element approach to study the interaction between elastic waves and localized defects. The analysis of wave-defect interaction is of fundamental importance for the development of ultrasonic non-destructive ... Keywords: Elastic wave scattering, Finite element method, Multiscale analysis

F. Casadei, J. J. Rimoli, M. Ruzzene

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of flyash surface phenomena and the application of surface analysis technology. Summary report: Phase I. [44 elements; 86 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The factors governing the formation of flyash surfaces during and following coal combustion are reviewed. The competing chemical and physical processes during the evolution of inorganic material in coal during combustion into flyash are described with respect to various surface segregation processes. Two mechanisms leading to surface enrichment are volatilization-condensation processes and diffusion processes within individual flyash particles. The experimental evidence for each of these processes is reviewed. It is shown that the volatilization-condensation process is the major factor leading to trace element enrichment in smaller flyash particles. Evidence also exists from surface analyses of flyash and representative mineral matter that diffusion processes may lead to surface enrichment of elements not volatilized or cause transport of surface-condensed elements into the flyash matrix. The semiquantitative determination of the relative importance of these two processes can be determined by comparison of concentration versus particle size profiles with surface-depth profiles obtained using surface analysis techniques. A brief description of organic transformations on flyash surfaces is also presented. The various surface analytical techniques are reviewed and the relatively new technique of Static-Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy is suggested as having significant advantages in studies of surfaces and diffusion processes in model systems. Several recommendations are made for research relevant to flyash formation and processes occurring on flyash surfaces.

Smith, R.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reasoning by Assumption: Formalisation and Analysis of Human Reasoning Traces Tibor Bosse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

undertaken. 1. Introduction Practical reasoning processes are often not limited to single reasoning steps, but extend to traces or trajectories of a number of interrelated reasoning steps over time. This paper-deductive) practical reasoning pattern involves a number of interrelated reasoning steps, and uses in its reasoning

Bosse, Tibor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Finite Element Analysis of Marine Diesel Engine Crankshaft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, with the ANSYS, stress distribution and safety factor of crankshaft were analyzed by using 3D finite element method. The results show that the exposed destructive position is the transition circ...

Bin Zheng; Yongqi Liu; Ruixiang Liu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Sulfur isotope and trace element data from ore sulfides in the Noranda district (Abitibi, Canada): implications for volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit genesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine models for volcanogenic massive sulfide (VMS) mineralization in the ~2.7-Ga Noranda camp, Abitibi subprovince, Superior Province, Canada, using a combination of multiple sulfur isotope and trace ele...

Elizabeth R. Sharman; Bruce E. Taylor; William G. Minarik

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A finite element model for transient thermal/structural analysis of large composite space structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on approximate 6 analysis techniques based on finite elements has begun. Such techniques as reduced basis techniques and generalized transform methods offer hope of solving the finite element 8 equations more efficiently. An integrated thermal/structural... integrated analysis codes. However, Mahaney, Thornton, and Dechaumphai have identified require 5 ments for such thermal/structural programs. They concluded that such analysis methods should have the following five characteristics. First, a common finite...

Lutz, James Delmar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing elemental composition Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SIMS trace- element data (up to 33 elements analyzed) are among... thermal processing. Bulk trace-element compositions: Our broad- beam SIMS data imply that vapor... refractory...

185

Finite element analysis of controlled laser coagulation experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A mathematical model to predict the effect of laser and tissue parameters on the zone of thermal injury by laser interaction on beef liver is presented. The heat transfer and coagulation process was modeled using a non-linear finite-element model...

Tolat, Nimish Prabodh

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

186

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle L. Coombs, Thomas W. Sisson, Peter W. Lipman (2006) Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Kilauea_Southwest_Rift_And_South_Flank_Area_(Coombs,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=510423"

187

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik, 2002) Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Jemez_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510418" Categories: Exploration Activities

188

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analytical techniques employed included instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), direct-current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy...

189

Insertion Preference of Maize and Rice Miniature Inverted Repeat Transposable Elements as Revealed by the Analysis of Nested Elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DNA element. This element (called Midway), initially found as an 850-bp...closer examination indicates that Midway harbors another Stowaway element (Stowaway-Os25). That there are three Midway/Stowaway composite elements in the...

Ning Jiang; Susan R. Wessler

190

Piezoelectric theory for finite element analysis of ultrasonic motors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors present the fundamental equations of piezoelectricity and references. They show how a second form of the equations and a second set of coefficients can be found, through inversions involving the elasticity tensor. They show how to compute the clamped permittivity matrix from the unclamped matrix. The authors list the program pzansys.ftn and present examples of its use. This program does the conversions and calculations needed by the finite element program ANSYS.

Emery, J.D.; Mentesana, C.P.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass Interaction During Localized Shearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Finite Element Analysis of TDR Cable-Grout-Soil Mass Interaction During Localized Shearing By J and laboratory measurement of Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) cable-grout response to analyze the interaction between the cable, grout, and surrounding soil mass during localized shearing. Finite element (FE) model

192

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown Exploration Basis A study of the known resource area Notes chemical and isotope analysis was completed to understand the location of the reservoir and the flow of...

193

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

194

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

estimated visually. Waters sampled for chemical analysis were stored in brimful polyethylene bottles with Polyseal caps following filtration from a large syringe attached to a...

195

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The evidence provided by the noble gases for a magmatic gas component in the Northwest Geysers adds new constraints to genetic models of the system and its evolution. The high proportion of magmatic gas and high total NCG in HTR steam are inconsistent with an origin of the vapor-dominated Northwest Geysers reservoir from deep boiling of a connate or metamorphic

196

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Rocks and minerals were visually identified in cuttings, and identifications were confirmed through examination of thin sections. X-ray powder diffraction was used to test the purity of some mineral separates. The chemical compositions of some metamorphic minerals were determined by electron microprobe. References Steven J. Lambert, Samuel Epstein (1992) Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Geysers_Area_(Lambert_%26_Epstein,_1992)&oldid=510406"

197

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Heber Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

198

Nonlinear structural finite element analysis using the preconditioned Lanczos method on serial and parallel computers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The application of the Lanczos algorithm in Newton-like methods for solving non-linear systems of equations arising in nonlinear structural finite element analysis is presented. It is shown that with appropria...

Th. Rottner; I. Lenhardt; G. Alefeld; K. Schweizerhof

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Atmospheric aerosols and possibilities of their analysis for elemental content at the IBR-2 reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Possibilities of neutron activation analysis for studying the elemental content of atmospheric aerosols at the IBR-2 reactor are discussed on the bases of the ... contents on the sensitivity of NAA, the reliability

V. F. Peresedov

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

32 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

Rohs, Remo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Analysis of anelastic flow and numerical treatment via finite elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we reconsider the various approximations made to the full equations of motion and energy transport for treating low-speed flows with significant temperature induced property variations. This entails assessment of the development of so-called anelastic for low-Mach number flows outside the range of validity of the Boussinesq equations. An integral part of this assessment is the development of a finite element-based numerical scheme for obtaining approximate numerical solutions to this class of problems. Several formulations were attempted and are compared.

Martinez, M.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Design, development, and analysis of processing elements for VLSI implemented MIMD computer system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND ANALYSIS OF PROCESSING ELEMENTS FOR VLSI IMPLEMENTED MIMD COMPUTER SYSTEM A Thesis by BRANDON THAYER WALDO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 199'2 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND ANALYSIS OF PROCESSING ELEMENTS FOR VLSI IMPLEMENTED MIMD COMPHTER SYSTEM A Thesis by BRANDON THAYER WALDO Approved as to style and content by...

Waldo, Brandon Thayer

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

203

A finite element viscous flow analysis in a radial turbine scroll  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1987 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A FINITE ELEMENT VISCOUS FLOW ANALYSIS IN A RADIAL TURBINE SCROLL A Thesis by DONALD LEE HILL JR. Approved as to style snd content by: Dr. Erian A. Baskharone (Chairman of Conunittee) Dr. Alan B azzolo...A FINITE ELEMENT VISCOUS FLOW ANALYSIS IN A RADIAL TURBINE SCROLL A Thesis DONALD LEE HILL JR. Submitted to the Graduate College. of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December...

Hill, Donald Lee

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Finite element analysis of conjugate heat transfer in axisymmetric pipe flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER IN AXISYMMETRIC PIPE FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT MILLER FITHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MA STER... OF S CI EN CE August 1987 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF CONJUGATE HEAT TRANSFER IN AXISYMMETRIC PIPE FLOWS A Thesis by ROBERT MILLER FITHEN Approved ss to style and content by: N. K. Anand (Chairman of Committee...

Fithen, Robert Miller

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Two dimensional finite element analysis of homogenization and failure in plain weave textile composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HOMOGENIZATION AND FAILURE IN PLAIN WEAVE TEXTILE COMPOSITES A Thesis by VEERARAGHAVA GOPAL KONDAGUNTA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University In partial fulffllment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HOMOGENIZATION AND FAILURE IN PLAIN WEAVE TEXTILE COMPOSITES A Thesis by VEERARAGHAVA GOPAL KONDAGUNTA...

Kondagunta, Veeraraghava Gopal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

206

Evaluation of new techniques for two dimensional finite element analysis of woven composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1992 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering EVALUATION OF NEW TECHNIQUES FOR TWO DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF WOVEN COMPOSITES A Thesis by SITARAM CHOWDARY GUNDAPANENI Approved...

Gundapaneni, Sitaram Chowdary

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

A shear deformable, doubly curved finite element for the analysis of laminated composite structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SHL'AR DEFORMABLE, DOUBLY CURVED FINITE ELEMENT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF LAMINATED COMPOSITE STRUCTURES A Thesis by JOSEPH PATRICK FUEHNE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AE-M University in partial fulfiHment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering A SHEAR DEFORMABLE, DOUBLY CURVED FINITE ELEMENT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF LAMINATED COMPOSITE STRUCTURES A Thesis by JOSEPH PATRICK FUEHNE Approved as to style and content by...

Fuehne, Joseph Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

A three dimensional finite element code for the analysis of damage in helically wound composite cylinders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A THREE DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT CODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE IN HELICALLY WOUND COMPOSITE CYLINDERS A Thesis MARVIiN AiNTHONY ZOCHER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ag:M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject; Aerospace Engineering A THREE DIMENSIONAL FINITE ELEMENT CODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF DAMAGE IN HELICALLY WOUND COMPOSITE CYLINDERS A Thesis by i%1ARVIN ANTHONY ZOCHER Approved...

Zocher, Marvin Anthony

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

were analyzed by Thermochem for chemical constituents and by Rafter Lab at GNS for isotope analysis. References (Unknown) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4...

210

Finite element analysis of a coiled composite tubular  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents the design and stress analysis of a composite tubular that can be coiled onto large spools for ease of storage and installation on offshore platforms. The tube is analyzed under working pressure and tensile loads, as well...

Judice, David Roy

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

211

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lightning Dock Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number DE-FC07-00AL66977 Notes This project deepened a well and took 4 samples from wells around the Lightning Docks KGRA and performed extensive chamical and isotope analysis...

212

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF BULK TRITIUM SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bulk Tritium Shipping Package was designed by Savannah River National Laboratory. This package will be used to transport tritium. As part of the requirements for certification, the package must be shown to meet the scenarios of the Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) defined in Code of Federal Regulations Title 10 Part 71 (10CFR71). The conditions include a sequential 30-foot drop event, 30-foot dynamic crush event, and a 40-inch puncture event. Finite Element analyses were performed to support and expand upon prototype testing. Cases similar to the tests were evaluated. Additional temperatures and orientations were also examined to determine their impact on the results. The peak stress on the package was shown to be acceptable. In addition, the strain on the outer drum as well as the inner containment boundary was shown to be acceptable. In conjunction with the prototype tests, the package was shown to meet its confinement requirements.

Jordan, J.

2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Surface Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

analysis, surface electronic properties NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Dynamic SIMS Cameca IMS- 5F & IMS-3F Trace-element contaminant and dopant analysis Ions (Cs, O, Ar)...

214

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Springs Ranch Area (Szybinski, 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Springs Ranch Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The brine from the drill holes, hot springs, seepages, and irrigation wells was sampled, as well as water from two nearby creeks, (total of 13 samples) and sent for analysis to Thermochem Inc. For sample locations refer to Figure 35; the geochemical data are presented in Appendix C. Geochemical results indicate the presence of two distinct waters in this group of samples (Tom Powell of Thermochem Inc., personal communication, 2005). Powell found that MDH, TRS-1 and TRS-6 are the most prospective waters and tend to be more bicarbonate rich with much higher proportions of B, Li and

215

Natural convection heat transfer analysis of ATR fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural convection air cooling of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel assemblies is analyzed to determine the level of decay heat that can be removed without exceeding the melting temperature of the fuel. The study was conducted to assist in the level 2 PRA analysis of a hypothetical ATR water canal draining accident. The heat transfer process is characterized by a very low Rayleigh number (Ra {approx} 10{sup {minus}5}) and a high temperature ratio. Since neither data nor analytical models were available for Ra < 0.1, an analytical approach is presented based upon the integral boundary layer equations. All assumptions and simplifications are presented and assessed and two models are developed from similar foundations. In one model, the well-known Boussinesq approximations are employed, the results from which are used to assess the modeling philosophy through comparison to existing data and published analytical results. In the other model, the Boussinesq approximations are not used, thus making the model more general and applicable to the ATR analysis.

Langerman, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Risk analysis by FMEA as an element of analytical validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We subjected a Near-Infrared (NIR) analytical procedure used for screening drugs on authenticity to a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), including technical risks as well as risks related to human failure. An FMEA team broke down the NIR analytical method into process steps and identified possible failure modes for each step. Each failure mode was ranked on estimated frequency of occurrence (O), probability that the failure would remain undetected later in the process (D) and severity (S), each on a scale of 110. Human errors turned out to be the most common cause of failure modes. Failure risks were calculated by Risk Priority Numbers (RPNs)=OנDנS. Failure modes with the highest RPN scores were subjected to corrective actions and the FMEA was repeated, showing reductions in RPN scores and resulting in improvement indices up to 5.0. We recommend risk analysis as an addition to the usual analytical validation, as the FMEA enabled us to detect previously unidentified risks.

J.F. van Leeuwen; M.J. Nauta; D. de Kaste; Y.M.C.F. Odekerken-Rombouts; M.T. Oldenhof; M.J. Vredenbregt; D.M. Barends

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dynamic analysis and application of fuel elements pneumatic transportation in a pebble bed reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Almost 10,000 spherical fuel elements are transported pneumatically one by one in the pipeline outside the core of a pebble bed reactor every day. Any failure in the transportation will lead to the shutdown of the reactor, even safety accidents. In order to ensure a stable and reliable transportation, it's of great importance to analyze the motion and force condition of the fuel element. In this paper, we focus on the dynamic analysis of the pneumatic transportation of the fuel element and derive kinetic equations. Then we introduce the design of the transportation pipeline. On this basis we calculate some important data such as the velocity of the fuel element, the force between the fuel element and the pipeline and the efficiency of the pneumatic transportation. Then we analyze these results and provide some suggestions for the design of the pipeline. The experiment was carried out on an experimental platform. The velocities of the fuel elements were measured. The experimental results were consistent with and validated the theoretical analysis. The research may offer the basis for the design of the transportation pipeline and the optimization of the fuel elements transportation in a pebble bed reactor.

Hongbing Liu; Dong Du; Zandong Han; Yirong Zou; Jiluan Pan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Compound and Elemental Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

219

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Beowawe Hot Compound and Elemental Analysis At Beowawe Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Beowawe Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

220

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2) 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510433

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bergfeld, Et Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Deborah Bergfeld, William C. Evans, James F. Howle, Christopher D. Farrar (2006) Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Bergfeld,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=510430"

222

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Compound and Elemental Analysis At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Crane Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Crane Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three

223

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this paper is to examine whether statistical analysis of encrustation chemistries, when supplemented with petrologic data, can identify the individual processes that generate and degrade fumarolic encrustations. Knowledge of these specific processes broadens the applications of fumarolic alteration studies. Geochemical data for a 47-element suite were obtained for an air-dried subset of the collected

224

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Goff & Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510463

225

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Alvord Hot Springs Compound and Elemental Analysis At Alvord Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Alvord Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

226

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cole, Cole, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Cole, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Wstern Utah hot springs: Antelope, Fish (Deadman), Fish (Wilson), Twin Peak, Cudahy, Laverkin, Grantsville, Crystal Prison, Arrowhead, Red Hill, Monroe, Joseph, Castilla, Saratoga, Thermo, Crater, Wasatch, Beck, Deseret, Big Spring, Blue Warm, Crystal Madsen, Udy, Cutler, Garland, Utah, Ogden, Hooper, Newcastle Area References David R. Cole (1983) Chemical And Isotopic Investigation Of Warm

227

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White, Et White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

228

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & Garside, Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive evaluation of Nevada's geothermal resource potential.

229

An Improved Trace Analysis for N-Nitrosoureas from Biological Media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, 5 Emerson Place, Boston, Massachusetts...room temperature, under special yellow lighting, in order to prevent any artificial loss...requirements, as well as manpower and overall cost per analysis. It is hoped that in the......

I.S. Krull; J. Strauss; F. Hochberg; N.T. Zervas

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE frommultiple,diverseexperimentsperformedonatargeted 1%ofthe human genome as part of the pilot phase and computational analyses. Together, our results advance the collective knowledge about human genome function

Lieb, Jason

231

Finite element-based analysis of shunted piezoelectric structures for vibration damping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piezoelectric patches shunted with passive electrical networks can be attached to a host structure for reduction of structural vibrations. This approach is frequently called ''shunted piezo damping'' and has the advantage of guaranteed stability and ... Keywords: Finite element analysis, Passive electrical network, Piezoelectric structure, Vibration damping

Jens Becker; Oliver Fein; Matthias Maess; Lothar Gaul

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Analysis of a Material Phase Shifting Element in an Atom Interferometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of a Material Phase Shifting Element in an Atom Interferometer John D. Perreault of the change in phase and coherence of matter waves as they pass within 25 nm of the grating bar surfaceW) interaction [5] changed the relative intensities of the diffraction orders. More recently the atom wave phase

Cronin, Alex D.

233

Finite element analysis of flows in secondary settling tanks D. Kleine 1 B. D. Reddy 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite element analysis of flows in secondary settling tanks D. Kleine 1 B. D. Reddy 2 December 7, 2003 Abstract The equations governing unsteady flows in secondary settling tanks, a component settling tanks, and against results obtained from a finite difference code based on an idealized one

Reddy, Batmanathan Dayanand "Daya"

234

Thermo-elasto-plastic finite element analysis of quasi-state processes in Eulerian reference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermo-elasto-plastic finite element analysis of quasi-state processes in Eulerian reference frames ­ Incremental scheme ­ Fine mesh along entire heat source path ­ Lengthy computer runs · Elasto-Plasticity at times ti and ti-1, respectively. Penn State University 5 #12;Elasto-Plasticity Equilibrium: r(r, t) + b

Michaleris, Panagiotis

235

Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AS&M, Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings ...

Lovejoy Andrew E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

On a tensor-based finite element model for the analysis of shell structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present study, we propose a computational model for the linear and nonlinear analysis of shell structures. We consider a tensor-based finite element formulation which describes the mathematical shell model in a natural and simple way by using...

Arciniega Aleman, Roman Augusto

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The human genome is an elegant but cryptic store of information. The roughly three billion bases encodeARTICLES Identification and analysis of functional elements in 1% of the human genome by the ENCODE frommultiple,diverseexperimentsperformedon atargeted 1%ofthe human genome as part of the pilot phase

Iyer, Vishy

238

It's Elemental - The Element Indium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cadmium Cadmium Previous Element (Cadmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tin) Tin The Element Indium [Click for Isotope Data] 49 In Indium 114.818 Atomic Number: 49 Atomic Weight: 114.818 Melting Point: 429.75 K (156.60°C or 313.88°F) Boiling Point: 2345 K (2072°C or 3762°F) Density: 7.31 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the bright indigo line in its spectrum. Say what? Indium is pronounced as IN-dee-em. History and Uses: Indium was discovered by the German chemists Ferdinand Reich and Hieronymus Theodor Richter in 1863. Reich and Richter had been looking for traces of the element thallium in samples of zinc ores. A brilliant indigo line in

239

Enrichment of trace elements in rare-metal bearing pegmatites of the muscovite class: Examples from the Jasper, Thomaston-Barnesville, Troup and Cherokee-Pickens districts in Georgia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pegmatites from four important mining districts in Georgia: the Cherokee-Pickens district (mica and beryl), the Thomaston-Barnesville (mica), Troup (beryl), and Jasper County (feldspar) districts, generally contain quartz, muscovite, K-feldspar and oligoclase and can be included in the muscovite class of pegmatites. No source intrusions are known for any of these pegmatite districts. The Thomaston-Barnesville district covers about 2,000 km[sup 2] compared to the < 100 km[sup 2] of the other three districts and includes 3--4 times as many pegmatites as each of the other districts. The more highly fractionated pegmatites represent 42 to 48 % of the total number of pegmatites sampled in each district except for the Thomaston-Barnesville district in which only 7 % are more highly fractionated. Muscovites from the more highly fractionated pegmatites in these districts contain mean trace element values of 1,118--1,732 ppm Rb, 1,867--3,083 ppm F, 91--278 ppm Li, 7.7-31 ppm Be, 122--147 ppm Ga, 122--315 ppm Nb, and 137--254 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.01--0.21 and 129--177 ppm. Mean Ba is 19--234 ppm. Mean trace element values of muscovites from the least fractionated pegmatites are 381--675 ppm Rb, 748--1,622 ppm F, 33--221 ppm Li, 4:8--20.6 ppm Be, 56--80 ppm Ga, 32--152 ppm Nb, and 59--113 ppm Zn. These pegmatites have mean Ba/Rb and Rb/K[sub 2]O ratios of 0.44--2.83 and 39--76. Mean Ba is 218--857 ppm. In each district, the more highly fractionated pegmatites contain beryl or are in the vicinity of beryl-bearing pegmatites.

Cocker, M.D. (Georgia Geologic Survey, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

TURTLE with MAD input (Trace Unlimited Rays Through Lumped Elements) -- A computer program for simulating charged particle beam transport systems and DECAY TURTLE including decay calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TURTLE is a computer program useful for determining many characteristics of a particle beam once an initial design has been achieved, Charged particle beams are usually designed by adjusting various beam line parameters to obtain desired values of certain elements of a transfer or beam matrix. Such beam line parameters may describe certain magnetic fields and their gradients, lengths and shapes of magnets, spacings between magnetic elements, or the initial beam accepted into the system. For such purposes one typically employs a matrix multiplication and fitting program such as TRANSPORT. TURTLE is designed to be used after TRANSPORT. For convenience of the user, the input formats of the two programs have been made compatible. The use of TURTLE should be restricted to beams with small phase space. The lumped element approximation, described below, precludes the inclusion of the effect of conventional local geometric aberrations (due to large phase space) or fourth and higher order. A reading of the discussion below will indicate clearly the exact uses and limitations of the approach taken in TURTLE.

Carey, D.C.

1999-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilh, Toledo District, Belize.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In Maya bioarchaeology, distinguishing the remains of revered ancestors from sacrificial victims often proves difficult due to the frequently poor bone preservation and the similarities (more)

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Telling friends from foes : strontium isotope and trace element analysis of companion burials from Pusilh, Toledo District, Belize  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Local Variability in Strontium Isotope Ratios of Human ToothDifferential Diagenesis of Strontium in Archaeological HumanThe ratio of barium to strontium as a paleodietary indicator

Somerville, Andrew D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Four formation water samples were collected from well 56-4, during an airlift test which took place between November 11 and November 14, 2007. One sample was taken from the Steiner Well which was the source for drilling water for the drilling of 56-4 and for the short injection test. The samples were analyzed by Thermochem for chemical constituents and by Rafter Lab at GNS for isotope analysis. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Reese_River_Area_(Henkle_%26_Ronne,_2008)&oldid=51045

244

Comparative Cost Analysis of Alternative Animal Tracing Strategies Directed Toward Foot and Mouth Disease Outbreaks in the Texas High Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with animal ID, then there are specific manufacturers that produce AIN devices including visual tags, RFID tags, and injectable transponders. The last step for NAIS is animal tracing. Animal tracking databases (ATD) that are maintained by the states...

Looney, John C.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

Multi-physics coupled code reactor analysis with the U.S. NRC code system TRACE/PARCS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will focus on the PARCS code and some of the recent applications of the coupled TRACE/PARCS codes to OECD LWR benchmarks and to the Advanced CANDU Reactor, the ACR-700. (authors)

Xu, Y.; Downar, T.; Ward, A. [Purdue Univ. (United States); Kozlowski, T. [KTH, Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden); Ivanov, K. [Penn State Univ. (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Regional-scale chemical transport modeling in support of the analysis of observations obtained during the TRACE-P experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during the TRACE-P experiment G. R. Carmichael,1 Y. Tang,1 G. Kurata,3 I. Uno,2 D. Streets,4 J.-H. Woo,1 H. Huang,1 J. Yienger,1 B. Lefer,5 R. Shetter,5 D. Blake,6 E. Atlas,5 A. Fried,5 E. Apel,5 F. Eisele the TRACE-P experiment is used to evaluate how well the CFORS/STEM-2K1 regional-scale chemical transport

Clarke, Antony

247

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemical and isotopic characteristics of fluid sampled from the principal fracture zone in LVEW indicate that this fluid is not directly connected with or simply supplied by thermal water from the present-day hydrothermal system that flows around the southern edge of the resurgent dome from sources in the west moat. At shallow depths in the caldera References Christopher D. Farrar, Michael L. Sorey, Evelyn Roeloffs, Devin L.

248

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wood, 2002) Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salton Sea Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

249

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed chemical and isotopic studies not only help quantify the discharge, but also may provide additional insight to subsurface conditions. For example, CO2-rich groundwaters that are cold and dilute may be a general indicator that a volcano contains a pressurized gas cap. Shallow depths. References William C. Evans, Michael L. Sorey, Andrea C. Cook, B. Mack Kennedy, David L. Shuster, Elizabeth M. Colvard, Lloyd D. White, Mark A. Huebner

250

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Deymonaz, Et Al., Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes There are no thermal springs within the Emigrant prospect area, but unambiguously indigenous hotwater samples were collected from boreholes 211 (see above) and 112 (Fig. 3). These samples were analyzed for major and selected minor chemical components (Table 1; Pilkington, 1984). Hot water at 96degrees C from borehole 211 was collected by airlifting from a depth of 123 m (water level) at a rate of 240 liters per minute. The

251

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Al., Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Water from six hot springs/seeps (out of some 20 seasonal discharges

252

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

253

Compound and Elemental Analysis At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At U.S. West Region (Krohn, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this discussion is to document mineralogic and textural characteristics of ammonium-bearing minerals at several known gold and mercury-bearing hydrothermal systems. Submicroscopic textural and paragenetic relations of ammonium-bearing minerals are examined at two gold deposits, Ivanhoe, Nevada and McLaughlin, California (Fig. 1 ), to understand how ammonium is related to other hydrothermal minerals. Nitrogen

254

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 1981 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the validity of data from multiple sources to develop a better conceptual model Notes Five analytical laboratories have conducted analyses on waters from the KGRA. Charge-balance error calculations conducted on the data produced from these laboratories indicated that data from three laboratories were reliable while two were not. A method of equating all data was established by using linear regression analyses on sets of paired data from various

255

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sorey, Et Al., Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed XRD studies of alteration mineralogy in west-moat drill holes (Flexser, 1989, 1991-this volume) show that the present temperatures in RDO-8, PLV-1, and INYO-4 are well below (65degrees C or more) alteration temperatures, except in the lower part of RDO-8 (below about 300 m). No XRD evidence of epidote or other relatively high-temperature ( > 230 degrees C) alteration products was found in any of the core. At shallow depths in the

256

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Wood, 2002) Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Hot Lake Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot Lake Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

257

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir with economically developable temperature. The fluid geothermometry tells a consistent story, with cation geothermometry detecting a >210degrees C reservoir temperature, probably near the fumarole, and silica geothermometry and presence of sinter suggesting that 160 to 180degrees C exists close to hot spring B.

258

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Seven Mile Hole Area (Larson, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Seven Mile Hole Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Standard X-ray diffractometer (XRD) analyses were used in the laboratory to confirm the PIMA mineral identifications and to look for minerals that have poor SWIR response (e.g., quartz and feldspars) or were not present in great enough concentrations to be detected by the PIMA. Petrographic and electron microprobe analyses of selected samples were conducted in the laboratories of the GeoAnalytical Laboratory at Washington State

259

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mickey Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Mickey Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

260

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Mccredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At McCredie Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location McCredie Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

262

Spring-supported thrust bearings used in hydroelectric generators: Finite element analysis of pad deflection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An iterative solution technique has been developed for fluid film lubrication of large spring-supported thrust bearings subject to hydrodynamic and hydrostatic lubrication using finite element analysis for pad deflection. Oil film pressures are obtained using a control volume formulation of the Reynolds equation while pad deflections are determined with a commercial finite element analysis package. Low rotor speeds are specified so that isothermal conditions prevail. A computer program links these two numerical methods to implement a solution procedure that consists of iterative loops for applied load, input flow rate, and pad deflection. Illustrative solutions have been obtained showing the influence of spring stiffness, lubricant viscosity, load, and location of the hydrostatic supply pocket.

Ms.A.L. Brown; Dr.J.B. Medley; Mr.J.H. Ferguson

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Modeling and design optimization of switched reluctance machine by boundary element analysis and simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonlinear boundary element analysis provides a more accurate and detailing tool for the design of switched reluctance machines, than the conventional equivalent-circuit methods. Design optimization through more detailed analysis and simulation can reduce development and prototyping costs and time to market. Firstly, magnetic field modeling of an industrial switched reluctance machine by boundary element method is reported in this paper. Secondly, performance prediction and dynamic simulation of motor and control design are presented. Thirdly, magnetic forces that cause noise and vibration are studied, to include the effects of motor and control design variations on noise in the design process. Testing of the motor in NEMA 215-Frame size is carried out to verify the accuracy of modeling and simulation.

Tang, Y.; Kline, J.A. Sr. [Emerson Motor Technology Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). U.S. Electrical Motors Div.] [Emerson Motor Technology Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). U.S. Electrical Motors Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been characterized adequately to allow accurate siting or drilling of production wells. Some deep wells, several seismic lines, limited gravity surveys, and geochemical and geological studies have suggested that the geothermal

265

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 1992) Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Clear Lake Area (Thompson, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Clear Lake Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on the above discussion, we favor a model in which thermal water rises somewhere between Howard and Seigler Springs. At Howard Springs we see evidence for the most representative deep thermal water because the C1 is elevated (highest measured C1 concentrations occur at Howard Springs). Moreover, the Na-Li, Na-K and Na-K-Ca geothermometers suggest temperatures greater than 240 degrees C. References J. M. Thompson, R. H. Mariner, L. D. White, T. S. Presser, W. C.

266

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Wood, 2002) (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Belknap-Foley-Bigelow Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

267

Stratospheric and mesospheric pressure-temperature profiles from rotational analysis of CO2 lines in atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy/ATLAS 1 infrared solar occultation spectra  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument. The basis for this method is a rotational analysis of retrieved apparent abundances from CO2 rovibrational absorption lines, employing existing constituent concentration retrieval software used in the analysis of data returned by ATMOS. Pressure-temperature profiles derived from spectra acquired during the ATLAS 1 space shuttle mission of March-April 1992 are quantitatively evaluated and compared with climatological and meteorological data as a means of assessing the validity of this approach.

Stiller, G.P.; Gunson, M.R.; Lowes, L.L.; Abrams, M.C.; Raper, O.F.; Farmer, C.B.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.P. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); [Jet Propulsion Lab., California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); [Liege Univ., Liege (Belgium); [NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Accretionary wedge harzburgite serpentinization and rodingitization constrained by perovskite U/Pb SIMS age, trace elements and Sm/Nd isotopes: Case study from the Western Carpathians, Slovakia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Perovskite-bearing harzburgites occur in a mlange type blueschist-bearing accretionary wedge complex of the Inner Western Carpathians Meliata Unit in Slovakia. Although dark rounded, slightly hydrated relic cores of harzburgite boulders are perovskite-free, perovskite (Prv) occurrence in the surrounding serpentinites and rodingites enabled dating of hydration, resulting in two metamorphicmetasomatic Prv generations. Perovskite (1) grows parallel to relic clinopyroxene exsolution lamellae or forms randomly oriented grain clusters in serpentinized orthopyroxene (Opx1) porphyroclasts, often accompanied by tiny andradite lamellae clusters, or it is partly replaced by Ti-andradite. Perovskite crystallization indicates evolving rodingitization fluids pervading the boundary between the harzburgite cores and Prv-free serpentinite. This strictly limited occurrence of Prv (1) within a 1 to 20-cm across-zone implies slightly postponed Prv crystallization to serpentinization by LREE(Ce,La), Ca2+, Ti/Fe3+-enriched aqueous fluids. A grain scale metasomatic mechanism partitioned Ca and Ti from the host orthopyroxene porphyroclasts, spinel (Ti) and grain-boundary pervasive fluids to Prv. In contrast, Prv (2) occurs in a 1 to 3cm across chlorite-rich blackwall zone between hosting serpentinite and rodingite veins, thus indicating channelled rodingitization fluid flow and accompanying hydraulic fracturing. Here, Prv (2) is ingrown by chlorite and apatite. Part of this Prv (2) formed in a rodingite vein mineral assemblage composed of diopside, andradite, vesuvianite, epidote/zoisite, apatite and chlorite. Both perovskite 1 and 2 are replaced by pyrophanite along the grain rims and interiors; most likely via fluid-aided coupled dissolutionreprecipitation at increased SiFeMnAl element solubility in rodingitization fluids pervading serpentinized harzburgite. Both Prv generations, especially Prv (2), can be partly to almost totally replaced by (Ti-) Adr. Overgrowths of spinel by andradite are occasionally observed in contact zones between the serpentinites and rodingites. LA-ICP-MS study revealed strong depletion in LREE from Prv (1) to Prv (2), and a more typically positive Eu anomaly for Prv (2). Our spider diagram depicts relative enrichment in U, Nb, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and decreased Rb, Ba, Th, Ta, Pb, Sr, Zr in both Prv generations. The U/Pb SIMS concordia ages of Prv (1) from 3 samples range from 1371Ma to 1351Ma, with a mean of 135.60.58Ma, while Prv (2) was dated at 133.75.4Ma. Such negligible age differences imply a relatively short-lived rodingitization event responsible for crystallization of both Prv generations. The 143Nd/144Nd mean value of Prv (1) is 0.5121530.000017 by LA-MC-ICP-MS, thus corresponding to the initial ?Nd(t=135)=?8.20.4 (math's mean). This suggests that the subducted and dehydrated continental crust was the main source of the interactive fluids which initiated serpentinization and rodingitization in the Neotethyan Meliatic accretionary wedge following closure of the MeliataHallstatt Triassic to Jurassic oceanic back-arc basin and the high-pressure metamorphism dated at ca. 160150Ma by 40Ar/39Ar.

Xian-Hua Li; Marin Puti; Yue-Heng Yang; Mat Koppa; Marian Dyda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

An error analysis of a finite element method for a system of nonlinear advection--diffusion--reaction equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present an analysis of a finite element method for solving a system of nonlinear advection-diffusion-reaction equations. We prove the existence and uniqueness of the numerical solution, and obtain a prior error estimates optimal in H^1 ... Keywords: Advection--diffusion--reaction, Error estimate, Finite element, Nonlinear

Biyue Liu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

34 The interdisciplinary field of Biomedical Engineering combines elements of engineering (electronics, systems analysis, fluid mechanics) with the life sciences (biology, physiology, biochemistry) to define and solve problems in biology and medicine. Students choose this growing branch of engineering

Rohs, Remo

271

Distribution of toenail selenium levels in young adult Caucasians and African Americans in the United States: The CARDIA Trace Element Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Data on selenium (Se) levels in American young adults, especially in African Americans, are lacking. Objective: This study presented toenail Se distributions in American young adults of both genders, including both Caucasians and African Americans; and explored potential predictors of toenail Se levels. Data and methods: Data from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study among 4252 American young adults, aged 20-32 in 1987 was used to examine toenail Se levels by instrumental neutron-activation analysis. The distribution of Se levels was described and multivariable linear regression was used to examine potential modifiers of toenail Se concentration within ethnicity-gender subgroups. Results: The geometric mean of toenail Se in this cohort was 0.844 {mu}g/g (95% CI, 0.840-0.849 {mu}g/g) and the median was 0.837 {mu}g/g (95% CI, 0.833-0.844 {mu}g/g). Median levels from lowest to highest quintile were 0.691, 0.774, 0.838, 0.913 and 1.037 {mu}g/g. Se levels varied geographically, and were generally in accordance with its concentrations in local soil. Males, African Americans, current smokers, heavy drinkers and less educated participants were more likely to have low Se levels. Conclusion: This study suggests that toenail Se levels vary geographically depending on soil Se concentrations. In addition to gender, ethnicity and education level, smoking status and alcohol consumption are two important indicators of Se status since they are modifiable lifestyle factors. Findings from this study might aid public health professionals in identifying people at relatively high or low Se levels, so that chronic disease prevention efforts can be directed toward these subgroups. - Research highlights: {yields} Average of toenail Se levels in this cohort was 0.844 {mu}g/g (95% CI, 0.840-0.849 {mu}g/g). {yields} Toenail Se levels vary geographically depending on soil Se concentrations. {yields} Males, African Americans and less educated participants have low Se levels. {yields} Smoking status and alcohol consumption are two important indicators of Se status.

Xun, Pengcheng; Bujnowski, Deborah [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2221 McGavran-Greenberg, Campus Box: 7461, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2221 McGavran-Greenberg, Campus Box: 7461, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Liu, Kiang [Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL (United States); Steve Morris, J. [Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States)] [Research Reactor Center, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO (United States); Guo, Zhongqin [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia (China) [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Ningxia Medical University, Ningxia (China); Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2221 McGavran-Greenberg, Campus Box: 7461, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); He, Ka, E-mail: kahe@unc.edu [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2221 McGavran-Greenberg, Campus Box: 7461, Chapel Hill, NC (United States) [Department of Nutrition, Gillings School of Global Public Health and School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2221 McGavran-Greenberg, Campus Box: 7461, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

CGC Trace Species Partitioning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trace Species Partitioning as Affected Trace Species Partitioning as Affected by Cold Gas Cleanup Conditions: A Thermodynamic Analysis February 10, 2011 DOE/NETL-2011/1503 T r ace Species P ar titioning at C old G as C leanup C onditions Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

273

Trace elements in zooplankton particulate products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the Martin and Knauer4 method. Samples along with appropriate blanks and standards were analysed by flameless or flame atomic absorption spectro-photometry10 and instrumental neutron activation11.

SCOTT W. FOWLER

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Trace Element and Isotopic Fluxes/ Subducted Slab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELS OF SUBDUCTION 5 3.20.4 EARLY-STAGE PROCESSING OF SEDIMENTS AND PORE WATERS IN TRENCH AND SHALLOW FOREARC SETTINGS (Early Subduction Chemistries of HP and UHP Suites 28 3.20.5.10 Forearc to Subarc: Summary and Outstanding Questions 30 3

Bebout, Gray E.

275

Role of Trace Elements in Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from less than 30 @zg/g,wet weight, to 170 and 50 to 460...were observed in 5 patients in corn plete remission, and values...may be introduced during the milling process. It has been suggested...manganese (1.5 2 @g/g,wet weight) and manganese isprimarily...

Morton K. Schwartz

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Compound and Elemental Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history models of fundamental scientific import but, more importantly, of use to

277

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

278

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

279

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Umpqua Hot Springs Umpqua Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Umpqua Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the Dieng field in Central Java, Indonesia. We have analyzed the samples from

280

Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Mechanistic modeling of Zircaloy deformation and fracture in fuel element analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review is given of the comprehensive model developed in the 1960's at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to explain the creep of Zircaloy during neutron irradiation and applied to fuel element analysis and design. The in-pile softening observed at low stresses was hypothesized to be due to a combination of the growth-directed Roberts-Cottrell yielding creep originally proposed for ..cap alpha..-uranium and the formation of point defect loops preferentially on certain planes in response to the applied stress, with the second process being of relatively greater importance. The in-pile hardening observed at high stresses (or strain-rates) was proposed to be due to the cutting by dislocations of radiation-produced obstacles. In this stress (strain-rate) region, in-pile behavior was proposed to be identical to post-irradiation behavior. At intermediate stresses (strain-rates) a mechanism of radiation-enhanced climb around obstacles was suggested as being rate controlling. As the stress is decreased, the climb process becomes easier and the rate was then predicted to be controlled by glide at a flow stress characteristic of unirradiated, annealed material, where radiation-enhanced diffusion enabled climbing around the normal strain-hardening obstacles. At still lower stresses, this glide process became negligibly slow compared with the growth-connected creep mechanism which was presumed to operate independently. The overall scheme was shown to be good agreement with all the in-pile data then available and implemented into the computer analysis of fuel element behavior. 48 refs., 1 fig.

Nichols, F.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A study on the proposes of energy analysis indicator by the window elements of office buildings in Korea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recently, the window area ratio of buildings has increased but the thermal insulation performance of windows is lower than the wall. Therefore, many studies have been carried out to reduce this heat loss. The Republic of Korea policies and guidelines for windows do not consider the optical and design elements of windows because it is more important to the insulation performance of windows. This paper proposes the supplement point of the Korea's policies and guidelines regarding windows through a comparison of Korea's policies and guidelines for windows, checks the variation of the energy consumption of buildings through the variation of the window elements, and proposes an energy analysis indicator for the Republic of Korea's situation. This study confirmed that the variation of the window elements affect to energy consumption by previous studies to consider in window design according to the policies and guidelines. The window elements were divided into performance elements of the windows and architectural/equipment plan element. By analyzing the energy consumption by changing the element, this study confirmed the variation of energy consumption by using the COMFEN4.0 simulation tool. This paper proposes an actual energy analysis indicator in the Republic of Korea.

Seok-Hyun Kim; Sun-Sook Kim; Kwang-Woo Kim; Young-Hum Cho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fundamental and methodological investigations for the improvement of elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass soectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation describes a variety of studies meant to improve the analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS. The emission behavior of individual droplets and LA generated particles in an ICP is studied using a high-speed, high frame rate digital camera. Phenomena are observed during the ablation of silicate glass that would cause elemental fractionation during analysis by ICP-MS. Preliminary work for ICP torch developments specifically tailored for the improvement of LA sample introduction are presented. An abnormal scarcity of metal-argon polyatomic ions (MAr{sup +}) is observed during ICP-MS analysis. Evidence shows that MAr{sup +} ions are dissociated by collisions with background gas in a shockwave near the tip of the skimmer cone. Method development towards the improvement of LA-ICP-MS for environmental monitoring is described. A method is developed to trap small particles in a collodion matrix and analyze each particle individually by LA-ICP-MS.

Ebert, Christopher Hysjulien [Ames Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

284

Finite element analysis of a crack tip in silicate glass: No evidence for a plastic zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, the claim was made that cracks in silicate glasses propagate by the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of cavities at crack tips, which is the same way as in metals but at a much smaller scale. This hypothesis for crack growth is based in part on the measurement of surface displacements near the tip of an emerging crack, which is the point at which a crack front intersects the side surface of the specimen. Surface displacements measured by atomic force microscopy were less than theoretically predicted. The difference between the theoretical and experimental displacements was attributed to a plastic zone surrounding the tip of the moving crack. In this paper, we show that the theoretical analysis used earlier was based on an incorrect assumption about the functional dependence of the displacement with distance from the crack tip. We use a full three-dimensional finite element analysis combined with an asymptotic solution of the crack geometry to obtain a solution to the surface displacement problem. We show that the calculated displacements are fully consistent with those experimentally measured by using an atomic force microscope. No divergence from elastic behavior is observed. Our results support the view that crack propagation in glass is entirely brittle. No evidence for plasticity at the crack tips is obtained.

T. Fett, G. Rizzi, D. Creek, S. Wagner, J. P. Guin, J. M. Lpez-Cepero, and S. M. Wiederhorn

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Photon Activation Analysis Of Light Elements Using 'Non-Gamma' Radiation Spectroscopy - The Instrumental Determination Of Phosphorus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unlike metal determinations the analysis of light elements (e.g., carbon, oxygen, phosphorus) is frequently problematic, in particular if analysed instrumentally. In photon activation analysis (PAA) the respective activation products do not emit gamma radiation in the most cases. Usually, annihilation quanta counting and subsequent decay curve analysis have been used for determinations of C, N, O, and F. However, radiochemical separation of the respective radioisotopes mostly is indispensable. For several reasons, some of the light elements cannot be analysed following this procedure, e.g. phosphorus. In this contribution the instrumental PAA of phosphorus in organic matrix by activation with bremsstrahlung of an electron linear accelerator and subsequent beta spectroscopy is described. The accuracy of the results was excellent as obtained by analysis of a BCR Reference Material.

Segebade, Christian [Idaho Accelerator Centre (IAC), Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States); Goerner, Wolf [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung, unter den Eichen 86, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Transient finite element analysis of electric double layer using Nernst-Planck-Poisson equations with a modified stern layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite element analysis of electric double layer capacitors using a transient nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson (NPP) model and Nernst-Planck-Poisson-modified Stern layer (NPPMS) model are presented in 1D and 2D. The NPP model provided unrealistic ion...

Lim, Jong Il

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Non-destructive assay of EBR-II blanket elements using resonance transmission analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Resonance transmission analysis utilizing a faltered reactor beam was examined as a means of determining the {sup 239}Pu content in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II depleted uranium blanket elements. The technique uses cadmium and gadolinium falters along with a {sup 239}Pu fission chamber to isolate the 0.3 eV resonance in {sup 239}Pu. In the energy range of this resonance (0.1 eV to 0.5 ev), the total microscopic cross-section of {sup 239}Pu is significantly greater than the cross-sections of {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U. This large difference allows small changes in the {sup 239}Pu content of a sample to result in large changes in the mass signal response. Tests with small stacks of depleted uranium and {sup 239}Pu foils indicate a significant change in response based on the {sup 239}Pu content of the foil stack. In addition, the tests indicate good agreement between the measured and predicted values of {sup 239}Pu up to approximately two weight percent.

Klann, R.T.; Poenitz, W.P.

1998-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Application of equivalent elastic methods in three-dimensional finite element structural analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes use of equivalent solid (EQS) modeling to obtain efficient solutions to perforated material problems using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3-D-FEA) programs. It is shown that EQS modeling in 3-D-FEA requires an EQS constitutive relationship with a sufficient number of independent constants to allow the EQS material to respond according to the elastic symmetry of the penetration pattern. It is also shown that a 3-D-FEA submodel approach to calculate peak stresses and ligament stresses from EQS results is very accurate and preferred over more traditional stress multiplier approaches. The method is demonstrated on the problem of a transversely pressurized simply supported plate with a central divider lane separating two perforated regions with circular penetrations arranged in a square pattern. A 3-D-FEA solution for a model that incorporates each penetration explicitly is used for comparison with results from an EQS solution for the plate. Results for deflection and stresses from the EQS solution are within 3% of results from the explicit 3-D-FE model. A solution to the sample problem is also provided using the procedures in the ASME B and PV Code. The ASME B and PV Code formulas for plate deflection were shown to overestimate the stiffening effects of the divider lane and the outer stiffening ring.

Jones, D.P.; Gordon, J.L.; Hutula, D.N.; Holliday, J.E.; Jandrasits, W.G. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Spectral element formulation for dynamic analysis of a coupled piezoelectric wafer and beam system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A spectral element model is developed to represent the dynamic response of a coupled piezoelectric wafer and beam system (CPBS) in which either a single or collocated piezoelectric wafers are bonded to a base beam. The Mindlin-Herrmann rod theory and ... Keywords: A coupled piezoelectric wafer and beam system (CPBS), Collocated piezoelectric wafers, Electro-mechanical interaction, Finite element method, Lamb waves, Spectral element method

Hyun Woo Park; Eun Jin Kim; Ki Lyong Lim; Hoon Sohn

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Trace Analysis of Polar Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater by LC-MS-MS: Comparison of Membrane Bioreactor and Activated Sludge Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Analysis of Polar Pharmaceuticals in Wastewater by LC-MS-MS: Comparison...compounds in three different wastewater recycling schemes in Australia. Chemosphere...fields irrigated with treated wastewater. J. Agric. Food. Chem. 53......

Mary Dawn Celiz; Sandra Prez; Dami Barcel; Diana S. Aga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

It's Elemental - The Element Cesium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Xenon Xenon Previous Element (Xenon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Barium) Barium The Element Cesium [Click for Isotope Data] 55 Cs Cesium 132.9054519 Atomic Number: 55 Atomic Weight: 132.9054519 Melting Point: 301.59 K (28.44°C or 83.19°F) Boiling Point: 944 K (671°C or 1240°F) Density: 1.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the Latin word for sky blue, caesius. Say what? Cesium is pronounced as SEE-zee-em. History and Uses: Cesium was discovered by Robert Wilhelm Bunsen and Gustav Robert Kirchhoff, German chemists, in 1860 through the spectroscopic analysis of Durkheim mineral water. They named cesium after the blue lines they observed in its

292

The Use of Explanations in Knowledge-Based Systems: Cognitive Perspectives and a Process-Tracing Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This exploratory research investigates the nature of explanation use and factors that influence it during users' interaction with a knowledge-based system (KBS) for decision-making. It draws upon several cognitive perspectives to help understand when, ... Keywords: Explanations Explanations In Expert Systems Knowledge Based Systems Verbal Protocol Analysis

Ji-Ye Mao; Izak Benbasat

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs Ottmar Loos Abstract We introduce nuclear elements in Banach Jordan pairs, generalizing the nuclear elements Jordan pairs and show that the trace form Trintroduced in [3] may be extended to the nuclear

294

Development of a three-dimensional finite element model of a horse's foot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a horse's foot and attempt to validate it using experimentally obtamed strain results. A Suite element model was constructed using geometric data &om traced outlines of slices cut lrom an actual foot. The model was analyzed using the ABAQUS Suite... element analysis code and strain results were obtamed which were found to difFer signi6cantly &om experimental resuhs. Based on iinformation from the literature, it was determmed that the structure of the model is essentially sound and discrepancies...

Hanft, Joseph Thomas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Rare Earth Elements:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...were also extracted as by-products of uranium mining from conglomerates at Elliot Lake...toxic waste lakes, acrid air, and high cancer rates in the Bayan Obo area. The environmental...Major and trace element composition of the depleted MORB mantle (DMM). Earth and Planetary...

Anton R. Chakhmouradian; Frances Wall

296

Finite Element Analysis of Ballistic Penetration of Plain Weave Twaron CT709 Fabrics: A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ballistic impact of Twaron CT709 plain weave fabrics is studied using an explicit finite element method. Many existing approximations pertaining to woven fabrics cannot adequately represent strain rate-dependent behavior exhibited by the Twaron...

Gogineni, Sireesha

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

297

TEA - a linear frequency domain finite element model for tidal embayment analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A frequency domain (harmonic) finite element model is developed for the numerical prediction of depth average circulation within small embayments. Such embayments are often characterized by irregular boundaries and bottom ...

Westerink, Joannes J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Dynamic analysis of shells of revolution submerged in an acoustic medium by the finite element method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the spherical shell transformation matrix relating (q} and (u) for an element generalized added mass matrix due to radiated pressure matrix relating (q) and (I) for an element unknown source strength velocity of sound in fluid coupled equivalent nodal load... A method 1s presented for the evaluation of the displacements and the surface pressure which are induced by the harmonic exc1tation of a shell of revolution submerged in an acoustic medium. The method utilizes a source distribution approach...

Ng, Chi Kin

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

EMSL - trace metals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

trace-metals en Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

300

Elements & Compounds Atoms (Elements)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Elements & Compounds #12;Atoms (Elements) Molecules (Compounds) Cells Elements & Compounds #12;Nucleus Electrons Cloud of negative charge (2 electrons) Fig. 2.5: Simplified model of a Helium (He) Atom He 4.002602 2 Helium Mass Number (~atomic mass) = number of Neutrons + Protons = 4 for Helium Atomic

Frey, Terry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

High resolution analysis of soil elements with laser-induced breakdown  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a system and method of detecting a concentration of an element in a soil sample wherein an opening or slot is formed in a container that supports a soil sample that was extracted from the ground whereupon at least a length of the soil sample is exposed via the opening. At each of a plurality of points along the exposed length thereof, the soil sample is ablated whereupon a plasma is formed that emits light characteristic of the elemental composition of the ablated soil sample. Each instance of emitted light is separated according to its wavelength and for at least one of the wavelengths a corresponding data value related to the intensity of the light is determined. As a function of each data value a concentration of an element at the corresponding point along the length of the soil core sample is determined.

Ebinger, Michael H. (Santa Fe, NM); Harris, Ronny D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Enhanced finite element analysis using the PATRAN-G pre- and post processor program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the layers of a composite inaterial with nodes and orientation General overview diagram of PATRAN-G svsyteni and interfaces Finite element mesh of 36 element plate with nodes labeled Stress contour plot showing the in-plane stress in the x...-direction for layer 1 Stress contour plot showing the in-plane stress in the y-direction for layer 1 Stress contour plot showing the in-plane xy stress for layer 1 Stress contour plot showing the transverse xz stress for layer 9 Stress contour plot...

Murry, Margaret Lois

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

304

Elemental Analysis of Gas Chromatographic Effluents with an Inductively Coupled Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......relatively low power (~800 W) 27 MHz plasma. However, Greenfield and McGeachin...not detected in their 7.5 MHz plasma until the power exceeds 5 KW...Evaluation of a microwave-induced plasma in helium at atmospheric pressure as an element-selective......

D.L. Windsor; M. Bonner Denton

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of synthetic motor oils for additive elements by ICP-AES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard motor oils are made by blending paraffinic or naphthenic mineral oil base stocks with additive packages containing anti-wear agents, dispersants, corrosion inhibitors, and viscosity index improvers. The blender can monitor the correct addition of the additives by determining the additive elements in samples dissolved in a solvent by ICP-AES. Internal standardization is required to control sample transport interferences due to differences in viscosity between samples and standards. Synthetic motor oils, made with poly-alpha-olefins and trimethylol propane esters, instead of mineral oils, pose an additional challenge since these compounds affect the plasma as well as having sample transport interference considerations. The synthetic lubricant base stocks add significant oxygen to the sample matrix, which makes the samples behave differently than standards prepared in mineral oil. Determination of additive elements in synthetic motor oils will be discussed.

Williams, M.C.; Salmon, S.G. [Texaco Inc., Beacon, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

Sensitivity analysis of single-layer graphene resonators using atomic finite element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic finite element simulation is applied to study the natural frequency and sensitivity of a single-layer graphene-based resonator with CCCC, SSSS, CFCF, SFSF, and CFCF boundary conditions using the commercial code ANSYS. The fundamental frequencies of the graphene sheet are compared with the results of the previous finite element study. In addition, the sensitivity of the resonator is compared with the early work based on nonlocal elasticity theory. The results of the comparison are very good in all considered cases. The sensitivities of the resonator with different boundary conditions are obtained, and the order based on the boundary condition is CCCC > SSSS > CFCF > SFSF > CFFF. The highest sensitivity is obtained when the attached mass is located at the center of the resonator. This is useful for the design of a highly sensitive graphene-based mass sensor.

Lee, Haw-Long; Hsu, Jung-Chang; Lin, Shu-Yu; Chang, Win-Jin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kun Shan University, Tainan 71003, Taiwan (China)

2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

307

A Thermal Discrete Element Analysis of EU Solid Breeder Blanket subjected to Neutron Irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to neutron irradiation, solid breeder blankets are subjected to complex thermo-mechanical conditions. Within one breeder unit, the ceramic breeder bed is composed of spherical-shaped lithium orthosilicate pebbles, and as a type of granular material, it exhibits strong coupling between temperature and stress fields. In this paper, we study these thermo-mechanical problems by developing a thermal discrete element method (Thermal-DEM). This proposed simulation tool models each individual ceramic pebble as one element and considers grain-scale thermo-mechanical interactions between elements. A small section of solid breeder pebble bed in HCPB is modelled using thousands of individual pebbles and subjected to volumetric heating profiles calculated from neutronics under ITER-relevant conditions. We consider heat transfer at the grain-scale between pebbles through both solid-to-solid contacts and the interstitial gas phase, and we calculate stresses arising from thermal expansion of pebbles. The overall effective conductivity of the bed depends on the resulting compressive stress state during the neutronic heating. The thermal-DEM method proposed in this study provides the access to the grain-scale information, which is beneficial for HCPB design and breeder material optimization, and a better understanding of overall thermo-mechanical responses of the breeder units under fusion-relevant conditions.

Yixiang Gan; Francisco Hernandez; Dorian Hanaor; Ratna Annabattula; Marc Kamlah; Pavel Pereslavtsev

2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling and numerical analysis of the bond behavior of masonry elements strengthened with SRP/SRG  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Steel Reinforced Polymers (SRPs) and Steel Reinforced Grout (SRG) strengthening systems have been recently introduced as an alternative solution to the traditional systems based on the use of fiber reinforced polymers materials (FRPs). Few studies on SRP/SRG are available in the current literature and all have shown the potentialities of SRP/SRG in improving structural performances of masonry and concrete elements and, at the same time, their difference with respect to \\{FRPs\\} particularly in terms of bond behavior. Aim of the present paper is to propose a simple approach devoted to study the bond behavior of masonry structures strengthened with SRP/SRG systems. The approach, based on experimental evidences and theoretical considerations mainly consists of deriving approximate bond stress-slip laws for the strengthening/support interface layer, able to reproduce the local bond stresses transferring mechanism. Finite Element (FE) analyses are then developed with reference to the experimental tests available in the current literature by adopting the bond stress-slip laws obtained through the proposed approach. The deduced results show the reliability of the proposed approach in simulating the bond behavior of masonry elements strengthened with SRP/SRG and the possibility to investigate further peculiarities characterizing this kind of strengthening systems.

Ernesto Grande; Maura Imbimbo; Elio Sacco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Finite element analysis of bending in a threaded connector for a 5 1/2-in. Marine riser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the development of a new finite element modelling technique for performing nonlinear bending analysis of tubulars and its application to a threaded connector for a 5-1/2 inch production tubing marine riser. A finite element technique has been developed for analyzing bending loads applied to an axisymmetric geometry. The method uses a Fourier series solution. The first two terms of the series are solved simultaneously, allowing nonlinearities to be included since the method does not use superposition, which normally requires linearity. Existing methods of analysis require either a linear elastic assumption, and axisymmetric approximation of bending loads, or a full three dimensional analysis. The new technique includes nonlinearities in mechanical properties, gapping, and friction. It is more accurate than the method where axisymmetric loads are applied so that pipe OD stresses are the same as those that would result from bending. The model is considerably less complicated to use than a three dimensional model and is also considerably less expensive. The method described above is applied to a 5-1/2 inch threaded connector. The connector is analyzed under make-up, tension, pressure, bending, and shear loads. Predictions include average and reversing stresses in the pin and box wall and at stress concentrations. These predictions can be used to evaluate the fatigue life of the connector.

Allen, M.B.; Eichberger, L.C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Trace-element analysis of individual synthetic and natural fluid inclusions with synchrotron radiation XRF using Monte Carlo simulations for quantification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mum thick NIST 612 material shielded by a bottom...Fig. 10. Ternary diagrams showing relative...Gerald Falkenberg, Thor Hansteen, Frank...Altherr for editorial handling. References Bodnar...glass reference materials. Geostandard Newsletter...certified Reference Material SRM 610-611...

Karen RICKERS; Rainer THOMAS; Wilhelm HEINRICH

311

Impact of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Quality on the Behavior of Alkali Metals and Trace Elements during Combustion: A Thermodynamic Equilibrium Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light, thermal- and bacterial-resistant, and inexpensive leathers, especially in the footwear industry, are obtained by the Cr tanning method. ... The selected waste items are representing the major combustible fractions found in MSW, i.e. paper, plastic, textile, and biogenic materials (both food and biomass), but also the other waste fraction (a mixed and poorly defined fraction). ... Pedersen et al.(6) studies six different waste fractions separately under different operational conditions in a full-scale incinerator: NaCl (road salt), household batteries, automotive shredder waste (rubber and plastics), Cu?Cr?As (CCA)-impregnated wood, PVC, and shoes (leather mainly). ...

Michae?l Becidan; Lars Srum; Daniel Lindberg

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

312

Application of electron microscopy and x-ray structural analysis for the determination of sizes of structural elements in nanocrystalline materials (Review)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibilities of determining the sizes of structural elements in various nanocrystalline materials by electron microscopy and X-ray structural analysis are analyzed. It is shown that these sizes depend on ...

Yu. D. Yagodkin; S. V. Dobatkin

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assessment of ground vibration impact from automotive and transit sources on future biotechnology research center using finite element analysis (FEA)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new science and biotechnology research center was to be built in a metropolitan industrial area. There was concern that ground vibration from a nearby freeway street traffic and trains on an adjacent railroad would impact vibration sensitive research equipment inside the building. Ground vibration was measured at the project site prior to construction. Finite Element Analysis(FEA) was used to develop a computer simulation of the building structure using the measured ground vibration as input to the FEAmodel. The study determined the building floor vibration due to exterior sources would achieve the projects criteria for the building structure as designed.

James E. Phillips

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Finite element analysis and design of large diameter flexible vertical pipes subjected to incremental compacted backfill loads and creep effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS AND DESiGN OF LARGE DIANETER FLEXIBLE VERTICAL PIPES SUBJECTED TO INCREMENTAL COMPACTED BACKFILL LOADS AND CREEP EFFECTS A Thesis by MOHAMMAD KABIR HOSSAIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... BACKFILL LOADS AND CREEP EFFECTS A Thesis by MOHAMMAD KABIR HOSSAIN Approved as to sty1e and content by: R be+r L. Lytton (Chair of Committee) Ozden 0. Ochoa (Member) Derek V. Morris (Member) ames T P Yao (Head of rtment) ABSTRACT Finite...

Hossain, Mohammad Kabir

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Finite element analysis of laminar mixed convection in the entrance region of horizontal annular ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The laminar mixed convection in the entrance region of horizontal straight ducts of an annular cross section is studied by means of a generally applicable finite element procedure based on the parabolized simplification of the Navier-Stokes and energy equations and on the Boussinesq approximation of the buoyancy term. The procedure is validated through comparisons of computed results with available data from the literature. New results concern annuli with radius ratios equal to 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 subjected to the fundamental boundary condition of the second and the third kinds, for Prandtl numbers equal to 0.7 and 7, and different values of Grashof number.

Nonino, C.; Giudice, S. del [Univ. di Udine (Italy). Dipt. di Energetica e Macchine

1996-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

Virtual dynamic balancing method without trial weights for multi-rotor series shafting based on finite element model analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The traditional influence coefficient dynamic balancing method for multi-rotor series shafting such as turbine-generator sets gas turbines compressor trains and others usually needs to startup many times using trial weights along the rotor. Based on finite element model analysis for the multi-rotor series shafting a virtual dynamic balancing methodology which only needs to collect data of vibration response at operating speed without trial weights is developed in this paper. According to shafting structure and operating parameters the dynamic finite element model was built by using rotor dynamics theory and finite element simulation technology. The shafting dynamic characteristics and weighted influence coefficient matrix can be gotten by exciting virtual unbalance force on the balance place correspondingly. The effectiveness and flexibility of the proposed method have been illustrated by solving a shafting dynamic balancing example with no trial weights requirements. It is believed that the new methods developed in this work will help in reducing the time and cost of the equipment manufacturer or field dynamic balancing procedures.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Response Surface Analysis of Elemental Composition and Energy Properties of Corn Stover During Torrefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research studied the effects of torrefaction temperature (250-250 C) and time (30-120 minutes) on elemental composition and energy properties changes in corn stover. Torrefied material was analyzed for moisture content, moisture-free carbon (%), hydrogen (%), nitrogen (%), sulfur (%), and higher heating value (MJ/kg). Results at 350 C and 120 minutes indicated a steep decrease in moisture content to a final value of about 1.48% - a reduction of about 69%. With respect to carbon content, the increase was about 23%, while hydrogen and sulfur content decreased by about 46.82% and 66.6%, respectively. The hydrogen-to-carbon ratio decreased as torrefaction temperature and time increased, with the lowest value of 0.6 observed at 350 C and 120 minutes. Higher heating value measured at 350 C and 60 minutes increased by about 22% and the maximum degree of carbonization observed was about 1.21. Further, the regression models developed for chemical composition in terms of torrefaction temperature and time adequately described the process with coefficient of determination values (R2) in the range of 0.92-0.99 for the elemental composition and energy properties studied. Response surface plots indicated that increasing both torrefaction temperature and time resulted in decreased moisture content, hydrogen content, and the hydrogen to-carbon ratio, and increased carbon content and higher heating value. This effect was more significant at torrefaction temperatures and times >280 C and >30 minutes.

Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Richard D. Boardman; Christopher T. Wright

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Elemental analysis of Edwards Formation flint: a comparison of sample areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Georgetown Elemental Concentrations Rock 1 Rock 2 Rock 3 Rock 4 Rock 5 Rock 6 Conc. 4. 84 5. 23 6. 22 7. 81 1. 01 1. 10 . 78 3. 00 2. 91 1. 34 1 a7 5. 24 5. 88 1. 83 1. 23 1. 24 7 . 68 2. 12 2. 34 1. 07 1. 18 A~v 6. 02 . 96 2. 20 4... 1810 1404 Al A~v 1663 1454 1304 1196 1878 1586 Aopendix I. (Continued) Rock 7 Rock 8 Rock 9 Rock 10 Rock 11 Rock 12 Conc. 2. 39 2. 24 1. 12 1. 45 1. 77 1. 84 2. 05 1. 21 1. 12 1. 00 1. 42 . 92 . 68 1. 77 2. 08 1. 80 l. 09 l...

McGinley, Ann Neil

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

On simple and accurate finite element models for nonlinear bending analysis of beams and plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T x; dQTxx dx = q(x) MTxx = Dxxd` T dx ; Q T x = AxzKs `T + dw T 0 dx (2.5a) 16 The Reddy Beam Theory (RBT) dMRxx dx = Q R x +fi dPxx dx flRx (2.6a) dQRx dx = q(x)+fl dRxx dx fi d2Pxx dx2 (2.6b) MRxx = Dxxd` R dx fiFxx d`R dx + d2wR0 dx2... >: T for TBT U = Dxx`RD xx fiFxxdw R 0dx for simplifled RBT (2.12) A = 8 >>>> >> >: Dxx AxzKs for TBT ^Dxx Axz for simplifled RBT (2.13) 18 B = 8> >>> >> >: 0 for TBT ^Dxx Axz for simplifled RBT (2.14) II.2.3. A unifled flnite element model...

Urthaler Lapeira, Yetzirah Yksya

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

320

Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Polo II, Rua Luis Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Alves, J. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058, Guimaraes (Portugal)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Molecular Analysis of a Hospital Cafeteria-Associated Salmonellosis Outbreak Using Modified Repetitive Element PCR Fingerprinting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...sophisticated digital gel analysis system such as was used in the present...databases and for quantitative assessments of similarity and reproducibility...Rapid food-borne pathogen ID system is making a difference...by PFGE as an epidemiologic tool for Salmonella infections...

James R. Johnson; Connie Clabots; Miguel Azar; David J. Boxrud; John M. Besser; Joseph R. Thurn

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DERIVING PLASMA DENSITIES AND ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES FROM SERTS DIFFERENTIAL EMISSION MEASURE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use high-resolution spectral emission line data obtained by the SERTS instrument during three rocket flights to demonstrate a new approach for constraining electron densities of solar active region plasma. We apply differential emission measure (DEM) forward-fitting techniques to characterize the multithermal solar plasma producing the observed EUV spectra, with constraints on the high-temperature plasma from the Yohkoh Soft X-ray Telescope. In this iterative process, we compare line intensities predicted by an input source distribution to observed line intensities for multiple iron ion species, and search a broad range of densities to optimize {chi}{sup 2} simultaneously for the many available density-sensitive lines. This produces a density weighted by the DEM, which appears to be useful for characterizing the bulk of the emitting plasma over a significant range of temperature. This 'DEM-weighted density' technique is complementary to the use of density-sensitive line ratios and less affected by uncertainties in atomic data and ionization fraction for any specific line. Once the DEM shape and the DEM-weighted density have been established from the iron lines, the relative elemental abundances can be determined for other lines in the spectrum. We have also identified spectral lines in the SERTS wavelength range that may be problematic.

Schmelz, J. T.; Kimble, J. A. [Physics Department, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Saba, J. L. R., E-mail: jschmelz@memphis.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

323

An Inverse Finite Element Analysis and A Parametric Study of Small Punch Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-displacement curve of 40CrNi2Mo alloy steel (Guan et al., 2011) ....... 21 Fig. 2.8 Estimate of the first step displacement ........................................................... 22 Fig. 2.9 FE simulation results with ? = 800 MPa at ? = 0...-strain curve of 40CrNi2Mo alloy steel from the inverse FE x analysis of the SPT ......................................................................................... 28 Fig. 2.18 1.25Cr0.5Mo alloy steel elastic modulus and yield...

Xu, Zhenzhen

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

Continuum flow sampling mass spectrometer for elemental analysis with an inductively coupled plasma ion source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sampling of ions from an atmospheric pressure inductively coupled plasma for mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) with a supersonic nozzle and skimmer is shown to follow similar behavior found for neutral beam studies and for ion extraction from other plasmas and flames. In particular, highest ion beam intensity is found if the skimmer tip is close to the Mach disk and at a calculated skimming Knudsen number close to the recommended value of 1. Our ICP-MS instrument with an off-axis detector and conventional cylindrical electrostatic ion focusing in the transition flow regime gives intense count rates of 1 to 5 MHz per mg L/sup -1/ of analyte superimposed on a background of 1 to 10 kHz. The dependence of count rates for metal oxide and doubly charged ions on ICP operating parameters, and sampling interface configuration are discussed for this instrument. A simple method is described for the approximate measurement of the ion energy distribution in ICP-MS. The average ion kinetic energy, kinetic energy spread, and maximum kinetic energy are evaluated from a plot of ion signal as a function of retarding voltage applied to the quadrupole mass analyzer. The effects of plasma operating parameters on ion signals and energies are described. In particular, kinetic energy is a sensitive function of aerosol gas flow rate. This behavior is attributed to a non-thermal, possibly electrical, interaction between the plasma and the sampling interface, which is induced by the presence of the axial channel in the ICP. The interference on the ionization of cobalt by five salts, NaCl, MgCl/sub 2/, NH/sub 4/I, NH/sub 4/Br and NH/sub 4/Cl, in an ICP is first considered theoretically and subsequently the theoretical trends are established experimentally by ICP-MS. The interference trends are found to be in the order of the most easily ionized element in the matrix salt, i.e., Na > Mg > I > Br > Cl.

Olivares, J.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Reconstructing the cosmic evolution of the chemical elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical elements are created in nuclear fusion processes in the hot and dense cores of stars. The energy generated through nucleosynthesis allows stars to shine for billions of years. When these stars explode as massive supernovae, the newly made elements are expelled, chemically enriching the surrounding regions. Subsequent generations of stars are formed from gas that is slightly more element enriched than that from which previous stars formed. This chemical evolution can be traced back to its beginning soon after the Big Bang by studying the oldest and most metal-poor stars still observable in the Milky Way today. Through chemical analysis, they provide the only available tool for gaining information about the nature of the short-lived first stars and their supernova explosions more than thirteen billion years ago. These events set in motion the transformation of the pristine universe into a rich cosmos of chemically diverse planets, stars, and galaxies.

Frebel, Anna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of heavy mineral and heavy element database of soil sediments in Japan using synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction and high-energy (116keV) X-ray fluorescence analysis: 1. Case study of Kofu and Chiba region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have started the construction of a nationwide forensic soil sediment database for Japan based on the heavy mineral and trace heavy element compositions of stream sediments collected at 3024 points all over Japan obtained by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRD) and high-energy synchrotron X-ray fluorescence analysis (HE-SR-XRF). In this study, the performance of both techniques was demonstrated by analyzing soil sediments from two different geological regions, the Kofu and Chiba regions in Kanto province, to construct database that can be applied in the future to provenance analysis of soil evidence from a crime scene. The sediments from the quaternary volcanic lithology of the Chiba region were found to be dominated by heavy minerals of volcanic origin orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, and amphibole, and the \\{REEs\\} (rare earth elements) within the region showed similar geochemical behavior. On the other hand, four distinct heavy mineral groups were identified in the sediments of the Kofu region, where there is a great variety of underlying bedrock, and the geochemical behavior of the \\{REEs\\} in the sediments also varied accordingly to their geological origins. As such, our study shows that high-resolution SR-XRD data can provide information on the spatial distribution patterns of heavy minerals in stream sediments, playing an important role in determining their likely geographical origin. Meanwhile, the highly sensitive HE-SR-XRF data allow us to study the geochemical behavior of trace heavy elements, especially the \\{REEs\\} in the sediments, providing additional support to further constrain the likely geographical origin of the sediments determined by heavy minerals.

Willy Shun Kai Bong; Izumi Nakai; Shunsuke Furuya; Hiroko Suzuki; Yoshinari Abe; Keiichi Osaka; Takuya Matsumoto; Masayoshi Itou; Noboru Imai; Toshio Ninomiya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Parallel Seismic Ray Tracing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 3.4.1 Rotated Take-Off Angle Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 3.4.2 Rotated Cubed Sphere Mesh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 3.4.3 Ray Tube Interpolation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3.5 Theoretical Model..., the ray parameters are defined as ?1 = ?(declination), ?2 = ?(azimuth), and ?3 = ?(travel-time). (b) Suppose we have a unit cube centered at the source point, then a ray can be traced from the source point through an evenly discretized point on the face...

Jain, Tarun K

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

Stress development and shape change during press-hardening process using phase-transformation-based finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Elastically driven shape change, or springback, in a press-hardened U-channel part made from a tailor-welded blank (TWB) was simulated using a fully coupled thermo-mechanicalmetallurgical finite element (FE) method. The TWB consists of boron steel and high-strength low-alloy steel, which have significantly different hardenabilities. A combined implicitexplicit three-step simulation consisting of air cooling, forming and die quenching, and springback was used for computational efficiency. All the required material models such as the modified phase-transformation kinetics and phase-transformation-related stress-update scheme were implemented in the FE software ABAQUS with the user-defined subroutines UMAT, VUMAT, and HETVAL. The developed FE procedure, including the material models, satisfactorily predicted the experimentally measured shape changes of the TWB part. Here we present an in-depth analysis of the residual stress development during forming and die quenching using different material modeling schemes. It should be noted that the stress evolution of the two materials with high and low hardenabilities were significantly different depending on the phase transformation kinetics during forming and quenching. Moreover, in order to enhance the prediction capability of the press-hardening simulations, it was essential to include the phase-transformation-related strains in the material model.

H.H. Bok; J.W. Choi; D.W. Suh; M.G. Lee; F. Barlat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Elemental fractionation during LA-ICP-MS analysis of silicate glasses: implications for matrix-independent standardization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-independent standardization Mabry Gaboardi and Munir Humayun* Received 16th January 2009, Accepted 11th June 2009 First-independent standardization of refractory elements is possible if the internal normalizing element is approximately the same uniform ESRs in transparent samples and matrix-independent standardization of volatiles in transparent

Weston, Ken

330

MeTAGeM-Trace: Improving trace generation in model transformation by leveraging the role of transformation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the context of Model-Driven Engineering (MDE), generation of traces can be automated using the implicit traceability relationships contained in any model transformation. Besides, if transformations are developed adopting a Model-Driven Engineering (MDE) approach, i.e. promoting the role of models and the level of automation, model transformation will benefit from the promised advantages of MDE in terms of less costly software development while reducing the inherent complexity of coding model transformations. To put these ideas into practice, this work introduces MeTAGeM-Trace, the first prototype of an EMF-based toolkit for the MDD of model-to-model transformations which supports trace generation, i.e. it allows developing model transformations that produce not only the corresponding target models, but also a trace model between the elements of the source and target models involved in the transformation.

lvaro Jimnez; Juan M. Vara; Vernica A. Bollati; Esperanza Marcos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ray-tracing for coordinate knowledge in the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe the matrix/vector ray tracing methods used to maintain pupil and image position knowledge in the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Simulator. These prove...

Sabatke, Derek S

332

Experimental and finite element analysis research on cold-formed steel lipped channel beams under web crippling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article presents the results of an investigation into web crippling behavior of cold-formed steel lipped channel beams subjected to end-one-flange (EOF), interior-one-flange (IOF), end-two-flange (ETF), and interior-two-flange (ITF) loading conditions. A total of 48 cold-formed steel lipped channel beams with different boundary conditions, loading conditions, bearing lengths, and section heights were tested. The experimental scheme, failure modes, concentrated load-general vertical deformation and strain intensity distribution curves are presented in the article. The effect of boundary condition, loading condition, bearing length and section height on web crippling ultimate capacity and ductility of cold-formed steel lipped channel beams was also studied. Results of these tests show that the effect of bearing length on the web crippling ultimate capacity in EOF and ETF loading conditions is more obvious than those in IOF and ITF loading conditions. When bearing length is 50, 100, and 150mm, web crippling ultimate capacity of cold-formed steel lipped channel beams with web slenderness=78 reaches its peak. The middle web enters plasticity and form plastic hinge zone. The values of web crippling ultimate capacity in interior-flange loading conditions are larger than those in end-flange loading conditions. It is shown that the specimens in the interior-flange loading conditions have higher ultimate capacity, larger initial stiffness and better ductility than those of specimens in the end-flange loading conditions. Finite element analysis can simulate experimental failure mode and web crippling ultimate capacity. The calculation equations of web crippling ultimate capacity put forward in the article can accurately predict experimental value.

Yu Chen; Xixiang Chen; Chaoyang Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Laser Based Techniques for Ultra Trace Isotope Production, Spectroscopy and Detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of research activities in the field of fundamental and applied nuclear physics has evolved in the last years using resonantly tuned radiation from powerful lasers. The technique of resonance ionization spectroscopy has delivered outstanding results and found broad acceptance in the last years as a particularly efficient and highly selective method for rare and exotic radioisotope studies. It is used for production, spectroscopy and detection of these species and provides complete isobaric, high isotopic and even some isomeric selection, which altogether is needed for on-line investigation of short lived species far off stability as well as for ultra trace determination. Good overall efficiency pushes the experimental limits of detection in elemental trace analysis down to below 106 atoms per sample, and additionally isotopic selectivity as high as 3 ? 1012 has been demonstrated. The widespread potential of resonance ionization techniques is discussed, focusing on the experimental arrangements for applications in selective on-line isotope production, spectroscopy of rare radioisotopes and ultra trace determination of radiotoxic isotopes like 238Pu to 244Pu, 135,137Cs, 89,90Sr or 41Ca in environmental, technical and biomedical samples.

Wendt, K.; Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Muller, P; Nortershauser, W.; Schmitt, Annette; Schumann, P; Trautmann, Norbert; Bushaw, Bruce A.

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

334

Application of /sup 252/Cf-source driven noise analysis measurements for subcriticality of HFIR fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach-to-critical measurements reported were for a plate-type fuel element where the height of the water moderator and side and top reflector were increased. Measurements were also performed with each of the two annuli of the fuel element to verify both the presence of boron in the fuel plates and the proper uranium loading prior to assembly of the two annuli for full submersion measurements. Measurements were also performed with detectors external to the reflector (> 15 cm of water on top, bottom, and side) for the assembled, submerged HFIR fuel element.

King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

BIOLOGICAL TRACE ELEMENT RESEARCH 6, 159-A Minireview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). 'Conver!iion from wet weight as!iuming 80% moisture. Biomagnification Biomagnification. the process wherl

Canberra, University of

336

A baseline characterization of trace elements in Texas soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A baseline survey of concentrations of Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Se, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb, Ba, and Ni was performed for 100 soils from seven Land Resource Areas of Texas. Nearly 300 soil samples from the upper, middle, and lower depths of selected pedons were...

Frybarger, Mary Rita

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Leaching of Major and Trace Elements from Coal Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most power stations currently operate wet ash disposal systems. However, this method of ash disposal is being subjected to increasing scrutiny as there is a potential for contamination of surface and groundwat...

D. R. Jones

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Nondestructive indices of trace element exposure in squamate reptiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a , J.W. Snodgrass c , B.P. Jackson a , D.E Kling a , C.L. Rowe d , J.D. Congdon a a Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Aiken, SC 29802, USA b Department of Biological Sciences, snakes were either fed ®sh from a coal ash-contaminated site or uncontaminated food from a reference site

Hopkins, William A.

339

Trace elements in prehispanic hair samples of Gran Canaria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present study we have analysed hair Zn, Cu, Fe, Mn, Sr, Pb and Ca contents of 8 prehispanic hair specimens from Gran Canaria, comparing them with 10 acutal samples,...

E. Gonzlez-Reimers; M. Arnay-de-la-Rosa; V. Castro-Alemn

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

It's Elemental - The Element Europium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Samarium Samarium Previous Element (Samarium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gadolinium) Gadolinium The Element Europium [Click for Isotope Data] 63 Eu Europium 151.964 Atomic Number: 63 Atomic Weight: 151.964 Melting Point: 1095 K (822°C or 1512°F) Boiling Point: 1802 K (1529°C or 2784°F) Density: 5.24 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named after the continent of Europe. Say what? Europium is pronounced as yoo-RO-pee-em. History and Uses: Europium was discovered by Eugène-Antole Demarçay, a French chemist, in 1896. Demarçay suspected that samples of a recently discovered element, samarium, were contaminated with an unknown element. He was able to produce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

It's Elemental - The Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium The Element Potassium [Click for Isotope Data] 19 K Potassium 39.0983 Atomic Number: 19 Atomic Weight: 39.0983 Melting Point: 336.53 K (63.38°C or 146.08°F) Boiling Point: 1032 K (759°C or 1398°F) Density: 0.89 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word potash. Potassium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for alkali, kalium. Say what? Potassium is pronounced as poh-TASS-ee-em. History and Uses: Although potassium is the eighth most abundant element on earth and comprises about 2.1% of the earth's crust, it is a very reactive element

342

It's Elemental - The Element Sulfur  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phosphorus Phosphorus Previous Element (Phosphorus) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Chlorine) Chlorine The Element Sulfur [Click for Isotope Data] 16 S Sulfur 32.065 Atomic Number: 16 Atomic Weight: 32.065 Melting Point: 388.36 K (115.21°C or 239.38°F) Boiling Point: 717.75 K (444.60°C or 832.28°F) Density: 2.067 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word sulvere and the Latin word sulphurium. Say what? Sulfur is pronounced as SUL-fer. History and Uses: Sulfur, the tenth most abundant element in the universe, has been known since ancient times. Sometime around 1777, Antoine Lavoisier convinced the rest of the scientific community that sulfur was an element. Sulfur is a

343

It's Elemental - The Element Magnesium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum The Element Magnesium [Click for Isotope Data] 12 Mg Magnesium 24.3050 Atomic Number: 12 Atomic Weight: 24.3050 Melting Point: 923 K (650°C or 1202°F) Boiling Point: 1363 K (1090°C or 1994°F) Density: 1.74 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? For Magnesia, a district in the region of Thessaly, Greece. Say what? Magnesium is pronounced as mag-NEE-zhi-em. History and Uses: Although it is the eighth most abundant element in the universe and the seventh most abundant element in the earth's crust, magnesium is never found free in nature. Magnesium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an

344

Heat-Traced Fluid Transfer Lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses basic considerations in designing a heat tracing system using either team or electrical tracing. Four basic reasons to heat trace are dealt with: water freeze protection, chemical freeze protection, viscosity maintenance...

Schilling, R. E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

It's Elemental - The Element Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen The Element Nitrogen [Click for Isotope Data] 7 N Nitrogen 14.0067 Atomic Number: 7 Atomic Weight: 14.0067 Melting Point: 63.15 K (-210.00°C or -346.00°F) Boiling Point: 77.36 K (-195.79°C or -320.44°F) Density: 0.0012506 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words nitron and genes, which together mean "saltpetre forming." Say what? Nitrogen is pronounced as NYE-treh-gen. History and Uses: Nitrogen was discovered by the Scottish physician Daniel Rutherford in 1772. It is the fifth most abundant element in the universe and makes up

347

It's Elemental - The Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium The Element Sodium [Click for Isotope Data] 11 Na Sodium 22.98976928 Atomic Number: 11 Atomic Weight: 22.98976928 Melting Point: 370.95 K (97.80°C or 208.04°F) Boiling Point: 1156 K (883°C or 1621°F) Density: 0.97 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal What's in a name? From the English word soda and from the Medieval Latin word sodanum, which means "headache remedy." Sodium's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for sodium carbonate, natrium. Say what? Sodium is pronounced as SO-dee-em. History and Uses: Although sodium is the sixth most abundant element on earth and comprises

348

It's Elemental - The Element Francium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium The Element Francium [Click for Isotope Data] 87 Fr Francium 223 Atomic Number: 87 Atomic Weight: 223 Melting Point: 300 K (27°C or 81°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: Unknown Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: 1 Group Name: Alkali Metal Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the country of France. Say what? Francium is pronounced as FRAN-see-em. History and Uses: Francium was discovered by Marguerite Catherine Perey, a French chemist, in 1939 while analyzing actinium's decay sequence. Although considered a natural element, scientists estimate that there is no more than one ounce of francium in the earth's crust at one time. Since there is so little

349

It's Elemental - The Element Phosphorus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur The Element Phosphorus [Click for Isotope Data] 15 P Phosphorus 30.973762 Atomic Number: 15 Atomic Weight: 30.973762 Melting Point: 317.30 K (44.15°C or 111.47°F) Boiling Point: 553.65 K (280.5°C or 536.9°F) Density: 1.82 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for light bearing, phosphoros. Say what? Phosphorus is pronounced as FOS-fer-es. History and Uses: In what is perhaps the most disgusting method of discovering an element, phosphorus was first isolated in 1669 by Hennig Brand, a German physician and alchemist, by boiling, filtering and otherwise processing as many as 60

350

It's Elemental - The Element Cerium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lanthanum Lanthanum Previous Element (Lanthanum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Praseodymium) Praseodymium The Element Cerium [Click for Isotope Data] 58 Ce Cerium 140.116 Atomic Number: 58 Atomic Weight: 140.116 Melting Point: 1071 K (798°C or 1468°F) Boiling Point: 3697 K (3424°C or 6195°F) Density: 6.770 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the asteroid Ceres. Say what? Cerium is pronounced as SER-ee-em. History and Uses: Cerium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius and Wilhelm von Hisinger, Swedish chemists, and independently by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, a German chemist, in 1803. Cerium is the most abundant of the rare earth elements

351

It's Elemental - The Element Neon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium The Element Neon [Click for Isotope Data] 10 Ne Neon 20.1797 Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Weight: 20.1797 Melting Point: 24.56 K (-248.59°C or -415.46°F) Boiling Point: 27.07 K (-246.08°C or -410.94°F) Density: 0.0008999 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 18 Group Name: Noble Gas What's in a name? From the Greek word for new, neos. Say what? Neon is pronounced as NEE-on. History and Uses: Neon was discovered by Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, and Morris M. Travers, an English chemist, shortly after their discovery of the element krypton in 1898. Like krypton, neon was discovered through the

352

It's Elemental - The Element Technetium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molybdenum Molybdenum Previous Element (Molybdenum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Ruthenium) Ruthenium The Element Technetium [Click for Isotope Data] 43 Tc Technetium 98 Atomic Number: 43 Atomic Weight: 98 Melting Point: 2430 K (2157°C or 3915°F) Boiling Point: 4538 K (4265°C or 7709°F) Density: 11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none Radioactive and Artificially Produced What's in a name? From the Greek word for artificial, technetos. Say what? Technetium is pronounced as tek-NEE-she-em. History and Uses: Technetium was the first artificially produced element. It was isolated by Carlo Perrier and Emilio Segrè in 1937. Technetium was created by bombarding molybdenum atoms with deuterons that had been accelerated by a

353

It's Elemental - The Element Cobalt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iron Iron Previous Element (Iron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nickel) Nickel The Element Cobalt [Click for Isotope Data] 27 Co Cobalt 58.933195 Atomic Number: 27 Atomic Weight: 58.933195 Melting Point: 1768 K (1495°C or 2723°F) Boiling Point: 3200 K (2927°C or 5301°F) Density: 8.86 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word for goblin or evil spirit, kobald and the Greek word for mine, cobalos. Say what? Cobalt is pronounced as KO-bolt. History and Uses: Cobalt was discovered by Georg Brandt, a Swedish chemist, in 1739. Brandt was attempting to prove that the ability of certain minerals to color glass blue was due to an unknown element and not to bismuth, as was commonly

354

It's Elemental - The Element Bromine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selenium Selenium Previous Element (Selenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Krypton) Krypton The Element Bromine [Click for Isotope Data] 35 Br Bromine 79.904 Atomic Number: 35 Atomic Weight: 79.904 Melting Point: 265.95 K (-7.2°C or 19.0°F) Boiling Point: 331.95 K (58.8°C or 137.8°F) Density: 3.11 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for stench, bromos. Say what? Bromine is pronounced as BRO-meen. History and Uses: The only nonmetallic element that is a liquid at normal room temperatures, bromine was produced by Carl Löwig, a young chemistry student, the summer before starting his freshman year at Heidelberg. When he showed his

355

It's Elemental - The Element Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine The Element Oxygen [Click for Isotope Data] 8 O Oxygen 15.9994 Atomic Number: 8 Atomic Weight: 15.9994 Melting Point: 54.36 K (-218.79°C or -361.82°F) Boiling Point: 90.20 K (-182.95°C or -297.31°F) Density: 0.001429 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 16 Group Name: Chalcogen What's in a name? From the greek words oxys and genes, which together mean "acid forming." Say what? Oxygen is pronounced as OK-si-jen. History and Uses: Oxygen had been produced by several chemists prior to its discovery in 1774, but they failed to recognize it as a distinct element. Joseph

356

It's Elemental - The Element Manganese  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chromium Chromium Previous Element (Chromium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iron) Iron The Element Manganese [Click for Isotope Data] 25 Mn Manganese 54.938045 Atomic Number: 25 Atomic Weight: 54.938045 Melting Point: 1519 K (1246°C or 2275°F) Boiling Point: 2334 K (2061°C or 3742°F) Density: 7.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for magnet, magnes. Say what? Manganese is pronounced as MAN-ge-nees. History and Uses: Proposed to be an element by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774, manganese was discovered by Johan Gottlieb Gahn, a Swedish chemist, by heating the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) in the presence of charcoal later that year.

357

It's Elemental - The Element Titanium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Scandium Scandium Previous Element (Scandium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Vanadium) Vanadium The Element Titanium [Click for Isotope Data] 22 Ti Titanium 47.867 Atomic Number: 22 Atomic Weight: 47.867 Melting Point: 1941 K (1668°C or 3034°F) Boiling Point: 3560 K (3287°C or 5949°F) Density: 4.5 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word Titans, the mythological "first sons of the Earth." Say what? Titanium is pronounced as tie-TAY-nee-em. History and Uses: Titanium was discovered in 1791 by the Reverend William Gregor, an English pastor. Pure titanium was first produced by Matthew A. Hunter, an American metallurgist, in 1910. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the

358

Progressive Damage Analysis of Laminated Composite (PDALC)-A Computational Model Implemented in the NASA COMET Finite Element Code  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method for analysis of progressive failure in the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed is presented in this report. The relationship employed in this analysis describes the matrix crack damage and fiber fracture via kinematics-based volume-averaged ...

Lo David C.; Coats Timothy W.; Harris Charles E.; Allen David H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

360

Trace 700 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace 700 Trace 700 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Technology characterizations Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 References: http://www.trane.com/Commercial/Dna/View.aspx?i=1136 Detailed HVAC design tool. Can provide heating and cooling load calculation, system sizing, and energy use. A fairly thorough understanding of HVAC is necessary to use this tool. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Trace 700 Agency/Company /Organization: Trane Phase: Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Solar Coronal Structures and Stray Light in TRACE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the 2004 Venus transit of the Sun to constrain a semi-empirical point-spread function for the TRACE EUV solar telescope, we have measured the effect of stray light in that telescope. We find that 43% of 171A EUV light that enters TRACE is scattered, either through diffraction off the entrance filter grid or through other nonspecular effects. We carry this result forward, via known-PSF deconvolution of TRACE images, to identify its effect on analysis of TRACE data. Known-PSF deconvolution by this derived PSF greatly reduces the effect of visible haze in the TRACE 171A images, enhances bright features, and reveals that the smooth background component of the corona is considerably less bright (and hence much more rarefied) than commonly supposed. Deconvolution reveals that some prior conlclusions about the Sun appear to have been based on stray light in the images. In particular, the diffuse background "quiet corona" becomes consistent with hydrostatic support of the coronal plasma; feature contrast is greatly increased, possibly affecting derived parameters such as the form of the coronal heating function; and essentially all existing differential emission measure studies of small features appear to be affected by contamination from nearby features. We speculate on further implications of stray light for interpretation of EUV images from TRACE and similar instruments, and advocate deconvolution as a standard tool for image analysis with future instruments such as SDO/AIA.

C. E. DeForest; P. C. H. Martens; M. J. Wills-Davey

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear matrix elements for 0??{sup ?}?{sup ?} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double ?{sup ?} decays (0??{sup ?}?{sup ?} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyvskyl-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

Civitarese, Osvaldo [Department of Physics, University of La Plata, c.c. 67 1900, La Plata Argentina (Argentina); Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, University of Jyvskyl, PO Box 35, FIN-40014 (Finland)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

363

It's Elemental - The Element Astatine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Polonium Polonium Previous Element (Polonium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radon) Radon The Element Astatine [Click for Isotope Data] 85 At Astatine 210 Atomic Number: 85 Atomic Weight: 210 Melting Point: 575 K (302°C or 576°F) Boiling Point: Unknown Density: about 7 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen Radioactive What's in a name? From the Greek word for unstable, astatos. Say what? Astatine is pronounced as AS-teh-teen or as AS-teh-ten. History and Uses: Astatine was produced by Dale R. Carson, K.R. MacKenzie and Emilio Segrè by bombarding an isotope of bismuth, bismuth-209, with alpha particles that had been accelerated in a device called a cyclotron. This created

364

It's Elemental - The Element Copper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc The Element Copper [Click for Isotope Data] 29 Cu Copper 63.546 Atomic Number: 29 Atomic Weight: 63.546 Melting Point: 1357.77 K (1084.62°C or 1984.32°F) Boiling Point: 2835 K (2562°C or 4644°F) Density: 8.933 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word cuprum, which means "from the island of Cyprus." Say what? Copper is pronounced as KOP-er. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using copper for at least 11,000 years. Relatively easy to mine and refine, people discovered methods for extracting copper from its ores at least 7,000 years ago. The

365

It's Elemental - The Element Gadolinium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Europium Europium Previous Element (Europium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Terbium) Terbium The Element Gadolinium [Click for Isotope Data] 64 Gd Gadolinium 157.25 Atomic Number: 64 Atomic Weight: 157.25 Melting Point: 1586 K (1313°C or 2395°F) Boiling Point: 3546 K (3273°C or 5923°F) Density: 7.90 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: none Group Name: Lanthanide What's in a name? Named for the mineral gadolinite which was named after Johan Gadolin, a Finnish chemist. Say what? Gadolinium is pronounced as GAD-oh-LIN-ee-em. History and Uses: Spectroscopic evidence for the existence of gadolinium was first observed by the Swiss chemist Jean Charles Galissard de Marignac in the minerals

366

It's Elemental - The Element Mercury  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gold Gold Previous Element (Gold) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Thallium) Thallium The Element Mercury [Click for Isotope Data] 80 Hg Mercury 200.59 Atomic Number: 80 Atomic Weight: 200.59 Melting Point: 234.32 K (-38.83°C or -37.89°F) Boiling Point: 629.88 K (356.73°C or 674.11°F) Density: 13.5336 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Liquid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? Named after the planet Mercury. Mercury's chemical symbol comes from the Greek word hydrargyrum, which means "liquid silver." Say what? Mercury is pronounced as MER-kyoo-ree. History and Uses: Mercury was known to the ancient Chinese and Hindus and has been found in 3500 year old Egyptian tombs. Mercury is not usually found free in nature

367

It's Elemental - The Element Hafnium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lutetium Lutetium Previous Element (Lutetium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tantalum) Tantalum The Element Hafnium [Click for Isotope Data] 72 Hf Hafnium 178.49 Atomic Number: 72 Atomic Weight: 178.49 Melting Point: 2506 K (2233°C or 4051°F) Boiling Point: 4876 K (4603°C or 8317°F) Density: 13.3 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 4 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the city of Copenhagen, Hafnia. Say what? Hafnium is pronounced as HAF-neeem. History and Uses: Hafnium was discovered by Dirk Coster, a Danish chemist, and Charles de Hevesy, a Hungarian chemist, in 1923. They used a method known as X-ray spectroscopy to study the arrangement of the outer electrons of atoms in

368

It's Elemental - The Element Boron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon The Element Boron [Click for Isotope Data] 5 B Boron 10.811 Atomic Number: 5 Atomic Weight: 10.811 Melting Point: 2348 K (2075°C or 3767°F) Boiling Point: 4273 K (4000°C or 7232°F) Density: 2.37 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 13 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Arabic word Buraq and the Persian word Burah, which are both words for the material "borax." Say what? Boron is pronounced as BO-ron. History and Uses: Boron was discovered by Joseph-Louis Gay-Lussac and Louis-Jaques Thénard, French chemists, and independently by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist,

369

It's Elemental - The Element Thorium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Actinium Actinium Previous Element (Actinium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Protactinium) Protactinium The Element Thorium [Click for Isotope Data] 90 Th Thorium 232.03806 Atomic Number: 90 Atomic Weight: 232.03806 Melting Point: 2023 K (1750°C or 3182°F) Boiling Point: 5061 K (4788°C or 8650°F) Density: 11.72 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 7 Group Number: none Group Name: Actinide Radioactive What's in a name? Named for the Scandinavian god of war, Thor. Say what? Thorium is pronounced as THOR-ee-em or as THO-ree-em. History and Uses: Thorium was discovered by Jöns Jacob Berzelius, a Swedish chemist, in 1828. He discovered it in a sample of a mineral that was given to him by the Reverend Has Morten Thrane Esmark, who suspected that it contained an

370

It's Elemental - The Element Chromium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vanadium Vanadium Previous Element (Vanadium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Manganese) Manganese The Element Chromium [Click for Isotope Data] 24 Cr Chromium 51.9961 Atomic Number: 24 Atomic Weight: 51.9961 Melting Point: 2180 K (1907°C or 3465°F) Boiling Point: 2944 K (2671°C or 4840°F) Density: 7.15 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for color, chroma. Say what? Chromium is pronounced as KROH-mee-em. History and Uses: Chromium was discovered by Louis-Nicholas Vauquelin while experimenting with a material known as Siberian red lead, also known as the mineral crocoite (PbCrO4), in 1797. He produced chromium oxide (CrO3) by mixing

371

It's Elemental - The Element Iron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Manganese Manganese Previous Element (Manganese) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Cobalt) Cobalt The Element Iron [Click for Isotope Data] 26 Fe Iron 55.845 Atomic Number: 26 Atomic Weight: 55.845 Melting Point: 1811 K (1538°C or 2800°F) Boiling Point: 3134 K (2861°C or 5182°F) Density: 7.874 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word iron. Iron's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for iron, ferrum. Say what? Iron is pronounced as EYE-ern. History and Uses: Archaeological evidence suggests that people have been using iron for at least 5000 years. Iron is the cheapest and one of the most abundant of all metals, comprising nearly 5.6% of the earth's crust and nearly all of the

372

It's Elemental - The Element Molybdenum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Niobium Niobium Previous Element (Niobium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Technetium) Technetium The Element Molybdenum [Click for Isotope Data] 42 Mo Molybdenum 95.96 Atomic Number: 42 Atomic Weight: 95.96 Melting Point: 2896 K (2623°C or 4753°F) Boiling Point: 4912 K (4639°C or 8382°F) Density: 10.2 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 6 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for lead, molybdos. Say what? Molybdenum is pronounced as meh-LIB-deh-nem. History and Uses: Molybdenum was discovered by Carl Welhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, in 1778 in a mineral known as molybdenite (MoS2) which had been confused as a lead compound. Molybdenum was isolated by Peter Jacob Hjelm in 1781. Today,

373

It's Elemental - The Element Iridium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Osmium Osmium Previous Element (Osmium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Platinum) Platinum The Element Iridium [Click for Isotope Data] 77 Ir Iridium 192.217 Atomic Number: 77 Atomic Weight: 192.217 Melting Point: 2719 K (2446°C or 4435°F) Boiling Point: 4701 K (4428°C or 8002°F) Density: 22.42 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 9 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for rainbow, iris. Say what? Iridium is pronounced as i-RID-ee-em. History and Uses: Iridium and osmium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Iridium and osmium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

374

It's Elemental - The Element Platinum  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Iridium Iridium Previous Element (Iridium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gold) Gold The Element Platinum [Click for Isotope Data] 78 Pt Platinum 195.084 Atomic Number: 78 Atomic Weight: 195.084 Melting Point: 2041.55 K (1768.4°C or 3215.1°F) Boiling Point: 4098 K (3825°C or 6917°F) Density: 21.46 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 10 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Spainsh word for silver, platina. Say what? Platinum is pronounced as PLAT-en-em. History and Uses: Used by the pre-Columbian Indians of South America, platinum wasn't noticed by western scientists until 1735. Platinum can occur free in nature and is sometimes found in deposits of gold-bearing sands, primarily those found in

375

It's Elemental - The Element Arsenic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Germanium Germanium Previous Element (Germanium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Selenium) Selenium The Element Arsenic [Click for Isotope Data] 33 As Arsenic 74.92160 Atomic Number: 33 Atomic Weight: 74.92160 Melting Point: 1090 K (817°C or 1503°F) Boiling Point: 887 K (614°C or 1137°F) Density: 5.776 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Latin word arsenicum, the Greek word arsenikon and the Arabic word Az-zernikh. Say what? Arsenic is pronounced as AR-s'n-ik. History and Uses: Although arsenic compounds were mined by the early Chinese, Greek and Egyptian civilizations, it is believed that arsenic itself was first identified by Albertus Magnus, a German alchemist, in 1250. Arsenic occurs

376

It's Elemental - The Element Barium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cesium Cesium Previous Element (Cesium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Lanthanum) Lanthanum The Element Barium [Click for Isotope Data] 56 Ba Barium 137.327 Atomic Number: 56 Atomic Weight: 137.327 Melting Point: 1000 K (727°C or 1341°F) Boiling Point: 2170 K (1897°C or 3447°F) Density: 3.62 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 2 Group Name: Alkaline Earth Metal What's in a name? From the Greek word for heavy, barys. Say what? Barium is pronounced as BAR-ee-em. History and Uses: Barium was first isolated by Sir Humphry Davy, an English chemist, in 1808 through the electrolysis of molten baryta (BaO). Barium is never found free in nature since it reacts with oxygen in the air, forming barium oxide

377

It's Elemental - The Element Gold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Platinum Platinum Previous Element (Platinum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Mercury) Mercury The Element Gold [Click for Isotope Data] 79 Au Gold 196.966569 Atomic Number: 79 Atomic Weight: 196.966569 Melting Point: 1337.33 K (1064.18°C or 1947.52°F) Boiling Point: 3129 K (2856°C or 5173°F) Density: 19.282 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 11 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Sanskrit word Jval and the Anglo-Saxon word gold. Gold's chemical symbol comes from the the latin word for gold, aurum. Say what? Gold is pronounced as GOLD. History and Uses: An attractive and highly valued metal, gold has been known for at least 5500 years. Gold is sometimes found free in nature but it is usually found

378

It's Elemental - The Element Rhenium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium The Element Rhenium [Click for Isotope Data] 75 Re Rhenium 186.207 Atomic Number: 75 Atomic Weight: 186.207 Melting Point: 3459 K (3186°C or 5767°F) Boiling Point: 5869 K (5596°C or 10105°F) Density: 20.8 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 7 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Latin word for the Rhine River, Rhenus. Say what? Rhenium is pronounced as REE-nee-em. History and Uses: Rhenium was discovered by the German chemists Ida Tacke-Noddack, Walter Noddack and Otto Carl Berg in 1925. They detected rhenium spectroscopically in platinum ores and in the minerals columbite ((Fe, Mn, Mg)(Nb, Ta)2O6),

379

It's Elemental - The Element Osmium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rhenium Rhenium Previous Element (Rhenium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Iridium) Iridium The Element Osmium [Click for Isotope Data] 76 Os Osmium 190.23 Atomic Number: 76 Atomic Weight: 190.23 Melting Point: 3306 K (3033°C or 5491°F) Boiling Point: 5285 K (5012°C or 9054°F) Density: 22.57 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 8 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Greek word for a smell, osme. Say what? Osmium is pronounced as OZ-mee-em. History and Uses: Osmium and iridium were discovered at the same time by the British chemist Smithson Tennant in 1803. Osmium and iridium were identified in the black residue remaining after dissolving platinum ore with aqua regia, a mixture

380

It's Elemental - The Element Antimony  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tin Tin Previous Element (Tin) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Tellurium) Tellurium The Element Antimony [Click for Isotope Data] 51 Sb Antimony 121.760 Atomic Number: 51 Atomic Weight: 121.760 Melting Point: 903.78 K (630.63°C or 1167.13°F) Boiling Point: 1860 K (1587°C or 2889°F) Density: 6.685 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Semi-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 15 Group Name: Pnictogen What's in a name? From the Greek words anti and monos, which together mean "not alone." Antimony's chemical symbol comes from its historic name, Stibium. Say what? Antimony is pronounced as AN-the-MOH-nee. History and Uses: Antimony has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores stibnite (Sb2S3) and

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381

Direct analysis of samples by mass spectrometry: From elements to bio-molecules using laser ablation inductively couple plasma mass spectrometry and laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass spectrometric methods that are able to analyze solid samples or biological materials with little or no sample preparation are invaluable to science as well as society. Fundamental research that has discovered experimental and instrumental parameters that inhibit fractionation effects that occur during the quantification of elemental species in solid samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is described. Research that determines the effectiveness of novel laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric methods for the molecular analysis of biological tissues at atmospheric pressure and at high spatial resolution is also described. A spatial resolution is achieved that is able to analyze samples at the single cell level.

Perdian, David C.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Category:Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Fluid Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Fluid Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Fluid Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Fluid Lab Analysis" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. C Compound and Elemental Analysis F Fluid Inclusion Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Fluid M Mercury Vapor T Trace Element Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Fluid_Lab_Analysis&oldid=689846"

383

It's Elemental - The Element Zinc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Copper Copper Previous Element (Copper) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Gallium) Gallium The Element Zinc [Click for Isotope Data] 30 Zn Zinc 65.38 Atomic Number: 30 Atomic Weight: 65.38 Melting Point: 692.68 K (419.53°C or 787.15°F) Boiling Point: 1180 K (907°C or 1665°F) Density: 7.134 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 4 Group Number: 12 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the German word zink. Say what? Zinc is pronounced as ZINK. History and Uses: Although zinc compounds have been used for at least 2,500 years in the production of brass, zinc wasn't recognized as a distinct element until much later. Metallic zinc was first produced in India sometime in the 1400s by heating the mineral calamine (ZnCO3) with wool. Zinc was rediscovered by

384

It's Elemental - The Element Chlorine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon The Element Chlorine [Click for Isotope Data] 17 Cl Chlorine 35.453 Atomic Number: 17 Atomic Weight: 35.453 Melting Point: 171.65 K (-101.5°C or -150.7°F) Boiling Point: 239.11 K (-34.04°C or -29.27°F) Density: 0.003214 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 3 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for greenish yellow, chloros. Say what? Chlorine is pronounced as KLOR-een or as KLOR-in. History and Uses: Since it combines directly with nearly every element, chlorine is never found free in nature. Chlorine was first produced by Carl Wilhelm Scheele, a Swedish chemist, when he combined the mineral pyrolusite (MnO2) with

385

It's Elemental - The Element Fluorine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Oxygen Previous Element (Oxygen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Neon) Neon The Element Fluorine [Click for Isotope Data] 9 F Fluorine 18.9984032 Atomic Number: 9 Atomic Weight: 18.9984032 Melting Point: 53.53 K (-219.62°C or -363.32°F) Boiling Point: 85.03 K (-188.12°C or -306.62°F) Density: 0.001696 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Gas Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 2 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Latin and French words for flow, fluere. Say what? Fluorine is pronounced as FLU-eh-reen or as FLU-eh-rin. History and Uses: Fluorine is the most reactive of all elements and no chemical substance is capable of freeing fluorine from any of its compounds. For this reason, fluorine does not occur free in nature and was extremely difficult for

386

Development of fatigue stress spectrum and fatigue life prediction of endless winder sheave for wind turbine lift using finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to develop the fatigue stress spectrum and predicted fatigue life of the endless winder sheave using finite element (FE) analysis which is utilized in wind turbine lift. First we identified the fatigue critical location (FCL) of endless winder sheave through a static FE analysis. And the lifting velocity was measured using the non-contact velocity dectector. Based on the measured lifting velocity and compressive loads by traction of endless winder sheave the compressive load-angle of rotation history at the FCL was determined. According to the compressive load-angle of rotation time history total 230 FE analyses were performed with the interval of the angle of rotation of 15 we eventually obtained the fatigue stress spectrum at the FCL. These results were processed using the rainflow cycle counting and the Goodman equation. Finally the fatigue life of sheave was evaluated using the linear damage cumulative rule.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Numerical Modeling of Hydraulic Fracture Propagation Using Thermo-hydro-mechanical Analysis with Brittle Damage Model by Finite Element Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Better understanding and control of crack growth direction during hydraulic fracturing are essential for enhancing productivity of geothermal and petroleum reservoirs. Structural analysis of fracture propagation and impact on fluid flow is a...

Min, Kyoung

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geographic determination of coffee beans using multi-element analysis and isotope ratios of boron and strontium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of using chemical and isotopic compositions of coffee beans to identify their geographic origins. Twenty-one Coffea arabica beans collected from 14 countries in 3 major coffee-producing regions, Africa, America and Asia, were analysed for multi-element of B, Rb, Sr, Ba, Fe, Mn and Zn, as well as isotopic compositions of B and Sr. Our results demonstrate that the geographic origin of coffee beans could be classified based on concentrations of Rb, Sr and Ba. However, the isotope ratios of B and Sr provide more sensitive information for the growth localities. Combined with literature data, this study indicates that B and Sr isotopes are excellent indicators of the origin of coffee beans.

Hou-Chun Liu; Chen-Feng You; Chiou-Yun Chen; Yu-Ching Liu; Ming-Tsung Chung

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Three-dimensional coupled ground water flow, thermal transport and/or migration of nuclides analysis by boundary element method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the safety analyses of radioactive waste disposal, it is important and indispensable to analyze coupled problems of ground water flow, thermal transport and/or migration of nuclides. The three-dimensional coupled problems is solved by boundary element method in this paper. The results of this method are compared with those experiments of JAERI and STRIPA SWEDEN on the thermal problem, and with those analyses of analytical and FEM results on the migration problem. In this formulation, natural convection is considered by Boussinesq approximation. An example of coupled ground water flow and migration of nuclides with decay chain U{sup 234} {yields} Th{sup 230} {yields} Ra{sup 226} is also tried.

Kawamura, Ryuji [Information and Mathematical Science Lab., Inc., Kanagawa (Japan)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Orientation dependent tensile deformation behavior of two-phase laminate composites: Model analysis and finite element results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model is presented which allows the distribution of stresses and strains within a two-phase laminate to be determined as a function of the angle between the normal vector to the laminate interfaces and the tensile axis during elastic and elastic-plastic deformation. The model is applied to {alpha}{sub 2}(Ti{sub 3}Al)/{gamma}(TiAl) and, for comparison, to Al/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} laminates in order to study (a) the transfer of stresses between the two phases due to the mutual deformation constraint at the interphase boundaries and (b) the dependence of the yield stress on the orientation of the lamellae with respect to the tensile axis. The model predictions are in good agreement with the results of finite element computations within the composite except for certain boundary layers at the outer surfaces.

Mertins, H.; Lahann, H.J. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung] [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Applications of Lagrangian Dispersion Modeling to the Analysis of Changes in the Specific Absorption of Elemental Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use a Lagrangian dispersion model driven by a mesoscale model with four-dimensional data assimilation to simulate the dispersion of elemental carbon (EC) over a region encompassing Mexico City and its surroundings, the study domain for the 2006 MAX-MEX experiment, which was a component of the MILAGRO campaign. The results are used to identify periods when biomass burning was likely to have had a significant impact on the concentrations of elemental carbon at two sites, T1 and T2, downwind of the city, and when emissions from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) were likely to have been more important. They are also used to estimate the median ages of EC affecting the specific absorption of light, aABS, at 870 nm as well as to identify periods when the urban plume from the MCMA was likely to have been advected over T1 and T2. Values of aABS at T1, the nearer of the two sites to Mexico City, were smaller at night and increased rapidly after mid-morning, peaking in the mid-afternoon. The behavior is attributed to the coating of aerosols with substances such as sulfate or organic carbon during daylight hours, but such coating appears to be limited or absent at night. Evidence for this is provided by scanning electron microscope images of aerosols collected at three sampling sites. During daylight hours the values of aABS did not increase with aerosol age for median ages in the range of 1-4 hours. There is some evidence for absorption increasing as aerosols were advected from T1 to T2 but the statistical significance of that result is not strong.

Doran, J. C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Laskin, Alexander; Desyaterik, Yury; Gilles, Marry K.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

392

It's Elemental - The Element Lead  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thallium Thallium Previous Element (Thallium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Bismuth) Bismuth The Element Lead [Click for Isotope Data] 82 Pb Lead 207.2 Atomic Number: 82 Atomic Weight: 207.2 Melting Point: 600.61 K (327.46°C or 621.43°F) Boiling Point: 2022 K (1749°C or 3180°F) Density: 11.342 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Metal Period Number: 6 Group Number: 14 Group Name: none What's in a name? From the Anglo-Saxon word lead. Lead's chemical symbol comes from the Latin word for waterworks, plumbum. Say what? Lead is pronounced as LED. History and Uses: Lead has been known since ancient times. It is sometimes found free in nature, but is usually obtained from the ores galena (PbS), anglesite (PbSO4), cerussite (PbCO3) and minum (Pb3O4). Although lead makes up only

393

It's Elemental - The Element Iodine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tellurium Tellurium Previous Element (Tellurium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Xenon) Xenon The Element Iodine [Click for Isotope Data] 53 I Iodine 126.90447 Atomic Number: 53 Atomic Weight: 126.90447 Melting Point: 386.85 K (113.7°C or 236.7°F) Boiling Point: 457.55 K (184.4°C or 364.0°F) Density: 4.93 grams per cubic centimeter Phase at Room Temperature: Solid Element Classification: Non-metal Period Number: 5 Group Number: 17 Group Name: Halogen What's in a name? From the Greek word for violet, iodes. Say what? Iodine is pronounced as EYE-eh-dine or as EYE-eh-din. History and Uses: Iodine was discovered by the French chemist Barnard Courtois in 1811. Courtois was extracting sodium and potassium compounds from seaweed ash. Once these compounds were removed, he added sulfuric acid (H2SO4) to

394

Application of Digital SIMS Imaging to Light Element and Trace Element Mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The determination of the relationship of compositional microstructure to morphological microstructure is often critical for elucidating structure-property relationships in materials. Traditionally, the study of t...

D. Newbury; D. Bright; D. Williams; C. M. Sung

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Trace Element Determination by Combining Solid-Phase Microextraction Hyphenated to Elemental and Molecular Detection Techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......degradation according with the storage time. Moreover, NaBEt4 must...case of speciation studies in seawater. In the case of aqueous matrices...25123 14.8-14.9 Hg2+ Seawater NaBEt4, acetate 100 m PDMS...pH 5) 0.11 4.8 Hg2+ Seawater NaBPr4, acetate 100 m PDMS......

Sergi Dez; Josep M. Bayona

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Isotopic abundance in atom trap trace analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and system for detecting ratios and amounts of isotopes of noble gases. The method and system is constructed to be able to measure noble gas isotopes in water and ice, which helps reveal the geological age of the samples and understand their movements. The method and system uses a combination of a cooled discharge source, a beam collimator, a beam slower and magneto-optic trap with a laser to apply resonance frequency energy to the noble gas to be quenched and detected.

Lu, Zheng-Tian; Hu, Shiu-Ming; Jiang, Wei; Mueller, Peter

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

397

Definition: Element | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Element Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Element Any electrical device with terminals that may be connected to other electrical devices such as a generator, transformer, circuit breaker, bus section, or transmission line. An element may be comprised of one or more components.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Electrical elements are conceptual abstractions representing idealized electrical components, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors, used in the analysis of electrical networks. Any electrical network can be analysed as multiple, interconnected electrical elements in a schematic diagram or circuit diagram, each of which affects the voltage in the network or current through the network. These ideal electrical elements represent real, physical electrical or electronic components but

398

Inferring human mobility patterns from taxicab location traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Taxicabs equipped with real-time location sensing devices are increasingly becoming popular. Such location traces are a rich source of information and can be used for congestion pricing, taxicab placement, and improved city planning. An important problem ... Keywords: hidden markov models, human mobility patterns, taxi cab occupancy, trajectory analysis

Raghu Ganti; Mudhakar Srivatsa; Anand Ranganathan; Jiawei Han

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems Tracing the behavior of parallel applications on extreme-scale systems January 3, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Event-tracing tools have proved vital for understanding how parallel applications behave. But new challenges make the use of event tracing on extreme-scale machines problematic. Tracing tools generate large amounts of data, which can overload the parallel file system and skew the application being studied. To remedy this problem, researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have devised a new technique that enables event tracing on exascale systems. Scientists who have been using existing performance analysis tools find that these frequently do not scale to large systems. And even if they do

400

Specifying API Trace Birthmark by Abstract Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API trace birthmark is a major class of software birthmarks, where API sequences are defined as software birthmarks to ... , an abstract interpretation-based method for specifying API trace birthmark is proposed ...

Ying Zeng; Fenlin Liu; Jian Chen; Bin Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Three-dimensional seismic tomography with tetrahedra element on isoparametric mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author has developed a method of three-dimensional seismic tomography on concrete structures. This method is based on ray-trace and identification technique, and the distribution of slowness or energy dissipation is identified based on simultaneously iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT) or the other kind of statistical identification technique. This kind of technique was originally developed for investigation of underground that is called geotomography, however, this technique was difficult to apply to concrete structures because the structures generally have irregular shape. A hexahedral element was implemented by the author to overcome this difficulty based on the idea of isoparametric mapping of hexahedral element on finite element analysis, however, it is still difficult to apply the method to the structures that have highly irregular shape. In this respect, an implementation of tetrahedral element is proposed for the three-dimensional seismic tomography on concrete structures to solve the difficulty in this paper. This implementation is based on the idea of isoparametric mapping as well as the case of hexahedral element and it enables to apply the method to structures of complex shape that is insufficient to represent by hexahedral elements. The validity of the proposed method is checked by some numerical example.

Yoshikazu Kobayashi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Distributed trace using central performance counter memory  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plurality of processing cores, are central storage unit having at least memory connected in a daisy chain manner, forming a daisy chain ring layout on an integrated chip. At least one of the plurality of processing cores places trace data on the daisy chain connection for transmitting the trace data to the central storage unit, and the central storage unit detects the trace data and stores the trace data in the memory co-located in with the central storage unit.

Satterfield, David L; Sexton, James C

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

Privacy vulnerability of published anonymous mobility traces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobility traces of people and vehicles have been collected and published to assist the design and evaluation of mobile networks, such as large-scale urban sensing networks. Although the published traces are often made anonymous in that the true identities ... Keywords: mobility traces, privacy, security and protection

Chris Y. T. Ma; David K. Y. Yau; Nung Kwan Yip; Nageswara S. V. Rao

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Ray Tracing JELLO Brand Paul S. Heckbert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ray Tracing JELL­O ® Brand Gelatin Paul S. Heckbert Dessert Foods Division Pixar San Rafael, CA ABSTRACT Ray tracing has established itself in recent years as the most general image synthesis algorithm for ray tracing Jell­O ® brand gelatin. We believe the method may have application to other brands

Treuille, Adrien

405

Point-to-curve ray tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Point-to-curve Ray Tracing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Point-to-curve ray tracing is an attempt at dealing with multiplicity of solutions to a generic boundary-value problem of ray tracing. In a point-to-curve tracing (P2C) the input parameters of the boundary-value....

Andrzej Hanyga

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Origin of the Elements  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The world around us is made of atoms. Did you ever wonder where these atoms came from? How was the gold in our jewelry, the carbon in our bodies, and the iron in our cars made? In this lecture, we will trace the origin of a gold atom from the Big Bang to the present day, and beyond. You will learn how the elements were forged in the nuclear furnaces inside stars, and how, when they die, these massive stars spread the elements into space. You will learn about the origin of the building blocks of matter in the Big Bang, and we will speculate on the future of the atoms around us today.

Murphy, Edward

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

408

Programmatic Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods of meeting the requirements of DOE O 151.1C for programmatic elements that sustain the emergency management program and maintain the readiness of the program to respond to an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 5-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-1, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 7-3.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

409

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Response Elements  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Evaluation of Wet Chemical ICP-AES Elemental Analysis Methods usingSimulated Hanford Waste Samples-Phase I Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The wet chemistry digestion method development for providing process control elemental analyses of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Melter Feed Preparation Vessel (MFPV) samples is divided into two phases: Phase I consists of: (1) optimizing digestion methods as a precursor to elemental analyses by ICP-AES techniques; (2) selecting methods with the desired analytical reliability and speed to support the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement of the WTP; and (3) providing baseline comparison to the laser ablation (LA) sample introduction technique for ICP-AES elemental analyses that is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Phase II consists of: (1) Time-and-Motion study of the selected methods from Phase I with actual Hanford waste or waste simulants in shielded cell facilities to ensure that the methods can be performed remotely and maintain the desired characteristics; and (2) digestion of glass samples prepared from actual Hanford Waste tank sludge for providing comparative results to the LA Phase II study. Based on the Phase I testing discussed in this report, a tandem digestion approach consisting of sodium peroxide fusion digestions carried out in nickel crucibles and warm mixed-acid digestions carried out in plastic bottles has been selected for Time-and-Motion study in Phase II. SRNL experience with performing this analytical approach in laboratory hoods indicates that well-trained cell operator teams will be able to perform the tandem digestions in five hours or less. The selected approach will produce two sets of solutions for analysis by ICP-AES techniques. Four hours would then be allocated for performing the ICP-AES analyses and reporting results to meet the nine-hour or less turnaround time requirement. The tandem digestion approach will need to be performed in two separate shielded analytical cells by two separate cell operator teams in order to achieve the nine-hour or less turnaround time. Because of the simplicity of the warm mixed-acid method, a well-trained cell operator team may in time be able to perform both sets of digestions. However, having separate shielded cells for each of the methods is prudent to avoid overcrowding problems that would impede a minimal turnaround time.

Coleman, Charles J.; Edwards, Thomas B.

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Trace metal concentration and fish size: Variation among fish species in a Mediterranean river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

29 April 2014 Accepted 12 May 2014 Keywords: Bioaccumulation Heavy metals Llobregat River species in an Iberian river with moderate metal pollution. Al, Fe and Zn were the most abundant metals trace elements (Bervoets and Blust, 2003; Noël et al., 2013). Heavy metals in fish represent a potential

García-Berthou, Emili

413

Elemental composition in sealed plutoniumberyllium neutron sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Five sealed plutoniumberyllium (PuBe) neutron sources from various manufacturers were disassembled. Destructive chemical analyses for recovered PuBe materials were conducted for disposition purposes. A dissolution method for PuBe alloys was developed for quantitative plutonium (Pu) and beryllium (Be) assay. Quantitation of Be and trace elements was performed using plasma based spectroscopic instruments, namely inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Pu assay was accomplished by an electrochemical method. Variations in trace elemental contents among the five PuBe sources are discussed.

N. Xu; K. Kuhn; D. Gallimore; A. Martinez; M. Schappert; D. Montoya; E. Lujan; K. Garduno; L. Tandon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

INTRODUCTION Metals comprise about 75% of the known elements and can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quality. Metals have traditionally been classified into categories such as light, heavy, semimetal (i of less than 0.1%. In biochemical and bio- medical research, trace element concentrations in plant

Sparks, Donald L.

415

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tool for Rapid Assessment of City Energy (TRACE) Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Climate Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: esmap.org/esmap/TRACE Cost: Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/tool-rapid-assessment-city-energy-tra Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: TRACE[1] This tool offers cities a quick and easy way to assess their energy

416

Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Measurements of Trace Uranium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Measurements of Trace Uranium at the Bismuth Film Electrode. Abstract: Bismuth-coated carbon-fiber electrodes have been successfully applied for adsorptive-stripping...

417

Accelerated Ray Traced Animations Exploiting Temporal Coherence.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ray tracing is a well-know technique for producing realistic graphics. However, the time necessary to generate images is unacceptably long. When producing the many frames (more)

Baines, Darwin Tarry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Rating Element  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Score Score Maturity Value Score Maturity Value Score A1 Cost Estimate H 7.5 1 7.5 0.0 0.0 A2 Cost Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 0.0 0.0 A3 Funding Requirements/Profile H 7.5 1 7.5 0.0 0.0 A4 Independent Cost Estimate/Schedule Review P 3.0 N/A 0.0 0.0 0.0 A5 Life Cycle Cost P 3.0 1 3.0 0.0 0.0 A6 Forecast of Cost at Completion P 3.0 N/A 0.0 0.0 0.0 A7 Cost Estimate for Next Phase Work Scope P 3.0 5 15.0 0.0 0.0 Subtotal Cost 36.0 0.0 0.0 B1 Project Schedule H 7.5 1 7.5 0.0 0.0 B2 Major Milestones P 3.0 1 3.0 0.0 0.0 B3 Resource Loading P 3.0 1 3.0 0.0 0.0 B4 Critical Path Management H 7.5 1 7.5 0.0 0.0 B5 Schedule Risk/Contingency Analysis P 3.0 1 3.0 0.0 0.0 B6 Forecast of Schedule Completion P 3.0 N/A 0.0 0.0 0.0 B7 Schedule for Next Phase Work Scope P 3.0 5 15.0 0.0 0.0 Subtotal Schedule 39.0 0.0 0.0 C1 Systems Engineering H 3.1 3 9.2 0.0 0.0 C2 Alternatives Analysis H

419

A Static Dilution System to Produce Trace Level Gas Standards for Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......trace chromatographic analysis of extraneous gases...standards for quantitative analysis of O2, N 2 , and other...its versatility and reliability. Introduction High-purity...atmosphere), and in analysis (as a carrier gas for...dried in a silica gel reactor before being admitted......

N.P. Neves; Jr.; C.A. Gasparoto; C.H. Collins

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

GEO+, a finite element program on a personal computer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The following study is the first step toward implementation of a complete finite element analysis package on a personal computer for geotechnical engineering problems. A complete finite element analysis has been written in the C/C++ language...

Guillin, Clement Gerard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after@kom.aau.dk Abstract-- Currently available video traces for scalable en- coded video with more than one layer are a convenient repre- sentation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video

Reisslein, Martin

422

Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Layered Video Coding Offset Distortion Traces for Trace-Based Evaluation of Video Quality after video traces for scalable encoded video with more than one layer are a convenient representation of the encoded video for the evaluation of networking mechanisms. The video distortion (RMSE) or quality (PSNR

Reisslein, Martin

423

LEACHING OF SLAG FROM STEEL RECYCLING: RADIONUCLIDES AND STABLE ELEMENTS. DATA REPORT, JAN.15, 1997, REVISED SEPT.9, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Of primary importance to this study are releases of radionuclides from slags. However, releases of other constituents also provide valuable information on releases of elements that may be toxic (e.g. Cr) or that may be used as analogs for radionuclides (e.g. K for Cs). In addition, leaching of bulk constituents from the slag gives information on weathering rates of the bulk material that can be used to estimate releases of non-leachable elements. Consequently, we have examined leaching of: radionuclides from those sloags that contain them; bulk elemental constituents of the slags; anionic constituents; trace elements, through spot checks of concentrations in leachates. Analysis by ICP of elemental constituents in leachates from radioactive samples was limited to those leachate samples that contained no detectable radionuclides, to avoid contamination of the ICP. In this data report we present leaching results for five slags that were produced by recycling steel. Two of the slags were generated at facilities that treat radioactively contaminated scrap, consequently the slag contains radionuclides. The slag from the other three was not contaminated. Because of this, we were able to examine the chemical composition of the slag and of the leachate generated during tests of these slags. For these materials we believe that leach rates of the stable elements can be used as analogs for radionuclides if the same steel processing method were used for radioactive material.

FUHRMANN,M.SCHOONEN,M.

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

New analysis of the two carbon-rich stars CS 22948-27 and CS 29497-34 : binarity and neutron-capture elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have carried out a new determination of abundances in the very metal-poor CH/CN strong stars CS 29497-34 and CS 22948-27, using high-resolution spectra obtained with the HARPS spectrograph at the 3.6m telescope of ESO, La Silla, that covers the range 400 - 690 nm at a resolution of R = 100,000. Both stars are found to be long period binaries. It is confirmed that the abundance patterns show an enhancement of all the alpha-elements (like Mg, Ca), of the proton capture elements (like Na and Al) and a strong enrichment in "r" and "s" process elements, where the s-enrichment is probably due to a mass transfer episode from a companion in its AGB phase. The possible origins of the abundance pattern and especially of the strong enhancement of both "s" and "r" elements are discussed.

B. Barbuy; M. Spite; F. Spite; V. Hill; R. Cayrel; B. Plez; P. Petitjean

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

425

Terminological aspects of data elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The creation and display of data comprise a process that involves a sequence of steps requiring both semantic and systems analysis. An essential early step in this process is the choice, definition, and naming of data element concepts and is followed by the specification of other needed data element concept attributes. The attributes and the values of data element concept remain associated with them from their birth as a concept to a generic data element that serves as a template for final application. Terminology is, therefore, centrally important to the entire data creation process. Smooth mapping from natural language to a database is a critical aspect of database, and consequently, it requires terminology standardization from the outset of database work. In this paper the semantic aspects of data elements are analyzed and discussed. Seven kinds of data element concept information are considered and those that require terminological development and standardization are identified. The four terminological components of a data element are the hierarchical type of a concept, functional dependencies, schematas showing conceptual structures, and definition statements. These constitute the conventional role of terminology in database design. 12 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Strehlow, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)) [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenworthey, W.H. Jr. (Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States)) [Department of Defense, Washington, DC (United States); Schuldt, R.E. (Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)) [Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Trace and ultratrace metals in bottled waters: Survey of sources worldwide and comparison with refillable metal bottles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bottled waters from diverse natural and industrial sources are becoming increasingly popular worldwide. Several potentially harmful trace metals (Ag, Be, Li, Ge, Sb, Sc, Te, Th, U) are not monitored regularly in such waters. As a consequence, there is extremely limited data on the abundance and potential health impacts of many potentially toxic trace elements. Containers used for the storage of bottled waters might also increase trace metal levels above threshold limits established for human consumption by the EPA or WHO. Applying strict clean room techniques and sector field ICPMS, 23 elements were determined in 132 brands of bottled water from 28 countries. In addition, leaching experiments with high purity water and various popular metal bottles investigated the release of trace metals from these containers. The threshold limits for elements such as Al, Be, Mn and U in drinking water were clearly exceeded in some waters. Several bottled waters had Li concentrations in the low mg/L range, a level which is comparable to blood plasma levels of patients treated against manic depression with Li-containing drugs. The rate of release of trace metals from metal bottles assessed after 13days was generally low, with one exception: Substantial amounts of both Sb and Tl were released from a commercially available pewter pocket flask, exceeding international guidelines 5- and 11-fold, respectively. Trace metal levels of most bottled waters are below guideline levels currently considered harmful for human health. The few exceptions that exist, however, clearly reveal that health concerns are likely to manifest through prolonged use of such waters. The investigated coated aluminium and stainless steel bottles are harmless with respect to leaching of trace metals into drinking water. Pocket flasks, in turn, should be selected with great care to avoid contamination of beverages with harmful amounts of potentially toxic trace metals such as Sb and Tl.

Michael Krachler; William Shotyk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Array. Ultrasensitive Voltammetric Detection of Trace Heavy Metal Ions Using Carbon Nanotube...

428

Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum cascade laser. Infrared near-field spectroscopy of trace explosives using an external cavity quantum...

429

The Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) Database III - Analysis of Enrichment Histories for Elements and Two Modes of Star Formation during the Early Evolution of Milky Way  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the enrichment histories for nine elements, C, four alpha-elements of Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, Sc, and three iron-peak elements of Co, Ni, and Zn, by using a large number of stellar data, collected by the Stellar Abundances for Galactic Archaeology (SAGA) database. We find statistically significant changes, or breaks, of the mean abundance ratios to iron at three metallicities of [Fe/H]-1.8, -2.2, and -3.3. Across the first one, the mean abundance ratios decrease with the metallicity by similar extents for all the elements with the sufficient data. Across the latter two, downward trends with the metallicity are also detected but for limited elements, C, Co, Zn, and possibly Sc, and for two of Co and Zn, respectively. The breaks define four stellar populations with the different abundance patters which are dominant in each metallicity range divided by the breaks, Pop IIa, IIb, IIc, and IId in order of increasing metallicity. We also explore their spatial distributions with the spectroscopic distances to de...

Yamada, Shimako; Komiya, Yutaka; Aoki, Wako; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during biologically-mediated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT 1 The behaviour of Rare-Earth Elements, Zr and Hf during.a,b* , Cangemi M.a , Brusca L.c , Madonia P.c , Saiano F.d , Zuddas P.e a) Department of Earth and Marine at the solid-liquid interface influencing the distribution of trace elements onto microbial surfaces. Since

431

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous. The fly ash has a silicate base and contains surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like. The process is carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl/sub 3/ in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl/sub 3/ to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, M.; Wai, C.M.; Nagy, Z.

1983-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Extraction of trace metals from fly ash  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for recovering silver, gallium and/or other trace metals from a fine grained industrial fly ash associated with a process for producing phosphorous, the fly ash having a silicate base and containing surface deposits of the trace metals as oxides, chlorides or the like, with the process being carried out by contacting the fly ash with AlCl.sub.3 in an alkali halide melt to react the trace metals with the AlCl.sub.3 to form compositions soluble in the melt and a residue containing the silicate and aluminum oxide or other aluminum precipitate, and separating the desired trace metal or metals from the melt by electrolysis or other separation techniques.

Blander, Milton (Palos Park, IL); Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Nagy, Zoltan (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Effect of residual elements on high performance nickel base superalloys for gas turbines and strategies for manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The need for better gas turbine operating efficiency and reliability has resulted in tightening of specification and acceptance standards. It has been realized that some elements even at trace level, can have ...

O. P. Sinha; M. Chatterjee; V. V. R. S. Sarma; S. N. Jha

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

CP-violating CFT and trace anomaly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is logically possible that the trace anomaly in four dimension includes the Hirzebruch-Pontryagin density in CP violating theories. Although the term vanishes at free conformal fixed points, we realize such a possibility in the holographic renormalization group and show that it is indeed possible. The Hirzebruch-Pontryagin term in the trace anomaly may serve as a barometer to understand how much CP is violated in conformal field theories.

Yu Nakayama

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

435

Definition: Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid lab analysis encompasses a broad array of techniques used for the analysis of water and gas samples. These analyses are used in a variety of disciplines to quantify the chemical components and properties of groundwater systems. In geothermal exploration and development, fluid analyses often provide a first look into the characteristics of a hydrothermal system, and are routinely used in ongoing monitoring of geothermal reservoirs.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water chemistry analyses are carried out to identify and quantify the chemical components and properties of a certain water. This include pH, major cations and anions, trace elements and isotopes. Water chemistry

436

Lab Analysis Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lab Analysis Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction; Rapid and unambiguous identification of unknown minerals; Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments; Obtain detailed information about rock composition and morphology; Determine detailed information about rock composition and morphology; Cuttings are used to define lithology; Core analysis is done to define lithology

437

Materials Science and Engineering B 117 (2005) 5361 Finite element analysis-based design of a fluid-flow control nano-valve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a fluid-flow control nano-valve M. Grujicica,, G. Caoa, B. Pandurangana, W.N. Royb a Department A finite element method-based procedure is developed for the design of molecularly functionalized nano-size devices. The procedure is aimed at the single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) used in the construction

Grujicic, Mica

438

Microcalorimeter Magnetic Sensor Geometries Using Superconducting Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a numerical code developed to estimate performance of magnetic microcalorimeter configurations, including superconducting elements and SQUID characteristics. We present results of a preliminary design analysis showing that composite sensors with both superconducting and paramagnetic elements should realize substantial gains in magnetic flux signal per magnetization change of the paramagnet, compared to sensors containing only paramagnet.

Boyd, S. T. P. [University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque NM 87131-0001 (United States); Cantor, R. H. [STAR Cryoelectronics, 25-A Bisbee Ct., Santa Fe NM 87508-1338 (United States)

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

439

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Magnesium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sodium Sodium Previous Element (Sodium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Aluminum) Aluminum Isotopes of the Element Magnesium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 24 78.99% STABLE 25 10.00% STABLE 26 11.01% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 19 4.0 picoseconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 20 90.8 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission ~ 27.00% 21 122 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 32.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay < 0.50%

440

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Chlorine  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sulfur Sulfur Previous Element (Sulfur) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Argon) Argon Isotopes of the Element Chlorine [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 35 75.76% STABLE 37 24.24% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 28 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 29 < 20 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 30 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 31 150 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.70% 32 298 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Potassium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Argon Argon Previous Element (Argon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Calcium) Calcium Isotopes of the Element Potassium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 39 93.2581% STABLE 40 0.0117% 1.248×10+9 years 41 6.7302% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 32 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 33 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 34 < 25 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 35 178 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 0.37% 36 342 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

442

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Silicon Silicon Previous Element (Silicon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sulfur) Sulfur Isotopes of the Element Phosphorus [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 31 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 24 No Data Available Electron Capture (suspected) No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 25 < 30 nanoseconds Proton Emission 100.00% 26 43.7 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission No Data Available 27 260 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with

443

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Francium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radon Radon Previous Element (Radon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Radium) Radium Isotopes of the Element Francium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Francium has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 199 12 milliseconds Alpha Decay > 0.00% Electron Capture No Data Available 200 49 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201 62 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 201m 19 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202 0.30 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 202m 0.29 seconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 203 0.55 seconds Alpha Decay <= 100.00% 204 1.8 seconds Alpha Decay 92.00%

444

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Oxygen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nitrogen Nitrogen Previous Element (Nitrogen) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Fluorine) Fluorine Isotopes of the Element Oxygen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 16 99.757% STABLE 17 0.038% STABLE 18 0.205% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 12 1.139×10-21 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available 13 8.58 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 14 70.620 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 15 122.24 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 16 STABLE - - 17 STABLE - - 18 STABLE - - 19 26.88 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

445

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Gallium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Zinc Zinc Previous Element (Zinc) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Germanium) Germanium Isotopes of the Element Gallium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 69 60.108% STABLE 71 39.892% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 56 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 57 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 58 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 59 No Data Available Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 60 70 milliseconds Electron Capture 98.40%

446

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Sodium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Neon Neon Previous Element (Neon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Magnesium) Magnesium Isotopes of the Element Sodium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 23 100% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 18 1.3×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 19 < 40 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 20 447.9 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 20.05% Electron Capture 100.00% 21 22.49 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 22 2.6027 years Electron Capture 100.00% 23 STABLE - - 24 14.997 hours Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

447

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Neon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fluorine Fluorine Previous Element (Fluorine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Sodium) Sodium Isotopes of the Element Neon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 20 90.48% STABLE 21 0.27% STABLE 22 9.25% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 16 9×10-21 seconds Double Proton Emission 100.00% 17 109.2 milliseconds Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay No Data Available Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 100.00% 18 1.6670 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 19 17.22 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 20 STABLE - -

448

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Copper  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nickel Nickel Previous Element (Nickel) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Zinc) Zinc Isotopes of the Element Copper [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 63 69.15% STABLE 65 30.85% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 52 No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 53 < 300 nanoseconds Electron Capture No Data Available Proton Emission No Data Available 54 < 75 nanoseconds Proton Emission No Data Available 55 27 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 15.0% 56 93 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00%

449

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Boron  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Beryllium Beryllium Previous Element (Beryllium) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Carbon) Carbon Isotopes of the Element Boron [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 10 19.9% STABLE 11 80.1% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 6 No Data Available Double Proton Emission (suspected) No Data Available 7 3.255×10-22 seconds Proton Emission No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 8 770 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 100.00% 9 8.439×10-19 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Double Alpha Decay 100.00%

450

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Tungsten  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tantalum Tantalum Previous Element (Tantalum) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Rhenium) Rhenium Isotopes of the Element Tungsten [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 180 0.12% >= 6.6×10+17 years 182 26.50% STABLE 183 14.31% > 1.3×10+19 years 184 30.64% STABLE 186 28.43% > 2.3×10+19 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 157 275 milliseconds Electron Capture No Data Available 158 1.25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 158m 0.143 milliseconds Isomeric Transition No Data Available Alpha Decay No Data Available 159 7.3 milliseconds Alpha Decay ~ 99.90%

451

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Radon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Astatine Astatine Previous Element (Astatine) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Francium) Francium Isotopes of the Element Radon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Radon has no naturally occurring isotopes. Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 193 1.15 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 194 0.78 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195 6 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 195m 5 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 196 4.4 milliseconds Alpha Decay 99.90% Electron Capture ~ 0.10% 197 53 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 197m 25 milliseconds Alpha Decay 100.00% 198 65 milliseconds Alpha Decay No Data Available

452

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Boron Previous Element (Boron) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Nitrogen) Nitrogen Isotopes of the Element Carbon [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 12 98.93% STABLE 13 1.07% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 8 1.981×10-21 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay No Data Available 9 126.5 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% Electron Capture with delayed Proton Emission 61.60% Electron Capture with delayed Alpha Decay 38.40% 10 19.308 seconds Electron Capture 100.00% 11 20.334 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 12 STABLE - -

453

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Rhenium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tungsten Tungsten Previous Element (Tungsten) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Osmium) Osmium Isotopes of the Element Rhenium [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 185 37.40% STABLE 187 62.60% 4.33×10+10 years Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 159 No Data Available No Data Available No Data Available 160 0.82 milliseconds Proton Emission 91.00% Alpha Decay 9.00% 161 0.44 milliseconds Proton Emission 100.00% Alpha Decay <= 1.40% 161m 14.7 milliseconds Alpha Decay 93.00% Proton Emission 7.00% 162 107 milliseconds Alpha Decay 94.00% Electron Capture 6.00%

454

Ray tracing of Jovian kilometric radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of computer ray tracing of Jovian kilometric from 56.2 kHz to 1 MHz in a model Jovian magnetosphere with an Io torus are presented. Ray tracing calculations indicate that the Io torus presents a propagation barrier to the radiation and that the Jovian kilometric radiation must be generated in the L-O mode from a source near Jupiter on field lines passing through the Io torus. One effect of the Io torus is to refract the rays away from the magnetic equator forming a shadow zone at radial distances beyond the torus. In general, at radial distances greater than 10 Jovian radii, as the wave frequency increases (>200 kHz) so does the magnetic latitude of the shadow zone. These and other features of the ray tracing calculations are in good qualitative agreement with the observations from the plasma wave receiver and planetary radio astronomy experiment on board both Voyager 1 and 2.

Green, J.L.; Gurnett, D.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Determination of the effect of part orientation to the strength value on additive manufacturing FDM for end-use parts by physical testing and validation via three-dimensional finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining the mechanical properties of the parts manufactured from additive manufacturing (AM) technology is important for manufacture end-use functional parts, known as rapid manufacturing (RM). It is important, within RM design, to verify to some degree of confidence that a part designed to be manufactured using this technology will be suitable and fit to function as intended, prior to committing to manufacture. The method of doing this is to perform physical testing on fabricated parts and validate via finite element analysis (FEA) on the parts.

R.H. Hambali; P. Smith; A.E.W. Rennie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: TRACE 700  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

700 700 TRACE 700 logo. Trane's TRACE 700 software - the latest version of Trane Air Conditioning Economics - brings the algorithms recommended by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) to the familiar Windows operating environment. Use it to assess the energy and economic impacts of building-related selections such as architectural features, comfort-system design, HVAC equipment selections, operating schedules, and financial options. Flexible data entry, coupled with multiple views and "drag-and-drop" load assignments, simplify the modeling process and help you identify optimal zoning and plant configurations. Compare up to four alternatives for a single project by modeling various air distribution and mechanical

457

Trace fossil assemblages in selected shelf sandstones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10... with progradation of the delta. The presence of trace fossils throughout the section, as compared to the lack of burrows in the upper unit of the True Watt A-1 section, can be attributed to the marginal location of the deposits. Santa Fe 13 and Santa Fe 10...

Locke, Kathleen Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Tracing compressed curves in triangulated surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple path or cycle in a triangulated surface is normal if it intersects any triangle in a finite set of arcs, each crossing from one edge of the triangle to another. We describe an algorithm to "trace" a normal curve in O(min set{X, n2log ... Keywords: computational topology, geodesics, normal coordinates

Jeff Erickson; Amir Nayyeri

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A novel approach to the identification and quantitative elemental analysis of amyloid deposits-Insights into the pathology of Alzheimer's disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the role of metals such as iron, copper, and zinc in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease. However to convincingly establish their presence in plaques in vivo, a sensitive technique is required that is both quantitatively accurate and avoids isolation of plaques or staining/fixing brain tissue, since these processes introduce contaminants and redistribute elements within the tissue. Combining the three ion beam techniques of scanning transmission ion microscopy, Rutherford back scattering spectrometry and particle induced X-ray emission in conjunction with a high energy (MeV) proton microprobe we have imaged plaques in freeze-dried unstained brain sections from CRND-8 mice, and simultaneously quantified iron, copper, and zinc. Our results show increased metal concentrations within the amyloid plaques compared with the surrounding tissue: iron (85 ppm compared with 42 ppm), copper (16 ppm compared to 6 ppm), and zinc (87 ppm compared to 34 ppm).

Rajendran, Reshmi; Minqin, Ren [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)] [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Ynsa, Maria Dolores [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)] [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales (CMAM), Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Campus de Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Casadesus, Gemma [Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)] [Department of Neurosciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George [Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Halliwell, Barry [Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore)] [Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Watt, Frank, E-mail: phywattf@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)] [Centre for Ion Beam Applications, Department of Physics, Blk S 12, Faculty of Science, National University of Singapore, 2, Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\LambdaCategories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear and Trace Ideals in Tensored \\Lambda­Categories Samson Abramsky \\Lambda Department of his 60th birthday. Abstract We generalize the notion of nuclear maps from functional analysis by defining nuclear ideals in tensored \\Lambda­categories. The motivation for this study came from attempts

Blute, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "trace element analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Trace gas contaminant control in a space station atmosphere using adsorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trace contaminants enter spacecraft atmospheres through offgassing of spacecraft materials and as products of crew metabolism. The consequences of fire or accidental release of toxic vapors from onboard systems is also a crew safety concern. The purpose of this work was to determine how these contaminants could be limited to safe concentrations in the atmosphere of the proposed space station. Contaminant source models were developed from spacecraft material offgassing and human metabolic production rate measurements. Contaminants were represented with a simplified model of 30 compounds by grouping similar species together. A trace contaminant control process, which consists of chemisorption of ammonia on phosphoric acid-impregnated activated carbon, ambient temperature catalytic oxidation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, catalytic conversion of the sulfur in hydrogen sulfide and mercaptans to elemental sulfur, and adsorption of the other contaminants in a regenerable activated carbon adsorber, was proposed. Trace contaminant adsorption rate and equilibrium equations were derived. Various adsorbents were evaluated to determine the optimum sorbents for this application. Removal system performance limits were established, and optimum design ranges for process parameters were developed. Trace gas contaminants can be limited to safe concentrations by the process proposed under normal conditions using as little as 1 Kg/man-year of ammonia chemisorbent. The most likely accidental contaminant releases can be removed in {approximately}20 hours using frequent adsorber regenerations.

Winter, J.D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Runtime Tracing of The Community Earth System Model: Feasibility and Benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Community Earth System Models (CESM) is one of US's leading earth system modeling systems, which has over decades of development history and embraced by large, active user communities. In this paper, we first review the history of CESM software development and layout the general objectives of performance analysis. Then we present an offline global community land model simulation within the CESM framework to demonstrate the procedure of runtime tracing of CESM using the Vampir toolset. Finally, we explain the benefits of runtime tracing to the general earth system modeling community. We hope those considerations can also be beneficial to many other modeling research programs involving legacy high-performance computing applications.

Wang, Dali [ORNL] [ORNL; Domke, Jens [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

0: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks T-720: Blue Coat Director HTTP Trace Processing Flaw Permits Cross-Site Scripting Attacks...

464

It's Elemental - Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Carbon Previous Element (Carbon) The Periodic Table of Elements Next Element (Oxygen) Oxygen Isotopes of the Element Nitrogen [Click for Main Data] Most of the isotope data on this site has been obtained from the National Nuclear Data Center. Please visit their site for more information. Naturally Occurring Isotopes Mass Number Natural Abundance Half-life 14 99.636% STABLE 15 0.364% STABLE Known Isotopes Mass Number Half-life Decay Mode Branching Percentage 10 No Data Available Proton Emission 100.00% 11 5.49×10-22 seconds Proton Emission 100.00% 12 11.000 milliseconds Electron Capture 100.00% 13 9.965 minutes Electron Capture 100.00% 14 STABLE - - 15 STABLE - - 16 7.13 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00% Beta-minus Decay with delayed Alpha Decay 1.2×10-3 % 17 4.173 seconds Beta-minus Decay 100.00%

465

Removal of trace olefins from aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for treating a hydrocarbon process stream by converting trace quantities of olefinic impurities to nonolefinic hydrocarbons. The process comprises contacting the process stream, which contains trace olefins in an amount of from about 50 to about 2000 as measured by Bromine Index and at least 80% by weight of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons having from 6 to 20 carbon atoms per molecule, at reaction conditions which ensure liquid phase operation with a solid catalyst composite comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate zeolite and a refractory inorganic oxide. A catalytic olefin-consuming alkylation reaction then produces an essentially olefinfree product stream with approximately the same quantity and distribution of aromatic and naphthenic hydrocarbons as contained in the process stream.

Sachtler, J.W.A.; Barger, P.T.

1989-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

466

Improve reformer operation with trace sulfur removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern bimetallic reforming catalysts typically have feed specifications for sulfur of 0.5 to 1 wppm in the reformer naphtha carge. Sulfur in the raw naphtha is reduced to this level by naphtha hydrotreating. While most naphtha hydrotreating operations can usually obtain these levels without substantial problems. It is difficult to obtain levels much below 0.5 to 1 wppm with this process. Revamp of a constrained existing hydrotreater to reduce product sulfur slightly can be extremely costly typically entailing replacement or addition of a new reactor. At Engelhard the authors demonstrated that if the last traces of sulfur remaining from hydrotreating can be removed, the resulting ultra-low sulfur feed greatly improves the reformer operation and provides substantial economic benefit to the refiner. Removal of the remaining trace sulfur is accomplished in a simple manner with a special adsorbent bed, without adding complexity to the reforming operation.

McClung, R.G.; Novak, W.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Josephson junction element  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sandwich-type josephson junction element wherein a counter electrode is made of a mo-re alloy which contains 10-90 atomic-% of re. The josephson junction element has a high operating temperature, and any deterioration thereof attributed to a thermal cycle is not noted.

Kawabe, U.; Tarutani, Y.; Yamada, H.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

468

Proceedings of transuranium elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The identification of the first synthetic elements was established by chemical evidence. Conclusive proof of the synthesis of the first artificial element, technetium, was published in 1937 by Perrier and Segre. An essential aspect of their achievement was the prediction of the chemical properties of element 43, which had been missing from the periodic table and which was expected to have properties similar to those of manganese and rhenium. The discovery of other artificial elements, astatine and francium, was facilitated in 1939-1940 by the prediction of their chemical properties. A little more than 50 years ago, in the spring of 1940, Edwin McMillan and Philip Abelson synthesized element 93, neptunium, and confirmed its uniqueness by chemical means. On August 30, 1940, Glenn Seaborg, Arthur Wahl, and the late Joseph Kennedy began their neutron irradiations of uranium nitrate hexahydrate. A few months later they synthesized element 94, later named plutonium, by observing the alpha particles emitted from uranium oxide targets that had been bombarded with deuterons. Shortly thereafter they proved that is was the second transuranium element by establishing its unique oxidation-reduction behavior. The symposium honored the scientists and engineers whose vision and dedication led to the discovery of the transuranium elements and to the understanding of the influence of 5f electrons on their electronic structure and bonding. This volume represents a record of papers presented at the symposium.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Note: Portable rare-earth element analyzer using pyroelectric crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a portable rare-earth element analyzer with a palm-top size chamber including the electron source of a pyroelectric crystal and the sample stage utilizing cathodoluminescence (CL) phenomenon. The portable rare-earth element analyzer utilizing CL phenomenon is the smallest reported so far. The portable rare-earth element analyzer detected the rare-earth elements Dy, Tb, Er, and Sm of ppm order in zircon, which were not detected by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis. We also performed an elemental mapping of rare-earth elements by capturing a CL image using CCD camera.

Imashuku, Susumu, E-mail: imashuku.susumu.2m@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Fuyuno, Naoto; Hanasaki, Kohei; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Improvements to Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for trace elemental analysis of solids. Trace element composition can be useful in forensic applications for matching or attribution studies, in which a material recovered from...

471

Distribution of trace elements in the tissues of benthic and pelagic fish from the Kerguelen Islands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cd g-1 dry wt and 1.51 µg Hg g-1 dry wt) for these toxic metals as well as for edible and non. Keywords : Antarctic ; Heavy metals ; Cd-enrichment ; Myctophidae INTRODUCTION Heavy metal concentrations high toxic metal concentrations, especially for Cd and Hg, in comparison with those from northern

Boyer, Edmond

472

Selected Trace Elements in the Sacramento River, California: Occurrence and Distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, thallium, thulium, uranium, vanadium, tungsten, yttrium, ytterbium, zinc, and zirconium--were measured ranged from 900 lg/L at Spring Creek (Iron Mountain acid mine drainage into Keswick Reservoir) to 0.65 lg to the delta in San Francisco Bay plays an important role in understanding the impact of mining, agriculture

473

ARTICLE IN PRESS Sedimentary trace element constraints on the role of North Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

occurred in two phases (Sinton and Duncan, 1998). The initial pulse (~60­62 Ma) produced basalt along distributed silicic ash falls (Knox and Morton, 1988; Sinton a

Bralower, Timothy J.

474

Chondrule trace element geochemistry at the mineral scale Emmanuel JACQUET1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Candidate heating/forming mechanisms, such as gas-liquid condensation (e.g., Blander et al. 2004; Varela et to the chondrule melt, as in the gas-melt interaction scenario of Libourel et al. (2006). The rapid cooling rate reservoirs sampled by chondrites. It is traditionally assumed that chondrule precursors were millimeter

Demouchy, Sylvie

475

Kinetic isotope and trace element partitioning during calcite precipitation from aqueous solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

minerals including trona and halite make up the bulk ofCalcite, Aragonite, Quartz, Halite Tufa Aragonite, MagnesianTufa Aragonite Tufa Aragonite, Halite Tufa Aragonite, Trona,

Nielsen, Laura Christina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Characteristics of coal ashes in Yanzhou mining district and distribution of trace elements in them  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the process of combustion of coal organic and inorganic materials in it will ... them will become volatiles and, together with coal smoke, enter into atmosphere, some will remain in micro-particulates such as

Guijian Liu; Zicheng Peng; Pingyue Yang; Herong Gui

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Flow, Salts, and Trace Elements in the Rio Grande: A Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must then focus on either in- creasing salt removal, minimizing salt inflow into the Rio Grande, or reducing evaporative losses of water, which concentrate salts. Although techniques to remove salts such as reverse os- mosis and electrodialysis exist...

Miyamoto, S.; Fenn, L. B.; Swietlik, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Detrimental Effects Associated with Trace Element Uptake in Lake Chubsuckers (Erimyzon sucetta) Exposed to Polluted Sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. For example, investigations near the D-area coal-fired power plant on the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC. Gariboldi,1 J. D. Congdon1 1 Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29802, USA 2 drain into the Savannah River. Organisms utilizing the disposal basins and downstream habitats

Hopkins, William A.

479

TRACE ELEMENTS LEACHING FROM ORGANIC SOILS STABILIZED WITH HIGH CARBON FLY ASH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

53706 USA, chbenson@wisc.edu 3 Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering INTRODUCTION Fly ash is a silt-size particulate collected by air pollution control systems at coal and transport of large volumes of soft soil and replacement with crushed rock from quarries. Eliminating removal

Aydilek, Ahmet

480

Trace element content in tea brewed in traditional metallic and stainless steel teapots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The migration of metals in tea brewed in metallic teapots was investigated. The teapots were obtained from North Africa stores in ... prepare the tea. Tea brewed in metallic teapots was compared to tea brewed in ...

D. Petit; W. El Houari; K. Jacobs; W. Baeyens

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Tracing of Error in a Time Series Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A physical (e.g. astrophysical, geophysical, meteorological etc.) data may appear as an output of an experiment or it may contain some sociological, economic or biological information. Whatever be the source of a time series data some amount of noise is always expected to be embedded in it. Analysis of such data in presence of noise may often fail to give accurate information. Although text book data filtering theory is primarily concerned with the presences of random, zero mean errors; but in reality, errors in data are often systematic rather than random. In the present paper we produce different models of systematic error in the time series data. This will certainly help to trace the systematic error present in the data and consequently that can be removed as possible to make the data compatible for further study.

Koushik Ghosh; Probhas Raychaudhuri

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

482

Characterization of electrodeposited elemental boron  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Elemental boron was produced through electrowinning from potassium fluoroborate dissolved in a mixture of molten potassium fluoride and potassium chloride. The characteristics of the electrodeposited boron (raw boron) as well as the water and acid-leached product (processed boron) were studied. The chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size of the boron powders were investigated. The morphology of the deposits was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical state of the matrix, as well as the impurity phases present in them, was established using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In order to interpret and understand the results obtained, a thermodynamic analysis was carried out. The gas-phase corrosion in the head space as well as the chemistry behind the leaching process were interpreted using this analysis. The ease of oxidation of these powders in air was investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA) coupled with thermogravimetry (TG). From the results obtained in this study it was established that elemental boron powder with a purity of 95-99% could be produced using a high temperature molten salt electrowinning process. The major impurities were found to be oxygen, carbon, iron and nickel.

Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)], E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in; Ananthasivan, K.; Ranganathan, R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Mittal, Vinit; Narasimhan, S.V. [Water and Steam Chemistry Division, BARC (F), Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vasudeva Rao, P.R. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Thematic Questions about Chemical Elements Nature of the chemical elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Be Atomic No. 1 2 3 4 Isotopes 1,2,3 3,4 6,7 9,10 Name Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Symbol B C N O Atomic No Environment Element Synthesis: Exploration of Chemical Fundamentals Element Synthesis and Isotopes · Elemental Abundance and Isotopes · distribution of elements in the universe · factors that define elemental

Polly, David

484

The chemical behavior of the transuranic elements and the barrier function in natural aquifer systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a geological repository for long-lived radioactive wastes, such as actinides and certain fission products, most of the stored radionuclides remain immobile in the particular geological formation. If any of these could possibly become mobile, only trace concentrations of a few radionuclides would result. Nevertheless, with an inventory in the repository of many tonnes of transuranic elements, the amounts that could disperse cannot be neglected. A critical assessment of the chemical behavior of these nuclides, especially their migration properties in the aquifer system around the repository site, is mandatory for analysis of the long-term safety. The chemistry requited for this includes many geochemical multicomponent reactions that are so far only partially understood and [which] therefore can be quantified only incompletely. A few of these reactions have been discussed in this paper based on present knowledge. If a comprehensive discussion of the subject is impossible because of this [lack of information], then an attempt to emphasize the importance of the