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  1. Teacher Research Associates (TRAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goals of Fermilab's TRAC program are to provide outstanding science, mathematics, computer science, and technology teachers with professional scientific, engineering, or technical experiences...

  2. ARM - Campaign Instrument - trac

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Time Resolved Aerosol Collector (TRAC) Instrument Categories Aerosols...

  3. SunTrac Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SunTrac Solar Place: Golden,, Colorado Zip: 80403 Sector: Solar Product: Colorado based solar thermal integrator References: SunTrac Solar1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  4. Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and the Alpha Magnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spectrometer (AMS) Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Resources with Additional Information Samuel C.C. Ting Credit: Courtesy of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 'Samuel C.C. Ting was born ... in Ann Arbor, Michigan, ... [and] received his elementary and secondary education in China ... . He excelled in mathematics, science and history. In 1956, Ting returned to the United States to attend the University of Michigan as an

  5. Ting Xu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blandine Jerome Ting Xu Previous Next List Ting Xu Ting Xu Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science & Engineering, University of California, Berkeley Email: tingxu [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-642-1632 EFRC research: Within the CGS, the Xu group is designing, synthesizing, and characterizing components and the membranes they form by self-assemby, with a focus on MOF/polymer mixed membranes. EFRC publications: Hourani, Rami; Zhang, Chen; van der Weegen, Rob; Ruiz, Luis; Li, Changyi;

  6. Ting Xu | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  7. Microsoft Word - summer.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b trac ting fro m th e da ily a ve rag e hig h te m p e ra tu res fo r th e la st 10 y ea rs a n am o un t e qu al to tw ice a n estim ate o f the stan da rd de via tion for h igh...

  8. Samuel C. Ting, 1975 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Samuel C. Ting, 1975 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1970's Samuel C. Ting, 1975 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For powerful new

  9. TRAC-P validation test matrix. Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, E.D.; Boyack, B.E.

    1997-09-05

    This document briefly describes the elements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) software quality assurance program leading to software (code) qualification and identifies a test matrix for qualifying Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-Pressurized Water Reactor Version (-P), or TRAC-P, to the NRC`s software quality assurance requirements. Code qualification is the outcome of several software life-cycle activities, specifically, (1) Requirements Definition, (2) Design, (3) Implementation, and (4) Qualification Testing. The major objective of this document is to define the TRAC-P Qualification Testing effort.

  10. TRAC Code Modifications Made for APT Blanket Safety Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report provides documentation of the necessary source code modifications made to the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 code version 5.4.28a developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Software design implementation document for TRAC-M data structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly-Woodruff, S. [Ogden Environmental and Energy Services (United States); Mahaffy, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Giguere, P.; Dearing, J.; Boyack, B. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-07-01

    The Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-M system-wide and component data structures are to be reimplemented by using the new features of Fortran 90 (F90). There will be no changes to the conceptual design, data flow, or computational flow with respect to the current TRAC-P, except that readability, maintainability, and extensibility will be improved. However, the task described here is a basic step that does not meet all future needs of the code, especially regarding extensibility. TRAC-M will be fully functional and will produce null computational changes with respect to TRAC-P, Version 5.4.25; computational efficiency will not be degraded significantly. The existing component and functional modularity and possibilities for coarse-grained parallelism will be retained.

  12. Peach Bottom Transients Analysis with TRAC/BF1-VALKIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdu, G.; Miro, R.; Sanchez, A.M.; Rosello, O.; Ginestar, D.; Vidal, V.

    2004-10-15

    The TRAC/BF1-VALKIN code is a new time domain analysis code for studying transients in a boiling water reactor. This code uses the best-estimate code TRAC/BF1 to give an account of the heat transfer and thermal-hydraulic processes and a three-dimensional neutronics module. This module has two options: the MODKIN option that makes use of a modal method based on the assumption that the neutronic flux can be approximately expanded in terms of the dominant lambda modes associated with a static configuration of the reactor core, and the NOKIN option that uses a one-step backward discretization of the neutron diffusion equation. To check the performance of the TRAC/BF1-VALKIN code, the Peach Bottom turbine trip transient has been simulated, because this transient is a dynamically complex event where neutron kinetics is coupled with thermal hydraulics in the reactor primary system, and reactor variables change very rapidly.

  13. APT Blanket System Model Based on Initial Conceptual Design - Integrated 1D TRAC System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L.L.

    1998-10-07

    This report documents the approaches taken in establishing a 1-dimensional integrated blanket system model using the TRAC code, developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  14. Assessment of TRAC-BD1 amd RAMONA-3B codes fpr BWR ATWS application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.; Hsu, C.J.; Saha, P.

    1984-01-01

    Based on comparisons between the TRAC-BD1 power imposed calculation and the RAMONA-3B results, it can be said that the thermal-hydraulic models of both RAMONA-3B and TRAC-BD1 provide adequate representation of an ATWS event in a BWR. However, for the reactor power calculation, RAMONA-3B with space-time neutron kinetics is a superior and preferable tool to the TRAC-BD1 with point kinetics for ATWS type events where the spatial core power distribution varies with time. Also, the computer running time for RAMONA-3B (with 115 hydraulic cells and 192 neutronic cells has been found to be about four times lower than TRAC-BD1 (with 63 hydraulic cells and point kinetics). Therefore, it is recommended that RAMONA-3B be further used for best-estimate analysis of BWR ATWS-type events.

  15. Comparison of TRAC-BF1 calculations with the LaSalle 2 instability event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    In March of 1988 the LaSalle 2 BWR, while at about 85 percent power, was exposed to a loss of both recirculation pumps providing drive flow to the jet pumps. Within a few minutes the reactor power began to oscillate, resulting in an overpower scram. This report presents results of calculations performed with the TRAC-BF1 code to assess the capability of the code to calculate the observed behavior of the LaSalle plant during the event.

  16. Verification of the coupled 3-D neutronics and thermal-hydraulic code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, T.; Takeuchi, A.

    2006-07-01

    In order to analyze the complex transients with coupled interactions between core behavior and plant dynamics, the three-dimensional neutronics code SKETCH-INS was coupled with the thermal-hydraulic code TRAC-P. The capability SKETCH-INS code was verified against the 3-D transient benchmark problem. The capability of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P was verified against the NEACRP 3-D LWR core transient benchmark and OECD MSLB benchmark problems. The results of analyses were in reasonable agreement with the reference and different codes results of benchmarks. This paper provides the outline of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P and the results of benchmarks. (authors)

  17. Post-test analysis of semiscale tests S-UT-6 and S-UT-7 using TRAC PF1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyack, B.E.

    1983-01-01

    A posttest study of Semiscale Tests S-UT-6 and S-UT-7 has been completed to assess TRAC-PFl predictions of pressurized water-reactor (PWR) small-break transients. The comparisons of the TRAC calculations and experimental results show that the correct qualitative influence of upper-head injection (UHI) was predicted. The major phenomenological difference predicted was the mode of core voiding. The data show a slow boiloff from the top of the core resulting in a dryout near the top of the core only. TRAC predicted a more extensive voiding with fluid forced from the bottom of the core by a pressure increase in the upper vessel plenum. The pressure increase was the primary consequence of a failure to predict a complete clearance of the seal in the intact-loop pump-suction upflow leg. Further review of the interphasic drag correlations, entrainment correlations, and critical-flow model is recommended. 20 figures.

  18. Application of TRAC-BD1/MOD1 to a BWR/4 feedwater control failure ATWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouhani, S.Z.; Giles, M.M.; Mohr, C.M. Jr.; Weaver, W.L. III

    1984-01-01

    This paper begins with a short description of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code for Boiling Water Reactors (TRAC-BWR), briefly mentioning some of its main features such as specific BWR models and input structure. Next, an input model of a BWR/4 is described, and, the assumptions used in performing an analysis of the loss of a feedwater controller without scram are listed. The important features of the calculated trends in flows, pressure, reactivity, and power are shown graphically and commented in the text. A comparison of some of the main predicted trends with the calculated results from a similar study by General Electric is also presented.

  19. Development of a Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector (Fast TRAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yu & James Cowin PNNL Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector ......Fast TRAC...... Xiao-Ying Yu, Ali Hashim, Martin Iedema, and James Cowin Atmospheric Sciences, Chemical Sciences Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Research is supported by NOAA & DOE. *Patent Pending Xiao-Ying Yu & James Cowin PNNL Cloud Microstructures ≤ 1 m Want to know the aerosols at this resolution Aircraft flies at 150 m/s Need time resolution 1 m/150 m/s = 6 ms (!!!!!) Xiao-Ying Yu & James

  20. Development of a Fast Time-Resolved Aerosol Collector (Fast TRAC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yu, James Cowin PNNL Probing Aerosols in Cloud Microstructures with Single Particle "Fast TRAC" Xiao-Ying Yu, Martin Iedema, and James Cowin Atmospheric Sciences, Chemical Sciences Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Research is supported by NOAA & DOE. *Patent Pending Xiao-Ying Yu, James Cowin PNNL Cloud Microstructures ≤ 1 m Want to know the aerosols at this resolution Aircraft flies at 150 m/s Need time resolution 1 m/150 m/s = 6 ms (!!!!!) Xiao-Ying Yu, James

  1. Application programming interface document for the modernized Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC-M)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahaffy, J. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Boyack, B.E.; Steinke, R.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this document is to ease the task of adding new system components to the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) or altering old ones. Sufficient information is provided to permit replacement or modification of physical models and correlations. Within TRAC, information is passed at two levels. At the upper level, information is passed by system-wide and component-specific data modules at and above the level of component subroutines. At the lower level, information is passed through a combination of module-based data structures and argument lists. This document describes the basic mechanics involved in the flow of information within the code. The discussion of interfaces in the body of this document has been kept to a general level to highlight key considerations. The appendices cover instructions for obtaining a detailed list of variables used to communicate in each subprogram, definitions and locations of key variables, and proposed improvements to intercomponent interfaces that are not available in the first level of code modernization.

  2. Analysis of a typical BWR/4 MSIV closure ATWS using RAMONA-3B and TRAC-BD1 codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, C.J.; Neymotin, L.; Saha, P.

    1984-01-01

    Analysis of a typical BWR/4 Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) has been performed using two advanced, best-estimate computer codes, namely, RAMONA-3B and TRAC-BD1. The transient was initiated by an inadvertant closure of all Main Steam Isolation Valves (MSIVs) with subsequent failure to scram the reactor. However, all other safety features namely, the safety and relief valves, recirculation pump trip, high pressure coolant injection and the standby liquid (boron) control system were assumed to work as designed. No other operator action was assumed. It has been found that both RAMONA-3B (with three-dimensional neutron kinetics) and TRAC-BD1 (with point kinetics) yielded similar results for the global parameters such as reactor power, system pressure and the suppression pool temperature. Both calculations showed that the reactor can be brought to hot shutdown in approximately twenty to twenty-five minutes with borated water mass flow rate of 2.78 kg/s (43 gpm) with 23800 ppM of boron. The suppression pool water temperature (assuming no pool cooling) at this time could be in the range of 170 to 205/sup 0/F. An additional TRAC-BD1 calculation with RAMONA-3B reactor power indicates that the thermal-hydraulic models in RAMONA-3B, although simpler than those in TRAC-BD1, can adequately represent the system behavior during the ATWS-type transient.

  3. Coupling of TRAC-PF1/MOD2, Version 5.4.25, with NESTLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knepper, P.L.; Hochreiter, L.E.; Ivanov, K.N.; Feltus, M.A.

    1999-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) spatial kinetics capability within a thermal-hydraulics system code provides a more correct description of the core physics during reactor transients that involve significant variations in the neutron flux distribution. Coupled codes provide the ability to forecast safety margins in a best-estimate manner. The behavior of a reactor core and the feedback to the plant dynamics can be accurately simulated. For each time step, coupled codes are capable of resolving system interaction effects on neutronics feedback and are capable of describing local neutronics effects caused by the thermal hydraulics and neutronics coupling. With the improvements in computational technology, modeling complex reactor behaviors with coupled thermal hydraulics and spatial kinetics is feasible. Previously, reactor analysis codes were limited to either a detailed thermal-hydraulics model with simplified kinetics or multidimensional neutron kinetics with a simplified thermal-hydraulics model. The authors discuss the coupling of the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-PF1/MOD2, Version 5.4.25, with the NESTLE code.

  4. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark with the Coupled Thermal-Hydraulics and Neutronics Code TRAC-M/PARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.; Ulses, Anthony; Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2004-10-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip 2 (TT2) experiment has been performed using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics code TRAC-M/PARCS. The objective of the analysis was to assess the performance of TRAC-M/PARCS on a BWR transient with significance in two-phase flow and spatial variations of the neutron flux. TRAC-M/PARCS results are found to be in good agreement with measured plant data for both steady-state and transient phases of the benchmark. Additional analyses of four fictitious extreme scenarios are performed to provide a basis for code-to-code comparisons and comprehensive testing of the thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling. The obtained results of sensitivity studies on the effect of direct moderator heating on transient simulation indicate the importance of this modeling aspect.

  5. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 US/Japanese PWR conservative LOCA prediction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, G E; Fisher, J E

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of a 200%, double-ended, cold-leg-break, loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) calculation using the TRAC-PF1/MOD1 computer code. The reactor system represented a typical United States/Japanese pressurized water reactor with a 15 x 15 fuel bundle arrangement 12-ft long, four loops, and cold-leg Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Systems. Conservation boundary and initial conditions were used. Reactor power was 102% of the 3250 MWt rated power, decay heat was set to 120% of American Nuclear Society Standard 5.1, highest core lifetime values for power peaking and fuel stored energy were used, and the LOCA occurred simultaneously with a loss of offsite power. Best estimate assumptions were used for the break flow model, fuel rod heat transfer and metal-water reaction correlations, and steady-state fuel temperature profiles. A flow blockage model, having the capability to account for the effects of cladding ballooning or rupturing, was not used. Except for these best estimate assumptions, the boundary and initial conditions were consistent with those used in licensing calculations. Maximum fuel rod temperatures were 1380 K (2020/sup 0/F) and 1040 K (1410/sup 0/F) on the hottest evaluation model rod and hottest best estimate rod, respectively. The high reported values or fuel cladding temperature were a direct consequence of the conservative boundary and initial conditions used for the calculation, primarily the 2% overpower condition, the core decay heat assumption, and the degraded ECCS. The calculation demonstrated successful core reflooding before 1478 K (2200/sup 0/F) cladding temperature was exceeded on any fuel rod. 7 refs., 47 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment: Semiscale Mod-2A intermediate break test S-IB-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L N

    1986-02-01

    The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 independent assessment project at Sandia National Laboratories is part of an overall effort funded by the NRC to determine the ability of various system codes to predict the detailed thermal/hydraulic response of light water reactors during accident and off-normal conditions. The TRAC code is being assessed at SNLA against test data from various integral and separate effects test facilities. As part of this assessment matrix, an intermediate break test (S-IB-3), performed at the Semiscale Mod-2A facility, has been analyzed. Using an input model with a 3-D VESSEL component, the vessel and downcomer inventories during 3-IB-3 were generally well predicted, but the core heatup was underpredicted compared to data. An equivalent calculation with an all 1-D input model ran about twice as fast as our basecase analysis using a 3-D VESSEL in the input model, but the results of the two calculations diverged significantly for many parameters of interest, with the 3-D VESSEL model results in better agreement with data. 22 refs., 100 figs.

  7. TRAC-PF1/MOD1: an advanced best-estimate computer program for pressurized water reactor thermal-hydraulic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in light-water reactors. The TRAC-PF1/MOD1 program provides this capability for pressurized water reactors and for many thermal-hydraulic test facilities. The code features either a one- or a three-dimensional treatment of the pressure vessel and its associated internals, a two-fluid nonequilibrium hydrodynamics model with a noncondensable gas field and solute tracking, flow-regime-dependent constitutive equation treatment, optional reflood tracking capability for bottom-flood and falling-film quench fronts, and consistent treatment of entire accident sequences including the generation of consistent initial conditions. The stability-enhancing two-step (SETS) numerical algorithm is used in the one-dimensional hydrodynamics and permits this portion of the fluid dynamics to violate the material Courant condition. This technique permits large time steps and, hence, reduced running time for slow transients.

  8. TRAC-PF1/MOD1 analysis of a 200% cold-leg break in a US/Japanese PWR with four loops and 15 x 15 fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spore, J.W.; Cappiello, M.W.

    1986-01-01

    This report presents the results of a TRAC-PF1/MOD1 calculation that simulated a 200% double-ended cold-leg-break loss-of-coolant accident in a generic US/Japanese pressurized water reactor. This is a best-estimate analysis using conservative boundary conditions and minimum safeguards. The calculation shows that the peak cladding temperature (PCT) occurs during blowdown and that the core reheat is minimal during reflood. The results also show that for an evaluation-model peak rod linear power of 15.85 kW/ft, a PCT of 1084 K is reached at 3.5 s into the blowdown transient, which is approx.394 K below the design basis limit of 1478 K. 10 figs.

  9. Microsoft Word - TRACS revise.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RSL ENHANCES NEW YORK'S COUNTER TERRORISM OPERATIONS The National Nuclear Security Administration's Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) at Nellis Air Force Base has given a lift to the Big Apple's terror-fighting capabilities. RSL recently retrofitted two new high-tech speedboats, two vans and several portable backpacks with radiation detection equipment for the New York Police Department (NYPD) Counter Terrorism Division. The detection equipment formerly called the Tactical Radiological Acquisition

  10. DockingShop: A Tool for Interactive Molecular Docking Ting-Cheng...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Genetics; I.3.6 Computer Graphics: Methodology and Techniques-Interaction Techniques; ... Institute for Quantitative Biomedical Research, Berkeley, California, tlu@lbl.gov, ...

  11. METALS~~~SINTEG~~~~TING~COMPANY, INC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NTEGTINGCOMPANY, INC. April 5, 1946 War Department Manhattan &glneer District P. 0. Box 33S Church Street Annex New York 8, New Pork Attention: Major W illiam C. Camobell Re:...

  12. Novel Membranes | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Novel Membranes Previous Next List Brett Helms Brett Helms Hopkinson David Hopkinson tsapatsis Michael Tsapatsis Ting Xu Ting Xu

  13. HOPSPACK

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002439WKSTN00 Hybrid Optimization Parallel Search PACKage https://software.sandia.dov/trac/hopspack

  14. SWQM

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002617MLTPL00 SWQM: Source Water Quality Modeling Software https://software.sandia.gov/trac/canary/downloader/download/category/10

  15. MEGA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002444SUPER00 Modular Environment for Graph Research and Analysis with a Persistent http://software.sandia.gov/trac/megraphs

  16. ACRO V.2.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    001742MLTPL01 Acro (A Common Repository for Optimizers) v. 2.0 https://software.sandia.gov/trac/acro

  17. EMPASE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002556MLTPL00 EMPaSE: an Extensible Multi-Paradigm Simulation Environment https://software.sandia.gov/trac

  18. Improved Technique of Hydrogen Content Analysis by Slow Neutron Scattering

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Rainwater, L. J.; Havens, W. W. Jr.

    1945-02-28

    A slow-neutron-transmission method fro determining the H content of fluorcarbons is described (G.Y.)

  19. Self-Assembly of Polymer Nano-Elements on Sapphire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the microelectronic and storage industries and perhaps others, such as photovoltaics. Self-Assembling Molecular Legos Tom Russell (UMass) and Ting Xu (UCBerkeley) had...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    green function (1) impurities (1) interactions (1) kondo effect (1) renormalization (1) resonance (1) spin (1) temperature dependence (1) Filter by Author Qi, Yunong (1) Ting, C S ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Tang, Ting ; Upton, Heather ; Shuai, Jin ; Zhou, Yuanzhe ; Li, Song ; Chen, Juan ; ... Ming ; Michigan-Med) ; Nankai) September 2013 Structural Basis for Telomerase RNA ...

  2. ALSNews Vol. 337

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    films, which have potential applications in fields ranging from energy harvesting to plasmonics. Read more... Contact: TIng Xu Studies Bolster Promise of Topological Insulators...

  3. Lipophilic Bisphosphonates as Dual Farnesyl/Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Goddard, Amanda ; Chang, Ting-Kai ; Lin, Fu-Yang ; Van Beek, Ermond ; Papapoulos, Socrates ; Wang, Andrew H.-J. more ; Kubo, Tadahiko ; Ochi, Mitsuo ; Mukkamala, Dushyant ; ...

  4. ALSNews Vol. 337

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    into device-ready thin films, which have potential applications in fields ranging from energy harvesting to plasmonics. Read more... Contact: TIng Xu Studies Bolster Promise of...

  5. Edge states and local electronic structure around an adsorbed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structure around an adsorbed impurity in a topological superconductor Authors: Tai, Yuan-Yen ; Choi, Hongchul ; Ahmed, Towfiq ; Ting, C. S. ; Zhu, Jian-Xin Publication Date:...

  6. In-situ TEM study of sodiation and failure mechanism of Sb anodes

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DF-TEM micrograph of TiN, obtained using a portion of the (111) and (200) rings, (e) XRD pattern of Sb(50nm )TiN@Ge nanowires, (f) HAADF micrograph of Sb(50nm )TiN@Ge; the ...

  7. CANARY-EDS V.4.3

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002119IBMPC01 Characterization and Analysis of Networked Array of Sensors for Event Detection (CANARY-EDS) https:/Isoftware.sandia.gov/trac/canary/

  8. FAST

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002363MLTPL00 FAST - A Framework for Agile Software Testing v. 2.0 https://software.sandia.gov/trac/fast

  9. Colombia-World Bank Climate Projects | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Offset Project "The Colombia Rio Frio Carbon Offset Project aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions fro the wastewater treatment sector in Colombia by modernizing the Rio Frio...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ting, C. S. (7) Zhu, Jian -Xin (5) Chia, Elbert E. M. (4) Das, Tanmoy (4) Gao, Yi (4) Ren, Jie (4) Si, Qimiao (4) Tai, Yuan-Yen (4) Ahmed, Towfiq (3) Balatsky, Alexander V. (3) ...

  11. Summary - Savannah River Site Tank 48H Waste Treatment Project

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Process: em (TRL4) tem (TRL4) tem (TRL3) WAO and FBSR ting the Tank 4 d; however, bo he team noted ne primary tec and investmen significantly low ack-up to the p Recommended...

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    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evolution of quasiparticle states with and without a Zn impurity in doped 122 iron pnictides Pan, Lihua ; Li, Jian ; Tai, Yuan-Yen ; Graf, Matthias J. ; Zhu, Jian-Xin ; Ting, C. S. ...

  13. Academic Year 2009-2010 Intern Project - Charles Buhler | Center for Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficient Materials Charles Buhler SOLAR CELL THERMOELECTRICS Charles Buhler Physics UC Santa Barbara Mentor: Je-Hyeong Bahk / Chieh-Ting Lin Faculty Advisor: John Bowers Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Robust high pressure stability and negative thermal expansion in sodium-rich antiperovskites Na3OBr and Na4OI2 Wang, Yonggang ; Wen, Ting ; Park, Changyong ; Kenney-Benson, Curtis ...

  15. Summary of the Activities of the Experimental Section of the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of determin- ing S% -- critical value of the reproduction factor k, Because of the difference in form of the equation for fast neutrons duri.ng.the sl%ting down process, and that...

  16. Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Fractional quantum spin Hall effect in flat-band checkerboard lattice model Authors: Li, Wei ; Sheng, D. N. ; Ting, C. S. ; Chen, Yan Publication Date: 2014-08-04 OSTI ...

  17. EIR SOP Septmebr 2010

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pr ting. pendix G, Exa ctor to utilize ate scope. requirements n excel spread ing cost prop f work. s, including P project. nted SOP have be s. (see Appen s have been in...

  18. Rami Hourani | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  19. Brett Helms | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J. Am. Chem. Soc., 133, 15296-15299 (2011). 10.1021ja2063082 Xu, Ting; Zhao, Nana; Ren, Feng; Hourani, Rami; Lee, Ming Tsang; Shu, Jessica Y; Mao, Samuel; and Helms,...

  20. Subnanometer Porous Thin Films by the Co-assembly of Nanotube...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Co-assembly of Nanotube Subunits and Block Copolymers Previous Next List Ting Xu, Nana Zhao, Feng Ren, Rami Hourani, Ming Tsang Lee, Jessica Y. Shu, Samuel Mao, and Brett A....

  1. Unified description of superconducting pairing symmetry in electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pairing symmetry in electron-doped Fe-based-122 compounds Authors: Li, Bo ; Pan, Lihua ; Tai, Yuan-Yen ; Graf, Matthias J. ; Zhu, Jian-Xin ; Bassler, Kevin E. ; Ting,...

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-018.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 SECTION A. Project Title: Replacement of Man Hole Covers Test Reactor Area (TRA)-Confined Space (CS)-051 and TRA-CS-091 SECTION B. Project Description: Entrances for confined spaces TRA-CS-051 and TRA-CS-091 are enclosed with flat metal covers which tend to freeze during the winter. The valves in these confined spaces are required to be checked daily, and removing the cover when frozen presents a safety hazard. The proposed work scope is to replace the covers with new type E roof hatch covers.

  3. Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-11-20

    The Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) is a real-time emergency response modeling capability designed to advise Emergency Managers of the path, timing, and projected impacts from an atmospheric release. TRAC evaluates the effects of both radiological and non-radiological hazardous substances, gases and particulates. Using available surface and upper air meteorological information, TRAC realistically treats complex sources and atmospheric conditions, such as those found in mountainous terrain. TRAC calculates atmospheric concentration, deposition, and dose for more thanmore »25,000 receptor locations within 80 km of the release point. Human-engineered output products support critical decisions on the type, location, and timing of protective actions for workers and the public during an emergency.« less

  4. Callpath Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-09

    The "Callpath Library" is a software abstraction layer over a number of stack tracing utilities. It allows tool develoopers to conveniently represent and mNipulate call paths gathered fro U. Wisconsin's Stackwalker API and GNU Backtrace.

  5. Faroe Islands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Faroe Islands Population 48,351 GDP 2,450,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code FO 3-letter ISO code FRO Numeric ISO...

  6. Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compares simulated fuel economy and emissions fro conventional and hybrid Class 8 heavy trucks PDF icon p-12gao.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced HD Engine Systems and ...

  7. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and...

  8. Rocky Flats 1990--91 winter validation tracer study: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, K.J.

    1991-10-01

    During the winter of 1990--91, North American Weather Consultants (NAWC) and its subcontractor, ABB Environmental Services (ABBES), conducted a Winter Validation Study (WVS) for EG&G Rocky Flats involving 12 separate tracer experiments conducted between February 3 and February 19, 1991. Six experiments were conducted during nighttime hours and four experiments were conducted during daytime hours. In addition, there was one day/night and one night/day transitional experiment conducted. The primary purpose of the WVS was to gather data to further the approval process for the Terrain Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC). TRAC is an atmospheric dispersion model developed and operated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) north of Denver, Colorado. A secondary objective was to gather data that will serve to validate the TRAC model physics.

  9. The AmAzing Journey of Columbia River Salmon B O N N E V I L

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 WAiTing To hATch 1 reneWing The cycLe 10 reTurn ing To spAWning grounds 9 cLimbing fish LAdders 8 sWimming upsTreAm 7 Living in The oceAn 6 yolk sac redd alevin 3 Five...

  10. Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited).

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited). Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanophotonic Architectures for Nanoscale Light Control (invited). Abstract not provided. Authors: Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian ; Fischer, Arthur Joseph ; Koleske, Daniel ; Xiao, Xiaoyin ; Wang, George T. ; Brener, Igal ; Wright, Jeremy Benjamin ; Liu, Sheng ; Wierer, Jonathan , ; Luk, Ting S. ; Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien Publication Date:

  11. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt035_ti_ng_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Asia/ITS

  12. Quadrennial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 RepoRt on the FiRst Quadrennial Technology review QTr Message froM the secretary of energy | i QUaDrennIaL technoLogy reVIeW 2011 Message froM the secretary of energy Steven Chu, Secretary of the United States Department of Energy today, our nation is at a cross road. While we have the world's greatest innovation ma- chine, countries around the world are moving aggressively to lead in the clean energy economy. We can either lead in the development of the clean energy economy or we can stand

  13. A Theorem and its Application to Finite Tampers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Feynman, R. P.

    1946-08-15

    A theorem is derived which is useful in the analysis of neutron problems in which all neutrons have the same velocity. It is applied to determine extrapolated end-points, the asymptotic amplitude from a point source, and the neutron density at the surface of a medium. Formulas fro the effect of finite tampers are derived by its aid, and their accuracy discussed.

  14. Summer 2010 Intern Project- Charles Buhler | Center for Energy Efficient

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Charles Buhler DESIGNING A MIDDLE ANTIREFLECTIVE COATING TO ALLOW LIGHT TO THE LOWER BANDGAP CELLS AND REFLECT HIGHER ENERGY PHOTONS BACK TO THE TOP CELLS TO INCREASE PERFORMANCE FOR A FOUR-JUNCTION SOLAR CELL Charles Buhler Physics UC Santa Barbara Mentor: Chieh-Ting Lin Faculty Advisor: John Bowers Department: Electrical and Computer Engineering As photovoltaic cells are made to absorb a larger part of the solar spectrum, antireflective (AR) coatings need to be better designed to

  15. Bearing design for flywheel energy storage using high-TC superconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hull, John R.; Mulcahy, Thomas M.

    2000-01-01

    A high temperature superconductor material bearing system (38) This system (38) includes a rotor (50) having a ring permanent magnet (60), a plurality of permanent magnets (16, 20 and 70) for interacting to generate levitation forces for the system (38). This group of magnets are a push/pull bearing (75). A high temperature superconductor structure (30) interacts with the ting permanent magnet (60) to provide stabilizing forces for the system (38).

  16. ALSNews Vol. 337

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Print Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films A team of UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab researchers have developed a relatively easy, inexpensive, and scalable technique to direct the self--assembly of gold nanoparticles into device-ready thin films, which have potential applications in fields ranging from energy harvesting to plasmonics. Read more... Contact: TIng Xu Studies Bolster Promise of Topological Insulators Topological insulators are highly promising materials for electronic

  17. Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Near infrared surfaceplasmonpolariton with hyperbolic metamaterials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Luk, Ting Shan ; Kim, Iltai ; Sinclair, Michael B. ; Howell, Stephen Wayne ; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian ; Fan, Shanhui ; Campione, salvatori Publication Date: 2012-10-01 OSTI Identifier: 1140382 Report Number(s): SAND2012-8551C

  18. Nonlocal effective medium analysis in symmetric metal-dielectric multilayer

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metamaterials (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nonlocal effective medium analysis in symmetric metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on May 26, 2016 Title: Nonlocal effective medium analysis in symmetric metal-dielectric multilayer metamaterials Authors: Sun, Lei ; Li, Zhigang ; Luk, Ting S. ; Yang, Xiaodong ; Gao, Jie Publication Date: 2015-05-27 OSTI Identifier: 1183224 Grant/Contract Number:

  19. Lipophilic Bisphosphonates as Dual Farnesyl/Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthase Inhibitors: An X-ray and NMR Investigation (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Lipophilic Bisphosphonates as Dual Farnesyl/Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase Inhibitors: An X-ray and NMR Investigation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lipophilic Bisphosphonates as Dual Farnesyl/Geranylgeranyl Diphosphate Synthase Inhibitors: An X-ray and NMR Investigation Authors: Zhang, Yonghui ; Cao, Rong ; Yin, Fenglin ; Hudock, Michael P. ; Guo, Rey-Ting ; Krysiak, Kilannin ;

  20. Dispersion control of NIR surface plasmon polariton using hyperbolic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metamaterials. (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Dispersion control of NIR surface plasmon polariton using hyperbolic metamaterials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dispersion control of NIR surface plasmon polariton using hyperbolic metamaterials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Luk, Ting Shan ; Howell, Stephen W. ; Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian. ; Grubbs, Robert K. ; Brener, Igal ; Sinclair, Michael B. ; Kim, Iltai ; Fan, Shanhui ; Chen, Hou-Tong Publication Date:

  1. The Tetrahymena telomerase p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is a unique CST

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    complex (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The Tetrahymena telomerase p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is a unique CST complex Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Tetrahymena telomerase p75-p45-p19 subcomplex is a unique CST complex Authors: Wan, Bingbing ; Tang, Ting ; Upton, Heather ; Shuai, Jin ; Zhou, Yuanzhe ; Li, Song ; Chen, Juan ; Brunzelle, Joseph S ; Zeng, Zhixiong ; Collins, Kathleen ; Wu, Jian ; Lei, Ming [1] + Show Author

  2. "Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica Catalyst" Patent Awarded | The Ames

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory "Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica Catalyst" Patent Awarded Congratulations to the late Victor Lin, Show-Ling Lee, Chih-Hsiang Tsai, Hung-Ting Chen, Marek Pruski and Takeshi Kobayashi for being awarded a patent on "Multifunctional Mesoporous Silica Catalyst", issued on March 31, 2015. U.S. Patent No. 8,993,793 can be viewed on the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office website.

  3. 2009-2010 Academic Year Internship Projects | Center for Energy Efficient

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials 2009-2010 Academic Year Internship Projects Name Mentor Advisor Major Project Title Garrett Brinkley Kristen Murphy Galen Stucky Biochemistry Elution of Bacteriophage for the Advancement of Photovoltaic Cells Nathaniel Brunner-Taulbee Jordan Lang James S. Speck Physics/Astronomy Nitride Based Solar Cells by MBE Charles Buhler Je-Hyeong Bahk / Chieh-Ting Lin John Bowers Physics Solar Cell Thermoelectrics Eneida Chesnut Dr. Mingfeng Wang Fred Wudl Chemical Engineering Synthesis of

  4. ARM - Datastreams - xsaprvpt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsxsaprvpt Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025329 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : XSAPRVPT X-SAPR Vertical PoinTing scan Active Dates 2011.04.23 - 2014.05.22 Measurement Categories Cloud Properties Originating Instrument X-Band Scanning ARM Precipitation Radar (XSAPR) Measurements Only measurements considered

  5. Center for Advanced Photophysics | Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CASP Publications Velizhanin, Kirill A.; and Saxena, Avadh Excitonic effects in two-dimensional semiconductors: Path integral Monte Carlo approach Physical Review B, 92, 195305 (2015). [DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.195305] [CASP] more details Chen, Ting; Reich, K. V.; Kramer, Nicolaas J.; Fu, Han; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; and Shklovskii, B. I. Metal-insulator transition in films of doped semiconductor nanocrystals Nature Materials, advance online publication, (2015). [DOI: 10.1038/nmat4486] [CASP] more

  6. Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors | Center for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Processable Cyclic Peptide Nanotubes with Tunable Interiors Previous Next List Rami Hourani, Chen Zhang, Rob van der Weegen, Luis Ruiz, Changyi Li, Sinan Keten, Brett A. Helms, and Ting Xu, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133 (39), pp 15296-15299 DOI: 10.1021/ja2063082 Abstract Image Abstract: A facile route to generate cyclic peptide nanotubes with tunable interiors is presented. By incorporating 3-amino-2-methylbenzoic acid in

  7. Publications | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications Home > Research > Publications Search Publications Year Any Topic Any PI Any Just Published Amorphous transparent conducting oxides in context: Work function survey, trends, and facile modification Yeh, T. C.; Zhu, Q.; Buchholz, D. B.; Martinson, A. B. F.; Chang, R. P. H.; Mason, T. O.; Applied Surface Science 2015, 330 (0), 405-410. Post metalation of solvothermally grown electroactive porphyrin metal-organic framework thin films Kung, Chung-Wei; Chang, Ting-Hsiang; Chou,

  8. Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology | Department of Energy 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt035_ti_ng_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology Development and Implementation of Degree Programs in Electric Drive Vehicle Technology GATE: Energy Efficient Vehicles for Sustainable Mobility

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tang, Ting" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All Book/Monograph Conference/Event Journal Article Miscellaneous Patent Program Document Software Manual Technical Report Thesis/Dissertation Subject: Identifier Numbers: Site: All Alaska Power Administration, Juneau, Alaska (United States) Albany Research Center (ARC), Albany, OR (United States) Albuquerque Complex - NNSA Albuquerque Operations Office, Albuquerque, NM (United States) Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium,

  10. Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure Evolution and Pulverization of Tin Nanoparticles during Lithiation-Delithiation Cycling. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh ; Liu, Yang ; Wang, Jiangwei ; Fan, Feifei ; Mao, Scott ; Liu, Xiaohua ; Zhu, Ting Publication Date:

  11. SU-E-J-39: Comparison of PTV Margins Determined by In-Room Stereoscopic Image Guidance and by On-Board Cone Beam Computed Tomography Technique for Brain Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, T; Paul, S; Munshi, A; Sarkar, B; Krishnankutty, S; Sathya, J; George, S; Jassal, K; Roy, S; Mohanti, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Stereoscopic in room kV image guidance is a faster tool in daily monitoring of patient positioning. Our centre, for the first time in the world, has integrated such a solution from BrainLAB (ExacTrac) with Elekta's volumetric cone beam computed tomography (XVI). Using van Herk's formula, we compared the planning target volume (PTV) margins calculated by both these systems for patients treated with brain radiotherapy. Methods: For a total of 24 patients who received partial or whole brain radiotherapy, verification images were acquired for 524 treatment sessions by XVI and for 334 sessions by ExacTrac out of the total 547 sessions. Systematic and random errors were calculated in cranio-caudal, lateral and antero-posterior directions for both techniques. PTV margins were then determined using van Herk formula. Results: In the cranio-caudal direction, systematic error, random error and the calculated PTV margin were found to be 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.41 cm with XVI and 0.14 cm, 0.13 cm and 0.44 cm with ExacTrac. The corresponding values in lateral direction were 0.13 cm 0.1 cm and 0.4 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.12 cm and 0.42 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The same parameters for antero-posterior were for 0.1 cm, 0.11 cm and 0.34 cm with XVI and 0.13 cm, 0.16 cm and 0.43 cm with ExacTrac imaging. The margins estimated with the two imaging modalities were comparable within ± 1 mm limit. Conclusion: Verification of setup errors in the major axes by two independent imaging systems showed the results are comparable and within ± 1 mm. This implies that planar imaging based ExacTrac can yield equal accuracy in setup error determination as the time consuming volumetric imaging which is considered as the gold standard. Accordingly PTV margins estimated by this faster imaging technique can be confidently used in clinical setup.

  12. Sensivitity improvement in low-profile distributed detector systems for tracking sources in transit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vilim, R. B.; Klann, R.; Campos, C.; Medley, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    The RadTrac real-time detection and tracking software runs on a laptop computer networked to gamma-radiation detectors. A probabilistic estimate for source position is generated by combining measured count rate data with a first-principles stochastic model for the space and time dependence of count rates and knowledge of detector intrinsic efficiency. Recent development work has focused on improving RadTrac sensitivity in low-count rate situations. A method has been developed for processing count rates by energy according to that part of the energy spectrum with the greatest signal-to-noise ratio. In addition a method has been developed that places constraints on the solution that are physically appropriate when count rates approach background. In both instances experiments with a weak source confirmed the uncertainty in estimated position is reduced.

  13. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  14. Combustion modeling in waste tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Unal, C.; Travis, J.R. |

    1997-08-01

    This paper has two objectives. The first one is to repeat previous simulations of release and combustion of flammable gases in tank SY-101 at the Hanford reservation with the recently developed code GASFLOW-II. The GASFLOW-II results are compared with the results obtained with the HMS/TRAC code and show good agreement, especially for non-combustion cases. For combustion GASFLOW-II predicts a steeper pressure rise than HMS/TRAC. The second objective is to describe a so-called induction parameter model which was developed and implemented into GASFLOW-II and reassess previous calculations of Bureau of Mines experiments for hydrogen-air combustion. The pressure time history improves compared with the one-step model, and the time rate of pressure change is much closer to the experimental data.

  15. SEP Success Story: Launching Green Entrepreneurship in New Hampshire |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Launching Green Entrepreneurship in New Hampshire SEP Success Story: Launching Green Entrepreneurship in New Hampshire June 18, 2010 - 9:25am Addthis This summer, five green companies in New Hampshire are participating in an intensive business accelerator initiative called the Green Launching Pad (GLP). Learn more. Addthis Related Articles Green Launching Pad 2.0 awards ceremony with Secretary Chu, Gov. John Lynch, and UNH President Mark Huddleston held at EnerTrac,

  16. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  17. Testing of hollow clay tile masonry prisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, W.D.; Butala, M.B.

    1993-10-15

    This paper presents test results of 610-mm wide (24-in.) by 1219-mm high (48-in.) by 203-or 330-mm (8- or 13-in.) thick prisms constructed of hollow clay tiles. Three prisms were extracted fro existing hollow clay title walls and 69 were constructed in laboratories at The University of Tennessee and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Modulus of Elasticity, E, and compressive strength f{prime}{sub m} were calculated from the results.

  18. Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    driving cycles and interstate roads | Department of Energy economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Fuel economy and emissions reduction of HD hybrid truck over transient driving cycles and interstate roads Compares simulated fuel economy and emissions fro conventional and hybrid Class 8 heavy trucks PDF icon p-12_gao.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced HD Engine Systems and Emissions Control Modeling and Analysis

  19. D

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFF . D . l i u ; x DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. . . . . . . . . . . - . ~ c o ~ s ~ u ~ ~ q y ~ b x s j - ~ +J:~G TJ;!,VP;T,OY~.L;;\;~ 05 C ~ : ~ . ~ ~ : E R T ~ A FG?- c;!,;:-i:;~;~ . . . . . . . '. . :. : . . , . :.. . . . . . . . OF POPUUL4T~0X ESPOSUEES TO PL*.D$TIOX FRO3 PRODUCTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . _ . _ . _ . . . a ' . . . . . . PROD'JC:ED ,BY .

  20. HADRON AND PHOTON PRODUCTION OF J PARTICLES AND THE ORIGIN OF J PARTICLES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COO.306?, 3'^ 7 HADRON AND PHOTON PRODUCTION OF J PARTICLES AND THE ORIGIN OF J PARTICLES Samuel C.C.Ting Department of Physics and Laboratory for Nuclear Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology RECEIVED BY TIC MlG 5 1975 A Rapporteur's Summary at the International Conference on High Energy Physics btil Palermo, Sicily. June, 1975 'W^'i'Lll DISTRIBUTION OFTHIS DOCUJvlLMi uMUMltrsP DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States

  1. From the Proton Synchroton to the Large Hadron Collider - 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The seminars will be held in the Main Auditorium with transmission to : Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Prévessin BE Auditorium , Kjell Johnssen Auditorium in Building 30, Room 40-S2-A01, and via webcast. Confirmed Speakers include: Prof. Jack Steinberger, Dr. Guenther Plass, Prof. Emilio Picasso, Dr. Steve Myers, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, Prof. Burton Richter, Dr. Lyndon Evans, Prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Prof. Leon Lederman, Prof. Jim Cronin, Prof. Sheldon Glashow, Prof. Jerome Friedman, Prof. Frank Wilczek, Prof. Martinus Veltman, Prof. Gerardus 't Hooft, Prof. David Gross, Prof. Samuel Ting, Prof. Steven Weinberg (via teleconference) --- Contact: Directorate.Office@cern.ch

  2. From the Proton Synchroton to the Large Hadron Collider - 50 Years of Nobel Memories in High-Energy Physics

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The seminars will be held in the Main Auditorium with transmission to : Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Prvessin BE Auditorium , Kjell Johnssen Auditorium in Building 30, Room 40-S2-A01, and via webcast. Confirmed Speakers include: Prof. Jack Steinberger, Dr. Guenther Plass, Prof. Emilio Picasso, Dr. Steve Myers, Prof. Carlo Rubbia, Prof. Burton Richter, Dr. Lyndon Evans, Prof. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, Prof. Leon Lederman, Prof. Jim Cronin, Prof. Sheldon Glashow, Prof. Jerome Friedman, Prof. Frank Wilczek, Prof. Martinus Veltman, Prof. Gerardus 't Hooft, Prof. David Gross, Prof. Samuel Ting, Prof. Steven Weinberg (via teleconference) --- Contact: Directorate.Office@cern.ch

  3. ARM - Datastreams - swacrfpt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsswacrfpt Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025290 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SWACRFPT S-WACR - Fixed PoinTing mode Active Dates 2010.04.28 - 2011.04.25 Measurement Categories Cloud Properties Originating Instrument W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, mounted to scan (SWACR) Measurements Only measurements considered

  4. ARM - Datastreams - swacrvpt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Datastreamsswacrvpt Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025297 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SWACRVPT S-WACR Vertical PoinTing scan Active Dates 2009.10.05 - 2011.04.25 Measurement Categories Cloud Properties Originating Instrument W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, mounted to scan (SWACR) Measurements Only measurements considered

  5. ARM - Instrument - swacr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentsswacr Documentation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : W-Band (95 GHz) ARM Cloud Radar, mounted to scan (SWACR) Instrument Categories Cloud Properties Output Datastreams swacrblrhi : S-WACR Boundary-layer Range-Height Indicator scan swacrcal : S-WACR calibration information swacrcwrhi : S-WACR Cross-Wind Range-Height Indicator scan swacrfpt : S-WACR - Fixed PoinTing mode

  6. Summary - ASCEM Review

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    S EM Pr ETR R Un ASCEM EM is ground world. passiv at DOE Advan Manag state-o unders transp ASCE predict identify calcula quantif The re docum Implem inform The pr and st time of condu review The pu techni projec Site: A roject: E Report Date: S ited States Peer R Why DOE M Model Diagram faced with one dwater and soi A major goal ve remediation E sites. To aid nced Simulation gement (ASCE of-the-art scien standing and p port in natural a M modeling too ting releases fr ying exposure ations, and

  7. FILE6 STATE OF MISSISSIPPI PROJECT SALMON SITE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    $,by FILE6 STATE OF MISSISSIPPI PROJECT SALMON SITE '3'1 DEC 2 fin 11 16 COUNTY OF LAHAR - TRACT NO. 100 (Series) - . . - - WAYNE S ~ I I T H - ' WARRANTY DEED CWYE'IIHG.FEEt ANILEASEMENT -.-..., I KNOW ALL HEN BY THESE PRESENT that TAT^^ LUHBER COMPANY, a Hississippi I ' Corporation, ac'ting- by and through its President PAUL TATUM, whose address and telephone number are Post Office Box 15547, . -. Hattiesburg, Mississippi 39404, (601) 794-8133, hereinafter referred to- &he GRANTOR, for

  8. Big Thinking: The Power of Nanoscience (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliron, Delia; Sanili, Babak; Weber-Bargioni, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2011-06-06

    Science at the Theater, June 6th, 2011: Berkeley Lab scientists reveal how nanoscience will bring us cleaner energy, faster computers, and improved medicine. Alex Weber-Bargioni: How can we see things at the nanoscale? Alex is pioneering new methods that provide unprecedented insight into nanoscale materials and molecular interactions. The goal is to create rules for building nanoscale materials. Babak Sanii: Nature is an expert at making nanoscale devices such as proteins. Babak is developing ways to see these biological widgets, which could help scientists develop synthetic devices that mimic the best that nature has to offer. Ting Xu: How are we going to make nanoscale devices? A future in which materials and devices are able to assemble themselves may not be that far down the road. Ting is finding ways to induce a wide range of nanoscopic building blocks to assemble into complex structures. Delia Milliron: The dividends of nanoscience could reshape the way we live, from smart windows and solar cells to artificial photosynthesis and improved medical diagnosis. Delia is at the forefront of converting fundamental research into nanotechnology. Moderated by Jim DeYoreo, interim director of the Molecular Foundry, a facility located at Berkeley Lab where scientists from around the world address the myriad challenges in nanoscience.

  9. "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses May 24, 2012 - 2:01pm Addthis Green Launching Pad 2.0 awards ceremony with Secretary Chu, Gov. John Lynch, and UNH President Mark Huddleston held at EnerTrac, Inc., in Hudson, NH. | Courtesy of University of New Hampshire Photographic Services Green Launching Pad 2.0 awards ceremony with Secretary Chu, Gov. John Lynch, and UNH President Mark

  10. http://www

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments and the Probes to which they are attached CHAPS 07 G-1 Instruments rev. 07-2-20 Instrument CVI non-CVI Gases Other PI TSI-3563 Neph 1 Ogren/Andrews TSI-3010 CPC 1 Ogren/Andrews PSAP Radiance 0 Laulainen PSAP NOAA 1 Ogren/Andrews AMS 1 Lee/Alexander FIMS 1 Wang LAPA-1 1 Dubey TRAC 1 Laskin TDL H2O 1 Ogren/Andrews CVI control 1 Ogren/Andrews CVI flow meters ? Ogren/Andrews CVI pumps 2 Ogren/Andrews CVI heat 0 Ogren/Andrews CVI zero air bottle 1 Ogren/Andrews CVI data system 1

  11. American Red Cross Blood Drive Hanford Health and Safety Exposition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Red Cross Blood Drive Hanford Health and Safety Exposition 6600 Burden Blvd. - TRAC Center Tuesday,May13,2014 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM To schedule your appointment go online to www.redcrossblood.org/make- donation, enter EXPO for sponsor code and follow further instructions. redcrossblood.org I 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800 - 733-2767) [!] ........ Use your smartphone to scan the OR code at left, or go to redcrossblood .org/social to follow us on Facebook and Twitter. Identif ication is requ ired to don ate.

  12. Fuel performance during severe accidents. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buescher, B.J.; Gruen, G.E.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1982-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. This program is underway in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In preparation for the first test, predictions have been performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer. This paper presents the calculated results showing a slow heatup to 2400 K over 5 hours, and the analysis includes accelerated oxidation of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1850 K.

  13. Meteorological conditions during the winter validation study at Rocky Flats, Colorado: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    The objective for the Winter Validation Study was to gather field data for validation of the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) under winter time meteorological conditions. Twelve tracer tests were conducted during a two-week period in February 1991. Each test lasted 12 hours, with releases of SF{sub 6} tracer from the Rocky Flats Plant near Golden, Colorado. The tests included ground-based and airborne sampling to 16 km from the release point. This presentation summarizes meteorological conditions during the testing period. Forty six viewgraphs are included.

  14. SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Businesses | Department of Energy "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses SEP Success Story: "Green Launching Pad" Supports Clean Energy Small Businesses May 24, 2012 - 5:10pm Addthis Green Launching Pad 2.0 awards ceremony with Secretary Chu, Gov. John Lynch, and UNH President Mark Huddleston held at EnerTrac, Inc., in Hudson, NH. | Courtesy of University of New Hampshire Photographic Services Green Launching Pad 2.0 awards ceremony with Secretary

  15. ,=SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY OF

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    =SIGR AKD PROL'UEim HISTORY /----------. OF u. 9, coliTRAcT w-74l2-FZG-1 Dcprtrnent of Energy Savannah R' ber Operations Of fii PCIBOXA Aiken. South Carolina 29801 B. I. du Pant de Neraure sad Company Alken, SC 2980s Dear Nr. Becheyars volume II, Design and Pmcurernurt Eistory of B&ford Engineer Work# and cliuton Sed-Worka, baa been reviewed for declssslficatim ln reapouae to a request fma 6. U. 0'lUs.r. xnltial revi& request was fa-aln L. ?. shal?nn&, AES, wl.ldngtoo, tq 6. n. O'

  16. Summary - Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX)Technology at the SRS

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ETR R Un Baseline The Sm being The SC operat which Sr, and waste critical the SC deploy Specif exchan [CST]) CST, a (mono and so (RMF) maturi readin design moving The pu techni projec Site: S roject: S E Report Date: F ited States Sma Why DOE e SCIX System Pr mall Column Io developed at S CIX system is tions (ion excha function to rem d actinides) fro and prepare th l technology ele CIX system tha yment and thes fically the critica nge on a selec ) housed in an actinide and Sr osodium titanat

  17. DovERA-65)q---7- Final Report Theoretical Studies of Magnetic Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DovERA-65)q---7- Final Report - Theoretical Studies of Magnetic Systems ' L. P. Gor'kov M. A. Novotny J. R. Schrieffer endpoint to the pub lication or Ve have *no o bjection fro g s a patent August 1, 1994 - November 30, 19gssen tination of this materials. l'e altYYQA(A.,-' '-a- 1 0 9 f National High Magnetic Field Labora Florida State University / _,iktiI,,, Fez, of Intellectual 1800 E Paul Dirac Dr. Property Counsel I. During the grant period we have studied five areas of research, 1) low

  18. / J8Y.17 I E(DE86008418)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    /,, DOE/EIS-0109F / J8Y.17 I E(DE86008418) O&4 .48 FINAL Environmental Impact Statement Long-Term Management of the Existing Radioactive Wastes and Residues at the Niagara Falls Storage Site ( Se(42Ho- /,02.F7fro^' t^ K- A~-) April 1986 U. S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 DOE/EIS-0109F (DE86008418) Distribution Category UC-70A FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT LONG-TERM MANAGEMENT OF THE EXISTING RADIOACTIVE WASTES AND RESIDUES AT THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE April 1986

  19. Geographic Setting M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Geographic Setting M . I , . Merritt Sandia Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Amchitka Island lies at latitude 51.5ON and longi- tude 17g0E. I t is one of the Rat Island Group of the Aleutian Islands, Alaska, which comprise the emergent part of a long submarine ridge connecting North America and Asia and separating the Bering Sea fro111 the North Pacific Ocean (Fig. 1). Am- chitka is allnost the souther~llnost Aleutian Island, only nearby Amatignak being farther south. I t is thus almost the

  20. I'

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    :!. i - _ -. .: -. _. _ : _. -._ -- I' . .- Rooker Case Pile Em. Prot. Bureau N.Y.S. Department of Law New York, New York I FOIA MATERIALS FP.09 DOE Ru /a- --- L -- - -- - ~~~~~~,,.~~;' ~~i~T~~~~ ' ~-~~&~' Mt??7WZ~d$O77 ED STATES GOVERNME:: TO : 8. J. smith, Jr., Chief. Operations Branch DATE: October 21, 1952 Produc tlai Divlsio FROM : H. J. Hsnhmn. Ch da sub-Dm.cs SKEPDRT FOROCTCEJZ SIXBX.: TA::HJH:M *:scpet;r\ P.$@$ Rp3 OIlU b ~~aw*~~ WHENsEPARATa FRo~mcLOSuRES - 6ss&y%fs

  1. Reports

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    aehsed herewith ia Coaprehenaive Survey of USBEC mtp, Lewebldinge ad G~r~n&-owned Bpipment under SC & COntraCtCW'S COntrOl, as requested in AEC BULLETIN No. 48 dated April 26, 1917. .& Inols. Reports 10 acres NO. 5412 5435 5436 5421 5621 5432 5433 5434 5431 5437 Pipe Shop /j LOCATION Ij ij 88 1 / j Lske 'OntsTis Tohawanda !IS AEC Ordndnce 'Worki, Sllkffiqe ,Model wty, ,New York '8 I' j, i/ DESCRIPTION !! OF TT 'fro1 heti TX-2 fron inec s3n Die ylaed Ialst JS Eng- 1, 3x38 *ict 23, 144

  2. To:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    117-01.85.sej.08 To: File cc: A. Wallo DATE: 27 March 1985 B. Fritz ', C. Young F. I-loch BUSJECT: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO., JAYHAWK WORKS FRoM: S.E. Jones The Spencer Chemical Co. Jayhawks Works, and Joplin, Missouri, located between Pittsburg, Kansas was licensed b!!.the NRC under Source Material License C-4352 and Special Nuclear Material Licenses SNM-154 to operate a uranium oxide pilot plant, and SNM-323 to process enriched uranium (for other licensees). Headquarters for the Spencer Chemical

  3. INTERO)CPICE CORRC-NOKNCL

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    s.u-or:.L~ p40.0-0(-b INTERO)CPICE CORRC-NOKNCL 7117-01.85.sej.08 TO: File cc: A. Wallo DATE: 27 March 1985 B. Fritz C. Young F. Hoch SUmJECT: SPENCER CHEMICAL CO., JAYHAWK WORKS A@-+ FRoMz S.E. Jones The Spencer Chemical Co. Jayhawks Works, and Joplin, Missouri, located between Pittsburg, Kansas was licensed b!!.the NRC undersource Material License C-4352 and Special NuclearMaterial Licenses SNM-154 to operate a uranium oxide pilot plant, and SNM-329 to process enriched uranium (for other

  4. ORDNANCE CORPS

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    id ' . ORDNANCE CORPS ..: .: FRANKFORD ARSENAL With reference to peur lethi doted 12 hroh 1953, aomxm&g mrml ltlnnb8 wblob will be tramierre- Bllklf8c~ Laboratorlee, Ino., ie flnmlebed: s.8 Reetm, &keo., tale follorlng 3lu~tlM 1. 2. At the preeent tiae no 8p ~terlal. he bun eldpped fro8thelbenkferdAreen8lto~Uanut80~ Laboratorlee, Inc. Rewemr, it le understood that 8e!aullportionDftbesPmaterllebippedto liatmtan Areeaal frcm the Prankfcrtl Areenel. bae been tramfed ta tbe Menuf8oturing

  5. Computer analyses for the design, operation and safety of new isotope production reactors: A technology status review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.

    1990-01-01

    A review is presented on the currently available technologies for nuclear reactor analyses by computer. The important distinction is made between traditional computer calculation and advanced computer simulation. Simulation needs are defined to support the design, operation, maintenance and safety of isotope production reactors. Existing methods of computer analyses are categorized in accordance with the type of computer involved in their execution: micro, mini, mainframe and supercomputers. Both general and special-purpose computers are discussed. Major computer codes are described, with regard for their use in analyzing isotope production reactors. It has been determined in this review that conventional systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5, RETRAN, etc.) cannot meet four essential conditions for viable reactor simulation: simulation fidelity, on-line interactive operation with convenient graphics, high simulation speed, and at low cost. These conditions can be met by special-purpose computers (such as the AD100 of ADI), which are specifically designed for high-speed simulation of complex systems. The greatest shortcoming of existing systems codes (TRAC, RELAP5) is their mismatch between very high computational efforts and low simulation fidelity. The drift flux formulation (HIPA) is the viable alternative to the complicated two-fluid model. No existing computer code has the capability of accommodating all important processes in the core geometry of isotope production reactors. Experiments are needed (heat transfer measurements) to provide necessary correlations. It is important for the nuclear community, both in government, industry and universities, to begin to take advantage of modern simulation technologies and equipment. 41 refs.

  6. Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S.

    2012-07-01

    The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

  7. NYO-1932-103

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NOV 2 8 1966 NYO-1932-103 TASK 2 r o en TIMELIKE MOMENTA IN QUANTUM ELECTRODYNAMICS* S t a n l e y j . Brodsky and Samuel c . C. Ting Department of P h y s i c s , Columbia U n i v e r s i t y New York, New York December, 1965 This document is PUBLICLY RELEASABLE AmhonziDitf Official Pate; fO-7Sf^/0 - L > 7/ ' - * * * « f ^ *S!in«!*n**''''*' ^ ^ s u p p o r t e d i n p a r t by t h e U.S.Atomic Energy CoromisBion, .*^.rxwuuw. JIOT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE. AVAILABLE TO THE AEG AND ITS

  8. Portable Doppler interferometer system for shock diagnostics and high speed motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, K.J.; Crump, O.B. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) is a system that uses the Doppler effect and is widely used for measuring the velocity of projectiles, detonations, flying plates, shock pressures (particle velocity) and other high speed/high acceleration motion. Other methods of measurement such as accelerometers and pressure gauges have disadvantages in that they are sensitive to radiation, electromagnetic pulses, and their mass can drastically alter the velocity of the projectile. VISAR uses single frequency-single mode laser fight focused onto a target of interest. Reflected fight from the target is collected and sent through a modified, unequal leg Michelson interferometer. In the interferometer the light is split into two components which travel through the legs of the interferometer cavity and are then recombined. When the light recombines, an interference pattern is created which can range from dark (destructive interference) to bright (constructive interference). When the target moves, the reflected laser light experiences a frequency shift (increase) with respect to the frequency from the target in a static condition. Since the Doppler shifted light is split and routed through an unequal leg interferometer cavity, there is a time lag of the light containing the Doppler information at the recombination point in the interferometer. The effect of the time lag is to create a sinusoidally changing interference pattern (commonly called fringes). Since the interferometer time delay, laser wavelength, and the speed of light are known, an accurate measurement of target velocity/acceleration may be measured by analyzing both the number of tinges and the speed of tinge generation (system accuracy is 3--4%).

  9. Advances in exposure and toxicity assessment of particulate matter: An overview of presentations at the 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunasekar, Palur G.; Stanek, Lindsay W.

    2011-07-15

    The 2009 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference (TRAC) session on 'Advances in Exposure and Toxicity Assessment of Particulate Matter' was held in April 2009 in West Chester, OH. The goal of this session was to bring together toxicology, geology and risk assessment experts from the Department of Defense and academia to examine issues in exposure assessment and report on recent epidemiological findings of health effects associated with particulate matter (PM) exposure. Important aspects of PM exposure research are to detect and monitor low levels of PM with various chemical compositions and to assess the health risks associated with these exposures. As part of the overall theme, some presenters discussed collection methods for sand and dust from Iraqi and Afghanistan regions, health issues among deployed personnel, and future directions for risk assessment research among these populations. The remaining speakers focused on the toxicity of ultrafine PM and the characterization of aerosols generated during ballistic impacts of tungsten heavy alloys.

  10. Considerations for realistic ECCS evaluation methodology for LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohatgi, U.S.; Saha, P.; Chexal, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    This paper identifies the various phenomena which govern the course of large and small break LOCAs in LWRs, and affect the key parameters such as Peak Clad Temperature (PCT) and timing of the end of blowdown, beginning of reflood, PCT, and complete quench. A review of the best-estimate models and correlations for these phenomena in the current literature has been presented. Finally, a set of models have been recommended which may be incorporated in a present best-estimate code such as TRAC or RELAP5 in order to develop a realistic ECCS evaluation methodology for future LWRs and have also been compared with the requirements of current ECCS evaluation methodology as outlined in Appendix K of 10CFR50. 58 refs.

  11. V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . 1.1 I . COO-30.72-25 11 t 1 Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories David J. Gross and S.B. Treiman Joseph Henry Labor atorie s of Physics -NOTICE- Pri nce ton Uni ver sit y 1 1 This repor t was prep ared as an acco unt of work 1 Pri nce ton , New Jer sey 1 spons ored by the Unite d State s Gove rnme nt. Neith er 1 1 the Un ited Sta tes nor the Un ited Sta tes Ato mic Ene rgy I 08 54 0 1 j Comm issi on, nor any of thei r empl oyee s, nor any of I the ir con trac tors , sub

  12. Severe fuel-damage scoping test performance. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, G.E.; Buescher, B.J.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of the Three Mile Island Unit-2 (TMI-2) accident, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a severe fuel damage test program to evaluate fuel rod and core response during severe accidents similar to TMI-2. The first test of Phase I of this series has been successfully completed in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Following the first test, calculations were performed using the TRAC-BD1 computer code with actual experimental boundary conditions. This paper discusses the test conduct and performance and presents the calculated and measured test bundle results. The test resulted in a slow heatup to 2000 K over about 4 h, with an accelerated reaction of the zirconium cladding at temperatures above 1600 K in the lower part or the bundle and 2000 K in the upper portion of the bundle.

  13. Development and pilot testing of modular dynamic thermomechanical pulp mill model to develop energy reduction strategies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coffin, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    With the development of on-line and real-time process simulations, one obtains the ability to predict and control the process; thus, the opportunity exists to improve energy efficiency, decrease materials wastes, and maintain product quality. Developing this capability was the objective of the this research program. A thermomechanical pulp mill was simulated using both a first principles model and a neural network. The models made use of actual process data and a model that calculated the mass and energy balance of the mill was successfully implemented and run at the mill on an hourly basis. The attempt to develop a model that accurately predicted the quality of the pulp was not successful. It was concluded that the key fro a successful implementation of a real-time control model, such as a neural net model, is availability of on-line sensors that sufficiently characterize the pulp.

  14. MFISH Measurements of Chromosomal Aberrations Individuals Exposed in Utero to Gamma-ray Doses from 5 to 20 cGy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-11-17

    Our plan was to identify and obtain blood from 36 individuals from the Mayak-in-utero exposed cohort who were exposed in utero only to gamma ray does doses fro 5 to 20 cGy. Our goal is to do mFISH and in a new development, single-arm mFISH on these samples to measure stable chromosome aberrations in these now adult individuals. The results were compared with matched control individuals (same age, same gender) available from the large control population which we are studying in the context of our plutonium worker study. The long term goal was to assess the results both in terms of the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to low doses of ionizing radiation, and in terms of different potential mechanisms (expanded clonal origin vs. induced instability) for an increased risk.

  15. Accuracy of cranial coplanar beam therapy using an oblique, stereoscopic x-ray image guidance system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinci, Justin P.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Neck, Daniel W.

    2008-08-15

    A system for measuring two-dimensional (2D) dose distributions in orthogonal anatomical planes in the cranium was developed and used to evaluate the accuracy of coplanar conformal therapy using ExacTrac image guidance. Dose distributions were measured in the axial, sagittal, and coronal planes using a CIRS (Computerized Imaging Reference Systems, Inc.) anthropomorphic head phantom with a custom internal film cassette. Sections of radiographic Kodak EDR2 film were cut, processed, and digitized using custom templates. Spatial and dosimetric accuracy and precision of the film system were assessed. BrainScan planned a coplanar-beam treatment to conformally irradiate a 2-cm-diameterx2-cm-long cylindrical planning target volume. Prior to delivery, phantom misalignments were imposed in combinations of {+-}8 mm offsets in each of the principal directions. ExacTrac x-ray correction was applied until the phantom was within an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (first two measurement sets) or 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. (last two measurement sets). Measured dose distributions from film were registered to the treatment plan dose calculations and compared. Alignment errors, displacement between midpoints of planned and measured 70% isodose contours ({delta}c), and positional errors of the 80% isodose line were evaluated using 49 2D film measurements (98 profiles). Comparison of common, but independent measurements of {delta}c showed that systematic errors in the measurement technique were 0.2 mm or less along all three anatomical axes and that random error averaged ({sigma}{+-}{sigma}{sub {sigma}}) 0.29{+-}0.06 mm for the acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. and 0.15{+-}0.02 mm for the acceptance criteria of 0.4 mm/0.4 deg. . The latter was consistent with independent estimates that showed the precision of the measurement system was 0.3 mm (2{sigma}). Values of {delta}c were as great as 0.9, 0.3, and 1.0 mm along the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively. Variations in {delta}c along the P-A axis were correlated to misalignments between laser isocenter and radiation isocenter as documented by daily clinical Lutz tests. Based on results of comparisons of measured with calculated positions of the 80% dose lines along the major anatomical axes, a 1.25, 1.0, and 1.0 mm (0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 mm) gross tumor volume (GTV)-planning target volume (PTV) margin to account for delivery error would be appropriate for the P-A, R-L, and I-S axes, respectively, for an acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (0.4 mm/0.4 deg. ). It typically took 2 (3) ExacTrac x-ray image sets to achieve and verify acceptance criteria of 1 mm/1 deg. (0.4 mm/0.4 deg. ). Our results demonstrated a measurement technique using a CIRS anthropomorphic head phantom with a modified film cassette, radiographic film (Kodak EDR2) with a custom film cutting template, and film dosimetry software has been developed and successfully applied to our clinic. It is recommended that a third party offer this service. Our goal of achieving accuracy of delivery of 1 mm or better in each of the three major anatomical axes was almost, but not quite achieved, not because of the accuracy of the image guidance system, but likely due to inaccuracy of laser isocenter and other systematic errors.

  16. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 87-232-1948, Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blade, L.M.; Savery, H.

    1989-02-01

    A study was made of possible hazardous working conditions at Consolidated Freightways, Pocono Summit, Pennsylvania. The request concerned potential exposure of dock workers to exhaust emissions from diesel-powered forklift trucks brought about by the health complaints of several of the workers there. Twenty-one workers were identified as symptomatic of exposure to diesel exhaust fumes. This included at least half of the midnight shift. Upper respiratory tract irritation was mentioned by all of these workers. Some reported eye irritation, cough productive of black-tinged sputum, and sore throat. These symptoms lessened during periods away from work. Airborne concentrations of all components measured at the site were well below the applicable exposure limits. A potential health hazard associated with exposure to diesel engine exhaust existed. The authors recommend that whenever a forklift truck is to be left unattended for more than the shortest of periods, the motor should be turned off. The newer forklifts should be used on a shift before the older, less emission controlled, lifts. Roof exhaust fans ordered are to be installed at the facility and their effectiveness evaluated.

  17. A flat-cathode thermionic injector for the PHERMEX Radiographic Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauppila, T.; Builta, L.; Burns, M.; Gregory, W.; Honaberger, D.; Watson, S.; Hughes, T.

    1993-06-01

    The PHERMEX (Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) standing-wave linear accelerator is a high-current electron beam generator used for flash-radiography. An improved electron gun has been designed employing a flat-thermionic cathode to replace the existing Pierce-geometry gun. The flat cathode yields increased current with the same applied voltage and cathode area as the Pierce gun. The ISIS code simulations indicate a beam current of 1.5 kA at 600 kV. The new geometry also reduces the probability for high voltage breakdown in the A-K gap. A reentrant magnet captures the expanding electron beam and a bucking coil nulls cathode-tinge field. A third coil is used to optimize the extraction field profile and reduce the effect of nonlinear space charge on the beam emittance. Time-resolved measurements of beam current and voltage have been made. In addition, a streak camera was used to measure beam emittance and spatial profile. Comparisons of measurements with simulations are presented.

  18. A flat-cathode thermionic injector for the PHERMEX Radiographic Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauppila, T.; Builta, L.; Burns, M.; Gregory, W.; Honaberger, D.; Watson, S. ); Hughes, T. )

    1993-01-01

    The PHERMEX (Pulsed High-Energy Radiographic Machine Emitting X-rays) standing-wave linear accelerator is a high-current electron beam generator used for flash-radiography. An improved electron gun has been designed employing a flat-thermionic cathode to replace the existing Pierce-geometry gun. The flat cathode yields increased current with the same applied voltage and cathode area as the Pierce gun. The ISIS code simulations indicate a beam current of 1.5 kA at 600 kV. The new geometry also reduces the probability for high voltage breakdown in the A-K gap. A reentrant magnet captures the expanding electron beam and a bucking coil nulls cathode-tinge field. A third coil is used to optimize the extraction field profile and reduce the effect of nonlinear space charge on the beam emittance. Time-resolved measurements of beam current and voltage have been made. In addition, a streak camera was used to measure beam emittance and spatial profile. Comparisons of measurements with simulations are presented.

  19. Evaluation of atmospheric transport models for use in Phase II of the historical public exposures studies at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rood, A.S.; Killough, G.G.; Till, J.E.

    1999-08-01

    Five atmospheric transport models were evaluated for use in Phase II of the Historical Public Exposures Studies at the Rocky Flats Plant. Models included a simple straight-line Gaussian plume model (ISCST2), several integrated puff models (RATCHET, TRIAD, and INPUFF2), and a complex terrain model (TRAC). Evaluations were based on how well model predictions compared with sulfur hexafluoride tracer measurements taken in the vicinity of Rocky Flats in February 1991. Twelve separate tracer experiments were conducted, each lasting 9 hr and measured at 140 samplers in arcs 8 and 16 km from the release point at Rocky Flats. Four modeling objectives were defined based on the endpoints of the overall study: (1) the unpaired maximum hourly average concentration, (2) paired time-averaged concentration, (3) unpaired time-averaged concentration, and (4) arc-integrated concentration. Performance measures were used to evaluate models and focused on the geometric mean and standard deviation of the predicted-to-observed ratio and the correlation coefficient between predicted and observed concentrations. No one model consistently outperformed the others in all modeling objectives and performance measures. The overall performance of the RATCHET model was somewhat better than the other models.

  20. Trace Assessment for BWR ATWS Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.; Arantxa Cuadra, Gilad Raitses, Arnold Aronson

    2010-04-22

    A TRACE/PARCS input model has been developed in order to be able to analyze anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) in a boiling water reactor. The model is based on one developed previously for the Browns Ferry reactor for doing loss-of-coolant accident analysis. This model was updated by adding the control systems needed for ATWS and a core model using PARCS. The control systems were based on models previously developed for the TRAC-B code. The PARCS model is based on information (e.g., exposure and moderator density (void) history distributions) obtained from General Electric Hitachi and cross sections for GE14 fuel obtained from an independent source. The model is able to calculate an ATWS, initiated by the closure of main steam isolation valves, with recirculation pump trip, water level control, injection of borated water from the standby liquid control system and actuation of the automatic depres-surization system. The model is not considered complete and recommendations are made on how it should be improved.

  1. MODFLOW 2. 0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  2. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2.1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  3. Code requirements document: MODFLOW 2. 1: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, P.F. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering); Paik, I.K. )

    1992-03-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation of the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  4. MODFLOW 2.0: A program for predicting moderator flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, P.F.; Paik, I.K.

    1991-07-01

    Sudden changes in the temperature of flowing liquids can result in transient buoyancy forces which strongly impact the flow hydrodynamics via flow stratification. These effects have been studied for the case of potential flow of stratified liquids to line sinks, but not for moderator flow in SRS reactors. Standard codes, such as TRAC and COMMIX, do not have the capability to capture the stratification effect, due to strong numerical diffusion which smears away the hot/cold fluid interface. A related problem with standard codes is the inability to track plumes injected into the liquid flow, again due to numerical diffusion. The combined effects of buoyant stratification and plume dispersion have been identified as being important in operation the Supplementary Safety System which injects neutron-poison ink into SRS reactors to provide safe shutdown in the event of safety rod failure. The MODFLOW code discussed here provides transient moderator flow pattern information with stratification effects, and tracks the location of ink plumes in the reactor. The code, written in Fortran, is compiled for Macintosh II computers, and includes subroutines for interactive control and graphical output. Removing the graphics capabilities, the code can also be compiled on other computers. With graphics, in addition to the capability to perform safety related computations, MODFLOW also provides an easy tool for becoming familiar with flow distributions in SRS reactors.

  5. Multi-dimensional Mixing Behavior of Steam-Water Flow in a Downcomer Annulus during LBLOCA Reflood Phase with a DVI Injection Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, T.S.; Yun, B.J.; Euh, D.J.; Chu, I.C.; Song, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Yusung P.O. Box 105, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the downcomer annulus of a pressurized water reactor vessel with a Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) mode is presented based on the experimental observation in the MIDAS (Multi-dimensional Investigation in Downcomer Annulus Simulation) steam-water test facility. From the steady-state test results to simulate the late reflood phase of a Large Break Loss-of-Coolant Accidents(LBLOCA), isothermal lines show the multidimensional phenomena of a phasic interaction between steam and water in the downcomer annulus very well. MIDAS is a steam-water separate effect test facility, which is 1/4.93 linearly scaled-down of 1400 MWe PWR type of a nuclear reactor, focused on understanding multi-dimensional thermalhydraulic phenomena in downcomer annulus with various types of safety injection during the refill or reflood phase of a LBLOCA. The initial and the boundary conditions are scaled from the pre-test analysis based on the preliminary calculation using the TRAC code. The superheated steam with a superheating degree of 80 K at a given downcomer pressure of 180 kPa is injected equally through three intact cold legs into the downcomer. (authors)

  6. Multidimensional Mixing Behavior of Steam-Water Flow in a Downcomer Annulus During LBLOCA Reflood Phase with a Direct Vessel Injection Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Tae-Soon; Yun, Byong-Jo; Euh, Dong-Jin; Chu, In-Cheol; Song, Chul-Hwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-15

    Multidimensional thermal-hydraulic behavior in the downcomer annulus of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessel with a direct vessel injection mode is presented based on the experimental observation in the MIDAS (multidimensional investigation in downcomer annulus simulation) steam-water test facility. From the steady-state test results to simulate the late reflood phase of a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA), isothermal lines show the multidimensional phenomena of a phasic interaction between steam and water in the downcomer annulus very well. MIDAS is a steam-water separate effect test facility, which is 1/4.93 linearly scaled down to a 1400-MW(electric) PWR type of a nuclear reactor, focused on understanding multidimensional thermal-hydraulic phenomena in a downcomer annulus with various types of safety injection during the refill or reflood phase of an LBLOCA. The initial and the boundary conditions are scaled from the pretest analysis based on the preliminary calculation using the TRAC code. The superheated steam with a superheating degree of 80 K at a given downcomer pressure of 180 kPa is injected equally through three intact cold legs into the downcomer.

  7. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  8. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  9. Interaction and merging of two sinistral filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Liu, Yu; Li, Haidong; Wang, Haimin; Ji, Haisheng; Li, Jianping

    2014-09-20

    In this paper, we report the interaction and subsequent merging of two sinistral filaments (F1 and F2) occurring at the boundary of AR 9720 on 2001 December 6. The two filaments were close and nearly perpendicular to each other. The interaction occurred after F1 was erupted and the eruption was impeded by a more extended filament channel (FC) standing in the way, in which F2 was embedded. The erupted material ran into FC along its axis, causing F1 and F2 to merge into a single structure that subsequently underwent a large-amplitude to-and-fro motion. A significant plasma heating process was observed in the merging process, making the mixed material largely disappear from the H? passband, but appear in Extreme Ultraviolet Telescope 195 images for a while. These observations can serve as strong evidence of merging reconnection between the two colliding magnetic structures. A new sinistral filament was formed along FC after the cooling of the merged and heated material. No coronal mass ejection was observed to be associated with the event; though, the eruption was accompanied by a two-ribbon flare with a separation motion, indicating that the eruption had failed. This event shows that, in addition to overlying magnetic fields, such an interaction is an effective restraint to make a filament eruption fail in this way.

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic process for alcohol fuels from syngas. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dombek, B.D.

    1996-03-01

    The primary objective of this project has been the pursuit of a catalyst system which would allow the selective production from syngas of methanol and isobutanol. It is desirable to develop a process in which the methanol to isobutanol weight ratio could be varied from 70/30 to 30/70. The 70/30 mixture could be used directly as a fuel additive, while, with the appropriate downstream processing, the 30/70 mixture could be utilized for methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) synthesis. The indirect manufacture of MTBE from a coal derived syngas to methanol and isobutanol process would appear to be a viable solution to MTBE feedstock limitations. To become economically attractive, a process fro producing oxygenates from coal-derived syngas must form these products with high selectivity and good rates, and must be capable of operating with a low-hydrogen-content syngas. This was to be accomplished through extensions of known catalyst systems and by the rational design of novel catalyst systems.

  11. I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I 1' . _ .t. /' L* x ,! " - p. iI C/-f-j i c, -q iGJbr%pq 22, 19&i 40:m Clli ;xmn r;. Cre?ltz J t E Y"* kL ss&LJl L' fJ i:~-q::~ i;<-t;j.!;z;:, 1 :,'. :; pctl;c-it nt a tsst of the ::3fr iZQviQ@l QT<*rl,l$jiOn t;rCso t!t t!lO 13 "; ?! i'@ t?'lS 2.2' I'"!'\Y ir, colw~bus with plome bill&S SO?' l"c fro?1 i:ol .T. ThO ~3X.~:nri.*,ellti FfB ~tt-?%-:Oti fOF 9 heYi., BQIpdPpJ 21. !?PeBait'k "~..j,;PC~ 1 .r. LOi~lr.tl 0" RU335li, ~iJrj.~~uioll sjl.6

  12. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Qingyong, E-mail: mengqingyong@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongshan Road 457, 116023 Dalian (China); Meyer, Hans-Dieter, E-mail: hans-dieter.meyer@pci.uni-heidelberg.de [Theoretische Chemie, Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls Universitt Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 229, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-09-28

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamical calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged. To compare the computational efficiency, standard MCTDH simulations using the same Hamiltonian are also performed. A comparison of the MCTDH and ML-MCTDH calculations shows that even for the present not-too-large system (9D here) the ML-MCTDH calculations can save a considerable amount of computational resources while producing identical spectra as the MCTDH calculations. Furthermore, the present theoretical B{sup ~} {sup 1}A{sup ?}?X{sup ~} {sup 1}A{sup ?} UV spectral band and the corresponding experimental measurements [J. M. Beames, F. Liu, L. Lu, and M. I. Lester, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 2004520048 (2012); L. Sheps, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 42014205 (2013); W.-L. Ting, Y.-H. Chen, W. Chao, M. C. Smith, and J. J.-M. Lin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 1043810443 (2014)] are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical UV spectrum simulated for this molecule including nuclear motion beyond an adiabatic harmonic approximation.

  13. DEVELOPING THE NATIONAL GEOTHERMAL DATA SYSTEM ADOPTION OF CKAN FOR DOMESTIC & INTERNATIONAL DATA DEPLOYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Ryan J.; Kuhmuench, Christoph; Richard, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    The National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) De- sign and Testing Team is developing NGDS software currently referred to as the NGDS Node-In-A-Box. The software targets organizations or individuals who wish to host at least one of the following: an online repository containing resources for the NGDS; an online site for creating metadata to register re- sources with the NGDS NDGS-conformant Web APIs that enable access to NGDS data (e.g., WMS, WFS, WCS); NDGS-conformant Web APIs that support dis- covery of NGDS resources via catalog service (e.g. CSW) a web site that supports discovery and under- standing of NGDS resources A number of different frameworks for development of this online application were reviewed. The NGDS Design and Testing Team determined to use CKAN (http://ckan.org/), because it provides the closest match between out of the box functionality and NGDS node-in-a-box requirements. To achieve the NGDS vision and goals, this software development project has been inititated to provide NGDS data consumers with a highly functional inter- face to access the system, and to ease the burden on data providers who wish to publish data in the sys- tem. It is important to note that this software package constitutes a reference implementation. The NGDS software is based on open standards, which means other server software can make resources available, and other client applications can utilize NGDS data. A number of international organizations have ex- pressed interest in the NGDS approach to data access. The CKAN node implementation can provide a sim- ple path for deploying this technology in other set- tings.

  14. NSRD-06. Computational Capability to Substantiate DOE-HDBK-3010 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, David L.Y.; Brown, Alexander L.

    2015-12-01

    Safety basis analysts throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex rely heavily on the information provided in the DOE Hand book, DOE-HDBK-3010, Airborne Release Fractions/Rates and Resp irable Fractions for Nonreactor Nuclear Facilities , to determine source terms. In calcula ting source terms, analysts tend to use the DOE Handbook's bounding values on airbor ne release fractions (ARFs) and respirable fractions (RFs) for various cat egories of insults (representing potential accident release categories). This is typica lly due to both time constraints and the avoidance of regulatory critique. Unfort unately, these bounding ARFs/RFs represent extremely conservative values. Moreover, th ey were derived from very limited small- scale table-top and bench/labo ratory experiments and/or fr om engineered judgment. Thus the basis for the data may not be re presentative to the actual unique accident conditions and configura tions being evaluated. The goal of this res earch is to develop a more ac curate method to identify bounding values for the DOE Handbook using the st ate-of-art multi-physics-based high performance computer codes. This enable s us to better understand the fundamental physics and phenomena associated with the ty pes of accidents for the data described in it. This research has examined two of the DOE Handbook's liquid fire experiments to substantiate the airborne release frac tion data. We found th at additional physical phenomena (i.e., resuspension) need to be included to derive bounding values. For the specific cases of solid powder under pre ssurized condition and mechanical insult conditions the codes demonstrated that we can simulate the phenomena. This work thus provides a low-cost method to establis h physics-justified sa fety bounds by taking into account specific geometri es and conditions that may not have been previously measured and/or are too costly to do so.

  15. Report on a randomized trial comparing two forms of immobilization of the head for fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednarz, Greg; Machtay, Mitchell; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Downes, Beverly; Bogner, Joachim; Hyslop, Terry; Galvin, James; Evans, James; Curran, Walter Jr.; Andrews, David

    2009-01-15

    Fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) requires accurate and reproducible immobilization of the patient's head. This randomized study compared the efficacy of two commonly used forms of immobilization used for SRT. Two routinely used methods of immobilization, which differ in their approach to reproduce the head position from day to day, are the Gill-Thomas-Cosman (GTC) frame and the BrainLab thermoplastic mask. The GTC frame fixates on the patient's upper dentition and thus is in direct mechanical contact with the cranium. The BrainLab mask is a two-part masking system custom fitted to the front and back of the patient's head. After patients signed an IRB-approved informed consent form, eligible patients were randomized to either GTC frame or mask for their course of SRT. Patients were treated as per standard procedure; however, prior to each treatment a set of digital kilovolt images (ExacTrac, BrainLabAB, Germany) was taken. These images were fused with reference digitally reconstructed radiographs obtained from treatment planning CT to yield lateral, longitudinal, and vertical deviations of isocenter and head rotations about respective axes. The primary end point of the study was to compare the two systems with respect to mean and standard deviations using the distance to isocenter measure. A total of 84 patients were enrolled (69 patients evaluable with detailed positioning data). A mixed-effect linear regression and two-tiled t test were used to compare the distance measure for both the systems. There was a statistically significant (p<0.001) difference between mean distances for these systems, suggesting that the GTC frame was more accurate. The mean 3D displacement and standard deviations were 3.17+1.95 mm for mask and 2.00+1.04 mm for frame. Both immobilization techniques were highly effective, but the GTC frame was more accurate. To optimize the accuracy of SRT, daily kilovolt image guidance is recommended with either immobilization system.

  16. SU-E-J-129: A Strategy to Consolidate the Image Database of a VERO Unit Into a Radiotherapy Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Y; Medin, P; Yordy, J; Zhao, B; Jiang, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To present a strategy to integrate the imaging database of a VERO unit with a treatment management system (TMS) to improve clinical workflow and consolidate image data to facilitate clinical quality control and documentation. Methods: A VERO unit is equipped with both kV and MV imaging capabilities for IGRT treatments. It has its own imaging database behind a firewall. It has been a challenge to transfer images on this unit to a TMS in a radiation therapy clinic so that registered images can be reviewed remotely with an approval or rejection record. In this study, a software system, iPump-VERO, was developed to connect VERO and a TMS in our clinic. The patient database folder on the VERO unit was mapped to a read-only folder on a file server outside VERO firewall. The application runs on a regular computer with the read access to the patient database folder. It finds the latest registered images and fuses them in one of six predefined patterns before sends them via DICOM connection to the TMS. The residual image registration errors will be overlaid on the fused image to facilitate image review. Results: The fused images of either registered kV planar images or CBCT images are fully DICOM compatible. A sentinel module is built to sense new registered images with negligible computing resources from the VERO ExacTrac imaging computer. It takes a few seconds to fuse registered images and send them to the TMS. The whole process is automated without any human intervention. Conclusion: Transferring images in DICOM connection is the easiest way to consolidate images of various sources in your TMS. Technically the attending does not have to go to the VERO treatment console to review image registration prior delivery. It is a useful tool for a busy clinic with a VERO unit.

  17. SU-E-J-90: MRI-Based Treatment Simulation and Patient Setup for Radiation Therapy of Brain Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Y; Cao, M; Han, F; Santhanam, A; Neylon, J; Gomez, C; Kaprealian, T; Sheng, K; Agazaryan, N; Low, D; Hu, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Traditional radiation therapy of cancer is heavily dependent on CT. CT provides excellent depiction of the bones but lacks good soft tissue contrast, which makes contouring difficult. Often, MRIs are fused with CT to take advantage of its superior soft tissue contrast. Such an approach has drawbacks. It is desirable to perform treatment simulation entirely based on MRI. To achieve MR-based simulation for radiation therapy, bone imaging is an important challenge because of the low MR signal intensity from bone due to its ultra-short T2 and T1, which presents difficulty for both dose calculation and patient setup in terms of digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. Current solutions will either require manual bone contouring or multiple MR scans. We present a technique to generate DRR using MRI with an Ultra Short Echo Time (UTE) sequence which is applicable to both OBI and ExacTrac 2D patient setup. Methods: Seven brain cancer patients were scanned at 1.5 Tesla using a radial UTE sequence. The sequence acquires two images at two different echo times. The two images were processed using in-house software. The resultant bone images were subsequently loaded into commercial systems to generate DRRs. Simulation and patient clinical on-board images were used to evaluate 2D patient setup with MRI-DRRs. Results: The majority bones are well visualized in all patients. The fused image of patient CT with the MR bone image demonstrates the accuracy of automatic bone identification using our technique. The generated DRR is of good quality. Accuracy of 2D patient setup by using MRI-DRR is comparable to CT-based 2D patient setup. Conclusion: This study shows the potential of DRR generation with single MR sequence. Further work will be needed on MR sequence development and post-processing procedure to achieve robust MR bone imaging for other human sites in addition to brain.

  18. High upwind concentrations observed during an upslope tracer event

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    In February of 1991 the Rocky Flats Plant conducted twelve tracer experiments to validate an emergency response dispersion model known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985). Experimenters released 140 to 260 kilograms of inert tracer gas (sulfur hexafloride) from the plant over an 11 hour period. During each release, one hundred and sixty-five samples, most of which formed concentric rings of 8 and 16 km radius from the plant, recorded cumulative hourly concentrations of the tracer at one meter above ground level (AGL). Figure 1 contains a depiction of the sampler location, the terrain, and the meteorological stations available within the tracer study area. Brown (1991) describes the experimental setup in more detail. The subject of this paper is an event that occurred early in the fifth experiment, on February 9, 1991. In this experiment, tracer material released from 13:00 to 17:00 LST appeared both downwind and upwind of the source, with the highest concentrations upwind. During the fifth experiment, high pressure in Utah produced mostly sunny skis around Rocky Flats. For most of the day, one could find moderate (5 to 10 ms{sup {minus}1}) northerly (from the North) flow within the 700 to 500 mb level of the atmosphere (approximately 3000 to 5500 meters above Mean Sea Level (MSL)). Synoptic scale motions were isolated enough from the surface layer and heating was great enough to produce a 1 km deep upslope flow (flow from the East to the West) by late afternoon. The winds reversed and became downslope at approximately 17:30 LST.

  19. Desulfurization of Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils and alkali, Quarterly report, March 1 - May 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.V.; Gaston, R.D.; Song, R.; Cheng, J.; Shi, F.; Wang, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Organic sulfur is removed from coals by treatment with aqueous base, air, and vegetable oils with minimal loss of BTU. Such results were revealed during exploratory experiments on an ICCI funded project to remove organic sulfur from Illinois coals with hydroperoxides of vegetable oils. In fact, prewashing IBC-108 coal with dilute alkali prior to treating with linseed oil and air results in 26% removal of sulfur. This new method is being investigated by treating coals with alkali, impregnating coals with polyunsaturated oils, converting the oils to their hydroperoxides, and heating. Since these oils are relatively inexpensive and easily applied, this project could lead to a cost effective method for removing organic sulfur from coals. During the first quarter the selection of base fro pretreatment and extraction was completed. NaOH is better than NH{sub 4}OH for the pretreatment and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is better than NaOH for the oil extraction. During the second quarter the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC-108 coal was further tested by pretreating the coal with two base concentrations at four different times followed by treatment with linseed oil at 125{degrees}C for three different times and finally washing with 5% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and methanol. During this third quarter more experimental parameters were systematically varied in order to study the effectiveness of linseed oil and NaOH for sulfur removal from IBC- 108 coal.

  20. Using the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark to Study Current Numerical and Computational Issues of Coupled Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Todorova, Nadejda K.; Sartori, Enrico

    2003-05-15

    Incorporating full three-dimensional (3-D) models of the reactor core into system transient codes allows for a 'best-estimate' calculation of interactions between the core behavior and plant dynamics. Recent progress in computer technology has made the development of coupled thermal-hydraulic (T-H) and neutron kinetics code systems feasible. Considerable efforts have been made in various countries and organizations in this direction. Appropriate benchmarks need to be developed that will permit testing of two particular aspects. One is to verify the capability of the coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions. The second is to test fully the neutronics/T-H coupling. One such benchmark is the Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem. It was sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and The Pennsylvania State University. The benchmark problem uses a 3-D neutronics core model that is based on real plant design and operational data for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The purpose of this benchmark is threefold: to verify the capability of system codes for analyzing complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions; to test fully the 3-D neutronics/T-H coupling; and to evaluate discrepancies among the predictions of coupled codes in best-estimate transient simulations. The purposes of the benchmark are met through the application of three exercises: a point kinetics plant simulation (exercise 1), a coupled 3-D neutronics/core T-H evaluation of core response (exercise 2), and a best-estimate coupled core-plant transient model (exercise 3).In this paper we present the three exercises of the MSLB benchmark, and we summarize the findings of the participants with regard to the current numerical and computational issues of coupled calculations. In addition, this paper reviews in some detail the sensitivity studies on exercises 2 and 3 performed by the benchmark team using the coupled code TRAC-PF1/NEM. The purpose of these supporting studies was to aid participants in developing their models.

  1. SU-E-J-189: Credentialing of IGRT Equipment and Processes for Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Court, L; Aristophanous, M; Followill, D; Kirsner, S; Kisling, K; Pidikiti, R; Wong, P; Balter, P; Bellezza, D; Massingill, B; Papanikolaou, N; Parker, B; Zhen, H

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Current dosimetry phantoms used for clinical trial credentialing do not directly assess IGRT processes. This work evaluates a custom-built IGRT phantom for credentialing of multiple IGRT modalities and processes. Methods: An IGRT phantom was built out of a low-density body with two inserts. Insert A is used for the CT simulation. Insert B is used for the actual treatment. The inserts contain identical targets in different locations. Relative positions are unknown to the user. The user simulates the phantom (with insert A) as they would a patient, including marking the phantom. A treatment plan is created and sent to the treatment unit. The phantom (with insert B) is then positioned using local IGRT practice. Shifts (planned isocenter, if applicable, and final isocenter) are marked on the phantom using room lasers. The mechanical reproducibility of re-inserting the inserts within the phantom body was tested using repeat high-resolution CT scans. The phantom was tested at 7 centers, selected to include a wide variety of imaging equipment. Results: Mechanical reproducibility was measured as 0.5-0.9mm, depending on the direction. Approaches tested to mark (and transfer) simulation isocenter included lasers, fiducials and reflective markers. IGRT approaches included kV imaging (Varian Trilogy, Brainlab ExacTrac), kV CT (CT-on-rails), kV CBCT (Varian Trilogy, Varian Truebeam, Elekta Agility) and MV CT (Tomotherapy). Users were able to successfully use this phantom for all combinations of equipment and processes. IGRT-based shifts agreed with the truth within 0.8mm, 0.8mm and 1.9mm in the LR, AP, and SI directions, respectively. Conclusion: Based on these preliminary results, the IGRT phantom can be used for credentialing of clinical trials with an action level of 1mm in AP and LR directions, and 2mm in the SI direction, consistent with TG142. We are currently testing with additional institutions with different equipment and processes, including Cyberknife. This project was funded by the Cancer Prevention Research Institute of Texas.

  2. Milestones for Selection Characterization and Analysis of the Performance of a Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel and HIh-Level Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rechard, Robert P.

    2015-02-01

    This report presents a concise history in tabular form of events leading up to site identification in 1978, site selection in 1987, subsequent characterization, and ongoing analysis throu gh 2009 of the performance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high - level radi oactive waste at Yucca Mou ntain in southern Nevada. The tabulated events generally occurred in five periods: (1) commitment to mined geologic disposal and identification of sites; (2) site selection and analysis, based on regional geologic characterization through literature and an alogous data; (3) feasibility analysis demonstrating calculation procedures and importance of system components, based on rough measures of performance using surface exploration, waste process knowledge, and general laboratory experiments; (4) suitability analysis demonstrating viability of disposal system, based on environment - specific laboratory experiments, in - situ experiments, and underground disposal system characterization; and (5) compliance analysis, based on completed site - specific characterization . The current sixth period beyond 2010 represents a new effort to set waste management policy in the United States. Because the relationship is important to understanding the evolution of the Yucca Mountain Project , the tabulation also shows the interaction between the policy realm and technical realm using four broad categories of events : (a ) R egulatory requirements and related federal policy in laws and court decisions, (c ) Presidential and agency directives, (c) technical milestones of implemen ting institutions, and (d ) critiques of the Yucca Mountai n P roject and pertinent national and world events related to nuclear energy and radioactive waste. Preface The historical progression of technical milestones for the Yucca Mountain Project was originally developed for 10 journal articles in a special issue of Reliability Engineering System Safe ty on the performance assessment for the Yucca Mountain license application [ 1 - 10 ] . The listing of mile stones , a distinct feature of those articles, has been collected and tabulated here. A lthough a brief description is presented here (based on the summaries in the 10 journal articles) , t he emphasis remains on the tab ulation because of its usefulness in pro viding a comprehensive but concise history of the Yucca Mountain Project . T he tabulation presented here is more elaborate than originally presented in that many of the interactions that occurred between the technical realm and policy realm can be depicted in separate columns . The usefulness of the milestones table is due in part to L.A. Connolly, for editorial and reference support, and S.K. Best, Raytheon, and L. May s, Sandia National Laboratories ( SNL ) , for illustration support. Reviewers P.N. Swift, SNL , and K. Gupta, University of Oklahoma, helped improve the discussion. The historical perspective presented is that of the author and is not necessarily held by reviewers, Sandia National Laboratories , and the US Department of Energy. As a historic perspect ive, the author is reporting on the work of others; however, any interpretative erro r s of the documentation are those of the author alone. The characterization and modeling of the Yucca Mountain disposal system required numerous participants with expertise in many areas of science a nd technology, as evident from the extensive reference list. Their d iligent efforts are generally acknowledged here and through the many references to their impressive work , but the 10 journal articles acknowledge by name many of the numerous participants that contributed to the Yucca Mountain Project .

  3. One-Dimensional Analysis of Thermal Stratification in AHTR and SFR Coolant Pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2007-10-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are very common in pool type reactor systems, such as the liquid-salt cooled Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) and liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems such as the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). It is important to accurately predict the temperature and density distributions both for design optimation and accident analysis. Current major reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP5 (for LWRs, and recently extended to analyze high temperature reactors), TRAC (for LWRs), and SASSYS (for liquid metal fast reactors) only provide lumped-volume based models which can only give very approximate results and can only handle simple cases with one mixing source. While 2-D or 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, yet such fine grid resolution is difficult or impossible to provide for studying the reactor response to transients due to computational expense. Therefore, new methods are needed to support design optimization and safety analysis of Generation IV pool type reactor systems. Previous scaling has shown that stratified mixing processes in large stably stratified enclosures can be described using one-dimensional differential equations, with the vertical transport by free and wall jets modeled using standard integral techniques. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to three-dimensional numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in large enclosures. The BMIX++ (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code was originally developed at UC Berkeley to implement such ideas. This code solves mixing and heat transfer problems in stably stratified enclosures. The code uses a Lagrangian approach to solve 1-D transient governing equations for the ambient fluid and uses analytical or 1-D integral models to compute substructures. By including liquid salt properties, BMIX++ code is extended to analyze liquid salt pool systems in the current AHTR design, to provide an example of its application. Similar analysis is possible for liquid-metal cooled reactors. The current AHTR baseline design uses a large buffer salt tank to provide more thermal inertial and safety margin. Reactor vessel, intermediate heat exchangers, pool reactor auxiliary cooling system heat exchangers (PHX), and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system heat exchangers (DHX) are all immerged in the buffer salt pool. These structures provide major driving sources for vertical mixing and thermal stratification. Predication of the temperature distribution within the buffer salt tank directly affects the major safety systems design, such as the PHX and DHX, safety analysis results, and structure thermal stresses analysis. The BMIX++ code is used to predict mixing and thermal stratification in this pool system. This example shows the potential of 1-D analysis methods and BMIX++ to be included in system analysis codes for pool type of Gen-IV reactor systems.

  4. Application of Bomb Radiocarbon Chronologies to Shortfin Mako (Isurus oxyrinchus)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardizzone, D; Cailliet, G M; Natanson, L J; Andrews, A H; Kerr, L A; Brown, T A

    2007-07-16

    There is an ongoing disagreement regarding the aging of the shortfin mako due to a difference of interpretation in the periodic deposition of vertebral growth band pairs, especially for the larger size classes. Using analysis of length-month information, tagging data, and length-frequency analysis, concluded that two band pairs were formed in the vertebral centrum every year (biannual band-pair interpretation). Cailliet et al. (1983), however, presented growth parameters based on the common assumption that one band pair forms annually (annual band-pair interpretation). Therefore, growth rates obtained by Pratt & Casey (1983) were twice that of Cailliet et al. (1983) and could lead to age discrepancies of about 15 years for maximum estimated ages on the order of 30 from the annual band-pair interpretation. Serious consequences in the population dynamics could occur for this species if inputs are based on an invalid age interpretation. The latest Fishery Management Plan (FMP) for Highly Migratory Species (HMS), for example, adopted the biannual band pair deposition hypothesis because it apparently fit the observed growth patterns best (Pacific Fishery Management Council 2003). However, the ongoing uncertainty about the aging of the shortfin mako was acknowledged and it was recommended that an endeavor to resolve this issue be made. Since 1983, five additional studies on the age and growth of the shortfin mako have been conducted (Chan 2001, Campana et al. 2002, Hsu 2003, Ribot-Carballal et al. 2005, Bishop et al. 2006). Using Marginal Increment Ratio (MIR), Hsu (2003) indicated the formation of annual translucent bands from July to September in western North Pacific Ocean shortfin makos. Using Marginal Increment Analysis (MIA) Ribot-Carballal et al. (2005) supported the annual band-pair interpretation for 109 shortfin makos collected in the eastern Pacific Ocean. Although the study provided support for annual band-pair deposition, no statistical test was performed and the number of samples for MIA analysis was insufficient for some months. Hence, unequivocal validation of shortfin mako age estimates has yet to be accomplished. Atmospheric testing of thermonuclear devices in the 1950s and 1960s effectively doubled the natural atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C). The elevated {sup 14}C levels were first recorded in 1957-58, with a peak around 1963. As a consequence, {sup 14}C entered the ocean through gas exchange with the atmosphere at the ocean surface and in terrestrial runoff. Despite variable oceanographic conditions, a worldwide rise of the bomb {sup 14}C signal entered the ocean mixed layer as dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in 1957-58. The large amounts of {sup 14}C released from the bomb tests produced a signature that can be followed through time, throughout the marine food web, and into deeper waters. The marked increase of radiocarbon levels was first measured in the DIC of seawater and in biogenic marine carbonates of hermatypic corals in Florida. Subsequently, this record was documented in corals from other regions and in the thallus of rhodoliths. The accumulation of radiocarbon in the hard parts of most marine organisms in the mixed layer (such as fish otoliths and bivalves) was synchronous with the coral time-series. This technique has been used to validate age estimates and longevity of numerous bony fishes to date, as well as to establish bomb radiocarbon chronologies from different oceans. In the first application of this technique to lamnoid sharks, validated annual band-pair deposition in vertebral growth bands for the porbeagle (Lamna nasus) aged up to 26 years. Radiocarbon values from samples obtained from 15 porbeagle caught in the western North Atlantic Ocean (some of which were known-age) produced a chronology similar in magnitude to the reference carbonate chronology for that region. The observed phase shift of about 3 years was attributed to different sources of carbon between vertebrae and those for otoliths, bivalves and corals. In the same study by Campana et al. (2002), a single vertebra fro