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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

1997 toxic chemical release inventory -- Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid.

Zaloudek, D.E.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Toxic chemical release inventory reporting: Questions and answers (Qs&As)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 22, 1992, the Secretary of Energy directed the Department to participate in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program and to initiate Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) reporting, pursuant to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) issued interim guidance on March 4, 1993, entitled ``Toxic Chemical Release Inventory and 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program`` that provided instructions on implementing the Secretarial directive. As stated in the interim guidance, all DOE sites not currently reporting under EPCRA Section 313, which meet the criteria for DOE TRI reporting, will initiate reporting of all TRI chemical releases and transfers for the 1993 calendar year with the annual report due to EPA, States and a courtesy copy to EH-20 by July 1, 1994. All other DOE sites which currently report under EPCRA Section 313 will also follow the criteria for DOE TRI reporting.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act, section 313 toxic chemical release inventory reporting forms for calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Forms and the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Certification Statement Form A(s) for chlorine for 1996 for the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The reporting forms contain information on the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Y-12 Plant and Johnson Controls Water Treatment Plant operational releases for specific toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land in addition to transfers to off-site disposal locations in CY 1996. Personnel from U.S. West reported no usage of the specified toxic chemicals in CY 1996; therefore, no Form R or Form A reporting data are included for U.S. West.

Evans, R.A.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

M. Stockton

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

M. Stockton

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics releases Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(Cu) and lead (Pb) (typically) Toxic chemical release reporting... standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July ... Source: Wechsler, Risa H. - Kavli...

8

Title III section 313 release reporting guidance: Estimating chemical releases from rubber production and compounding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Facilities engaged in rubber production and compounding may be required to report annually any releases to the environment of certain chemicals regulated under Section 313, Title III, of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. The document has been developed to assist those who produce rubber in the completion of Part III (Chemical Specific Information) of the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Reporting Form. Included herein is general information on toxic chemicals used and process wastes generated, along with several examples to demonstrate the types of data needed and various methodologies available for estimating releases.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

10

Environmental toxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and wildlife tissues were collected from four National Priority List Superfund sites within the United States. In general, chemical analysis was not always predictive of mixture toxicity. Although biodegradation reduced the concentration of total...

Gillespie, Annika Margaret

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory | Data.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Dataset Summary Description TRI.NET ("T-R-I-dot-net") is a new application developed by EPA to help you analyze Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) information. This application is capable of easily and quickly performing complex queries to help you understand TRI information. It is especially useful for analysts who need a highly interactive environment in order to refine their queries and analyses in an efficient and productive way. TRI.NET makes heavy use of mashups using the latest mapping technologies to help visualize where TRI releases are occurring.

14

INVENTORY -EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVENTORY - EDITED SARA TITLE III TOXIC CHEMICALS Department: Principal Investigator: SARA Reporter) 75-71-8 Dielectric Oil 64742-53-6 Emetine Dihydrochloride 316-42-7 Formaldehyde 50-00-0 Fuel Oil, #2 (Inside) 68476-30-2 Fuel Oil, #4 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #4 (Underground) 68476-31-3 Fuel Oil, #6 68553

Entekhabi, Dara

15

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

16

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Mercury Release and Speciation in Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mercury Release and Speciation in Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal ... In the in situ Gasification Chemical Looping Combustion of coal (iG-CLC), the fuel is gasified in situ in the fuel reactor and gasification products are converted to CO2 and H2O by reaction with the oxygen carrier. ... This work is the first study on mercury release in Chemical Looping Combustion of coal. ...

T. Mendiara; M. T. Izquierdo; A. Abad; P. Gayn; F. Garca-Labiano; L. F. de Diego; J. Adnez

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

18

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

Maroncelli, Mark

19

NETL: News Release - From Coal to Chemicals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 13, 2003 May 13, 2003 From Coal to Chemicals... Successful Clean Coal-to-Methanol Project Boosts Prospects For "Multi-Product" Coal Plant - The Liquid Phase Methanol Plant at the Eastman Chemicals-from-Coal Complex - The Kingsport, Tenn., clean coal project operated virtually flawlessly throughout its demonstration period and continues its steady operations today. - KINGSPORT, TN - It was 35 years ago that a single word in the smash hit, coming-of-age movie The Graduate made cinema history: "plastics." As a baby-faced Dustin Hoffman learned, the future was "plastics." Now, largely because of one of the Department of Energy's most successful Clean Coal Technology projects, in the next 35 years, the future may well be "plastics?from coal."

20

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Chemical Speciation on Toxicity of Mercury to Escherichia coli Biofilms and Planktonic Cells ... charged forms of mercuric chloride (HgCl3-/HgCl42-) induced less light prodn. ...

Isaac Najera; Chu-Ching Lin; Golenaz Adeli Kohbodi; Jennifer A. Jay

2005-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 1. Main report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Study of chemical toxicity of low-level wastes. Volume 2. Monographs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical composition of fuel-cycle wastes is reasonably well known. By comparison, there is little information on the chemical composition of non-fuel cycle wastes. Such non-fuel cycle wastes come from a variety of sources - industrial, chemical, and medical. Because of the paucity of information, it is difficult to define the chemical characteristics and to evaluate potential hazards of non-fuel cycle wastes as a result of chemical toxicity. This report provides an assessment of the chemical toxicity of low-level radioactive wastes based on literature reviews, preparation of bibliographies and monographs, and application of a variety of methodologies either being currently applied or being proposed for relative hazard assessments. The report relies primarily on data from the Maxey Flats, Kentucky waste disposal site. While there are differences between humid and dry sites, the findings are believed to be generally applicable to evaluating the chemical toxicity of wastes at all low-level radioactive waste burial sites.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The toxicity of oil and chemically dispersed oil to the seagrass Thalassia testudinum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turtle grass beds, a valuable natural resource, are diminishing throughout the tropics because of damage from dredging, boats, and other factors. The toxicity of chemical dispersants and crude oil to turtle grass was determined in the laboratory to assess the potential for damage from spills occurring in the field. Studies of water-soluble fractions (WSF) of crude oil in static bioassays showed that a chemical dispersant (Corexit 9527) increased the amount of total oil in water more than 50-fold. The toxicity of chemically dispersed oil was assessed by conventional (96-h 50% lethal concentration) methods in static systems, and the results were compared with toxicity measurements where the system was flushed after 12 h. Prudhoe Bay crude WSF was more toxic than dispersed oil or dispersant alone, possibly because of the large component of benzene, toluene, and C-2 benzene. The percentage of green (chlorophyllous) leaves was useful as evidence of toxicity. The importance of anatomical features such as recessed meristem and abundant leaf sheaths in protecting the growing region from waterborne pollutants was evident.

Baca, B.J.; Getter, C.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Regulation: EPA sued for undercounting toxic emissions at refineries, chemical plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several community organizations have filed a lawsuit to force the Environmental Protection Agency to review the way it measures toxic air pollution from oil refineries and petrochemical plants along the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coast. ... Recent independent studies at Marathon Oil, Shell, and BP refineries measured actual emissions at levels 10 to 100 times higher than estimates based on the methods facilities currently use to report their releases, the suit says. ...

GLENN HESS

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Base catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals. [Final report, September 4, 1990--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are vast amounts of toxic and hazardous chemicals, which have pervaded our environment during the past fifty years, leaving us with serious, crucial problems of remediation and disposal. The accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), ``dioxins`` and pesticides in soil sediments and living systems is a serious problem that is receiving considerable attention concerning the cancer-causing nature of these synthetic compounds.US EPA scientists developed in 1989 and 1990 two novel chemical Processes to effect the dehalogenation of chlorinated solvents, PCBs, PCDDs, PCDFs, PCP and other pollutants in soil, sludge, sediment and liquids. This improved technology employs hydrogen as a nucleophile to replace halogens on halogenated compounds. Hydrogen as nucleophile is not influenced by steric hinderance as with other nucleophile where complete dehalogenation of organohalogens can be achieved. This report discusses catalyzed decomposition of toxic and hazardous chemicals.

Rogers, C.J.; Kornel, A.; Sparks, H.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle {<=} 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected; however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC{sub 50} values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 {mu}M) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 {mu}M). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms.

Boyd, Windy A. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W. [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Freedman, Jonathan H., E-mail: freedma1@niehs.nih.go [Biomolecular Screening Branch, National Toxicology Program, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Laboratory of Toxicology and Pharmacology, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Acute lethal toxicity of some reference chemicals to freshwater fishes of Scandinavia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relevance of the choice of a test organism intended to be representative for a given environment seems to be under continual debate in aquatic ecotoxicology. For instance, it is commonly argue that acute toxicity tests with rainbow trout, the species most often recommended as a standard cold water teleost, were not representative for Nordic countries because the species is an alien in local faunas. A comparative study with several freshwater species was therefore initiated to clarify the validity of this assumption. As a first approximation, standard LC 50 assays were conducted. The species used were chosen only on the basis of their local availability, i.e, they randomly represented the fish fauna of Nordic inland waters. Furthermore, inter-species variation of toxicity response was compared with certain other, quantitatively more important, intra-species sources of variability affecting the toxicity of chemicals. Use of reference toxicants has been recommended as a means of standardizing bioassays. Compounds, characteristic of effluents from the pulp and paper industry, were selected for the present study. The toxicity of organic acids such a phenols and resin acids, as well as that of pupmill effluents, strongly depends on water pH. Because of the possibility that species differences could exist in this respect, effects of water acidity on toxicity of these types of substances to a randomly selected local species was investigated. Finally, as an example of the biological source of assay variability, the effect of yolk absorption was studied with a subsequent crisis period due to moderate starvation under laboratory conditions.

Oikari, A.O.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

The EPA's process safety management program for preventing accidental chemical releases (40 CFR 68)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 304, Chemical Process Safety Management,'' of the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments of 1990 required the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to develop a complete integrated process safety management program regulation. In February 1992, OSHA published rule 29 CFR 1910.119, Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals''. The 1990 CAA Amendment section 112(r), Prevention of Accidental Releases'', required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to establish measures for owners and operators of facilities processing or handling hazardous materials to prevent accidental releases of regulated substances and other extremely hazardous substances to the air. Additionally, it required the consequence of releases to be minimized by focusing preventative measures on those chemicals that pose the greatest risk. Section 112(r) begins with a general duty clause requiring owners and operators to: identify hazards that may result from releases; design and maintain a safe facility; and minimize the consequences of releases when they occur. The major difference between the two regulations concerns the areas affected by the potential release of a regulated substance. The OSHA 29 CFR 1910.119 regulation limits the concern to incidents that could result in an exposure to employees within the boundaries of the facility. The proposed EPA 40 CFR regulation will address significant accidental releases that have a potential for off-site effects on humans and the environment. The provisions of the new EPA regulation would require additional resources and increase the formal documentation and record keeping requirements beyond those of the older OSHA regulation.

Brown, C.A.; Sharma, P. (Brown and Root Petroleum and Chemicals Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NETL: News Release - American Institute of Chemical Engineers Honors DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6, 2009 6, 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Honors DOE Researcher Award Recognizes Accomplishments in Fluidization, Fluidized Processes Washington, D.C. - For his efforts in modeling and simulating fluid-particle flows, a researcher at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been selected to receive the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Fluidized Processing Recognition Award. AIChE presents the award every two years to an AIChE member "who has made significant contribution to the science and technology of fluidization or fluidized processes and who has shown leadership in the engineering community." This year the award goes to Dr. Madhava Syamlal, Focus Area Leader for Computational and Basic Sciences at NETL. Dr. Syamlal will receive his award during AIChE's 2009 annual meeting set for November 8-13, 2009, in Nashville, Tenn.

31

Uncertainty in synthetic biology for release and possibilities for regulation under the Toxic Substances Control Act  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emerging field of synthetic biology is developing rapidly and promises diverse applications. Many anticipated applications, particularly those involving release of engineered microbes into the environment or human ...

Lightfoot, Shlomiya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

News Briefs: The U.S. chemical industry's Responsible Care program "has not encouraged pollution prevention or greater public access to information about toxic threats,"  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

News Briefs: The U.S. chemical industry's Responsible Care program "has not encouraged pollution prevention or greater public access to information about toxic threats," ...

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

33

Description of interview data regarding Pittsburgh and confluence toxic chemical accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evacuation is the protective action most often recommended in response to chemical releases in the United States. The appropriateness of a decision to evacuate depends on whether the affected areas can be cleared of residents before it is contaminated by the chemical release. In determining whether an evacuation can be completed in time, emergency officials must consider both technical and behavioral aspects. The technical components can be readily conceived and quantified. In contrast, the behavioral components are much more abstract and more difficult to estimate. This report summarizes the univariate analysis of responses to surveys conducted in two communities where evacuation was recommended following train derailments involving hazardous chemicals. The surveys were designed to identify the actions taken by residents upon receiving the emergency warning; determine when people received the warning, decided to take action, and implemented the action; and ascertain factors that might explain the nature and timing of their actions. The surveys were conducted in the Bloomfield section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in the town of Confluence, Pennsylvania. The study confirms that compliance with an emergency warning to evacuate varies and that potentially dangerous delays can be expected. Significant differences were noted, however, in the rate and speed of compliance in the two communities. The surveys provide information on several factors that may be useful in determining the reasons for differences in the responses from the two communities as well as differences among individual respondents. Such factors include the time of day when the accident occurred, where the respondent was at the time, whether the family was together, previous disaster experience, pet ownership, the content of the warning message, and demographic characteristics. 4 refs., 4 figs., 18 tabs.

Rogers, G.O.; Shumpert, B.L.; Sorensen, J.H.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Toxics Release Inventory Expansion Rule Phase 3 (TRI-P3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ORR [East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), Y-12 Plant, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] is considered a single facility for reporting by the DOE prime contractors. The processing, manufacturing, or "otherwise use" Section313 chemicals are combined to determine TRI reportability. Such is the case with lead metal, which is one of two chemicals for which reportin~ forms were prepared in this pilot study (Task 2;1. The lead shop at ORNL exceeded the reporting threshold, causing a lead activity at a Y-1 2 machine shop and lead in waste at ETTP to be reportable. TRI-P3 report preparation time for lead totaled 36.5 hours. The second chemical investigated and reported (chromium) also required nearly a man-week for report preparation and documentation by experienced TRI personnel. The ORR TRI report typically includes about six chemicals, so an estimate of the TRI-P3 incremental reporting burden for ORR would be six weeks for experienced personnel axI d two/three man-months for first-time ORR preparers.

Evans, R.A.; Saunders, A.D.; Worley, G.G.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Knowledge system and method for simulating chemical controlled release device performance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A knowledge system for simulating the performance of a controlled release device is provided. The system includes an input device through which the user selectively inputs one or more data parameters. The data parameters comprise first parameters including device parameters, media parameters, active chemical parameters and device release rate; and second parameters including the minimum effective inhibition zone of the device and the effective lifetime of the device. The system also includes a judgemental knowledge base which includes logic for 1) determining at least one of the second parameters from the release rate and the first parameters and 2) determining at least one of the first parameters from the other of the first parameters and the second parameters. The system further includes a device for displaying the results of the determinations to the user.

Cowan, Christina E. (Richland, WA); Van Voris, Peter (Richland, WA); Streile, Gary P. (Richland, WA); Cataldo, Dominic A. (Kennewick, WA); Burton, Frederick G. (West Jefferson, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

NO release during chemical looping combustion with iron ore as an oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the promising technologies to capture CO2 with low cost. Owing to the existence of nitrogen in fuel, the emission of fuel-NOx is a significant concern during the CLC process. This work evaluated NO release in the CLC process of bituminous coal and petcoke using iron ore as an oxygen carrier in a fluidized bed. The effect of several factors was evaluated, including bed material, fuel type, temperature and gasification medium. The results indicate that in the fuel reactor (FR), fuel-NOx due to the reaction between NH3/HCN and iron ore was supported only when the iron ore was reduced from Fe2O3 to Fe3O4. Compared with the case of an inert bed material, NO yield during the gasification in an iron ore bed material was relatively higher due to the enhanced char-gasification and the oxidization effect of iron ore. For the bituminous coal, NO release in FR was mainly due to the volatile release and subsequent oxidation by iron ore. For the petcoke process, NO release in FR could mainly be ascribed to the char-gasification and subsequent oxidization of NOx-precursors by iron ore. The elevated temperature and the use of H2O/N2 in comparison to CO2 could efficiently enhance the fuel conversion and \\{NOx\\} precursors release in FR. Thus, NO yield in FR increased, whereas that in AR correspondingly decreased. Furthermore, the NO release during continuous coal CLC was investigated in a 1 kWth CLC prototype based on the iron ore oxygen carrier. Overall, the elevated fuel reactor temperature and the use of H2O as gasification medium are beneficial to reduce NO release in the CLC system.

Haiming Gu; Laihong Shen; Zhaoping Zhong; Xin Niu; Huijun Ge; Yufei Zhou; Shen Xiao; Shouxi Jiang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing From Human Health Impact Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in material selection processes for sustainable design andselection process for developing a sustainable materialintegrated sustainable material selection process of toxic

Yuan, Chris; Dornfeld, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

40

Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A mechanism for providing institutional assurance for the safe handling of acutely toxic or physically dangerous chemicals in research laboratories  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical use is ubiquitous in research laboratories and is necessary for the advancement of research and creation of new technology. Regulatory mechanisms currently exist that mandate the provision of basic safety training for workers and the assurance that essential safety information is readily available. Unfortunately, in some cases, institutional oversight of specific high risk laboratory chemical use may be absent. This may be due in part to the difficulty in delineating between chemicals that are commonly used but possess a hazardous characteristic (e.g., flammability) and those that exhibit acutely toxic or particularly dangerous properties (e.g., explosivity). In 1994, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston began addressing this issue through the creation of an institutional Chemical Safety Committee (CSC) that consists largely of research faculty. Through a shared governance process, the committee identified criteria for which certain chemical use would require institutional review and approval, striving to achieve a balance between supporting research while providing an added level of assurance that work involving the acutely toxic or physically dangerous chemical can be performed safely. The process used for developing these criteria is described along with the lessons learned from its evolutionary process.

Robert Emery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Schematic Method for Sustainable Material Selection of Toxic Chemicals in Design and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the material selection process for sustainable design andfrom the perspectives of sustainable process design andinte- grated sustainable material selection process of toxic

Yuan, Chris Yingchun; David Dornfeld

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Chemical pollution and toxicity of water samples from stream receiving leachate from controlled municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study was aimed to determine the impact of municipal waste landfill on the pollution level of surface waters, and to investigate whether the choice and number of physical and chemical parameters monitored are sufficient for determining the actual risk related to bioavailability and mobility of contaminants. In 20072012, water samples were collected from the stream flowing through the site at two sampling locations, i.e. before the stream?s entry to the landfill, and at the stream outlet from the landfill. The impact of leachate on the quality of stream water was observed in all samples. In 20072010, high values of TOC and conductivity in samples collected down the stream from the landfill were observed; the toxicity of these samples was much greater than that of samples collected up the stream from the landfill. In 20102012, a significant decrease of conductivity and TOC was observed, which may be related to the modernization of the landfill. Three tests were used to evaluate the toxicity of sampled water. As a novelty the application of Phytotoxkit F for determining water toxicity should be considered. Microtox showed the lowest sensitivity of evaluating the toxicity of water samples, while Phytotoxkit F showed the highest. High mortality rates of Thamnocephalus platyurus in Thamnotoxkit F test can be caused by high conductivity, high concentration of TOC or the presence of compounds which are not accounted for in the water quality monitoring program.

A. Melnyk; K. Kukli?ska; L. Wolska; J. Namie?nik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reducing Mortality from Terrorist Releases of Chemical and Biological Agents: I. Filtration for Ventilation Systems in Commercial Building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is growing concern about potential terrorist attacks involving releases of chemical and/or biological (CB) agents, such as sarin or anthrax, in and around buildings. For an external release, the CB agent can enter the building through the air intakes of a building's mechanical ventilation system and by infiltration through the building envelope. For an interior release in a single room, the mechanical ventilation system, which often recirculates some fraction of the air within a building, may distribute the released CB agent throughout the building. For both cases, installing building systems that remove chemical and biological agents may be the most effective way to protect building occupants. Filtration systems installed in the heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems of buildings can significantly reduce exposures of building occupants in the event of a release, whether the release is outdoors or indoors. Reduced exposures can reduce the number of deaths from a terrorist attack. The purpose of this report is to provide information and examples of the design of filtration systems to help building engineers retrofit HVAC systems. The report also provides background information on the physical nature of CB agents and brief overviews of the basic principles of particle and vapor filtration.

Thatcher, Tracy L.; Daisey, Joan M.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Protecting buildings from a biological or chemical attack: Actions to take before or during a release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents advice on how to operate a building to reduce casualties from a biological or chemical attack, as well as potential changes to the building (e.g. the design of the ventilation system) that could make it more secure. It also documents the assumptions and reasoning behind the advice. The particular circumstances of any attack, such as the ventilation system design, building occupancy, agent type, source strength and location, and so on, may differ from the assumptions made here, in which case actions other than our recommendations may be required; we hope that by understanding the rationale behind the advice, building operators can modify it as required for their circumstances. The advice was prepared by members of the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group, which is part of the Indoor Environment Department at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The group's expertise in this area includes: tracer-gas measurements of airflows in buildings (Sextro, Thatcher); design and operation of commercial building ventilation systems (Delp); modeling and analysis of airflow and tracer gas transport in large indoor spaces (Finlayson, Gadgil, Price); modeling of gas releases in multi-zone buildings (Sohn, Lorenzetti, Finlayson, Sextro); and occupational health and safety experience related to building design and operation (Sextro, Delp). This report is concerned only with building design and operation; it is not a how-to manual for emergency response. Many important emergency response topics are not covered here, including crowd control, medical treatment, evidence gathering, decontamination methods, and rescue gear.

Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Delp, William W.; Lorenzetti, David M.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Sextro, Richard G.; Derby, Elisabeth A.; Jarvis, Sondra A.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

MEMS-based resonant sensor arrays : selective detection of volatile and toxic chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With growing concerns about homeland security, public health, and environmental cleanliness, there is a strong need today for robust chemical sensing systems that are portable in addition to being highly sensitive. While ...

Whitfield, George C., 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Implications of the toxicity of tetramethyltin, dimethyl tin dichloride, and tin tetrachloride in selecting a suitable tin precursor in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential health hazards in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide films from tetramethylin dimethylin dichloride and tin tetrachloride have to be balanced against the benefits to solar cell fabrication. Concerns regarding the toxicity costs and physical properties of and the quality of the tin oxide films produced with these tin precursors are outlined. (AIP)

Roy G. Gordon; James W. Prescia

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

49

How Do I Know? A Guide to the Selection of Personal Protective Equipment for Use in Responding to A Release of Chemical Warfare Agents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with an HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and monitoring devices used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel.

Foust, C.B.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO). In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sector-bulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Effects of Lifestyle and Toxicants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vast number of toxic chemicals encountered at the work place, in the environment or related to lifestyle have the potential to impair male reproductive health. The list of known male reproductive toxicants i...

J. P. Bonde

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

DOE/EA-1494; Final Environmental Assessment for Activities Using Biological Simulants and Releases of Chemicals at the Nevada Test Site (June 2004)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

494 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ACTIVITIES 494 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ACTIVITIES USING BIOLOGICAL SIMULANTS AND RELEASES OF CHEMICALS June 2004 v Table of Contents Section Page ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS.................................................................................................. viii GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................. GL-1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .....................................................................................................................ES-1 CHAPTER 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION..................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................

54

Assessment of metal content and toxicity of leachates from teapots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic teapots traditionally used in Morocco were investigated for release of toxic metals from the teapots and their toxicity, as determined by MetPAD, a bacterial toxicity test that is specific for heavy metal toxicity. Our data show that some teapots were non-toxic while a few others were highly toxic, as shown by MetPAD. Tea addition reduced somewhat heavy metal toxicity due possibly to the complexing ability of tea. Chemical analysis of teapot leachates showed that some contained zinc and copper. Teapot No. 5, which showed the highest toxicity, also displayed the highest Zn concentration (7.39 mg/l), confirming the toxicity data. Based on estimates of tea consumption in Morocco, we showed that the extra daily burden of Zn ranged from 1.75 to 4.2 mg/day, assuming the maximum zinc concentration of 7.4 mg/l, as found in our study. This represents 3.58% of the LOAEL for zinc of 50 mg/day and would not be important as compared to other sources of zinc intake.

Ali Boularbah; Gabriel Bitton; J.L Morel

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control Standard NESHAPs National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NOx oxides of nitrogen NPOC nonAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner

Wechsler, Risa H.

56

Activation of Soil and Chemical Reagents Exposed to the Neutrons Released by the JCO Criticality Accident in Tokai-mura  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......hours) of fission neutrons to the environment...release of fission products. To evaluate the neutron doses to residents...of neutron-induced radionuclides...the apparent thermal S56 Y. MURATA...fluence and its energy spectrum. By using......

Yoshimasa Murata; Toshiharu Muroyama; Yoshiko Kawabata; Masayoshi Yamamoto; Kazuhisa Komura

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Application of release rate data to hazard load calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The author illustrates methods of applying heat, smoke and toxic gas release rate data to calculating fire hazard loading values.

Edwin E. Smith

1974-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxic regulations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control... -volatile organic compound TAC toxic air contaminant TCA trichloroethane TCE...

59

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Rad-Release  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The R&D 100 Award winning Rad-Release Chemical Decontamination Technology is a highly effective (up to 99% removal rate), affordable, patented chemical-foam-clay decontamination process tailored to specific radiological and metal contaminants, which is applicable to a wide variety of substrates. For more information about this project, visit http://www.inl.gov/rd100/2011/rad-release/

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program rapid accident assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops a scheme for the rapid assessment of a release of toxic chemicals resulting from an accident in one of the most chemical weapon demilitarization plants or storage areas. The system uses such inputs as chemical and pressure sensors monitoring the plant and reports of accidents radioed to the Emergency Operations Center by work parties or monitoring personnel. A size of release can be estimated from previous calculations done in the risk analysis, from back calculation from an open-air chemical sensor measurement, or from an estimated percentage of the inventory of agent at the location of the release. Potential consequences of the estimated release are calculated from real-time meteorological data, surrounding population data, and properties of the agent. In addition to the estimated casualties, area coverage and no-death contours vs time would be calculated. Accidents are assigned to one of four categories: community emergencies, which are involve a threat to off-site personnel; on-post emergencies, which involve a threat only to on-site personnel; advisory, which involves a potential for threat to on-site personnel; and chemical occurrence, which can produce an abnormal operating condition for the plant but no immediate threat to on-site personnel. 9 refs., 20 tabs.

Chester, C.V.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics volume Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

designed to remove the acutely toxic chemicals before the air is discharged into the environment. Acutely... Chemistry Department Standard Operating Procedure Title: Acutely Toxic...

65

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute organ toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

toxicity between chemicals and between organisms... . They are examples of known pollutants, albeit ones listed as having low-to-moderate acute toxicities, purposely... to...

66

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Toxicity of Engineered Nanoparticles in the Environment ... While nanoparticles occur naturally in the environment and have been intentionally used for centuries, the production and use of engineered nanoparticles has seen a recent spike, which makes environmental release almost certain. ... Therefore, recent efforts to characterize the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles have focused on the environmental implications, including exploration of toxicity to organisms from wide-ranging parts of the ecosystem food webs. ...

Melissa A. Maurer-Jones; Ian L. Gunsolus; Catherine J. Murphy; Christy L. Haynes

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Chemical Occurrences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

68

Potential Release Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

69

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program chemicals of concern that may impact the estuary's ecosystem. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE identified weak associations between mortality and bulk-phase chlordane and silver concentrations at Redwood

70

Developmental programming: Impact of fetal exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals on gonadotropin-releasing hormone and estrogen receptor mRNA in sheep hypothalamus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bisphenol-A (BPA) and methoxychlor (MXC), two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with estrogenic and antiandrogenic effects, disrupt the reproductive system. BPA has profound effects on luteinizing hormone (LH) surge amplitude, and MXC has profound effects on on LH surge timing in sheep. The neural mechanisms involved in the differential disruption of the LH surge by these two EDCs remain to be elucidated. We tested the hypothesis that the differential effects of BPA and MXC on LH surge system involved changes in hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and estrogen receptors (ESR), ESR1 and ESR2, mRNA expression. Pregnant sheep were given daily injections of cottonseed oil (controls), MXC, or BPA (5 mg/kg/day) from day 30 to 90 of gestation (term 147 d). Offspring from these animals were euthanized as adults, during the late follicular phase following synchronization of estrus with prostaglandin F{sub 2{alpha}}, just before the expected onset of preovulatory LH surge and changes in mRNA expression of hypothalamic GnRH, ESR1, and ESR2 quantified following in situ hybridization. GnRH mRNA expression was significantly lower in both groups of EDC-treated females compared to controls. ESR1 expression was increased in prenatal BPA- but not MXC-treated females in medial preoptic area relative to controls. In contrast, ESR2 expression was reduced in the medial preoptic area of both EDC-treated groups. Differences in expression of ESR1/ESR2 receptors may contribute to the differential effects of BPA and MXC on the LH surge system. These findings provide support that prenatal exposure to EDCs alters the neural developmental trajectory leading to long-term reproductive consequences in the adult female.

Mahoney, Megan M. [Veterinary Biosciences and Neuroscience Program, University of Illinois, 2001 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana IL. 61802 (United States); Padmanabhan, Vasantha, E-mail: vasantha@umich.ed [Department of Pediatrics and Reproductive Sciences Q1 Program, University of Michigan, 300 N. Ingalls Bldg., Rm. 1109 SW, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0404 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Genotoxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studies, specifically on carbon monoxide. Schmiedeberg focused on liver and its detoxification mechanisms. Lewin?s work included chronic toxicity of narcotics, along with toxicity of chemicals such as methanol, glycerol, acrolein and chloroform...

Phillips, Tracie Denise

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Experimental determination of the speciation, partitioning, and release of perrhenate as a chemical surrogate for pertechnetate from a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key component to closing the nuclear fuel cycle is the storage and disposition of nuclear waste in geologic systems. Multiphase ceramic waste forms have been studied extensively as a potential host matrix for nuclear waste. Understanding the speciation, partitioning, and release behavior of radionuclides immobilized in multiphase ceramic waste forms is a critical aspect of developing the scientific and technical basis for nuclear waste management. In this study, we evaluated a sodalite-bearing multiphase ceramic waste form (i.e., fluidized-bed steam reform sodium aluminosilicate [FBSR NAS] product) as a potential host matrix for long-lived radionuclides, such as technetium (99Tc). The FBSR NAS material consists primarily of nepheline (ideally NaAlSiO4), anion-bearing sodalites (ideally M8[Al6Si6O24]X2, where M refers to alkali and alkaline earth cations and X refers to monovalent anions), and nosean (ideally Na8[AlSiO4]6SO4). Bulk X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the multiphase ceramic waste form, suggest rhenium (Re) is in the Re(VII) oxidation state and has partitioned to a Re-bearing sodalite phase (most likely a perrhenate sodalite Na8[Al6Si6O24](ReO4)2). Rhenium was added as a chemical surrogate for 99Tc during the FBSR NAS synthesis process. The weathering behavior of the FBSR NAS material was evaluated under hydraulically unsaturated conditions with deionized water at 90 ?C. The steady-state Al, Na, and Si concentrations suggests the weathering mechanisms are consistent with what has been observed for other aluminosilicate minerals and include a combination of ion exchange, network hydrolysis, and the formation of an enriched-silica surface layer or phase. The steady-state S and Re concentrations are within an order of magnitude of the nosean and perrhenate sodalite solubility, respectively. The order of magnitude difference between the observed and predicted concentration for Re and S may be associated with the fact that the anion-bearing sodalites contained in the multiphase ceramic matrix are present as mixed-anion sodalite phases. These results suggest the multiphase FBSR NAS material may be a viable host matrix for long-lived, highly mobilie radionuclides which is a critical aspect in the management of nuclear waste.

Pierce, Eric M.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Fitts, Jeff. P.; Jantzen, Carol. M.; Tang, G.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessing the potential toxicity of resuspended sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two moderately contaminated freshwater sediments (Sorel Harbour, St. Lawrence River, Canada) were subjected to a suspension event. The objective was to assess the environmental impact of the disposal of dredged material in water, in particular, the short-term effects of dumping on the water column and the long-term effects of dredged sediment deposits. In a series of microcosms, the sediments were left to stand for 25 d under flow-through conditions. In a second series of microcosms, sediments were vigorously suspended for 15 min before being left to settle and were submitted to the same treatment as reference sediments during the following 25 d. Physicochemical and biological parameters (Daphnia magna and Hydra attenuata survival) were measured in overlying water throughout the experiment. Sediment toxicity was assessed with Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca exposed to sediments collected at both the beginning and end of the 25-d period. Pore-water toxicity was evaluated with D. magna. During the suspension process, in the Sorel Harbour mixed sediment overlying water, the authors observed effects on H. attenuata survival and ammonia and metals (chromium, copper, and zinc) releases. Meanwhile, in reference (nonmixed) and mixed sediments as well as in associated pore waters, there were no significant chemical modifications no biological effects after the 25-d experiments. The developed approach, which attempts to simulate a dumping process, aims at allowing the assessment of the short- and long-term hazards resulting from a resuspension process in overlying water and in resettled sediments using both chemical and biological measurements.

Bonnet, C.; Babut, M.; Ferard, J.F.; Martel, L.; Garric, J.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Copper Toxicity in the San Francisco Bay-Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reducing the toxicity of copper that continues to leach fromothers to characterize copper bioaccumulation from distinctreview of total dissolved copper and its chemical speciation

Buck, Kristen N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

NETL: IEP - Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization The goal of the proposed effort is to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements on the management of CCBs. Supporting objectives are to 1) determine the release potential of selected air toxic elements, including mercury and arsenic, from CCBs under specific environmental conditions; 2) increase the database of information on mercury and other air toxic element releases for CCBs; 3) develop comparative laboratory and field data; and 4) develop appropriate laboratory and field protocols. The specific mechanisms of air toxic element releases to be evaluated will be leaching releases, vapor releases to the atmosphere, and biologically induced leaching and vapor releases.

76

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient air toxics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

77

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Indicators Project; CDC, NCEH, EHHE; January 2006 7 Summary: pollutants in ambient air Hazardous or toxic substances released in ambient air Residence in non... Indicators...

78

Extension to Chemical Products of the CERES Platform Used to Evaluate the Atmospheric Dispersion and Human Health Consequences of Noxious Releases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CERES platform developed by CEA to assess the atmospheric ... LaMP in order to take account of the chemical reactivity during dispersion. The method used consists ... concentration gradient issued by M2C2 to ...

Luc Patryl; Laurent Deguillaume

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bath-salt chemical promises safer solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... making of tofu can replace a toxic, expensive chemical in the manufacture of high-tech solar ...solarcells ...

Richard Van Noorden

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess sporicidal chemicals Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hygiene Plan Section 3.5 - CHEMICALS OF HIGH ACUTE & CHRONIC TOXICITY... Special Handling Procedures 1. Avoid or minimize contact with these chemicals by any route of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

E-Print Network 3.0 - affecting chemical indices Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hygiene Plan Section 3.5 - CHEMICALS OF HIGH ACUTE & CHRONIC TOXICITY... Special Handling Procedures 1. Avoid or minimize contact with these chemicals by any route of...

82

AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;AEROBIC BIOTRANSFORMATION OF TOXIC ORGANICS IN WASTEWATER DOE FRAP 1997-15 Prepared for in both domestic and industrial wastewater. The release of these compounds during wastewater treatment to predict the mass of the VOCs in the wastewater treated by biotransformation and the mass stripped

83

A human pluripotent stem cell platform for assessing developmental neural toxicity screening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current methods of testing chemicals for developmental neural toxicity include animal testing...in vitro...testing using cultured primary cells or cell lines. Here, we review the current state of neural toxicity ...

Zhonggang Hou; Jue Zhang; Michael P Schwartz; Ron Stewart

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Measurement endpoints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to ail organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazard to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which are the appropriate measurement endpoints. Should only mortality, growth, or reproductive endpoints be used? Since toxicity threshold values may be used to make management decisions, should values related to each measurement endpoint be presented to allow the risk assessor to choose the measurement endpoint most relevant to the assessment questions being asked, or is a standard approach that uses the lowest value that causes a toxicologic response in any system of the animal a more appropriate, conservative estimate?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Dose metric  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by examining which dose metric to use for threshold determination and interspecific extrapolation, Since wild animals are exposed to environmental contaminants primarily through ingestion, should threshold values be expressed as amount of chemical in the diet (e.g., ppm) or as a body weight-adjusted dose (mg/kg/day)? Which of these two approaches is most relevant for ecological risk assessment decision making? Which is best for interspecific extrapolations? Converting from one metric to the other can compound uncertainty if the actual consumption rates of a species is unknown. How should this be dealt with? Is it of sufficient magnitude to be of concern?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Preliminary Release: March 28, 2011",,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April 2013","Released  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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87

--PRESS RELEASE--  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE Global Energy, Inc. For Immediate Release GLOBAL ENERGY INC. AND WABASH VALLEY POWER RELAUNCH WABASH GASIFICATION FACILITY AS SG SOLUTIONS LLC Cincinnati and Indianapolis, February 7, 2005 - Global Energy Inc. and Wabash Valley Power Association announced today that they have formed SG Solutions LLC to move the Wabash Gasification Facility forward to achieve base load operations and future growth. SG Solutions LLC (SGS) is owned 50/50 by Wabash Valley Power Association and Wabash River Energy, a unit of Global Energy Inc. In recent years the Wabash Gasification Facility has operated under a demanding market-based contract which challenged the operation to make very low cost synthetic gas. As a result, Wabash has consistently produced synthetic gas with a

88

Press Release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Release Press Release LLNL garners 'Best in Class' award from NNSA April 30, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today congratulated its national laboratories and sites for achievements in environmental stewardship, awarding a total of 24 Pollution Prevention (P2) Awards for innovative initiatives across the enterprise. The P2 Awards recognize performance in integrating environmental stewardship practices that helps to reduce risk, protect natural resources and enhance site operations. "I applaud the work done at NNSA's sites in finding creative ways to reduce the environmental impact of our work," said NNSA's Deputy Administrator for

89

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Electrically Heated High Temperature Incineration of Air Toxics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Process Technology has placed a prototype of its patented, electrically heated, packed-bed air toxics oxidizer at a northern California chemical plant. This thermal oxidizer is capable of handling a wide range of chlorinated and non...

Agardy, F. J.; Wilcox, J. B.

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics sources Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics regulatory Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

94

E-Print Network 3.0 - air toxics compliance Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Requirements Department: Chemical and General Safety Summary: standards for air pollutants Second semi-annual exceedance report July 30 Air Toxics Inventory State Compare......

95

Unlimited Release  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Unlimited Release Unlimited Release Printed November 1987 Proceedings of The Wellbore Sampling Workshop Richard K. Traeger, Barry W. Harding Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 9 4 5 5 0 f o r the United States Department of Energy . under Contract DE-AC04-76DP00789 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

96

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Preliminary Release: March 28, 2011",,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Survey: Final Housing Characteristics Tables" "Preliminary Release: March 28, 2011" "Final Release: April 2013" "Table HC5.6 Computers and Other Electronics in...

99

Mitigation options for accidental releases of hazardous gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies include: secondary confinement, deinventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented.

Fthenakis, V.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Plasma chemical process for treatment of hazardous wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional methods of combustion are not always effective. One of the new methods for waste treatment is the destruction in plasma jet of chemical reactive gases. An unit with plasmotron power up to 50 kW is constructed for the investigations. Sulphur, chlorine and nitrogen containing organic toxic wastes are subjected to destruction. Water steam, air and their mixture are used as plasma generating gas and chemical reagent. The studies are carried out at a different ratio of plasma generating gasltoxic wastes at temperatures to 2000C. The products are analysed by gas mass spectroscopy. The released gas is composed of Co, H2 and CO2. There were found no hydrocarbons, dioxine and furan. Gas heat value is good for its burning without environment pollution.

Iv. Georgiev; Zh. Bulgaranova; B. Kumanova

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Structure activity relationships to assess new chemicals under TSCA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under Section 5 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), manufacturers must notify the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) 90 days before manufacturing, processing, or importing a new chemical substance. This is referred to as a premanufacture notice (PMN). The PMN must contain certain information including chemical identity, production volume, proposed uses, estimates of exposure and release, and any health or environmental test data that are available to the submitter. Because there is no explicit statutory authority that requires testing of new chemicals prior to their entry into the market, most PMNs are submitted with little or no data. As a result, EPA has developed special techniques for hazard assessment of PMN chemicals. These include (1) evaluation of available data on the chemical itself, (2) evaluation of data on analogues of the PMN, or evaluation of data on metabolites or analogues of metabolites of the PMN, (3) use of quantitative structure activity relationships (QSARs), and (4) knowledge and judgement of scientific assessors in the interpretation and integration of the information developed in the course of the assessment. This approach to evaluating potential hazards of new chemicals is used to identify those that are most in need of addition review of further testing. It should not be viewed as a replacement for testing. 4 tabs.

Auletta, A.E. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

103

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: NOAEL versus LOAEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. One is then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. This section continues the debate by six panelists of the ``correct`` approach for determining wildlife toxicity thresholds by debating which toxicity value should be used for setting threshold criteria. Should the lowest observable effect level (LOAEL) be used or is it more appropriate to use the no observable effect level (NOAEL)? What are the short-comings of using either of these point estimates? Should a ``benchmark`` approach, similar to that proposed for human health risk assessments, be used instead, where an EC{sub 5} or EC{sub 10} and associated confidence limits are determined and then divided by a safety factor? How should knowledge of the slope of the dose-response curve be incorporated into determination of toxicity threshold values?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solutin and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal.

Francis, Arokiasamy J. (Middle Island, NY); Dodge, Cleveland J. (Wading River, NY); Gillow, Jeffrey B. (Valley Cottage, NY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Bacterial and enzymatic bioassays for toxicity testing in the environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbioassays using bacteria or enzymes are increasingly applied to measure chemical toxicity in the environment. Attractive features of these assays may include low cost, rapid response to toxicants, high sample throughput, modest laboratory equipment and space requirements, low sample volume, portability, and reproducible responses. Enzymatic tests rely on measurement of either enzyme activity or enzyme biosynthesis. Dehydrogenases are the enzymes most used in toxicity testing. Assay of dehydrogenase activity is conveniently carried out using oxidoreduction dyes such as tetrazolium salts. Other enzyme activity tests utilize ATPases, esterases, phosphatases, urease, luciferase, beta-galactosidase, protease, amylase, or beta-glucosidase. Recently, the inhibition of enzyme (beta-galactosidase, tryptophanase, alpha-glucosidase) biosynthesis has been explored as a basis for toxicity testing. Enzyme biosynthesis was found to be generally more sensitive to organic chemicals than enzyme activity.107 references.

Bitton, G.; Koopman, B. (Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Tools for Policy Making Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: October 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines air toxics as pollutants that are known or suspected to cause serious health effects. Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act established 189 chemicals as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants. Large uncertainties still exist regarding exposure, risks, and sources and there has been a heavy reliance on inventories and modeling to determine sources and risks. In January 2002, Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) embarked on a project to investigate air toxics in Allegheny County. This

109

Acoustic plug release indicator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention comprises an acoustic plug release indicator system. The acoustic plug release indicatior system comprises a microphone, recording system and operator listening device.

Carter, E.E. Jr.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Identification of toxic components in beechwood and petroleum creosotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1989 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Approved as to style and content by: Ay(hn Akger (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. Rick Irvin (Co...

Okaygun, Mehmet S.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Work Practices for Chemical Fumehoods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Practices for Chemical Fumehoods Practices for Chemical Fumehoods (Reviewed May 16, 2011) Always use a chemical fumehood when working with toxic and/or volatile chemicals, not on an open bench. Chemical fumehoods are designed to provide protection for the user from chemical and radiological contaminants. However, they do not absolutely eliminate exposure, even under ideal conditions. Careless work practices can result in considerable exposure to users who may believe they are protected. To optimize the performance of the chemical hood, adhere to the following work practices: 1. Ensure that your chemical hood has a current inspection sticker (dated within the last year). The face velocity should be between 80 and 120 linear feet per minute (lfpm). 2. Verify that the chemical hood is drawing air.

112

Biological treatment options for consolidated tailings release waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group, operates a large oil sands mining and extraction operation in northeastern Alberta. The extraction plant produces large volumes of a tailings slurry which resists dewatering and treatment, and is toxic to aquatic organisms. Consolidated tailings (CT) technology is used to treat tailings by either acid/lime or gypsum and enhances the possibility of treating residual fine tails in a ``dry`` land reclamation scenario and treating the release water in a wastewater treatment reclamation scenario. The objective was to assess the treatability of CT release water (i.e., the reduction of acute and chronic toxicities to trout, Ceriodaphnia, and bacteria) in bench-scale biological treatment systems. Microtox{reg_sign} IC20 test showed complete detoxification for the gypsum CT release water within 3 to 5 weeks compared with little reduction in toxicity for dyke drainage. Acute toxicity (fish) and chronic toxicity (Ceriodaphnia, bacterial) was removed from both CT release waters. Phosphate and aeration enhanced detoxification rates. Concentrations of naphthenic acids (an organic toxicant) were not reduced, but levels of dissolved organic compounds decreased faster than was the case for dyke drainage water, indicating that some of the organic compounds in both acid/lime and gypsum CT waters were more biodegradable. There was a pattern of increasing toxicity for dyke drainage water which confirmed observations during field-scale testing in the constructed wetlands and which was not observed for CT release waters. Acid/lime and gypsum CT water can be treated biologically in either an aeration pond, constructed wetlands, or a combination of both thereby avoiding the expense of long-term storage and/or conventional waste treatment systems.

Gunter, C.P.; Nix, P.G.; Sander, B. [EVS Environment Consultants, North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Knezevic, Z.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Acceptable Levels of Risk in Setting Chemical Standards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The setting of a chemical standard is a function not only of the toxic properties of the chemical but also the level of risk under which the standard is established. This ... demonstrates the quantitative effects...

Paul S. Price

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

RMOTC - News - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases January Sale of Equipment and Materials Janurary 2014 | Press Releases Read Press Release here. Department of Energy to Sell NPR-3 July 2013 | Press Releases Read Press Release here. View Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Report to Congress here. Press Releases Archive STWA, Inc. to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs (PDF) June 2011 | Press Releases Geothermal research initiative at RMOTC (PDF) October 2009 | Press Releases RMOTC partner receives award for tech tested at Teapot Dome (PDF) August 2009 | Press Releases Summer interns work with RMOTC engineers August 2009 | Articles | Casper Journal College, business, government officials launch wind project

115

New low toxicity corrosion inhibitors for industrial cleaning operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inhibitors are routinely employed in chemical cleaning solvents used for removing scale from electrical power plants and industrial equipment since these cleaning solvents are corrosive to metal surfaces. This paper discusses the development of three new inhibitors developed for the use in hydrochloric acid, ammoniated EDTA or citric acid chemical cleaning solutions. Synthesis procedures used in the production of Mannich derivatives employed in the inhibitors were optimized for maximum corrosion resistance and reduced toxicity. All auxiliary ingredients used in the formulation of final inhibitor products were chosen to give the lowest possible toxicity of these products.

Lindert, A.; Johnston, W.G. [Henkel Surface Technologies, Madison Heights, MI (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act, revised significantly in 2006, seeks to mitigate the use of toxic substances and the production of toxic byproducts through reporting requirements as well as resource conservation plans...

117

Nuclear Chemical EngineeringNuclear Chemical Engineering (Prof. Mikael Nilsson)(Prof. Mikael Nilsson)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Chemical EngineeringNuclear Chemical Engineering (Prof. Mikael Nilsson)(Prof. Mikael in nuclear engineering. Current work involves validation of computer codes for composition and toxicity for future nuclear waste reprocessing. Projects include new methods and chemicals used in solvent extraction

Mease, Kenneth D.

118

Nuclear Chemical EngineeringNuclear Chemical Engineering (Prof.(Prof. MikaelMikael Nilsson)Nilsson)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear Chemical EngineeringNuclear Chemical Engineering (Prof.(Prof. MikaelMikael Nilsson in nuclear engineering. Current work involves validation of computer codes for composition and toxicity for future nuclear waste reprocessing. Projects include new methods and chemicals used in solvent extraction

Mease, Kenneth D.

119

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

120

SRS - News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6/2014 6/2014 SEARCH GO spacer News Releases govDELIVERY Video Releases Fact Sheets Photo Gallery Speakers Media Contacts SRS Home SRS News Releases News releases are in PDF format (requires Acrobat Reader - click here to download). * 2013 News Releases * 2012 News Releases * 2011 News Releases * 2010 News Releases 2013: 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment 12.16.13 Registration for the 2014 SRS Public Tour Program Begins December 30 12.12.13 Area Children to Benefit from SRS "Toys for Tots" Campaign 12.10.13 Ruth Patrick's Work Opens Doors for SRNL Environmental Remediation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Change El Complete Revision (6) Document Title: Visual Inspection Plan for Single-Shell Tanks and Double-Shell Tanks (7) ChangeRelease Initial Release Description: (8) Change NA...

122

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEWS MEDIA CONTACTS (Fermilab) Donald Sena, 630840-5678 Judy Jackson, 630840-3351 December 8, 1997 For immediate release Attached and below is the joint press release from the...

123

Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April 2013","Releas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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124

Definition: Chemical energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy energy Energy stored in chemical bonds between atoms within molecules. When a chemical reaction occurs, the chemical energy within a molecule can increase or that energy can be released into its surroundings as another form of energy (e.g., heat or light). Fuel combustion is example of the conversion of chemical energy to another form of energy.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In chemistry, Chemical energy is the potential of a chemical substance to undergo a transformation through a chemical reaction or, to transform other chemical substances. Examples include batteries and light bulbs and cells etc. Breaking or making of chemical bonds involves energy, which may be either absorbed or evolved from a chemical system Energy that can be released (or absorbed) because of a reaction between a set of

125

Results of acute and chronic toxicity tests conducted at SRS NPDES outfalls, July--October 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acute (48 hour LC50) and chronic (7-day reproductive impairment) toxicity tests were conducted on Ceriodaphnia dubia in water collected from 53 NPDES outfalls. All tests were conducted at the in-stream waste concentration. only 12 of the 53 outfalls showed no evidence of toxicity. Twenty-eight of the outfalls were acutely toxic, often producing 100% mortality during the first day of exposure. Fourteen outfalls had no discharge at the time of sampling and could not be tested. Three outfalls were not tested because their toxicity has been adequately characterized in other investigations. Elevated concentrations of total residual chlorine are suspected to be responsible for the observed toxicity of many NPDES outfalls, particularly the sanitary wastewater treatment plants. Chemical data from previous studies indicate that metals may also be present in toxic concentrations at many outfalls. Toxicity identification and reduction options are discussed.

Specht, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

127

NEWS RELEASE PRESSOFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEWS RELEASE PRESSOFFICE Release Date: April 18, 2008 Contact: Christine Mangi (202) 205-6948 Release Number: 08-35 Internet Address: www.sba.gov/news/ SBA TO PARTNER WITH THE U.S.-INDIA BUSINESS development programs and services, disseminate current SBA news and information, provide speakers for SBA

128

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Microbial Activity on Trace Element Release from Sewage Sludge S H A B N A M Q U R E S H in mobilization of trace elements from land-applied wastewater sludge is not well-defined. Our study examined-effective management alternative. Unfor- tunately, sewage sludge also contains potentially toxic trace elements

Walter, M.Todd

129

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Toxic potential of non-ortho and mono-ortho coplanar PCBs in commercial PCB preparations: 2,3,7,8-T/sub 4/ CDD Toxicity Equivalence Factors Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Identification of highly toxic polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in commercial PCBs has contributed to the belief that they play a major role in the PCB toxicity. However, Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies have indicated that PCB congeners with chlorine substitution at both para and two or more meta positions resemble 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (T/sub 4/CDD) in their biologic and toxic effects due to their coplanarity. The relative toxic potential of these PCB isomers in wild animals such as Forster's tern, marine mammals and Snapping turtle has been emphasized. Some members of these toxic congeners were also identified and quantitated in commercial PCBs. However, there is no serious effort to evaluate the toxic potential of these PCB congeners in commercial PCB mixtures. Hence an isomer-specific toxic evaluation was attempted in those mixtures to understand the chemical factors behind their toxicity.

Kannan, N.; Tanabe, S.; Tatsukawa, R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Storage and Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Partial List of Incompatible chemicals (Toxic Hazards) Substances in the left hand column should be stored and handled so that they cannot possibly accidentally contact corresponding substances in the center column, because toxic materials (right hand column) would be produced. Arsenical Materials Any Reducing Agent Arsine Azides Acids Hydrogen Azide Cyanides Acids Hydrogen Cyanide Hypochlorites Acids Chlorine or Hypochlorous Acid Nitrates Sulfuric Acid Nitrogen Dioxide Nitric acid Copper, Brass, Heavy Metals Nitrogen Dioxide Nitrites Acids Nitrous Fumes Phosphorus Caustic Alkalies/ Reducers Phosphine Selenides Reducers Hydrogen Selenide Sulfides Acids Hydrogen Sulfide Tellurides Reducers Hydrogen Telluride

133

ORISE: Current News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases Official announcements released by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) are listed below. News releases are sortable by date, headline or topic. For news releases from previous years, please visit our News Archives. Recent News Releases Date Title 07/15/2013 College of American Pathologists renews accreditation of beryllium laboratory managed by ORAU 06/12/2013 Top graduate students from U.S. convene with Nobel Laureates in Lindau, Germany 12/03/2012 DOE recognizes partnership with ORAU for long-time management of Tennessee Science Bowl 09/10/2012 Evasius selected as ORAU's vice president and director of science education programs 03/12/1012 ORAU Receives Another Safety Site Star of Excellence 01/18/2012 Study finds foreign doctorate recipients' stay rates remain high

134

NREL: News - News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releases Releases NREL's Public Relations Office works with media outlets on news stories about the laboratory and renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. You may subscribe to receive new NREL releases by email or via RSS feed. NREL News Releases RSS Feed (XML) Search All News Releases Search Help 2014 News Releases January 6, 2014 NREL Expert Honored for Energy Systems Innovations The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently won several prestigious awards, including honors for innovations in window air-conditioning efficiency, data sharing, and its energy-efficient computer data center. January 2, 2014 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy

135

NETL 2007 News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 News Releases 7 News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 18, 2007 Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project DOE awarded $66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium for the Department's fourth large scale carbon sequestration project. December 06, 2007 DOE Estimates Future Water Needs for Thermoelectric Power Plants The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a 2007 update to its groundbreaking study, "Estimating Freshwater Needs to Meet Future Thermoelectric Generation Requirements." December 05, 2007 Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power Generation and Gasification Technologies

136

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RELEASE Press Contacts Judy Treend, Fermilab, (630) 840 3351 New exhibit on accelerators in medicine at Fermilab A new exhibit, Pulse: Accelerator Science in Medicine...

137

WIPP News Releases - 1999  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 News Releases DOE's Barbara Smith Returns to Carlsbad -- December 13 Nine WIPP Employees Taken to Hospital as Precaution Following Acid Spill -- December 8 Project Management...

138

Accidental Release Program (Delaware)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware Accidental Release Prevention Regulation contains requirements for owners or operators of stationary sources having regulated extremely hazardous substances onsite to develop and...

139

National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low \\{NOAELs\\} and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert for possible effects on fertility (or early embryonic development), the biological significance of which can be ascertained in a littering (e.g. 2-generation) study. From the chemicals reviewed it would appear that where there are no alerts from a repeat-dose toxicity study, a pre-natal developmental toxicity study and sex steroid receptor binding assays, there exists a low priority for animal studies to address the fertility endpoint. The ability for these types of tests to provide alerts for effects on fertility is clearly dependent on the mode of action of the toxicant in question. Further work should therefore be performed to determine the failure rate of this type of approach when applied to a larger group of chemicals with diverse modes of action.

M.P. Dent

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Chemical Management  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available...

143

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] Aerosol Research Heats Up During Summer Fire Season Bookmark and Share Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. While the impacts of wildfires on people and the surrounding environment are apparent, the effect on the atmosphere from smoky soot particles-a type of aerosol-is much less so. Whether from grass, timber, or brush, each type of biological material releases its own sooty chemical signature that interacts differently with sunlight, clouds, and other particles in the sky. How does this mingling affect Earth's climate? Enter the Biomass Burning Observation Project, or BBOP. Beginning in July, scientists funded by the U.S. Department of Energy will maneuver a high-tech research aircraft into the plumes of wildfires to

144

Comparative toxicities of two common agricultural chemicals to toads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Amphibians are limited in their movements compared to other terrestrial vertebrates and are therefore at risk of having entire local populations destroyed by agricultural pesticides. This study provides basic toxicological information about two toad...

Cowman, Deborah Fay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles their origin activity and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public health concerns related to this sometimes-strange new science of nano while raising awareness of nanomaterials toxicity among scientists and manufacturers handling them. We show that humans have always been exposed to tiny particles via dust storms volcanic ash and other natural processes and that our bodily systems are well adapted to protect us from these potentially harmful intruders. The reticuloendothelial system in particular actively neutralizes and eliminates foreign matter in the body including viruses and nonbiological particles. Particles originating from human activities have existed for millennia e.g. smoke from combustion and lint from garments but the recent development of industry and combustion-based engine transportation has profoundly increased anthropogenic particulate pollution. Significantly technological advancement has also changed the character of particulate pollution increasing the proportion of nanometer-sized particles-nanoparticles-and expanding the variety of chemical compositions. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between particulate air pollution levels respiratory and cardiovascular diseases various cancers and mortality. Adverse effects of nanoparticles on human health depend on individual factors such as genetics and existing disease as well as exposure and nanoparticle chemistry size shape agglomeration state and electromagnetic properties. Animal and human studies show that inhaled nanoparticles are less efficiently removed than larger particles by the macrophage clearance mechanisms in the lungs causing lung damage and that nanoparticles can translocate through the circulatory lymphatic and nervous systems to many tissues and organs including the brain. The key to understanding the toxicity of nanoparticles is that their minute size smaller than cells and cellular organelles allows them to penetrate these basic biological structures disrupting their normal function. Examples of toxic effects include tissue inflammation and altered cellular redox balance toward oxidation causing abnormal function or cell death. The manipulation of matter at the scale of atoms nanotechnology is creating many new materials with characteristics not always easily predicted from current knowledge. Within the nearly limitless diversity of these materials some happen to be toxic to biological systems others are relatively benign while others confer health benefits. Some of these materials have desirable characteristics for industrial applications as nanostructured materials often exhibit beneficial properties from UV absorbance in sunscreen to oil-less lubrication of motors. A rational science-based approach is needed to minimize harm caused by these materials while supporting continued study and appropriate industrial development. As current knowledge of the toxicology of bulk materials may not suffice in reliably predicting toxic forms of nanoparticles ongoing and expanded study of nanotoxicity will be necessary. For nanotechnologies with clearly associated health risks intelligent design of materials and devices is needed to derive the benefits of these new technologies while limiting adverse health impacts. Human exposure to toxic nanoparticles can be reduced through identifying creation-exposure pathways of toxins a study that may someday soon unravel the mysteries of diseases such as Parkinsons and Alzheimers. Reduction in fossil fuel combustion would have a large impact on global human exposure to nanoparticles as would limiting deforestation and desertification. While nanotoxicity is a relatively new concept to science this review reveals the result of lifes long history of evolution in the presence of nanoparticles and how the human body in particular has adapted to defend itself against nanoparticulate intruders.

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

News Releases | Biosciences Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Biosciences Division News Releases Protein crystal samples are placed on a small metal tip so X-rays from the adjacent beam pipe can pass through them and diffract off the atoms inside the crystal. Lessening X-ray damage is healthy for protein discovery data too December 16, 2013 - New recommendations for using X-rays promise to speed investigations aimed at understanding the structure and function of biologically important proteins - information critical to the development of new drugs. Read more. Kayakers and boats traverse the branch of the Chicago River in the downtown area Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study Chicago River microbe population

147

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

02-26 December 20, 2002 For immediate release Judy Treend, Fermilab, 630-840-3351 Elizabeth Clements, Fermilab, 630-840-3351 Holiday Special: Fermilab's Lederman Science Center...

148

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

03-26 December 19, 2003 For immediate release Press Contact: Elizabeth Clements, Fermilab, 630-840-3351 Fermilab Hosts Virtual Ask-a-Scientist on January 29, 2004 BATAVIA, Ill. -...

149

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4-11 July 8, 2004 For immediate release Press contact: Tom Jordan, 630-840-4035, jordant@fnal.gov Fermilab Supports Energy Department Science Education Initiative Batavia,...

150

Press Release: Nuclear Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two nuclear physicists, a nuclear engineer, and an economistmmembers of the Union of Concerned Scientists--released a report today that examined a new problem with nuclear reactor safety. According to the repo...

Henry W. Kendall

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 21, 2005 Media contact: Kurt Riesselmann, 630-840-3351 Free tickets & information: 630-840-2787, M-F 9-4 Photos of Jack Liebeck and Brian Foster...

152

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

17 Sept. 28, 2007 Media Contact: Tona Kunz, Fermilab Office of Communication, 630-840-3351, tkunz@fnal.gov For immediate release Volunteers Welcome at Fermilab's Prairie Harvest on...

153

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 27 030711 Fermilab offers Family Open House on Sunday, Feb. 27 021611 Dark Energy Survey Poised to Probe Cosmic Speed-Up 011111 Archived Releases 2013 2012 2011 2010...

154

2010 Report Released | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Released 2010 Report Released January 12, 1987 2010 Report Released Washington, DC White House releases "2010 Report," projecting requirements for maintaining and modernizing...

155

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

involves developing and maintaining waste tank inventories comprising 25 chemical and 46 radionuclide components in the 177 Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These BBIs...

156

DOCUMENT RELEASE FORM  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

involves developing and maintaining waste tank inventories comprising 25 chemical and 46 radionuclide components in the 177 Hanford Site underground storage tanks. These...

157

Smoke and toxic species analyses from combustion of guayule bagasse modified fiberboards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The determination of particle size distribution. 3. The identification of heavy metals in the smoke and ash phases. 4. The identification of other major smoke components. These tests will also be performed on normal, untreated fiberboard samples so... and untreated fiberboards were less than 10 microns in size and were, therefore, respirable to humans. Toxic species identification through the use of the gas chromatograph/mass spectroscopy identified no unusually toxic chemical species within the smoke...

Paris, Lisa Danielle

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

STEP Utility Data Release Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

STEP Utility Data Release Form, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

159

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

160

News Releases - 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases - 2013 News Releases - 2013 /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2013 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. los alamos acheivements Dateline Los Alamos: Top Science News for 2013 HIV vaccine, Mars water, climate change, birth of a black hole, thwarting terrorists among topics of interest Los Alamos outstanding science and technology achievements for 2013 - 12/24/13 2014 Employee Giving Campaign Nearly $2 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2014 employee giving campaign Lab employee contributions will fund a wide range of programs offered by eligible nonprofit organizations. - 12/17/13 Bradbury Science Museum

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Press Release Archive 4 Press Release Archive Recent Releases Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator 12/16/04 NIU launches Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab 12/6/04 Pier Oddone of Berkeley Lab Named Fermilab Director 11/19/04 Fermilab To Host Girl Scout Badge Event on Saturday, November 6 11/4/04 Rocky Kolb to Direct New Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center 11/1/04 Fermilab Director Witherell One of Eight Directors to Receive Energy Secretary's Gold Award 10/25/04 Fermilab Arts Series Celebrates 30th Anniversary 10/7/04 Fermilab Offers Tours of Antimatter Production Site, October 3 and 24 9/14/04 Fermilab Scientists Present New Physics Results at ICHEP Beijing 8/18/04 How They Spent Their Summer Vacation: QuarkNet Students Experience Real Work of Fermilab Scientists 8/3/04

162

NETL 2008 News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 News Releases 8 News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 23, 2008 Fossil Energy Research Grants Awarded to Four Minority Universities Continuing its long-standing minority university research program, DOE has selected four institutions where students and faculty will investigate projects dealing with sensors and controls, computational energy sciences, and advanced materials for use in fossil fuel power systems. December 19, 2008 NETL’s Multiphase Flow Research Group Wins INCITE Award The Multiphase Flow Research Group at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has won a 2009 Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) award from the U.S. Department of Energy for their proposal "Clean and Efficient Coal Gasifier Designs using Large-Scale Simulations."

163

SR 2000 News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 News Releases 0 News Releases Nuclear Security Oversight Panel Visits SRS As Part of NNSA Tour - SR-00-01 DOE Security Czar To Visit SRS - SR-00-02 DOE To Present SRS Fiscal Year 2001 Budget - SR-00-03 DOE Releases Accident Investigation Report On FB-Line Workers' Plutonium Intake - SR-00-04 Environmental Management Science Program National Workshop - SR-00-05 DOE Cleanup Science on Display In Atlanta - SR-00-06 Environmental Cleanup Technology Conference Held - SR-00-07 Wackenhut Receives Award Fee - SR-00-08 WSRC Receives Award Fee - SR-00-09 DOE Hosts Radioactive Materials Transportation Workshop - SR-00-10 Energy Secretary To Visit SRS - SR-00-11 "Melt & Dilute" Selected To Treat DOE's Spent Nuclear Fuel At SRS - SR-00-12 Savannah River Operations Office Wins Best Practices Award - SR-00-13

164

NETL 2003 Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Releases 3 Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 30, 2003 Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power Project of 2003 A power plant featuring a next-generation gas turbine developed as part of DOE's advanced turbine systems program has been selected by Power Engineering magazine as one of three 2003 Projects of the Year. December 8, 2003 Historically Black, Other Minority Colleges Encouraged to Compete for Grants for Fossil Energy Research DOE has issued its annual call for fossil fuel research proposals from historically black and other minority colleges and universities. December 5, 2003 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor is 2003 Lowry Award Winner The Energy Department's 2003 Homer H. Lowry Award will go to a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor emeritus whose combustion research continues to influence the design and commercialization of cleaner, 'low NOx' combustors widely used in the power industry.

165

SRNL EMERGENCY RESPONSE CAPABILITY FOR ATMOSPHERIC CONTAMINANT RELEASES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical or radiological contamination is enhanced when plume predictions, field measurements, and real-time weather information are integrated into a geospatial framework. The Weather Information and Display (WIND) System at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) utilizes such an integrated framework. The rapid availability of predictions from a suite of atmospheric transport models within this geospatial framework has proven to be of great value to decision makers during an emergency involving an atmospheric contaminant release.

Koffman, L; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Buckley, R; Robert Addis, R

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

166

SEPA Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

sepa/press-releases Southeastern Power Administration sepa/press-releases Southeastern Power Administration 1166 Athens Tech Rd. Elberton, GA 30635-6711Phone: (706) 213-3800 en ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013 http://energy.gov/sepa/articles/energy-efficiency-and-renewable-energy-report-fy-2013 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013

167

NE Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC 20585202-586-5000 en Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-new-investment-innovative-small-modular-reactor Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor

168

EM Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en Task Order Awarded to Small Business for Natural Gas Services http://energy.gov/em/articles/task-order-awarded-small-business-natural-gas-services Task Order Awarded to Small Business for Natural Gas Services

169

Benzene release. status report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scoping benzene release measurements were conducted on 4 wt percent KTPB `DEMO` formulation slurry using a round, flat bottomed 100-mL flask containing 75 mL slurry. The slurry was agitated with a magnetic stirrer bar to keep the surface refreshed without creating a vortex. Benzene release measurements were made by purging the vapor space at a constant rate and analyzing for benzene by gas chromatography with automatic data acquisition. Some of the data have been rounded or simplified in view of the scoping nature of this study.

Dworjanyn, L.O. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Rappe, K.G.; Gauglitz, P.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Release in Earthquakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......and Dynamic Electricity. (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 2nd Ed.). Starr A. T. , 1928. Slip in a Crystal...Electromagnetic Theory (McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York). Energy Release in Earthquakes Leon Knopoff (Received 1957......

Leon Knopoff

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Toxic Remediation System And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

What is disclosed is a novel toxic waste remediation system designed to provide on-site destruction of a wide variety of hazardous organic volatile hydrocarbons, including but not limited to halogenated and aromatic hydrocarbons in the vapor phase. This invention utilizes a detoxification plenum and radiation treatment which transforms hazardous organic compounds into non-hazardous substances.

Matthews, Stephen M. (Alameda County, CA); Schonberg, Russell G. (Santa Clara County, CA); Fadness, David R. (Santa Clara County, CA)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wildlife toxicity extrapolations: Allometry versus physiologically-based toxicokinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ecotoxicological assessments must rely on the extrapolation of toxicity data from a few indicator species to many species of concern. Data are available from laboratory studies (e.g., quail, mallards, rainbow trout, fathead minnow) and some planned or serendipitous field studies of a broader, but by no means comprehensive, suite of species. Yet all ecological risk assessments begin with an estimate of risk based on information gleaned from the literature. The authors are then confronted with the necessity of extrapolating toxicity information from a limited number of indicator species to all organisms of interest. This is a particularly acute problem when trying to estimate hazards to wildlife in terrestrial systems as there is an extreme paucity of data for most chemicals in all but a handful of species. The question arises of how interspecific extrapolations should be made. Should extrapolations be limited to animals within the same class, order, family or genus? Alteratively, should extrapolations be made along trophic levels or physiologic similarities rather than by taxonomic classification? In other words, is an avian carnivore more like a mammalian carnivore or an avian granivore in its response to a toxic substance? Can general rules be set or does the type of extrapolation depend upon the class of chemical and its mode of uptake and toxicologic effect?

Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Berg, M. van den [Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands). Research Inst. of Toxicology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Combustion toxics: Available data and additional needs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continuing expansion of air pollution regulations there is an increasing awareness of the potential need to assess the emissions and impact of trace compounds from combustion sources in refineries and chemical plants. It has been found that these trace compounds may be emitted as the result of incomplete fuel combustion, formation of new compounds during combustion, or the presence of inorganics (e.g., metals) in the fuel. Emission factors based on field data from these sources have recently been published by both the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The emission factors indicate that a large number of trace compounds may be emitted from combustion sources including volatiles, semi-volatiles, PAHs, metals, and dioxins/furans. Some of these trace compounds have been classified as hazardous or toxic. A review of the EPA and API published data sets indicates that, while there is some overlap, many gaps exist in specific source and emission types. Where gaps exist, there is a lack of confirmation for the reported emission factor. Comparison of the EPA and API emission factors for gas and fuel oil fired boilers, however, indicates reasonable agreement for several metals and some PAHs where the data overlap. EPA, however, has sampled for many more metals than API and several EPA factors for PAHs are significantly higher than reported by API. Additionally tests may be warranted where there is insufficient overlap. Much additional work needs to be done to provide reliable factors which can be used to estimate trace toxic emissions from combustion. Many gaps and inconsistencies exist in the emission factors database and changes to existing factors are expected as the database is expanded.

Siegell, J.H.

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

SEPA Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

articles/181/1/SEPA Press Releases Southeastern Power articles/181/1/SEPA Press Releases Southeastern Power Administration 1166 Athens Tech Rd. Elberton, GA 30635-6711Phone: (706) 213-3800 en ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013 http://energy.gov/sepa/articles/energy-efficiency-and-renewable-energy-report-fy-2013 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013

175

New Releases | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Features Story Tips Audio Spots Honors and Awards Videos ORNL Review Magazine ORNL Reporter DOE Pulse Media Contacts Media Mentions RSS Feeds News Home | ORNL | News | News Releases News Releases ORNL's Office of Communications works with national, regional, and local media outlets on news stories about the laboratory. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our Media Contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov. 1-25 of 25 Results ORNL-UT researchers invent 'sideways' approach to 2-D hybrid materials ORNL-UT researchers invent 'sideways' approach to 2-D hybrid materials

176

JGI - News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA. Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. November 25, 2013 How Scavenging Fungi Became a Plant's Best Friend. Glomeromycota is an ancient lineage of fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with roots that goes back nearly 420 million years to the earliest plants. More than two thirds of the world's plants depend on this soil-dwelling symbiotic fungus to survive, including critical agricultural crops such as wheat, cassava, and rice. November 22, 2013

177

2009 WIPP News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

09 News Releases 09 News Releases December 21 Magnum Minerals to Buy WIPP Salt October 14 Agreement Reached Between WTS and Union Employees October 1 Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment September 18 WIPP Completes First RH-TRU Shipment from VNC July 24 DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over Waste Disposal in Salt June 25 DOE Carlsbad Field Office Opens Local Recovery Act Office June 18 DOE Announces the Transfer of the WIPP Water Line to the City of Carlsbad June 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP June 1 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Best Overall at Competition April 24 Remote-Handled TRU Waste Shipments from the Savannah River Site Arrive Safely at WIPP March 31 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico

178

SR 2001 News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SR 2001 News Releases SR 2001 News Releases Department of Energy Extends Contract at SRS - R-01-002 Savannah River Site's Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observance - SR-01-01 DOE Announces Availability of Draft SEIS on Salt Processing Alternatives - SR-01-02 Media Availability For WIPP Shipment - SR-01-03 Savannah River Site Sends First Shipment Of Transuranic Waste To WIPP - SR-01-04 DOE Announces Availability Of Draft RFP On Salt Waste Processing Facility - SR-01-05 DOE Announces Wackenhut Services, Inc. - SR-01-06 DOE & DOL Hold Public Meeting For Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act - SR-01-07 DOE Announces Plans For Offsite Treatment & Disposal Of SRS Waste - SR-01-08 DOE Announces Availability Of Final Supplemental EIS And Identifies Preferred Salt Processing Alternative - SR-01-09

179

NACP Data Set Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP: MODIS Daily Land Incident 4-km PAR Images for North America, 2003-2005 . Data set prepared by S. Liang and D. Wang. This data set contains daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) Images over North America for the years 2003 - 2005. The daily images were derived by integrating MODIS/Terra and MODIS/Aqua instantaneous PAR data where the instantaneous PAR data is estimated directly from Terra or Aqua MODIS 5-min L1b swath data (Liang et al., 2006 and Wang et al., 2010). The spatial distribution of this data set includes the MODIS tile subsets covering North America, Central America, portions of South America, and

180

WIPP News Releases - 1998  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 News Releases 8 News Releases DOE Notifies States and Tribes That First Shipment To WIPP Could Occur as Early as Mid-January - December 18, 1998 International Scientists, Engineers Make Stop in Carlsbad To Tour WIPP, Environmental Monitoring Center - November 19, 1998 WIPP Exercise Termed Success By Utah, DOE Officials - November 16, 1998 WIPP Contractor To Participate In Lea County Procurement Workshop - November 12, 1998 WIPP Crews Complete One Maintenance Project, On Schedule to Finish Second by Mid-December - November 10, 1998 Energy Department Awards $300,000 to City of Carlsbad To Help Boost Region's Economic Planning - November 4, 1998 Mansour Akbarzadeh Appointed WIPP Laboratories Manager - November 4, 1998 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Members Bring Home Four Awards From Missouri Competition - November 2, 1998

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Hometown News Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Publications Hometown News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 October 18, 2013 NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award Morgantown, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen E. Zitney of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Mid-Atlantic region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Excellence in Technology Transfer for his work on the 3D Virtual Energy Plant Simulator and Immersive Training System. October 18, 2013 NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award Albany, Ore. - Jeffrey Hawk of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Far West region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Outstanding Technology Development for his work on Superior Heat Resistant Alloys through Controlled Homogenization.

182

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 Press Release Archive 7 Press Release Archive The Midnight Ride of the CMS Tracking Detector 12/20/07 Industry and Research Heavyweights Collaborate to Demonstrate Data Transport Capability at SC07 11/12/07 Auger Observatory closes in on long-standing mystery, links highest-energy cosmic rays with violent black holes 11/08/07 Fermilab environmental program receives international recognition 10/15/07 Fermilab in Top 10 list of Chicagoland Scientific Achievements 10/02/07 Volunteers Welcome at Fermilab's Prairie Harvest on Oct. 6 and Nov. 3 09/28/07 Fermilab named one of the Chicago area's best places to work 09/25/07 Anna Zuccarini, Naperville, leads Department of Energy education program for undergraduates 08/10/07 Pierre Auger Observatory shares cosmic-ray data with public, students 07/03/07

183

WIPP News Releases - 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 News Releases 4 News Releases November 4 Detwiler Resumes Position at DOE Headquarters October 14 WIPP Mine Rescue Team First in Missouri October 12 DOE Announces WIPP Contract Negotiations October 6 Washington TRU Solutions is Mine Operator of the Year September 28 Washington Group International Named Tops in Safety July 24 No Damage to WIPP Cargo in Roswell Traffic Accident July 22 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins "Overall Contest" at Nationals July 2 DOE Prevails in WIPP Court Case July 1 $1M to Fund Underground Science at WIPP April 6 NMED Approves Safer Testing Requirements for LANL Sealed Source Wastes April 1 WIPP Marks Five Years of Safe Operation March 30 EPA Approves Remote-Handled Waste Procedures for WIPP March 26 DOE Submits WIPP Compliance Recertification Application to EPA

184

CHEMICAL MARKETING  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKETING ... The reason, I believe, is that the chemical industry has been blind (until very recently) to the need for paying attention to marketing. ... Its marketing needs are now like those of a matureno longer a growingindustry. ...

1960-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

EIA new releases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

187

Factors affecting toxicity and efficacy of polymeric nanomedicines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to medicine. The purpose of this article is to review common characteristics of polymeric nanomedicines with respect to passive targeting. We consider several biodegradable polymeric nanomedicines that are between 1 and 100 nm in size, and discuss the impact of this technology on efficacy, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and targeting. The degree of toxicity of polymeric nanomedicines is strongly influenced by the biological conditions of the local environment, which influence the rate of degradation or release of polymeric nanomedicines. The dissemination of polymeric nanomedicines in vivo depends on the capillary network, which can provide differential access to normal and tumor cells. The accumulation of nanomedicines in the microlymphatics depends upon retention time in the blood and extracellular compartments, as well as the type of capillary endothelium surrounding specific tissues. Finally, the toxicity or efficacy of intact nanomedicines is also dependent upon tissue type, i.e., non-endocrine or endocrine tissue, spleen, or lymphatics, as well as tumor type.

Igarashi, Eiki [NanoCarrier Co., Ltd., Chiba 277-0882 (Japan)], E-mail: igarashi@nanocarrier.co.jp

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

ELECTROCHEMICAL RESEARCH IN CHEMICAL HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS: SODIUM BOROHYDRIDE AND ORGANOTIN HYDRIDES.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane (more)

McLafferty, Jason

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

APPENDIX B CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION SCHEME Developing safe storage practices for laboratory chemicals is not always easy and often  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/or ventilated gas storage cabinet. Methane, Acetylene, Hydrogen Oxidizing and toxic compressed gases, oxidizing68 APPENDIX B ­ CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION SCHEME Developing safe storage practices. Your ability to develop a safe storage system will depend on your knowledge of chemicals or your

190

Media Release Media Contact FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Heather Rasmussen  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Release Media Contact Release Media Contact FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Heather Rasmussen September 22, 2011 Communication Specialist (801) 819-7623 hrasmussen@wecc.biz WECC releases its first-ever transmission plan for the Western Interconnection The Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) announced the release of its first 10-Year Regional Transmission Plan (Plan) for the Western Interconnection. Looking ahead to 2020, the Plan focuses on how to meet the Western Interconnection's transmission requirements; including transmission expansion, new generation development, adapting to local, state/provincial, and federal policy changes, and their associated financial and environmental costs.

191

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial acidification and pH effects on trace element release from sewage sludge Shabnam Qureshia; Trace metals; Mobilization; Land application 1. Introduction Trace elements in land-applied wastewater sludge (sewage biosolids) are potentially phyto- or zoo-toxic if present in sufficient concentration

Walter, M.Todd

192

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Release of Inorganic Constituents from Leached Biomass during Thermal Conversion ... This suggests that while leaching reduces fuel nitrogen, it may also affect the nitrogen combustion chemistry in that a larger fraction of the fuel-bound nitrogen was converted to NO(g) during combustion of the leached samples compared to the unleached samples. ... Six biomasses with different chemical compositions ... ...

D. C. Dayton; B. M. Jenkins; S. Q. Turn; R. R. Bakker; R. B. Williams; D. Belle-Oudry; L. M. Hill

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

193

Chemical behavior of tritium in/on various materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, the chemical interaction of tritium with various materials is studied. The chemical state of tritium resting in materials depended on their chemical and physical conditions. The state of tritium can be classified into four categories, chemically bounded tritium, molecularly trapped tritium, tritium trapped as atomic state, and tritium localized in a special part. These chemical states in or on materials controlled the diffusivity of tritium in them and release from their surfaces. The chemical properties of materials mainly affect the resting state of tritium, but in some cases, the effects of physical properties are more important than those of the chemical ones.

Saeki, M.; Hirabayashi, T.; Aratono, Y.; Nakashima, M.; Masaki, N.M.; Tachikawa, E. (Dept. of Chemistry, Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken 319-11 (JP))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Review of models used for determining consequences of UF{sub 6} release: Model evaluation report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three uranium hexafluoride-(UF{sub 6}-) specific models--HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6}, Science Application International Corporation, and RTM-96; three dense-gas models--DEGADIS, SLAB, and the Chlorine Institute methodology; and one toxic chemical model--AFTOX--are evaluated on their capabilities to simulate the chemical reactions, thermodynamics, and atmospheric dispersion of UF{sub 6} released from accidents at nuclear fuel-cycle facilities, to support Integrated Safety Analysis, Emergency Response Planning, and Post-Accident Analysis. These models are also evaluated for user-friendliness and for quality assurance and quality control features, to ensure the validity and credibility of the results. Model performance evaluations are conducted for the three UF{sub 6}-specific models, using field data on releases of UF{sub 6} and other heavy gases. Predictions from the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} and SAIC models are within an order of magnitude of the field data, but the SAIC model overpredicts beyond an order of magnitude for a few UF{sub 6}-specific data points. The RTM-96 model provides overpredictions within a factor of 3 for all data points beyond 400 m from the source. For one data set, however, the RTM-96 model severely underpredicts the observations within 200 m of the source. Outputs of the models are most sensitive to the meteorological parameters at large distances from the source and to certain source-specific and meteorological parameters at distances close to the source. Specific recommendations are being made to improve the applicability and usefulness of the three models and to choose a specific model to support the intended analyses. Guidance is also provided on the choice of input parameters for initial dilution, building wake effects, and distance to completion of UF{sub 6} reaction with water.

Nair, S.K.; Chambers, D.B.; Park, S.H.; Radonjic, Z.R.; Coutts, P.T.; Lewis, C.J.; Hammonds, J.S.; Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

SAND2000-1256 Unlimited Release  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

models for continuous releases such as those from smokestacks (elevated releases) or pipeline leaks (ground-level releases) are inappropriate for use in transportation risk...

196

Nanoencapsulation Strategies for Antimicrobial Controlled Release to Enhance Fresh and Fresh-Cut Produce Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, polydispersity index, entrapment efficiency, phase-solubility, and controlled release profile. Following physical and chemical characterization, the oils and their nanocapsules were analyzed for their antimicrobial activity against Salmonella enterica serovar...

Hill, Laura Ellen

2014-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

197

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About It Speaker(s): Arlene Blum Date: November 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk Polystyrene, polyisocyanurate, and polyurethane are insulation materials that increase energy efficiency and whose use in buildings, especially energy efficient buildings, is growing rapidly. At the same time, the flame retardants currently in use with these materials are often chemicals that are known to be toxic or have not been adequately evaluated for their impact on human health and the environment. For example, all polystyrene foam insulation used in buildings is treated with HBCD, a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic flame retardant. The impacts of exposure to

198

Hydrogen oxidation in soils as a possible toxic-effects indicator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient soil bioassays are needed in a screening array to determine the toxicities of industrial products and wastes. Hydrogen consumption is a common soil microbiological process that we evaluated as a possible soil indicator of toxic effects. Elemental tritium was used as a tracer to determine the H/sub 2/ oxidation rates in soils. The H/sub 2/ bioassay can be completed within 24 h using liquid scintillation counting of the tritium tracer. This test was used to evaluate the effects of known toxic chemicals (e.g., heavy metals, herbicides, and air pollutants), as well as a variety of suspected environmentally harmful compounds (e.g., waste waters, particulates, and sludges from industrial processes) on H/sub 2/ oxidation in soils. This bioassay responded to test compounds at concentrations shown to be toxic in other soil microbiological investigations.

Rogers, R.D. (U.S. EPA, Las Vegas); McFarlane, J.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation on the Bioavailability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Frontiers in Assessing the Role of Chemical Speciation and Natural Attenuation components. Applications of these techniques to assess metal and organic chemical sorption/release, natural widely employed to provide an indirect assessment ofchemical speciation and association ofcontaminants

Sparks, Donald L.

200

Evaluation of artificially-weathered standard fuel oil toxicity by marine invertebrate embryogenesis bioassays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Weathering of petroleum spilled in the marine environment may not only change its physical and chemical properties but also its effects on the marine ecosystem. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) obtained from a standard fuel oil following an environmentally realistic simulated weathering process for a period of 80d. Experimental flasks with 40gL?1 of fuel oil were incubated at 18C with a 14hlight:10hdark photoperiod and a photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) intensity of 70?Em?2s?1. Samples were taken at four weathering periods: 24h, 7, 21 and 80d. WAF toxicity was tested using the sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) and mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) embryolarval bioassays and the aromatic hydrocarbons levels (AH) in the WAF were measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In contrast with the classic assumption of toxicity decrease with oil weathering, the present study shows a progressive increase in WAF toxicity with weathering, being the EC50 after 80d eightfold lower than the EC50 at day1, whereas AH concentration slightly decreased. In the long term, inoculation of WAF with bacteria from a hydrocarbon chronically-polluted harbor slightly reduced toxicity. The differences in toxicity between fresh and weathered fuels could not be explained on the basis of the total AH content and the formation of oxidized derivatives is suggested to explain this toxicity increase.

Juan Bellas; Liliana Saco-lvarez; scar Nieto; Josep Mara Bayona; Joan Albaigs; Ricardo Beiras

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Multiple-Drug Toxicity Caused by the Coadministration of 4-Methylmethcathinone (Mephedrone) and Heroin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......of Results Substance Abuse Detection Young Adult An accidental death...found for sale on the internet as a re- search chemical...be discovered through internet drug user forums. Multiple-DrugToxicity...considered a rare drug of abuse. However, in July 2009......

Amber J. Dickson; Shawn P. Vorce; Barry Levine; Marilyn R. Past

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Press Pass - Press Releases  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Press Release Archive 5 Press Release Archive High Energy Physics Team Captures Network Prize at SC|05 12/6/05 Beyond Einstein: A live Webcast from around the Globe Thursday, December 1, 2005, from 5:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST 11/21/05 Pierre Auger Observatory Celebrates Progress on Detector Array and Presents First Science Results 11/10/05 Science and Reading Combine in Family Literacy Experience at Fermilab on Thursday, November 17 10/11/05 Media invited to attend Pierre Auger Observatory Celebration, to be held November 9-12, 2005 in Malargüe, Argentina 11/2/05 Science and Reading Combine in Family Literacy Experience at Fermilab on Thursday, November 17 10/11/05 Volunteers Welcome at Fermilab's Prairie Harvest on Oct. 1 and 29 9/26/05 Hot Topics Featured at World Year of Physics Symposium for Students and Teachers, Saturday, October 8 from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at Fermilab's Ramsey Auditorium 9/14/05

203

Theoretical and Experimental Evaluation of Chemical Reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

released and the rate of energy released for a specific reactive chemical. 2.1 DSC DSC is a popular screening tool (safe and fast) and can provide an overall indication of exothermic activity of the chemical being tested. In a DSC, a sample and a... endothermic or exothermic reaction. When the rate of heat generation in the sample exceeds a particular value, the heat supply to the sample is cut off and this additional heat gain is attributed to exothermic activity within the sample.17 From the DSC...

Wang, Qingsheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline DOE Releases Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Risk Management Process (RMP) Guideline...

205

News Releases - 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2011 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory announces top 10 science stories of 2011 Stories include alternative energy research, magnetic fields, disease tracking, the study of Mars, climate change, fuel cells, solar wind, and magnetic reconnection. - 12/23/11 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

206

News Releases - 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2010 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). - 12/21/10 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. LANL announces Top 10 science & technology developments of 2010 Top 10 developments based on major programmatic milestones, strategic

207

Efficient Sugar Release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sugar Sugar Release by the Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation Technology and Enzymatic Cellulose Hydrolysis GEOFFREY MOXLEY, † ZHIGUANG ZHU, † AND Y.-H. PERCIVAL ZHANG* ,†,‡,§ Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia 24061, and Department of Energy (DOE) BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Efficient liberation of fermentable soluble sugars from lignocellulosic biomass waste not only decreases solid waste handling but also produces value-added biofuels and biobased products. Industrial hemp, a special economic crop, is cultivated for its high-quality fibers and high-value seed oil, but its hollow

208

News Releases - 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2008 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque International Sunport A new tool that distinguishes potential-threat liquids from the harmless shampoos and sodas a regular traveler might take aboard an aircraft. - 12/16/08 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

209

News Releases - 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2009 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Science satellites seek Santa Los Alamos scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the course taken by the elfin traveler. - 12/16/09 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

210

Release Date: April 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2009/04Q) April 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2009/04Q) Next Release Date: June 2010 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2009 April 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this

211

News Releases | Biosciences Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Alaska Soil Research Alaska Soil Research BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Alaska Soil Research Project Aiming to Improve Understanding of Global Climate November 26, 2012 A research team being led by Julie Jastrow, an ecologist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, recently traveled to the North Slope of Alaska as part of a soil research project that aims to ultimately help improve and validate global climate models. Using jackhammer to dig a sampling pit in frozen soil After removing the seasonally thawed soil active layer in coastal plain tundra near Prudhoe Bay, members of the Argonne research team use a jackhammer to dig through frozen soil, creating a soil pit from which different soil layers can be viewed and sampled.

212

Quick release engine cylinder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quick release engine cylinder allows optical access to an essentially unaltered combustion chamber, is suitable for use with actual combustion processes, and is amenable to rapid and repeated disassembly and cleaning. A cylinder member, adapted to constrain a piston to a defined path through the cylinder member, sealingly engages a cylinder head to provide a production-like combustion chamber. A support member mounts with the cylinder member. The support-to-cylinder mounting allows two relationships therebetween. In the first mounting relationship, the support engages the cylinder member and restrains the cylinder against the head. In the second mounting relationship, the cylinder member can pass through the support member, moving away from the head and providing access to the piston-top and head.

Sunnarborg, Duane A. (1123 Lucille St., Livermore, Alameda County, CA 94550)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be conservatively applied to confined CSNF assemblies.

S.O. Bader

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

215

Toxicity of tire wear particle leachate to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tire wear particles filed from the treads of end-of-life vehicle tires have been added to sea water to examine the release of Zn and the toxicity of the resulting leachate and dilutions thereof to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca. Zinc release appeared to be diffusion-controlled, with a conditional rate constant of 5.4?g[L(h)1/2]?1, and about 1.6% of total Zn was released after 120h incubation. Exposure to increasing concentrations of leachate resulted in a non-linear reduction in the efficiency of photochemical energy conversion of U. lactuca and, with the exception of the undiluted leachate, increasing accumulation of Zn. Phototoxicity was significantly lower on exposure to equivalent concentrations of Zn added as Zn(NO3)2, suggesting that organic components of leachate are largely responsible for the overall toxicity to the alga. Given the ubiquity and abundance of TWP in urban coastal sediments, the generation, biogeochemistry and toxicity of tire leachate in the marine setting merit further attention.

Andrew Turner; Lynsey Rice

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Lidocaine Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toxicity Misinterpreted as a Stroke Benjamin Bursell, MDdysfunction, manifested as a stroke, occurred acutely in andeterioration suggesting stroke. We will review the dosing,

Bursell, Benjamin; Smally, Alan J; Ratzan, Richard M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

NETL Releases Hydraulic Fracturing Study  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a technical report on the results of a limited field study that monitored a hydraulic fracturing operation in Greene County, PA.

218

Press Pass - Press Release Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 LHC Press Release - 120897 Fermilab's Science Center to Open of First Saturdays - 112197 U.S. Department of Energy and Fermilab Invite Public to Informational Meeting...

219

News Releases | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releases CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy, September 10, 2014 Five Critical Materials Institute researchers named Most Influential Scientific Minds...

220

Method for detecting toxic gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed which is capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas. This method utilizes a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component. An electrochemical sensor responds to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor. 6 figures.

Stetter, J.R.; Zaromb, S.; Findlay, M.W. Jr.

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Support Vector Machines in the Prediction of Mutagenicity of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The classifier, that we derived from SVM methods, outperforms the available methods in performance and simplicity and people, hence their toxic activity has to be assessed. Biological active chemicals interact composition, are unfortunately largely unknown, thus toxicity tests are needed. Alongside classical methods

Gini, Giuseppina

222

Chemical Stabilization of Hanford Tank Residual Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three different chemical treatment methods were tested for their ability to stabilize residual waste from Hanford tank C-202 for reducing contaminant release (Tc, Cr, and U in particular). The three treatment methods tested were lime addition [Ca(OH)2], an in-situ Ceramicrete waste form based on chemically bonded phosphate ceramics, and a ferrous iron/goethite treatment. These approaches rely on formation of insoluble forms of the contaminants of concern (lime addition and ceramicrete) and chemical reduction followed by co-precipitation (ferrous iron/goethite incorporation treatment). The results have demonstrated that release of the three most significant mobile contaminants of concern from tank residual wastes can be dramatically reduced after treatment compared to contact with simulated grout porewater without treatment. For uranium, all three treatments methods reduced the leachable uranium concentrations by well over three orders of magnitude. In the case of uranium and technetium, released concentrations were well below their respective MCLs for the wastes tested. For tank C-202 residual waste, chromium release concentrations were above the MCL but were considerably reduced relative to untreated tank waste. This innovative approach has the potential to revolutionize Hanfords tank retrieval process, by allowing larger volumes of residual waste to be left in tanks while providing an acceptably low level of risk with respect to contaminant release that is protective of the environment and human health. Such an approach could enable DOE to realize significant cost savings through streamlined retrieval and closure operations.

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Um, Wooyong; Williams, Benjamin D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Gartman, Brandy N.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Buck, Edgar C.; Mausolf, Edward J.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Exploring a Chemical Approach for the Mitigation of Prymnesium parvum Blooms and Ecological Considerations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Known as Golden Algae in popular media, Prymnesium parvum causes harmful algal blooms. When stressed, it secretes increased amounts of toxic chemicals called prymnesins, which have resulted in major fish kills in Texas. Although many options exist...

Umphres, George 1987-

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The early release provides a basis for the examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or possible technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2014 is released in 2014, exploring key

225

AEO2013 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Early Release Overview 3 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. This early release focuses on the AEO2013 Reference case, which provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2013 is released in early 2013, exploring key uncertainties in the Reference case. Major highlights in the AEO2013 Reference case include:

226

Biocides in Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids: A Critical Review of Their Usage, Mobility, Degradation, and Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To enable assessment of the potential environmental and health impacts of the biocides used in hydraulic fracturing fluids, we review their relevant pathways of environmental contamination, environmental mobility, stability and chemical behavior in a variety of natural environments, and toxicity. ... In Frackings Wake: New Rules Are Needed to Protect Our Health and Environment From Contaminated Wastewater, NRDC Document D:12-05-A; Natural Resources Defense Council (NDRC): New York, 2012; pp 1 113. ... Henderson, N. D. Environmental Impact and Toxic Effects of DDAC; Environmental Protection Division, BC Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks: Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 1992. ...

Genevieve A. Kahrilas; Jens Blotevogel; Philip S. Stewart; Thomas Borch

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Conley, William R. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Phytoremediation of Heavy Metal Toxicity and Role of soil in Rhizobacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Our surrounding is filled up with a large number of toxicants in different forms. They contaminate our water, land and atmosphere where we live. Heavy metal pollution of soil is a significant environmental problem and has its negative impact on human health and agriculture. Rhizosphere, as an important interface of soil and plant, plays a significant role in phytoremediation of contaminated soil by heavy metals, in which, microbial populations are known to affect heavy metal mobility and availability to the plant through release of chelating agents, acidification, phosphate solubilization and redox changes. Phytoremediation of toxic heavy metals could be carried out by using specific metallophytes. Green plants are the lungs of nature with unique ability to purifying impure air by photosynthesis and remove or minimize heavy metals toxicity from soil and water ecosystem by absorption, accumulation and biotransformation process. This article paper reviews some recent advances in effect and significance of rhizobacteria in phytoremediation of heavy metal toxicity in contaminated soils. There is also a need to improve our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the transfer and mobilization of heavy metals by rhizobacteria and to conduct research on the selection of microbial isolates from Rhizosphere of plants growing metal contaminated soils for specific restoration programmes. Index Terms- Environmental, heavy metal toxicity,

Rajendra Prasad Bharti; Abhilasha Shri Vastava; Kishor Soni; Asha Tiwari; Shivbhanu More

229

Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

230

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

231

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

232

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested-volt region. Thus chemical accelerators can provide the same type of information for elemen- tary chemical

Zare, Richard N.

233

Toxic congener-specific analysis of PCBs: assessment of toxicity in equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High resolution capillary gas chromatographic analysis of the polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) present in snapping turtle eggs, provided quantitative data on selected toxic congeners. The concentrations of these congeners have been converted into equivalent toxic concentrations of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-p-dibenzodioxin (TCDD). The toxic equivalent factors (TEFs), necessary to effect this transformation were derived from EC/sub 50/ values (half the concentration of the toxic congener required to produce the maximum effect) for aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) induction associated with the corresponding toxic PCB congener or isomer. Summation of the resulting toxic equivalents provided a composite assessment of the toxicity of the PCB mixture in terms of an equivalent concentration of TCDD.

Olafsson, P.G.; Bryan, A.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Effect of temperature on the release of intentionally and non-intentionally added substances from polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles into water: Chemical analysis and potential toxicity Cristina Bach a used for the bottling of drinking water is polyethylene terephthalate (PET). Since migra- tion can

Short, Daniel

235

NETL: News Release - Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking Resurgence of Coal-Fired Power Plants Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking Resurgence of Coal-Fired Power Plants Report Shows 151 Proposed and New Plants, 90 Gigawatts of Capacity by 2020 WASHINGTON, DC - A newly released Department of Energy report shows that many power producers are turning to coal as the most economic and abundant national resource for electricity generation. The report, titled Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants, was developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide a snapshot of coal's resurgence in the generation of electric power. The report was derived from a database that NETL maintains to track proposals for new coal-fired power plants. Created in 2002, the database is updated quarterly as new information is released and cataloged. The results contained in the database are derived from information publicly available from a variety of tracking organizations and news groups.

236

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

238

Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins of Gasoline and Diesel Emissions Comparative Toxicity of Combined Particle and Semi-Volatile Organic Fractioins...

239

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

240

Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases 2012 Press Releases December 10, 2012 Experiment Finds Ulcer Bug's Achilles' Heel (see Press Release) June 6, 2012 New secrets from "Bay of the Pirates" warship that sunk 2,300 years ago (see Press Release) March 5, 2012 X-rays Reveal How Soil Bacteria Carry Out Surprising Chemistry (see Press Release) 2011 Press Releases July 3, 2011 Researchers Decipher Protein Structure of Key Molecule in DNA Transcription System (see Press Release) June 30, 2011 X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds (see Press Release) March 24, 2011 High-temperature Superconductor Spills Secret: A New Phase of Matter (see Press Release) March 23, 2011 First Image of Protein Residue in 50 Million Year Old Reptile Skin (see Press Release) 2010 Press Releases

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ARM - Features and Releases Archive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance Features and Releases Archive 2013 Dec 30 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Nov 13 Research Flights Completed for Biomass Burning Field Campaign Nov 07 MAGIC Takes a Bow

242

PRESS RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELEASE RARE FRUIT CONFERENCE July 9 - 13, 2014 Sponsored by the Tropical Fruit & Vegetable Society of the Redland & the Fruit & Spice Park 24801 SW 187th Avenue, Homestead, Florida

Jawitz, James W.

243

Enhanced formulations for neutralization of chemical, biological and industrial toxants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An enhanced formulation and method of making that neutralizes the adverse health effects of both chemical and biological compounds, especially chemical warfare (CW) and biological warfare (BW) agents, and toxic industrial chemicals. The enhanced formulation according to the present invention is non-toxic and non-corrosive and can be delivered by a variety of means and in different phases. The formulation provides solubilizing compounds that serve to effectively render the chemical and biological compounds, particularly CW and BW compounds, susceptible to attack, and at least one reactive compound that serves to attack (and detoxify or kill) the compound. The formulation includes at least one solubilizing agent, a reactive compound, a bleaching activator and water.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueque, NM) [Albuqueque, NM

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

244

THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 release of the RAVE chemical catalog is complementary to the third RAVE data release of radial velocities and stellar parameters, and it contains chemical abundances for the elements Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, with a mean error of {approx}0.2 dex, as judged from accuracy tests performed on synthetic and real spectra. Abundances are estimated through a dedicated processing pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

245

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

247

CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-31, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate the chemical management against DOE policy, regulatory requirements. Primary attention will be given to activities governed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Hazard Communication Standards (29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59) and Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450). However, review of any activities for managing, storing, or using hazardous chemicals, pesticides, and toxic

248

CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-31, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate the chemical management against DOE policy, regulatory requirements. Primary attention will be given to activities governed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Hazard Communication Standards (29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59) and Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450). However, review of any activities for managing, storing, or using hazardous chemicals, pesticides, and toxic

249

Assessing homeland chemical hazards outside the military gates: industrial hazard threat assessments for department of defense installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of comprehensive joint medical surveillance measures outlined by the Department of Defense, the US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine (USACHPPM) is beginning to assess environmental health threats to continental US military installations. A common theme in comprehensive joint medical surveillance, in support of Force Health Protection, is the identification and assessment of potential environmental health hazards, and the evaluation and documentation of actual exposures in both a continental US and outside a continental US setting. For the continental US assessments, the USACHPPM has utilized the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) database for risk management plans in accordance with Public Law 106-40, and the toxic release inventory database, in a state-of the art geographic information systems based program, termed the Consequence Assessment and Management Tool Set, or CATS, for assessing homeland industrial chemical hazards outside the military gates. As an example, the US EPA toxic release inventory and risk management plans databases are queried to determine the types and locations of industries surrounding a continental US military installation. Contaminants of concern are then ranked with respect to known toxicological and physical hazards, where they are then subject to applicable downwind hazard simulations using applicable meteorological and climatological data sets. The composite downwind hazard areas are mapped in relation to emergency response planning guidelines (ERPG), which were developed by the American Industrial Hygiene Association to assist emergency response personnel planning for catastrophic chemical releases. In addition, other geographic referenced data such as transportation routes, satellite imagery and population data are included in the operational, equipment, and morale risk assessment and management process. These techniques have been developed to assist military medical planners and operations personnel in determining the industrial hazards, vulnerability assessments and health risk assessments to continental United States military installations. These techniques and procedures support the Department of Defense Force Protection measures, which provides awareness of a terrorism threat, appropriate measures to prevent terrorist attacks and mitigate terrorism's effects in the event that preventive measures are ineffective.

Jeffrey S Kirkpatrick; Jacqueline M Howard; David A Reed

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

ORSSAB News Releases | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

ORSSAB News Releases ORSSAB News Releases December 1, 2014 The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board meets on the second Wednesday of the month. DOE seeks candidates for...

251

OREM Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Press Releases OREM Press Releases RSS November 14, 2014 The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board meets on the second Wednesday of the month. DOE seeks candidates for...

252

Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2012 Annual Report January 7, 2013 - 3:56pm Addthis The Geothermal Technologies...

253

MagLab - Press Release Archives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releases Arrow News Archives 2013 News & Press Releases Date Subject Nov. 27 High Magnetic Field Science and Its Application in the United States: Current Status and Future...

254

Press Releases | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Areas Press Release Jan 16, 2015 NNSA Hosts Cybersecurity Consortium Members Following White House Announcement of 25 Million in Grants to 13 HBCUs Press Release Jan 13, 2015...

255

The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2013 Annual Report The Energy Department's Geothermal Technologies Office Releases 2013 Annual Report February 7,...

256

Changes in release cycles for EIA's  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Annual Energy Outlook Full Edition will be released in spring 2014, including analysis of energy issues and many alternative scenarios. Shorter will be released in late 2014 or...

257

Polymers in the Controlled Release of Agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chapter 3...describes the uses of polymeric materials in agriculture for controlled release formulations of agrochemicals, which are released into the environment of ... in agricultural application...

Ahmed Akelah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Nanomaterials and nanoparticles: Sources and toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is presented as a common foundation for scientists interested in nanoparticles, their origin, activity, and biological toxicity. It is written with the goal of rationalizing and informing public he...

Cristina Buzea; Ivan I. Pacheco; Kevin Robbie

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in people who work in pulp and paper mills, at hazardous waste sites, municipal and hazardous waste incinerators, and those involved in production, use, and disposal of chlorinated pesticides and herbicides. The most toxic of the PCDDs, 2...

Naspinski, Christine S.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

260

Toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to Hyalella azteca (Amphipoda)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stormwater runoff from highways and commercial, industrial, and residential areas contains a wide spectrum of pollutants including heavy metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides, herbicides, sediment, and nutrients. Recent efforts to reduce the impacts of urbanization on natural wetlands and other receiving waters have included the construction of stormwater treatment ponds and wetlands. These systems provide flood control and improve water quality through settling, adsorption, and precipitation of pollutants removing up to 95% of metals, nutrients and sediment before discharged from the site. The design of stormwater ponds to provide habitat for aquatic wildlife has prompted concern over the potential exposure of aquatic organisms to these contaminants. Aquatic sediments concentrate a wide array of organic and inorganic pollutants. Although water quality criteria may not be exceeded, organisms living in or near the sediments may be adversely affected. The availability of chemicals in sediments depends strongly on the prevailing chemistry. Physical conditions of the sediment and water quality characteristics including pH, redox potential and hardness, also influence contaminant availability. Studies have shown that heavy metals and nutrients carried by runoff concentrate in the sediment of stormwater ponds. Although several investigations have assessed the toxicity of sediments in streams receiving urban runoff, there have been few studies of the toxicity of stormwater treatment pond sediments to aquatic organisms. This study was part of a large-scale assessment of the contaminant hazards of stormwater treatment ponds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of sediments and water from stormwater ponds over a 10-d period to juvenile Hyalella azteca. Bioassay results were related to concentrations of acid volatile sulfides and metals of the tested sediments. 17 refs., 4 tabs.

Karouna-Renier, N.K. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States); [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States); Sparling, D.W. [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)] [Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel, MD (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Residual Toxicities of Insecticides to Cotton Insects.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the effects of simulated wind and rain on the residues. Tempera- ture and humidity conditions incident to the holding period were sufficient to destroy most of the residual toxicity of this material. Effect of Simulated Wind Among the chlorinated... hydrocarbon insecticides, there was little difference between the effects of simu- lated wind and rain on residual toxicities. However, it is likely that under field conditions the effects of rain would be more noticeable. Simulated wind was less damaging...

Hightower, B. G.; Gaines, J. C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spectroscopic Measurements of Low-Temperature Heat Release for Homogeneous Combustion Compression Ignition (HCCI) n-Heptane/Alcohol Mixture Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spectroscopic Measurements of Low-Temperature Heat Release for Homogeneous Combustion Compression Ignition (HCCI) n-Heptane/Alcohol Mixture Combustion ... (6) The earlier short heat release, LTHR, is characteristic of chemical oxidation at low temperature of the hydrocarbon fuel. ... lower heating value (kJ/kg) ...

Peerawat Saisirirat; Fabrice Foucher; Somchai Chanchaona; Christine Mounai?m-Rousselle

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

263

Toxicant-disease-environment interactions associated with suppression of immune system, growth, and reproduction. [PCB  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of marginal malnourishment, infections, and environmental chemicals on growth and reproductive success in Swiss-Webster white mice and wild deer mice were studied with fractional factorial designs. Interaction effects were discovered. For example, malnourished mice were more sensitive to virus exposure and environmental chemicals (a plant growth regulator or polychlorinated biphenyls). Since several commercial plant growth regulators also appear to suppress the immune system, these results cast doubt on the adequacy of current toxicity testing procedures in which factors are studied individually and not in combination.

Porter, W.P.; Hinsdill, R.; Fairbrother, A.; Olson, L.J.; Jaeger, J.; Yuill, T.; Bisgaard, S.; Hunter, W.G.; Nolan, K.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Oxygen Toxicity Calculations by Erik C. Baker, P.E. Management of exposure to oxygen toxicity myself using the good ole' FORTRAN programming language, I found that incorporating oxygen toxicity for others. Background Two oxygen toxicity parameters are typically "tracked" in technical diving

Read, Charles

265

Volatile organic chemical emissions from carpets. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research, was to measure the emission rates of selected individual VOC, including low molecular-weight aldehydes, released by samples of four new carpets that are typical of the major types of carpets used in residences, schools and offices. The carpet samples were collected directly from the manufacturers` mills and packaged to preserve their chemical integrity. The measurements of the concentrations and emission rates of these compounds were made under simulated indoor conditions in a 20-M{sup 3} environmental chamber designed specifically for investigations of VOC. The measurements were conducted over a period of one week following the installation of the carpet samples in the chamber. Duplicate experiments were conducted for one carpet. In addition, the concentrations and emission rates of VOC resulting from the installation of a new carpet in a residence were measured over a period of seven weeks. The stabilities of the week-long ventilation rates and temperatures were one percent relative standard deviation. The four carpets emitted a variety of VOC, 40 of which were positively identified. Eight of these were considered to be dominant. They were (in order of chromatographic retention time) formaldehyde, vinyl acetate, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane), 1,2-propanediol (propylene glycol), styrene, 2-ethyl-l-hexanol, 4-phenylcyclohexene (4-PCH), and 2,6 di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT). With the exception of formaldehyde, only limited data are available on the toxicity and irritancy of these compounds at low concentrations. Therefore, it is difficult to determine at this time the potential magnitude of the health and comfort effects that may occur among the population from exposures to emissions from new carpets. The concentrations and emission rates of most compounds decreased rapidly over the first 12 h of the experiments.

Hodgson, A.T.; Wooley, J.D.; Daisey, J.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Press Release June 9, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conservation, reducing climate change impact, life cycle product safety, and sustainable freshwater supply problems. We are grateful to the Dow Chemical Company Foundation for partnering with us in this international effort to promote sustainability." The Dow Chemical Company Foundation oversees the Sustainability

MacIver, Malcolm A.

267

Five LBA Data Sets Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Use-Land Change Data Sets Released Use-Land Change Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of three data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-09 Land Cover Transitions Maps for Study Sites in Para, Brazil: 1970-2001 . Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes classified land cover transition maps at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat TM, MSS, ETM+ imagery and aerial photos of Altamira, Santarem, and Ponta de Pedras, in the state of Para, Brazil. The Landsat images were classified into several types of land use and subjected to change detection analysis to create transition matrices of land cover change. LBA-ECO LC-22 Post-deforestation Land Use, Mato Grosso, Brazil:

268

SAFARI 2000 Data Set Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Set Released Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "SAFARI 2000 MISR Level 2 Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000". This data set is a product of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative containing 240 HDF-EOS formatted MISR Level 2 Top-of-Atmosphere/Cloud and Aerosol/Surface Products focused in a southern African study area which includes: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The MISR Level 2 Products are geophysical measurements derived from the Level 1B2 data which consists of parameters that have been geometrically corrected and projected to a standard map grid. The products are in swaths, each derived from a single MISR orbit, where the imagery is 360 km wide and

269

Two Ecosystem Demography Models Released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Demography Models Released Ecosystem Demography Models Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of two Ecosystem Demography Models: Ecosystem Demography Model: U.S. Ecosystem Carbon Stocks and Fluxes, 1700-1990 . Data set prepared by G. Hurtt, S.W. Pacala, P.R. Moorcroft, J. Caspersen, E. Shevliakova, R.A. Houghton, B. Moore III, and J. Fisk. This model product contains the source code for the Ecosystem Demography Model (ED version 1.0) as well as model input and output data files for the conterminous United States. The ED is a mechanistic ecosystem model built around established sub-models of leaf level physiology, organic matter decomposition, hydrology, and functional biodiversity. It was used herein to estimate ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes in the conterminous U.S. at

270

ORNL DAAC: Amazon Data Release  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Amazon Data Released Amazon Data Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The data set "LBA-ECO CD-07 GOES-8 L3 Gridded Surface Radiation and Rain Rate for Amazonia: 1999" contains surface down-welling solar radiation, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and infrared radiation, as well as precipitation rates for the LBA study area at 8x8-km and half-hourly resolutions. The data cover the time periods March 1, 1999 - April 30, 1999, and September 1, 1999 - October 31, 1999. LBA is an international research initiative under the leadership of Brazil. The project focuses on the climatological, ecological, biogeochemical, and hydrological functions of Amazonia; the impact of land use change on these

271

News Releases | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News & Awards News & Awards News Releases Honors & Awards News Features Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | News & Awards | News Releases News Releases 1-7 of 7 Results ORNL devises recipe to fine-tune diameter of silica rods December 16, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 16, 2013 - By controlling the temperature of silica rods as they grow, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory could be setting the stage for advances in anti-reflective solar cells, computer monitors, TV screens, eye glasses and more. ORNL's Bruce Pint elected 2014 NACE fellow December 13, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 13, 2013 - Bruce Pint, a research staff member at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a 2014 National Association of Corrosion

272

Time-dependent release of iron from soot particles by acid extraction and the reduction of fe3+ by elemental carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, iron release, and DNA damage and toxicity in rat lung epithelial cells. Inhalation Toxicolog. 11:1123-1141. Veranth, J., Smith, K., Aust, A., Dansie, S., Griffin, J., Hu, A. A., Huggins, M., and Lightly, J. (2000). Coal fly ash and mineral dust..., iron release, and DNA damage and toxicity in rat lung epithelial cells. Inhalation Toxicolog. 11:1123-1141. Veranth, J., Smith, K., Aust, A., Dansie, S., Griffin, J., Hu, A. A., Huggins, M., and Lightly, J. (2000). Coal fly ash and mineral dust...

Drake, Stephen James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Standard Operating Procedures Template for Highly Hazardous Chemicals Title of Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Standard Operating Procedures Template for Highly Hazardous Chemicals Title of Procedure: Date or the procedure.) Examples include: 1) Chemical hazards such as carcinogenic, irritant, corrosive, acutely toxic 2 of exposure associated with the procedure such as inhalation, injection, skin/eye contact) Exposure Limit: (As

274

Information resources for assessing health effects from chemical exposure: Office of pesticides programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Pesticide Programs is trying to develop a complete picture of a chemical`s toxicity and exposure profile. It is also important to share information in the office`s files because of pesticides, particularly as a consequence of agricultural use, find their way into places not necessarily intended.

Fenner-Crisp, P. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Anthony Adornato  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

engineer named Burton Blatt Institute Fellow SYRACUSE, NY ­ James Abbott, professor of audio engineering of the renowned Music Engineering program at the University of Miami, Abbott's work can be heard on NPR, PBS. In 2010, a project he engineered for the Syracuse Society for New Music released on Innova Records

Mather, Patrick T.

276

EM Recovery Act Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

press-releases Office of Environmental press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility http://energy.gov/em/articles/idaho-site-completes-demolition-cold-war-era-nuclear-fuel-reprocessing Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility

277

Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Toxic Range Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- ly alter grazing behavior. To minimize losses to toxic plants, producers should learn how to identify the toxic plants, use good graz- ing and livestock management practices, and take measures to control the plants when necessary. Know which plants... are toxic The first step in managing for toxic plants is being able to identify them. Ranchers must be able to: Identify plants that are toxic to livestock in their area Understand what makes them poisonous Recognize the symptoms produced when live...

Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

278

Toxicity of depleted uranium on isolated rat kidney mitochondria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background Kidney is known as the most sensitive target organ for depleted uranium (DU) toxicity in comparison to other organs. Although the oxidative stress and mitochondrial damage induced by DU has been well investigated, the precise mechanism of DU-induced nephrotoxicity has not been thoroughly recognized yet. Methods Kidney mitochondria were obtained using differential centrifugation from Wistar rats and mitochondrial toxicity endpoints were then determined in both in vivo and in vitro uranyl acetate (UA) exposure cases. Results Single injection of UA (0, 0.5, 1 and 2mg/kg, i.p.) caused a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine levels. Isolated mitochondria from the UA-treated rat kidney showed a marked elevation in oxidative stress accompanied by mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse as compared to control group. Incubation of isolated kidney mitochondria with UA (50, 100 and 200?M) manifested that UA can disrupt the electron transfer chain at complex II and III that leads to induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, and glutathione oxidation. Disturbances in oxidative phosphorylation were also demonstrated through decreased ATP concentration and ATP/ADP ratio in UA-treated mitochondria. In addition, UA induced a significant damage in mitochondrial outer membrane. Moreover, MMP collapse, mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were observed following the UA treatment in isolated mitochondria. General significance Both our in vivo and in vitro results showed that UA-induced nephrotoxicity is linked to the impairment of electron transfer chain especially at complex II and III which leads to subsequent oxidative stress.

Fatemeh Shaki; Mir-Jamal Hosseini; Mahmoud Ghazi-Khansari; Jalal Pourahmad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Experimental Program for the validation of the design of a 150KWth Chemical looping Combustion reactor system with main focus on the reactor flexibility and operability.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Chemical Looping Combustion is one of the most promising way to limit the CO2 release to the atmosphere among the other technologies for Carbon (more)

Ghorbaniyan, Masoud

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

CSR Press Release Submitted by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSR Press Release Submitted by: Categories: Posted: Energy Efficiency Listed as the Top important to their work. Across all five sectors included in the survey, energy efficiency was listed as by far the most important sustainability issue at hand, with water and land & soil falling to the bottom

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

MEDIA RELEASE 17 March 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's plan to build energy efficient rental housing for an additional 8,000 students on campus could resultMEDIA RELEASE 17 March 2011 Study suggests next step for BC's pioneering carbon neutral public sector British Columbia's pioneering move to create North America's first carbon neutral public sector

Pedersen, Tom

282

CSR Press Release Submitted by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 2000, yet fuel consumption decreased by 3.2 million gallons. Fuel efficiency levels were improved, sophisticated routing technology and operational initiatives such as minimizing engine idling. Alternative fuelCSR Press Release Submitted by: Categories: Posted: UPS Sets New Automotive Goal to Improve Fuel

283

PRESS RELEASE January 28, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESS RELEASE January 28, 2013 Media Contact Becky Kelly, FSU Panama City, Office of Advancement at (850) 770-2151 or rkelly@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY SUMMER SCUBA LAB Panama City, FL--The Advanced Science Diving Program at Florida State University Panama City is offering a Summer

Weston, Ken

284

PRESS RELEASE February 13, 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRESS RELEASE February 13, 2013 Media Contact Becky Kelly, FSU Panama City, Office of Advancement at (850) 770-2151 or rkelly@pc.fsu.edu. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY PANAMA CITY SUMMER STEM CAMPS Panama City, FL--Florida State University Panama City STEM Institute's Summer STEM Camps are open to rising 8th

Weston, Ken

285

MEDIA ADVISORY FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research to meet our changing energy goals, to market expansion of energy business solutions, to improved and vision in areas such as communications, energy, water, transportation, the environment, green jobs FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Media Contacts: CPUC: Terrie Prosper, 415-703-1366, news@cpuc.ca.gov California Energy

286

Sea Level Rise Media Release  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea Level Rise Media Release Coverage Report 07/06/2009 Melting Ice Could Lead to Massive Waves 06/11/2009 Rising sea levels could see U.S. Atlantic coast cities make hard choices; Where to let Baltimore Chronicle & Sentinel, The 06/08/2009 Rapid rise in sea levels on East Coast predicted Pittsburgh

Hu, Aixue

287

CCPPressRelease October 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, which have been added to flight base prices since the unprecedented increases in the cost of oil they will be removed. In contrast to the conventional wisdom of pricing over the business cycle, a duopoly collusiveCCPPressRelease October 2006 Companies' Surcharges Make Higher Prices Possible W: www

Feigon, Brooke

288

Chemical structure of coal tar during devolatilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enormous progress has been made in coal pyrolysis research during the last two decades. Models of coal devolatilization have progressed from simple rate expressions based on total mass release to empirical relationships based on the elemental composition of the parent coal to models that attempt to describe the macromolecular network of the coal. In the last several years, advancements in chemical analysis techniques have allowed quantitative investigations of the chemical structure of both coal and its pyrolysis products, including the nature of the resulting char. A prominent research goal is to accurately predict the rates, yields, and products of devolatilization from measurements of the parent coal structure. The prediction of nitrogen species evolved during devolatilization is of current interest. These goals necessitate modeling the reaction processes on the molecular scale, with activation energies that relate to chemical bond breaking rather than to the mass of products released from the coal. Solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy has proven particularly useful in obtaining average values of chemical structure features of coal and char, while liquid phase {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy has been used to determine some of the chemical features of coal tar. Pyridine extract residues from coal and partially-pyrolyzed coal chars have also been analyzed by solid-state {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, and the extracts have been analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy.

Fletcher, T.H.; Watt, M. [Bringham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Bai, S.; Solum, M.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Efficieny handling effluent gases through chemical scrubbing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is presented as an information source for efficiencies of chemical scrubbing. In it, we will discuss the specific problems of scrubbing silane, disilane, diborane, phosphine, hydrogen selenide and arsine. We will explain the scrubber dynamics, gases and flow rates used along with liquid mediums. The equipment and procedures used for testing, as well as the determination of the results, will be discussed. We intend to give examples of possible reactions and documentation of our efficiencies. Installation and maintenance will be touched, as well as our experiments into accidental catastrophic releases. From all of this we will derive conclusions as to the best possible means of wet chemical scrubbing.

Herman, T.; Soden, S.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2013 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Release Schedule: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2013) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2013 will be released between April 15 and May 2. See release schedule. . Download the AEO2013 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2013 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2013 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2012 Reference case

292

Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,Extension CommunicationsSpecialistTheTexasA&MUniversitySystem. Cover design byRhondaKappler, ExtensionCommercial Artist Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants Allan McGinty and Rick Machen* More than 100 species of toxic plants in- fest Texas rangelands. These plants... and Sons: New York, N.Y. Lane, M. A., M. H. Ralphs, J. D. Olsen, F. D. Provenza and J. A. Pfister. 1990. ?Conditioned taste aversion: potentialfor reducing cattle loss to larkspur.? Journal ofRangeManagement. 43:127-131. McGinty, Allan and Tommy G. Welch...

McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

293

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List Chemicals on this list are routine use chemicals in the CAMD Cleanroom and are available to users for general use. All others (*) are approved for use...

294

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 17, 2008 November 17, 2008 DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration Atlas New Version Provides Additional Information on Carbon Dioxide Storage 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas II WASHINGTON, D. C.- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of its second Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada, which documents more than 3,500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential in oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams, and saline formations. Preliminary estimates suggest the availability of more than 1,100 years of CO2 storage for the United States and Canada in these geologic formations. "In the year since it was first published, the carbon sequestration atlas has proven to be an invaluable tool to the entire sequestration community," said Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy James Slutz. "The second edition will bolster our efforts to find environmentally sound, cost-effective methods to sequester carbon dioxide."

295

NETL: News Release -Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of advanced coal technologies a priority," Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell said. "Through new and innovative programs such as the Clean Coal Power Initiative and FutureGen demonstration, private sector partnerships, and use of tax credits and loan guarantees, the Department of Energy is advancing research to further develop and deploy advanced coal technologies to meet growing energy demand."

296

NETL: News Release - DOE Releases Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 4, 2007 October 4, 2007 DOE Releases Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for CCPI Round 3 Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has released for public comment the draft Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), Model Cooperative Agreement, and Model Payment Agreement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). CCPI invites private industries to partner with Government to demonstrate new clean coal technologies at commercial scale. MORE INFO Read the Draft FOA Register for the Public Workshop [beginning 10.05.07] The draft FOA allows interested parties to voice concerns and seek answers to questions regarding the cost-shared partnership. The public comment period begins immediately and continues through November 9, 2007. In addition, a public meeting will be held on November 1, 2007, at the Hyatt

297

Recommended plutonium release fractions from postulated fires. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was written at the request of EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. in support of joint emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) by EG&G and the State of Colorado. The intent of the report is to provide the State of Colorado with an independent assessment of any respirable plutonium releases that might occur in the event of a severe fire at the plant. Fire releases of plutonium are of interest because they have been used by EG&G to determine the RFP emergency planning zones. These zones are based on the maximum credible accident (MCA) described in the RFP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) of 1980, that MCA is assumed to be a large airplane crashing into a RFP plutonium building.The objective of this report was first, to perform a worldwide literature review of relevant release experiments from 1960 to the present and to summarize those findings, and second, to provide recommendations for application of the experimental data to fire release analyses at Rocky Flats. The latter step requires translation between experimental and expected RFP accident parameters, or ``scaling.`` The parameters of particular concern are: quantities of material, environmental parameters such as the intensity of a fire, and the physico-chemical forms of the plutonium. The latter include plutonium metal, bulk plutonium oxide powder, combustible and noncombustible wastes contaminated with plutonium oxide powder, and residues from plutonium extraction processes.

Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Chemical process safety management within the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the Department of Energy (DOE) is not well known for its chemical processing activities, the DOE does have a variety of chemical processes covered under OSHA`s Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (the PSM Standard). DOE, like industry, is obligated to comply with the PSM Standard. The shift in the mission of DOE away from defense programs toward environmental restoration and waste management has affected these newly forming process safety management programs within DOE. This paper describes the progress made in implementing effective process safety management programs required by the PSM Standard and discusses some of the trends that have supported efforts to reduce chemical process risks within the DOE. In June of 1994, a survey of chemicals exceeding OSHA PSM or EPA Risk Management Program threshold quantities (TQs) at DOE sites found that there were 22 processes that utilized toxic or reactive chemicals over TQs; there were 13 processes involving flammable gases and liquids over TQs; and explosives manufacturing occurred at 4 sites. Examination of the survey results showed that 12 of the 22 processes involving toxic chemicals involved the use of chlorine for water treatment systems. The processes involving flammable gases and liquids were located at the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and Naval petroleum Reserve sites.

Piatt, J.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

chemical analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

300

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRENDS in Chemical Marketing ... BEFORE any chemical sales organization, can meet or establish new trends in marketing, it must be completely aware of the problem it faces. ...

W. M. RUSSELL

1955-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

released  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arctic Arctic algae, a cereal crop whose genetic code is nearly equivalent to sequencing two full human genomes, and microbial communities in deep- sea hydrothermal vents are among the 35 projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) for its 2011 Community Sequencing Program (CSP) to be character- ized for bioenergy and environ- mental applications. Enabling scientists from universities and national labo- ratories around the world to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants to meet the DOE missions of bioenergy, carbon cycling and biogeo- chemistry, this year's CSP portfolio is composed mostly of large-scale projects, which DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin said was in keeping with the facility's mission of large-scale genomics and analysis. "Advances in sequencing technologies are really chang- ing the landscape and have dramatically

302

Waterborne Release Monitoring and Surveillance Programs at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the liquid release environmental compliance programs currently in place at the Savannah river Site (SRS). Included are descriptions of stream monitoring programs, which measure chemical parameters and radionuclides in site streams and the Savannah river and test representative biological communities within the streams for chemical and radiological uptake. This report also explains the field sampling and analytical capabilities that are available at SRS during both normal and emergency conditions.

Blanchard, A.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

303

Z .Chemical Geology 158 1999 189202 Bacterial effects on the mobilization of cations from a weathered  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The mobility of the Pb associated with these iron oxides was less than that of other heavy metals that were .matrix Wang et al., 1995 . Irreversible sorption or precipitation of heavy metals onto subsurface min toxicity of the metal remains. Metal release is likel

Dorn, Ron

304

Toxic effects of excess cloned centromeres.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mitosis. We conclude that an excess of centromeres is toxic and...Yeast transformations. The lithium acetate method (19) was used...modifications. Cells were treated with lithium acetate at a cell concentration...and mixed with a twofold excess of similarly treated strain...

B Futcher; J Carbon

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

BOREAS Release, Oct. 15, 1999  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oct. 15 Oct. 15 Six new data sets from the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) were released by the ORNL DAAC on October 15, 1999. The release brings the total number to 186 data sets currently available. The newest data are related to hydrology, remote sensing, and background measurements (called "staff science"): BOREAS HYD-09 Hourly and Daily Radar Rainfall Maps for the Southern Study Area - Radar data that can be used to construct hourly and daily rainfall maps. BOREAS RSS-02 Extracted Reflectance Factors Derived from ASAS Imagery - Reflectance factors for small homogeneous areas around ground measurement sites, derived from remote sensing imagery. BOREAS Daedalus TMS Level-0 Imagery Digital Counts in BIL Format - Remotely sensed images showing radiant energy in the visible,

306

NREL: News - Release Archives 2008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version News Release Archives 2008 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 11, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center Creates New Tool to Calculate Ways to Cut Gas Use A business owner with a fleet of 10 heavy-duty diesel trucks wants to cut diesel use by 10 percent. Would using a biodiesel blend or investing in onboard power sources that reduce engine idling achieve the biggest drop in petroleum use? An average driver, using 600 gallons of gas a year in a typical sedan, wants to reduce gas consumption by 20 percent. Would using

307

AEO2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Early Release Overview December 2009 Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO- 2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and com- pared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 2009 1 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties in- herent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market trans- formation, or active changes in legislation, the refer- ence case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is re- leased in order to gain perspective on how variations

308

NREL: News - Release Archives 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version News Release Archives 2009 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 23, 2009 New NREL Web Site Helps Campuses Go Green The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Cornell University have launched a Web site to help campus-based institutions develop clean energy and carbon-reduction strategies. December 22, 2009 NREL Evaluates UPS Hybrid-Electric Van Performance The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has collected and analyzed fuel economy, maintenance and other

309

Chemical Safety Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

310

2012 Microgrid Workshop Summary Released  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy has released the summary report from the July 30-31, 2012 Microgrid Workshop presented by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. The workshop was held in response to discussions at the preceding DOE Microgrid Workshop, held in August 2011, which called for sharing lessons learned and best practices for system integration from existing projects in the U.S. (including military microgrids) and internationally.

311

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Full Report Release Date: Early Spring 2014 | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2014) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2014 full version will be released early Spring 2014. Download the AEO2014 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2014 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2014 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2013 Reference case

312

News Releases & Features | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News Releases SHARE News Releases and Features 1-2 of 2 Results U.S. Rep. Fleischmann touts ORNL as national energy treasure February 11, 2011 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Feb. 11, 2011 -...

313

BPA releases I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RELEASE Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2012 CONTACT: Doug Johnson, 503-230-5840 or 503-230-5131 BPA releases I-5 Corridor Reinforcement Project Draft EIS and preferred alternative...

314

DOE Issues WIPP Radiological Release Investigation Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Today, the Department of Energys Office of Environmental Management (EM) released the initial accident investigation report related to the Feb. 14 radiological release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico.

315

The release of phosphorus during sediment resuspension  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The release of phosphorus from sediments to overlaying water was studied during laboratory and in situ experiments.

Ryszard N. Wisniewski

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity due Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

318

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic mode-of-action Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

319

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute testis toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxicity results Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... not cause overt fetal or maternal toxicity, but not rats...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic encephalopathy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

322

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute renal toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

323

E-Print Network 3.0 - acutely toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

324

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute urinary toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute liver toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

326

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic hepatitis Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute toxicity: CNS depression...

327

Chemical Management Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

328

About Chemical Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

329

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emission Samples Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emission Samples 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute...

330

Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Emissions Relationship Between Composition and Toxicity of Engine Emissions 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lovelace Respiratory Research...

331

Fate and control of blistering chemical warfare agents in Kuwait`s desalination industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kuwait, as most of the other states located along the Western shores of the Arabian Gulf, relies upon the Gulf as its main drinking water resource via desalination. In case of seawater contamination with blistering chemical warfare agents, traces of the agents and/or degradation products in the finished water might pose a serious health hazard. The objective of the present review is to study the potential contamination, transport, fate, effect and control of blistering chemical warfare agents (CWAs), in the Kuwaiti desalination industry. In general, all the environmental factors involved in the aquatic degradation of CWAs in Kuwait marine environment except for the high salinity in case of blistering agents such as sulphur mustard, and in favor of a fast degradation process. In case of massive releases of CWAs near the Kuwaiti shorelines, turbulence resulting from tidal cycles and high temperature will affect the dissolution process and extend the toxicity of the insoluble agent. Post- and pre-chlorination during the course of seawater desalination will catalyze and significantly accelerate the hydrolysis processes of the CWAs. The heat exerted on CWAs during the power generation-desalination processes is not expected to thermally decompose them. However, the steam heat will augment the agent`s rate of hydrolysis with subsequent acceleration in their rate of detoxification. Conventional pretreatment of feed seawater for reverse-osmosis desalination is theoretically capable of reducing the concentration of CWAs by coprecipitation and adsorption on flocs formed during coagulation. Prechlorination and prolonged detention in time in pretreatment units will simultaneously promote hydrolysis reactions. 50 refs.

Khordagui, H.K. [United Nations Economic and Social Commission for West Asia, Amman (Jordan)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Acute and chronic toxicity of uranium compounds to Ceriodaphnia-Daphnia dubia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of uranyl nitrate, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, and uranium dioxide to the organism Ceriodaphnia dubia was conducted. The toxicity tests were conducted by two independent environmental consulting laboratories. Part of the emphasis for this determination was based on concerns expressed by SCDHEC, which was concerned that a safety factor of 100 must be applied to the previous 1986 acute toxicity result of 0.22 mg/L for Daphnia pulex, This would have resulted in the LETF release limits being based on an instream concentration of 0.0022 mg/L uranium. The NPDES Permit renewal application to SCDHEC utilized the results of this study and recommended that the LETF release limit for uranium be based an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. This is based on the fact that the uranium releases from the M-Area LETF will be in the hydrogen uranyl phosphate form, or a uranyl phosphate complex at the pH (6--10) of the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility effluent stream, and at the pH of the receiving stream (5.5 to 7.0). Based on the chronic toxicity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate, a lower uranium concentration limit for the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility outfall vs. the existing NPDES permit was recommended: The current NPDES permit ``Guideline`` for uranium at outfall M-004 is 0.500 mg/L average and 1.0 mg/L maximum, at a design flowrate of 60 gpm. It was recommended that the uranium concentration at the M-004 outfall be reduced to 0.28 mg/L average, and 0.56 mg/L, maximum, and to reduce the design flowrate to 30 gpm. The 0.28 mg/L concentration will provide an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. The 0.28 mg/L concentration at M-004 is based on the combined flows from A-014, A-015, and A-011 outfalls (since 1985) of 1840 gpm (2.65 MGD) and was the flow rate which was utilized in the 1988 NPDES permit renewal application.

Pickett, J.B.; Specht, W.L.; Keyes, J.L.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chemical Management (Vol. 2 of 3)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

i i TS DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 AUGUST 2006 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 2 of 3) Chemical Safety and Lifecycle Management U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site http://standards.doe.gov DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 iii Foreword During the last several years, the Department of Energy (DOE) complex has averaged one chemical incident per day. DOE considers this rate to be unacceptable. In an effort to address

334

A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

Gephart, Roy E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seeing Toxic Algae Before it Blooms By Steve Ress Researchers at the University of Nebraska of toxic blue-green algae before the bacteria that produce it can grow into a full-scale bloom. Now UNL and monitor in real-time, the water-borne agents that can cause toxic blue- green algae to flourish and become

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

336

DOC-DOE China Mission Announcement Press Release | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

China Mission Announcement Press Release DOC-DOE China Mission Announcement Press Release DOC-DOE China Mission Announcement Press Release DOC-DOE China Mission Announcement Press...

337

2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.286286 Rational Design of Light-Controllable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

� 2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.286286 Rational Design of Light offering control over when and where the release of loaded agents takes place. � 2007 The Japan Chemical r M i c e l l e s 287� 2007 The Japan Chemical Journal Forum and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. arrived

Zhao, Yue

338

NREL: News - Release Archives 2004  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 4 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 21, 2004 NREL Recognizes Solar Pioneer with National Honor November 23, 2004 NREL Recognizes Solar Pioneer with National Honor November 17, 2004 Basalt Middle School Teacher Recognized for Renewable Energy Efforts October 5, 2004 NREL Theorist Recognized for Highest Citation Impact September 24, 2004 NREL Selects Contractor for New Science & Technology Facility August 26, 2004 NREL Praised for Efforts in Sustainable Pollution Prevention August 19, 2004 FLC Recognizes Laboratory's Technology Transfer Activities

339

Research priorities for mobile air toxics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Health Effects Institute, a cooperative effort of the auto industry and the EPA, whose mission is to provide health effects information to ensure that motor vehicle emissions do not pose unreasonable risks, recently undertook a project to define priorities for research that would decrease uncertainties in risk assessments for mobile air toxics. At a workshop held in December 1992, scientists from academia, industry, and government worked to identify uncertainties in understanding the potential risk of exposure to mobile air toxics, including methanol, an important potential alternate fuel. Although cancer risk was the primary concern regarding most compounds, there was also much discussion of non-cancer effects of potential importance. Participants discussed research priorities for scientific issues that apply across all compound groups, such as dosimetry, high-to-low dose extrapolation, exposure assessment, and molecular biology approaches.

Not Available

1993-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Using alternative chemicals in the flotation of heavy metals from lead mill tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) investigated alternative chemicals for the flotation of heavy metal values from southeast Missouri lead mill tailings. The objectives of the study were to lower the Pb remaining in the reprocessed tailings to <500 ppm, concentrate the metal values, and lower the overall toxicity of the flotation reagent scheme. Due to the high toxicity of classic flotation chemicals, collectorless flotation, as well as nontoxic or less-toxic chemicals, was studied for use in the flotation process. The investigation centered on the National tailings pile in Flat River, MO. Advantages to using alternative chemicals for the flotation process are presented. Novel reagent schemes are discussed for the treatment of the tailings. Various nontoxic or less-toxic oils were tested, and a substitute for sodium sulfide was investigated. Using a food additive oil, soda ash, and a frother as the reagent scheme, froth flotation recovered 89% of the Pb values. Further scavenging lowered the Pb remaining in the reprocessed tailings to <500 ppm. A less-toxic substitute for sodium cyanide was also studied for use in the cleaner flotation stages. Preliminary results indicate that the food additive oil, canola oil, to be as effective as classic sulfide flotation reagents.

Benn, F.W. [Bureau of Mines, Rolla, MO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Acute toxicity of toluene, hexane, xylene, and benzene to the rotifers Brachionus calyciflorus and Brachionus plicatilis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of studies on the biological effects of oil pollution in the aquatic environment deal with the effects of whole crude or refined oils or their water-soluble fractions. However, low boiling, aromatic hydrocarbons, which are probably the most toxic constituents of oil, have until now not been examined in sufficient detail. Toluene, benzene and xylene, constitute a major component of various oils. They may be readily lost by weathering but are toxic in waters that are relatively stagnant and are chronically polluted. Korn et al. have stated that toluene is more toxic than many other hydrocarbons such as benzene, though the latter are more water-soluble. Report of the effects of exposure to organic solvents like hexane or toluene are still limited although organic solvents are a well-known group of neurointoxicants. Various benzene derivates continue to be used as chemical intermediates, solvents, pesticides, so on, in spite of incomplete knowledge of their chronic toxicity. The majority of toxicity studies about the effects of pollution on aquatic organisms under controlled conditions have used either fish or the cladoceran Daphnia magna and there are few studies reported using rotifers. The effects of herbicides on population variables of laboratory rotifer cultures have been investigated. Rotifers are one of the main sources of zooplankton production and they have an important ecological significance in the aquatic environment. The present work was designed to investigate the effect of short-term exposure to some petroleum derivates which might be expected to occur immediately under an oil-slick, on freshwater and brackish environment rotifers. 18 refs., 1 tab.

Ferrando, M.D.; Andreu-Moliner, E. (Univ. of Valencia (Spain))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

BACTOX, a Rapid Bioassay That Uses Protozoa To Assess the Toxicity of Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...well-recognized standard for toxicity testing (, , , ). The purpose of the BACTOX test is the detection of the overall toxicity of surreptitious strains which synthesize toxic secondary metabolites (toxicants) and which may constitute a biohazard. Its purpose is...

Wolfram Schlimme; Marcello Marchiani; Kurt Hanselmann; Bernard Jenni

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined.

Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

MODELING ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF TRITIUM FROM NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium source term analysis and the subsequent dispersion and consequence analyses supporting the safety documentation of Department of Energy nuclear facilities are especially sensitive to the applied software analysis methodology, input data and user assumptions. Three sequential areas in tritium accident analysis are examined in this study to illustrate where the analyst should exercise caution. Included are: (1) the development of a tritium oxide source term; (2) use of a full tritium dispersion model based on site-specific information to determine an appropriate deposition scaling factor for use in more simplified, broader modeling, and (3) derivation of a special tritium compound (STC) dose conversion factor for consequence analysis, consistent with the nature of the originating source material. It is recommended that unless supporting, defensible evidence is available to the contrary, the tritium release analyses should assume tritium oxide as the species released (or chemically transformed under accident's environment). Important exceptions include STC situations and laboratory-scale releases of hydrogen gas. In the modeling of the environmental transport, a full phenomenology model suggests that a deposition velocity of 0.5 cm/s is an appropriate value for environmental features of the Savannah River Site. This value is bounding for certain situations but non-conservative compared to the full model in others. Care should be exercised in choosing other factors such as the exposure time and the resuspension factor.

Okula, K

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Prediction of the heat release rate of wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A model for the heat release rate of wood during flaming combustion was developed during this research. It includes the effects of char shrinkage, multiple chemical components, adsorbed moisture, internal convective cooling and the variation of the thermophysical and thermochemical properties with temperature and the mass retention fraction of the char. It does not include char oxidation or diffusion of moisture and volatile pyrolysis products toward the rear surface. It calculates the time to ignition, mass burning rate, heat release rate, heat of combustion, heat of gasification and depth of char. An important part of this research was the determination of the thermochemical and thermophysical properties required by the model. An apparatus was developed for determining the kinetic parameters and the heat of combustion of the volatiles under conditions similar to those in the interior of a flaming slab of wood. Data were obtained on each of the four major chemical components present in Douglas fir. Thermal diffusivity measurements on Douglas fir and its char yielded an average value of 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} s{sup 2}/s which was nearly independent of temperature and mass retention fraction of the char for temperature sup to 500{degree}C and for mass-retention fractions above 0.30.

Parker, W.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Release Data Package for Hanford Site Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support a Hanford assessment. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 through 2005 to support the Release Module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) for the updated composite analysis. This work was completed as part of the Characterization of Systems Project, part of the Remediation and Closure Science Project, the Hanford Assessments Project, and the Characterization of Systems Project managed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Related characterization activities and data packages for the vadose zone and groundwater are being developed under the remediation Decision Support Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. The Release Module applies release models to waste inventory data from the Inventory Module and accounts for site remediation activities as a function of time. The resulting releases to the vadose zone, expressed as time profiles of annual rates, become source terms for the Vadose Zone Module. Radioactive decay is accounted for in all inputs and outputs of the Release Module. The Release Module is implemented as the VADER (Vadose zone Environmental Release) computer code. Key components of the Release Module are numerical models (i.e., liquid, soil-debris, cement, saltcake, and reactor block) that simulate contaminant release from the different waste source types found at the Hanford Site. The Release Module also handles remediation transfers to onsite and offsite repositories.

Riley, Robert G.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Engel, David W.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

349

An evaluation of trace element release associated with acid mine drainage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The determination of trace element release from geologic materials, such as oil shale and coal overburden, is important for proper solid waste management planning. The objective of this study was to determine a correlation between release using the following methods: (1) sequential selective dissolution for determining trace element residencies, (2) toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), and (3) humidity cell weathering study simulating maximum trace element release. Two eastern oil shales were used, a New Albany shale that contains 4.6 percent pyrite, and a Chattanooga shale that contains 1.5 percent pyrite. Each shale was analyzed for elemental concentrations by soluble, adsorbed, organic, carbonate, and sulfide phases. The results of the results of the selective dissolution studies show that each trace element has a unique distribution between the various phases. Thus, it is possible to predict trace element release based on trace element residency. The TCLP results show that this method is suitable for assessing soluble trace element release but does not realistically assess potential hazards. The results of the humidity cell studies do demonstrate a more reasonable method for predicting trace element release and potential water quality hazards. The humidity cell methods, however, require months to obtain the required data with a large number of analytical measurements. When the selective dissolution data are compared to the trace element concentrations in the TCLP and humidity cell leachates, it is shown that leachate concentrations are predicted by the selective dissolution data. Therefore, selective dissolution may represent a rapid method to assess trace element release associated with acid mine drainage.

Sullivan, P.J.; Yelton, J.L. (Univ. of Wyoming Research Corp., Laramie (United States))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ? We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ? The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ? CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ? Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ? We also identified ER stress as an early effector of CsA toxicity.

Sarr, Eduard, E-mail: eduard.sarro@vhir.org [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain) [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Jacobs-Cach, Conxita, E-mail: conxita.jacobs@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain)] [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Itarte, Emilio, E-mail: emili.itarte@uab.es [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)] [Departament de Bioqumica i Biologia Molecular, Unitat de Bioqumica de Biocincies, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Meseguer, Anna, E-mail: ana.meseguer@vhir.org [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain) [Renal Physiopathology, CIBBIM-Nanomedicine, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), 08035 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Bioquimica i Biologia Molecular, Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autnoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

The problem of living in a world contaminated with chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proliferation of xenobiotic chemicals in the global environment poses living problems for each of us aboard {open_quotes}spaceship earth.{close_quotes} Seven case studies are presented that illustrate the magnitude of the problem that can result from waiting to identify toxic hazards until there have been decades of {open_quotes}human guinea pig{close_quotes} exposure. 25 refs., 5 tabs.

Metcalf, R.L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chemicals from Metabolic Pathways  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A few basic raw materials, petroleum, natural gas, +S from oil or natural gas, and O2 + N2 from air, generate first primary (or platform) chemicals, next secondary (commodity) chemicals, then intermediates, and f...

John Villadsen; Jens Nielsen; Gunnar Lidn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00�12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

354

Chemicals and health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemicals and health ... I must add here that some chemicals are indeed dangerous in the environment, largely because they persist, they don't break down, and they can therefore build up in the food chain. ...

1980-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Biobased Chemicals Without Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unlike most other companies using biology to make chemicals, LanzaTech does not rely on biomass feedstocks. ...

MELODY BOMGARDNER

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Disposition of toxic PCB congeners in snapping turtle eggs: expressed as toxic equivalents of TCDD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of snapping turtles, taken from the region of the Upper Hudson River, in New York State, revealed exceedingly high levels of PCBs in the adipose tissue. There is evidence to suggest that large reserves of fat provide protection against chlorinated hydrocarbon toxicity. Such storage may protect snapping turtle eggs from disposition of toxic PCB congeners and account for the apparent absence of reports regarding detrimental effects on the hatchability of eggs from turtles living in the vicinity of the upper Hudson River. The present study was undertaken to determine if indeed these eggs are protected against disposition of toxic PCB congeners by the presence of large reserves of fat. Although tissue volumes play an important role in determining the initial site of disposition, the major factor controlling the elimination of these compounds involves metabolism. For simple halogenated benzenes as well as for more complex halogenated biphenyls, oxidative metabolism catalyzed by P-448, occurs primarily at the site of two adjacent unsubstituted carbon atoms via arene oxide formation leading to the formation of water soluble metabolites. Toxicological studies have demonstrated that the most toxic PCB congeners, isosteriomers of tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), require no metabolic activation. These compounds have chlorine atoms in the meta and para positions of both rings. It may be concluded that the structures of PCB congeners and isomers which favor induction of cytochrome P-448 are also those which are toxic and resist metabolism. It is the objective of the present study to determine if the heavy fat bodies of the female turtle provide a sufficiently large sink to retain the toxic congeners and prevent their incorporation into the eggs.

Bryan, A.M.; Stone, W.B.; Olafsson, P.G.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

NREL: News - Release Archives 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 7 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 4, 2007 Energy Lab Sets Aggressive Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has pledged to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 75 percent from 2005 to 2009. The new goal is part of NREL's participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Climate Leaders program. November 8, 2007 Wakonda Technologies is the Clean Energy Entrepreneur of the Year A small company commercializing a novel solar energy technology has been

358

NREL: News - Release Archives 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2003 2003 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 22, 2003 Renewable Energy a Smart Choice for Farmers and Ranchers December 10, 2003 Georgia Tech's Rohatgi Wins Second Annual Rappaport Award December 9, 2003 Acclaim for Three Leaders at Annual NREL Stakeholders Reception November 14, 2003 World Renewable Energy Congress Provides International Forum November 12, 2003 NREL and Company Researchers Team Up on Thin-Film Solar Cells October 30, 2003 NREL's Art Nozik Elected AAAS Fellow October 21, 2003 Workshop Tackles Biological Hydrogen Production

359

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

NREL: News - Release Archives 2006  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 14, 2006 Experimental "Wind to Hydrogen" System Up and Running Xcel Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory unveiled a unique facility that uses electricity from wind turbines to produce and store pure hydrogen. November 28, 2006 University of Denver High School Teacher Recognized for Commitment to Renewable Energy Don Cameron, physics and astronomy teacher at the University of Denver High School (DUHS), earned this year's Renewable Energy Teacher Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Nolij Corporation Proprietary & Confidential Information Release Notes for Nolij Web  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nolij Corporation Proprietary & Confidential Information Release Notes for Nolij Web Release 6.3.x Web Release 6.3.x Copyright © 2010 - 2011, Nolij Corporation. All rights reserved. Revised 02Release Notes for Nolij Web Release 6.3.x Introduction These release notes provide information about new

Escher, Christine

362

Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes (ICEHT) Place: Hellas, Greece Zip:...

363

SANDlA REPORT Unlimited Release  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Markie, D.C., and Shanor, S.P., "Pepper Sauce Toxicity" Drug Chem. 20. Gosselin, R.E., Smith, R.P., and Hokge, H.C., "Detergents, Surfactants, and . .ToxicoI. 5:89-113 (1982)....

364

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

365

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

366

Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Proposal for a novel chemical heat pump dryer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new chemical heat pump (CHP) system for ecofriendly effective utilization of thermal energy in drying is proposed from the viewpoints of energy saving and environmental impact. CHPs can store thermal energy in the form of chemical energy by an endothermic reaction and release it at various temperature levels for heat demands by exo/endothermic reactions. CHPs have potential for heat recovery and dehumidification in the drying process by heat storage and high/low temperature heat release. In this study, the authors estimate the potential of the CHP application to drying systems for industrial use. Some combined systems of CHPs and dryers are proposed as chemical heat pump dryers (CHPD). The potential for commercialization of CHPDs is discussed.

Ogura, Hironao; Mujumdar, A.S.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 25, 2009 Feature Stories and Releases Nature Magazine Features Mobile Facility Deployment In China Bookmark and Share A news feature published in Vol. 461 of Nature...

369

Hometown News Release | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emergency Communications LabNotes Archive Netlognews Archive News Releases NETL Staff Bios Features NETL Awards Fact Sheets NETL Logo Standards Research News...

370

SEPA Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Southeastern Power Administration visited a local high school to discuss hydroelectric power and demonstrate power generation. News Press Releases Career Opportunities...

371

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2014 Feature Stories and Releases Biogenic Aerosols Examined in Finland Forest Bookmark and Share The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) is operating in Hyytil, Finland,...

372

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - News Release Archives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lower labor costs, drives China's current advantage in manufacturing photovoltaic (PV) solar energy systems, according to a new report released today by the Energy Department's...

373

NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investigation that focused on the release of radioactive material from the underground facility into the environment and related exposure to aboveground workers, as well as...

374

DOE National Laboratory Releases Annual Accomplishments Report...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Annual Accomplishments Report NETL's netlognews and Carbon Sequestration Atlas win first-place awards from the National Association of Government Communicators. NETL...

375

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - News Release Archives  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shows Power Grid can Accommodate Large Increase in Wind and Solar Generation The National Renewable Energy Laboratory today released an initial study assessing the operational...

376

NETL: News Release - DOE Releases Feasibility Study for Conceptual  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

21 , 2007 21 , 2007 DOE Releases Feasibility Study for Conceptual Coal-to-Liquids Facility in Midwest Report Outlines the Path Toward Future Domestic Energy Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued a report that examines the feasibility of a commercial 50,000 barrel per day coal-to-liquids (CTL) facility in the Illinois coal basin. The conceptual design study provides a performance baseline that can be used to show how CTL could capitalize on domestic energy resources while providing a much-needed bulwark against rising petroleum and natural gas prices. The price of coal-derived liquid fuels has traditionally been unable to compete with the price of fuels derived from crude oil. As oil prices continue to rise, however, domestic sources of transportation fuels are becoming more affordable. The economic and national security concerns related to non-domestic liquid fuels have more eyes turning to alternative sources of liquid fuels, and, with coal being America's most abundant energy resource, CTL facilities may provide a winning option.

377

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

American Chemical Society-Chinese Chemical Society Alliance ... The American Chemical Society and the Chinese Chemical Society (CCS) formed a three-year collaborative alliance in 2010 to address shared global concerns. ...

MARINDA LI WU; YAO JIANNIAN

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

378

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Use of Remotely Sensed Bioelectric Action Potentials to Evaluate Episodic Toxicity Events and Ambient Toxicity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from storm water runoff is very difficult. The research reported here describes a non-invasive, or minimally invasive, system that measures in real-time or near real-time, clam gape. Clams have been shown to change gape in the presence of toxicants i...

Waller, W. Tom; Acevedo, Miguel F.; Allen, H. J.; Schwalm, F. U.

380

Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Department of Energy Releases WIPP Recovery Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Washington, D.C. Today, the Department of Energy (DOE) released the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Recovery Plan, outlining the necessary steps to resume operations at the transuranic waste disposal site outside of Carlsbad, N.M. WIPP operations were suspended following an underground truck fire and a radiological release earlier this year.

384

CARD No. 31 Application of Release Limits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of calculating the release limits. Section 194.31 specifies that release limits should be calculated based a likelihood of less than one chance in 1,000 of exceeding ten times the quantities calculated according, in particular, the waste unit factor depends solely on the TRU component of waste. Section 194.31 requires

385

Grid Architecture Release 2.3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Draft Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November 2014 Draft #12;Grid Architecture Release 2.3 November..................................................................................................... 2.1 3.0 Brief Introduction to Grid Architecture........................................................................................ 3.2 3.1 How Grid Architecture Can Be Used

386

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigations of Sediment Elutriate Toxicity at Three Estuarine Stations in San Francisco Bay.............................................................................................. 8 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures................................................................................. 9 August 1997 Sediment-Water Interface Exposures

387

ANDERSON, DONALD M. Bloom dynamics of toxic Alexandrium ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

icity becomes dangerous. This is a particularly important feature, as the toxicity of ..... for certain marine biotoxins. Mass. Dep. Public Health. Final. Rep. 140 p.

388

Salicylate Toxicity from Ingestion and Continued Dermal Absorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of salicylate dermal absorption and toxicity. REFERENCESand Continued Dermal Absorption Rachel L. Chin, MD*, Kent R.bases in the percutaneous absorption of salicylates II. J

Chin, Rachel L; Olson, Kent R; Dempsey, Delia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The full AEO2011 will be released April 26, 2011. Download the AEO2011 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2011, EIA evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2011 Reference case, which is presented and compared with the AEO2010 Reference case released in December 2009 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties inherent in any energy market projection, the Reference case results should not be viewed in

391

Use of Biosensors to Screen Urine Samples for Potentially Toxic Chemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......easily maintained at a low cost, and a largenumber ofcells...advances in biological and medical diagnostics. J.Anal. Chem...1986). 12. G.I. Paton. Lighting the way for bioremediation...Ellenhorn and D.G. Barceloux.Medical Toxicology: Diagnosis and......

Jacqui Horswell; Stuart J. Dickson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Integrated chemical/biological treatment of paint stripper mixed waste: Metals toxicity and separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE complex has generated vast quantities of complex heterogeneous mixed wastes. Paint stripper waste (PSW) is a complex waste that arose from decontamination and decommissioning activities. It contains paint stripper, cheesecloth, cellulose-based paints with Pb and Cr, and suspect Pu. Los Alamos National Laboratory has 150--200 barrels of PSW and other national laboratories such as Rocky Flats Plant have many more barrels of heterogeneous waste. Few technologies exist that can treat this complex waste. Our approach to solving this problem is the integration of two established technologies: biodegradation and metals chelation.

Vanderberg-Twary, L.; Grumbine, R.K.; Foreman, T.; Hanners, J.L.; Brainard, J.R.; Sauer, N.N.; Unkefer, P.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Advances in the Analysis of Toxic Heavy Elements Having Variable Chemical Forms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......ammonium ion form. Surface active materials present can be controlled...using an arsenic hollow cathode lamp. As might be expected...organomercury in biological materials using tetramethyl tin...compounds in biological materials that is based on the......

Paul Mushak

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Quantitative High Content Imaging of Cellular Adaptive Stress Response Pathways in Toxicity for Chemical Safety Assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Steven Wink , Steven Hiemstra , Suzanna Huppelschoten , Erik Danen , Marije Niemeijer , Giel Hendriks , Harry Vrieling , Bram Herpers , and Bob van de Water * ... (37-39) The true power of HCS using automated imagers lies in its ability to capture when and where specific molecular signaling events are taking place, enabling characterization of cellular responses to multiple changes in the environment with high time and spatial resolution, relatively high throughput (depending on the exact setup) and on a single cell basis, enabling the detection of heterogeneity within populations. ... (141) The members of this family are highly expressed in the liver and include PXR, RXR, CAR, AHR, and HXR. ...

Steven Wink; Steven Hiemstra; Suzanna Huppelschoten; Erik Danen; Marije Niemeijer; Giel Hendriks; Harry Vrieling; Bram Herpers; Bob van de Water

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Chemical Management (Volume 3 of 3)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 April 2005 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. It is available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. It is available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

396

Chemical Structure and Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2154-3 2154-3 UC-400 Annual Report 2000 Chemical Structure and Dynamics Steven D. Colson, Associate Director Robin S. McDowell, Program Manager and the Staff of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program April 2001 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Contents Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report 1. Introduction Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program......................................................... 1-3 2. Reaction Mechanisms at Liquid Interfaces Structure and Reactivity of Ice Surfaces and Interfaces G. A. Kimmel, Z. Dohnálek, K. P. Stevenson, R. S. Smith,

397

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL UNIONS FORM ALLIANCE ... The Paper, Allied-Industrial, Chemical & Energy "Workers International Union (PACE) and the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) are industrial unions that have similar histories and many chemical and petroleum industry members, say union officials. ... PACE has created strategic alliances with several companies, said PACE President Boydlfoung in a statement, adding that it made sense to try the same thing with other unions. ...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Assessing interactions between nutrients and toxicity : influences of nitrogen and phosphorus on triclosan toxicity to the aquatic macrophyte "lemna gibba".  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the present study, influences of nutrient availability on triclosan toxicity to a model aquatic macrophyte Lemna gibba were explored. Triclosan effective concentrations varied by (more)

Fulton, Barry A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Chemicals (2010 MECS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) Energy use data source: 2010 EIA MECS (with adjustments) Footprint Last Revised: February 2014

400

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weakly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Chemical Market Prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical Market Prices ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1945-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

404

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter, with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

406

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CHEMICAL MARKET PRICES ... Compiled from weekly current price listings in the Oil, Paint and Drug Reporter , with permission of the publisher under its copyright. ...

1941-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

408

Int J Hyg Environ Health. Author manuscript Comparative assessing for radiological, chemical, and physical exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, chemical, and physical exposures at the French uranium conversion plant: Is uranium the only stressor to be potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic and used at the main uranium conversion plant in France for further investigation of association between exposure and mortality among uranium conversion workers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

Estimating Air Chemical Emissions from Research Activities Using Stack Measurement Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current methods of estimating air emissions from research and development (R&D) activities use a wide range of release fractions or emission factors with bases ranging from empirical to semi-empirical. Although considered conservative, the uncertainties and confidence levels of the existing methods have not been reported. Chemical emissions were estimated from sampling data taken from four research facilities over ten years. The approach was to use a Monte Carlo technique to create distributions of annual emission estimates for target compounds detected in source test samples. Distributions were created for each year and building sampled for compounds with sufficient detection frequency to qualify for the analysis. The results using the Monte Carlo technique without applying a filter to remove negative emission values showed almost all distributions spanning zero, and forty percent of the distributions having a negative mean. This indicates that emissions are so low as to be indistinguishable from building background. Application of a filter to allow only positive values in the distribution provided a more realistic value for emissions and increased the distribution mean by an average of sixteen percent. Release fractions were calculated by dividing the emission estimates by a building chemical inventory quantity. Two variations were used for this quantity: chemical usage, and chemical usage plus one-half standing inventory. Filters were applied so that only release fraction values from zero to one were included in the resulting distributions. Release fractions had a wide range among chemicals and among data sets for different buildings and/or years for a given chemical. Regressions of release fractions to molecular weight and vapor pressure showed weak correlations. Similarly, regressions of mean emissions to chemical usage, chemical inventory, molecular weight and vapor pressure also gave weak correlations. These results highlight the difficulties in estimating emissions from R&D facilities using chemical inventory data.

Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Duchsherer, Cheryl J.; Woodruff, Rodger K.; Larson, Timothy V.

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail Climate Change and Chemical Risks Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Pesticides, air pollutants, and other contaminants could become increasingly harmful to human health due to climate change, according to a new series of papers published in Environmental Toxicology Chemistry (ET&C). The seven publications, which appeared in ET&C's January 2013 issue, present evidence that climate change could affect how chemicals are transported and cause toxicity in both ecosystems and people. These impacts could mean that chemical risk assessment practices will demand swift modification and adaptation. "Risk assessors and public health practitioners need to understand how climate change may alter chemical risks to people in the future," said one of the papers' lead authors John Balbus, M.D., who is leading the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences's (NIEHS) Global Environmental Health and Sustainable Development projects. "Existing data sources and assumptions used in exposure and risk assessment may not apply. Environmental health researchers and risk assessors will need to consider interactions between climate-related stressors and chemical stressors and other ways that future risks may be changing," he added.

411

Evaluation of the potential for significant ammonia releases from Hanford waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia is ubiquitous as a component of the waste stored in the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). Because ammonia is both flammable and toxic, concerns have been raised about the amount of ammonia stored in the tanks and the possible mechanisms by which it could be released from the waste into the head space inside the tanks as well as into the surrounding atmosphere. Ammonia is a safety issue for three reasons. As already mentioned, ammonia is a flammable gas and may contribute to a flammability hazard either directly, if it reaches a high enough concentration in the tank head space, or by contributing to the flammability of other flammable gases such as hydrogen (LANL 1994). Ammonia is also toxic and at relatively low concentrations presents a hazard to human health. The level at which ammonia is considered Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) is 300 ppm (WHC 1993, 1995). Ammonia concentrations at or above this level have been measured inside the head space in a number of SSTs. Finally, unlike hydrogen and nitrous oxide, ammonia is highly soluble in aqueous solutions, and large amounts of ammonia can be stored in the waste as dissolved gas. Because of its high solubility, ammonia behaves in a qualitatively different manner from hydrogen or other insoluble gases. A broader range of scenarios must be considered in modeling ammonia storage and release.

Palmer, B.J.; Anderson, C.M.; Chen, G.; Cuta, J.M.; Ferryman, T.A.; Terrones, G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Predictions of PuO{sub 2} and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. [Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Callow, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Predictions of PuO sub 2 and tracer compound release from ISV melts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two field tests were conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to assess in situ vitrification (ISV) suitability for long-term stabilization of buried radioactive waste. Both tests contained rare-earth oxide tracers (DY{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7}) to simulate the presence of plutonium in the form of PuO{sub 2}. In the first test, Intermediate Field Test (IFT)-l, approximately 4-% release of tracer material occurred during soil melting and associated off-gassing, while essentially nil release was observed for the second experiment (IFT-2) for which off-gassing was much reduced. This report presents an evaluation of the IFT test data in terms of governing release processes. Prediction of tracer release during ISV melting centered on an assessment of three potential transport mechanisms, (a) tracer diffusion through stagnant pool, (b) tracer transport by convective currents, and (c) tracer carry-off by escaping gas bubbles. Analysis indicates that tracer release by escaping gas is the dominant release mechanism, which is consistent with video records of gas bubble escape from the ISV melt surface. Quantitative mass transport predictions were also made for the IFT-I test conditions, indicating similarity between the 4-% release data and calculational results at viscosities of {approx} poise and tracer diffusivities of {approx}10{sub {minus}6} CM{sup 2}/s. Since PuO{sub 2} has similar chemical and transport (diffusivity) properties as the rare-earth tracers used in the rare earth tracers used in the IFT experiments, release of PuO{sub 2} is predicted for similar off-gassing conditions. Reduced off-gassing during ISV would thus be expected to improve the overall retention of heavy-oxides within vitrified soil.

Cronenberg, A.W. (Engineering Science and Analysis, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Callow, R.A. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The weathering of oil after the Deepwater?Horizon oil spill: insights from the chemical composition of the oil from the sea surface, salt marshes and sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oil released during the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill may have both short-?and long-time impacts on the northern Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. An understanding of how the composition and concentration of the oil are altered by weathering, including chemical, physical and biological processes, is needed to evaluate the oil toxicity and impact on the ecosystem in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This study examined petroleum hydrocarbons in oil mousse collected from the sea surface and salt marshes, and in oil deposited in sediments adjacent to the wellhead after the DWH oil spill. Oil mousses were collected at two stations (OSS and CT, located 130 and 85?km away from the wellhead, respectively) in May 2010, and two sediment samples from stations SG and SC, within 6 km of the wellhead, in May 2011. We also collected oil mousse from salt marshes at Marsh Point (MP), Mississippi, 186?km away from the wellhead in July 2010. In these samples, n-alkanes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylated PAHs, BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and p-, m-, and o-xylenes), C3-benzenes and trace metals were measured to examine how the oil was altered chemically. The chemical analysis indicates that the oil mousses underwent different degrees of weathering with the pattern of OSS?DWH oil spill, as supported by the presence of short-chained n-alkanes (C10?C 15), BTEX and C 3-benzenes. The weathering of oil in sediment may result from biological degradation and dissolution, evidenced by the preferential loss of mid-chained n-alkanes C16?C 27, lower ratios of n-C 17/Pr and n-C 18/Ph , and preferential loss of PAHs relative to alkylated PAHs.

Zhanfei Liu; Jiqing Liu; Qingzhi Zhu; Wei Wu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM Nitric acid Corrosive - acid KAc Potassium acetate Irritant KCl Potassium chloride Irritant K2H PO4 Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY

Pawlowski, Wojtek

416

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of Coal Combustion By-Product Disposal and Utilizaton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) conducted a multiyear study to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements (ATEs) on the management of coal combustion by-products (CCBs). The ATEs evaluated in this project were arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, nickel, and selenium. The study included laboratory tasks to develop measurement techniques for mercury and ATE releases, sample characterization, and release experiments. A field task was also performed to measure mercury releases at a field site. Samples of fly ash and flue gas desulfurization (FGD) materials were collected preferentially from full-scale coal-fired power plants operating both without and with mercury control technologies in place. In some cases, samples from pilot- and bench-scale emission control tests were included in the laboratory studies. Several sets of 'paired' baseline and test fly ash and FGD materials collected during full-scale mercury emission control tests were also included in laboratory evaluations. Samples from mercury emission control tests all contained activated carbon (AC) and some also incorporated a sorbent-enhancing agent (EA). Laboratory release experiments focused on measuring releases of mercury under conditions designed to simulate CCB exposure to water, ambient-temperature air, elevated temperatures, and microbes in both wet and dry conditions. Results of laboratory evaluations indicated that: (1) Mercury and sometimes selenium are collected with AC used for mercury emission control and, therefore, present at higher concentrations than samples collected without mercury emission controls present. (2) Mercury is stable on CCBs collected from systems both without and with mercury emission controls present under most conditions tested, with the exception of vapor-phase releases of mercury exposed to elevated temperatures. (3) The presence of carbon either from added AC or from unburned coal can result in mercury being sorbed onto the CCB when exposed to ambient-temperature air. The environmental performance of the mercury captured on AC used as a sorbent for mercury emission control technologies indicated that current CCB management options will continue to be sufficiently protective of the environment, with the potential exception of exposure to elevated temperatures. The environmental performance of the other ATEs investigated indicated that current management options will be appropriate to the CCBs produced using AC in mercury emission controls.

David Hassett; Loreal Heebink; Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett; Tera Buckley; Erick Zacher; Mei Xin; Mae Sexauer Gustin; Rob Jung

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

When and how to end shelter-in-place protection from a release of airborne hazardous material : report on a decision-making concept and methodology.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shelter-in-place (SIP) is considered a credible alternative to immediate evacuation to protect the population on and around Army chemical warfare agent stockpile storage sites from accidental agent releases of short duration. To be effective, this strategy requires immediate SIP to minimize initial exposure to agent vapor, followed by timely and appropriate termination of SIP to minimize additional exposure to agent vapor accumulations in the shelter when the air outside becomes less hazardous. However, a major challenge facing emergency managers has been how to decide the best time and way to end SIP to obtain this ideal. This report describes a concept to make this decision, and suggests a methodology to apply the concept as a site-specific response tool. The major conditions that influence the exposure of a population are the source term values of the agent that is released, meteorological conditions, shelter air change rates, the distance of the shelter from the source, and th e dose-response relationship of the hazardous material. The circumstances that contribute to overall exposure associated with a SIP strategy involve exposure during the time before taking shelter, exposure while sheltered due to vapor infiltration, and additional exposure (if any) following the termination of SIP. Options to end SIP are to resume normal activities with no restrictions, to ventilate the shelter but remain indoors, to exit from the shelter and remain nearby, or to relocate to a designated facility. The optimal time and way to end SIP involves examining the relationships among the conditions and circumstances listed above to find the combination of these variables that gives the smallest area where a sheltered population might receive a certain level of toxic effect. For example, find the combination of times, conditions, and circumstances that produce the smallest area where fatalities are possible. In this case, the best time and action to end SIP to minimize fatalities is that combination of variables which produces the smallest area where this level of effect is expected. The methodology to apply the concept is to use a computer model to examine the relationships among these conditions and circumstances (many of which are pre-planned default inputs), and display the best time and action to end SIP quickly, in a user-friendly format. A computer model that was developed to prove the concept and demonstrate the methodology (called the TSIP Model) is described in the report, and the use of the TSIP Model is illustrated in a case study in an appendix to the report. The report also discusses public education and emergency instructions essential for implementing this concept, and makes recommendations for agreements, plans, and exercises relevant to deciding when and how to end SIP. This concept and methodology is independent of the atmospheric dispersion model used, and is not limited to chemical warfare agent vapor hazards. Thus it can help make decisions on when and how to end SIP following the accidental release of many other non-flammable non-reactive hazardous vapors if sufficient information is available about the characteristics of the material and the circumstances of the release.

Yantosik, G.; Lerner, K.; Maloney, D.; Wasmer, F.

2002-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Toxic Heavy Metals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 217 Unit 7 Toxic Heavy Metals Overview In ancient Rome wine was stored for this section. #12;Chemistry 330 / Study Guide 219 Common Features--Toxicity of the Heavy Metals Objectives. Metals--especially heavy metals--pose a unique environmental pollution problem. Heavy metals

Short, Daniel

419

VINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The "irreversible effects threshold" is the maximum concentration of pollutant in the air for a given exposure timeVINYL CHLORIDE ACUTE TOXICITY THRESHOLDS IN THE CONTEXT OF CONTROLLING URBAN DEVELOPMENT OR LAND of vinyl Chloride , the french procedure to set acute toxicity thresholds in the context of controlling

Boyer, Edmond

420

Chronic toxicity evaluation of simulated DWPF effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 7-Day Full Series Chronic Toxicity test was conducted April 13--20, 1990, for the Savannah River Site to assess the chronic toxicity of Simulated defense waste processing facility (DWPF) effluent to Ceriodaphnia dubia. The simulated effluented consisted of Sodium Nitrate, Sodium Oxalate, Sodium Formate, and Corros. Inib.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 6 were identified as significant contributors to national emissions of hazardous air pollutants EPA Mobile Source Air Toxics Rules March 2001 rule relied on existing control programs (Tier 2March 29, 2007 Mobile Source Air Toxics Analysis for FHWA Projects Jeff Houk FHWA Resource Center

Minnesota, University of

422

Argonne Historical News Releases about Nuclear Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Releases Releases About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

423

Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Reed, of the Illinois Geological Survey...Virginia-Carolina Chemical Corporation, Richmond...Board of Health, Madison, Wis. Division...Pennsylvania. Division of Chemical Education: Chairman...the University of Illinois; on execu-tive...from 10 or more plants were macerated...

1939-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chemical Signals Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Signals · Types · Production · Transmission · Reception · Reading: Ch 10 except boxes 10.1 and 10.2 #12;What is chemical communication? · Movement of molecules from sender to receiver · Methods compounds are volatile. - 5-20 carbon compounds - carbon (MW=12) + hydrogen is less dense than oxygen (MW

Wilkinson, Gerald S.

426

Chemical Engineering Andrew Zydney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ChE Employment (2003 at PSU) Merck Dow ExxonMob Air Products Amgen PPG Sunoco Kraft Foods NRC Procter, microelectronics, consumer products, biotechnology, fuels / energy, environmental engineering, etc. ·Chemical Engineers focus on the processes involved in making new products, including chemical reactions

Maranas, Costas

427

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

428

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

429

Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco Documents - and - Tobacco Companies Sucessfully Prevented Tobacco Control Legislation in Argentina Speaker(s): Ernesto Sebrie Suzaynn Schick Date: November 10, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Two seminars will be presented by two speakers. "Chemical change in secondhand tobacco smoke...." (by Dr. Schick): The major US tobacco companies responded to Hirayama et al's 1981 paper showing secondhand smoke can cause lung cancer in nonsmokers by intensifying their study of the chemistry and toxicity of secondhand smoke. Using a variety of experimental approaches, RJ Reynolds and Philip Morris studied the effects of aging, dilution and contact with typical room surfaces on secondhand

430

Quantitative structureactivity relationships for toxicity and genotoxicity of halogenated aliphatic compounds: Wing spot test of Drosophila melanogaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Halogenated aliphatic compounds were evaluated for toxic and genotoxic effects in the somatic mutation and recombination test employing Drosophila melanogaster. The tested chemicals included chlorinated, brominated and iodinated; mono-, di- and tri-substituted; saturated and unsaturated alkanes: 1,2-dibromoethane, 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1-iodopropane, 2,3-dichloropropene, 3-bromo-1-propene, epibromohydrin, 2-iodobutane, 3-chloro-2-methylpropene, 1,2,3-trichloropropane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dichlorobutane, 1-chloro-2-methylpropane, 1,3-dichloropropane, 1,2-dichloropropane, 2-chloroethymethylether, 1-bromo-2-methylpropane and 1-chloropentane. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea served as the positive and distilled water as the negative control. The set of chemicals for the toxicological testing was selected by the use of statistical experiment design. Group of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons were generally more toxic than saturated analogues. The genotoxic effect was observed with 14 compounds in the wing spot test, while 3 substances did not show any genotoxicity by using the wing spot test at 50% lethal concentration. The highest number of wing spots was observed in genotoxicity assay with 1-bromo-2-chloroethane, 1,2-dichloroethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1-iodopropane. Nucleophilic superdelocalizability calculated by quantum mechanics appears to be a good parameter for prediction of both toxicity and genotoxicity effects of halogenated aliphatic compounds.

Karel Chroust; Martina Pavlov; Zbyn?k Prokop; Jan Mendel; Kate?ina Bokov; Zden?k Kubt; Veronika Zaj??kov; Ji?? Damborsk

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

EM Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 19, 2011 September 19, 2011 Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released The National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has released the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. September 15, 2011 DOE Hosts German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information CARLSBAD, N.M. - A high-ranking energy official from Germany formalized a partnership between her country and the United States during a recent visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). September 15, 2011 Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Dedicated to Those Who Helped Complete Projects Funded by Recovery Act RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the third chapter of The Hanford Story today to the public. September 13, 2011

433

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 (Early Release) The early release version of the AEO2008 reference case does not include consideration of the H.R.6, "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007," that was signed into law on December 19, 2007. EIA is compiling a revised reference case that includes the impact of H.R.6. Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption

434

Energy Department Releases Grid Energy Storage Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department released its Grid Energy Storage report to the members of the U.S. Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, identifying the benefits and challenges of grid energy storage that must be addressed to enable broader use.

435

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0, 2012 Feature Stories and Releases ARM Mobile Facility Completes Aerosol Campaign in India Bookmark and Share First-ever Indo-U.S. collaboration for climate research sets stage...

436

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4, 2007 Feature Stories and Releases Climate Scientists Air Their Views in Oklahoma Bookmark and Share Media and distinguished guests are invited to talk with top U.S. climate...

437

MATHEMATICS OF PLANET EARTH PRESS RELEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATHEMATICS OF PLANET EARTH PRESS RELEASE MARCH 5 2013 MATHEMATICS OF PLANET EARTH DAY AT UNESCO Paris (France) ­ March 5 2013 in a major world-wide initiative: Mathematics of Planet Earth 2013 (MPE2013). This year

438

Press Pass - Press Release - LHC First Beam  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20 Sept. 10, 2008 For Immediate Release Media Contacts: National Science Foundation: Lisa-Joy Zgorski, lisajoy@nsf.gov, 703-292-8311 U.S. Department of Energy: Jeff Sherwood,...

439

Bonneville Power Administration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 13 Bonneville Power Administration FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE December 26, 2013 CONTACT: Teresa Waugh, 503-230-7536 or 503-230-5131 BPA seeks comment on draft study of proposed...

440

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 13 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Monday, July 29, 2013 CONTACT: Joel Scruggs, 503-230-5511 503-230-5131 BPA project receives innovation award for new...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 14 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Wednesday, March 5, 2014 CONTACT: Joel Scruggs, 503-230-5511 503-230-5131 Mainzer taps Gendron, Ehli to lead Power and...

442

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 14 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2014 CONTACT: Kevin Wingert, 503-230-4140971-207-8390 or 503-230-5131 Middle school teams from...

443

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Friday, Feb. 15, 2013 CONTACT: Joel Scruggs, 503-230-5511 503-230-5131 BPA launches Science Lab videos for National...

444

Polysaccharides as safer release systems for agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agrochemicals are used to improve the production of crops. Conventional formulations of agrochemicals can contaminate the environment, in particular in ... is a need for controlled-release formulations of agrochemicals

Estefnia Vangelie Ramos Campos

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

865.574.4399 865.574.4399 ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. OAK RIDGE, Oct. 3, 2013 -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie led the 12-member committee that developed new chemical safety guidelines described in the report, "Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories," released by the American Chemical Society (ACS) at its 246th National Meeting & Exposition held in September. Jeskie was also appointed last spring to serve on the National Research Council Committee on Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Laboratory Research. That panel is examining chemical research laboratory safety in nonindustrial settings.

446

Comparative effects of parathion and chlorpyrifos on extracellular endocannabinoid levels in rat hippocampus: Influence on cholinergic toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parathion (PS) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are organophosphorus insecticides (OPs) that elicit acute toxicity by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Endocannabinoids (eCBs, N-arachidonoylethanolamine, AEA; 2-arachidonoylglycerol, 2AG) can modulate neurotransmission by inhibiting neurotransmitter release. We proposed that differential inhibition of eCB-degrading enzymes (fatty acid amide hydrolase, FAAH, and monoacylglycerol lipase, MAGL) by PS and CPF leads to differences in extracellular eCB levels and toxicity. Microdialysis cannulae were implanted into hippocampus of adult male rats followed by treatment with vehicle (peanut oil, 2 ml/kg, sc), PS (27 mg/kg) or CPF (280 mg/kg) 67 days later. Signs of toxicity, AChE, FAAH and MAGL inhibition, and extracellular levels of AEA and 2AG were measured 2 and 4 days later. Signs were noted in PS-treated rats but not in controls or CPF-treated rats. Cholinesterase inhibition was extensive in hippocampus with PS (8990%) and CPF (7883%) exposure. FAAH activity was also markedly reduced (8891%) by both OPs at both time-points. MAGL was inhibited by both OPs but to a lesser degree (3550%). Increases in extracellular AEA levels were noted after either PS (about 2-fold) or CPF (about 3-fold) while lesser treatment-related 2-AG changes were noted. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist AM251 (3 mg/kg, ip) had no influence on functional signs after CPF but markedly decreased toxicity in PS-treated rats. The results suggest that extracellular eCBs levels can be markedly elevated by both PS and CPF. CB1-mediated signaling appears to play a role in the acute toxicity of PS but the role of eCBs in CPF toxicity remains unclear. - Highlights: Chlorpyrifos and parathion both extensively inhibited hippocampal cholinesterase. Functional signs were only noted with parathion. Chlorpyrifos and parathion increased hippocampal extracellular anandamide levels. 2-Arachidonoylglycerol levels were lesser affected. The CB1 antagonist AM251 had no effect on chlorpyrifos but reduced parathion toxicity.

Liu, Jing [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Parsons, Loren [Committee on Neurobiology of Affective Disorders, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA (United States); Pope, Carey, E-mail: carey.pope@okstate.edu [Department of Physiological Sciences, Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

T-526: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

26: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote Code Execution Vulnerability T-526: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote Code Execution Vulnerability...

448

Energy Department Releases Case Studies and Best Practices to...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Department Releases Case Studies and Best Practices to Assist Innovative Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Department Releases Case Studies and Best Practices to Assist...

449

Microfabricated Renewable Beads-Trapping/Releasing Flow Cell...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing Flow Cell for Rapid Antigen-Antibody Reaction in Chemiluminescent Immunoassay Microfabricated Renewable Beads-TrappingReleasing...

450

Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water Heating, Appliances, and Low-GWP Refrigerants Energy Department Releases Roadmaps on HVAC Technologies, Water...

451

Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ateECEnergyComputational Modeling & SimulationSandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design Model, CACTUS Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design Model,...

452

DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers DOE Releases EPRI Report on Benefits of Regional Coordination in Wind Energy Transfers...

453

Control of hydrogen release and uptake in amine borane molecular...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

hydrogen release and uptake in amine borane molecular complexes: Thermodynamics of ammonia borane, ammonium Control of hydrogen release and uptake in amine borane molecular...

454

SBIR/STTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SBIRSTTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15-Includes Hydrogen and...

455

DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report DOE Releases 2013 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report November 12, 2014 - 11:13am Addthis The Energy Department today...

456

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release The Energy Policy and Conservation...

457

NNSA Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response Teams Deploying to Japan NNSA Releases Pictures, Video of Consequence Management Response Teams Deploying to Japan March...

458

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

459

Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database CY 1995 releases and supporting data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a hard copy of the CY 1995 airborne and liquid effluent data contained in the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) computer database.

Gleckler, B.P., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magma Chamber Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma Chamber Abstract...

463

Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, both insoluble (principally hydrogen) and soluble (principally ammonia), posing a number of safety concerns (Peurrung et al. 1997; Meader 1996).

J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

465

Chemicals from Biomass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Added Chemicals from Biomass. Volume I: Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas (www1.eere.energy.gov/biomass/pdfs/35523.pdf) . 6. Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical...

David R. Dodds; Richard A. Gross

2007-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

466

Chemical decontamination specification preparation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the first low-concentration chemical decontamination in the United States at Vermont Yankee in 1979, > 75 decontamination applications have been made at > 20 nuclear electrical generating stations. Chemical decontamination has become a common technique for reducing person-rem exposures. Two vendors are currently offering low-concentration chemical decontamination reagents for application in boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor systems. All technical aspects associated with the chemical decontamination technology have been commercially tested and are well advanced beyond the research and development stage. Extensive corrosion and material compatibility testing has been performed on the major solvent systems with satisfactory results. The material compatibility testing for the three main solvent systems, CANDECON, CITROX, and LOMI, has been documented in numerous Electric Power Research Institute reports.

Miller, M.A.; Remark, J.F.; Vandergriff, D.M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Western Chemical Information  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Western Chemical Information ... For the most part, the units are small because production is geared to the needs of the 11 states, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona, not to the entire country. ...

FREDERICK G. SAWYER

1949-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

468

Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) and looping cycles in general represent an important new ... technologies, which can be deployed for direct combustion as well as be used in gasification...2...stream suitable fo...

Edward John (Ben) Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Chemicals from coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute silver toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Membrane of Rainbow Trout Gills Summary: that are the primary site for acute heavy metal toxicity (Mc- Donald and Wood, 1993). The toxic action of silver... and chloride...

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute copper toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with additional metals analyses. Because copper concentrations were within the range toxic to bivalves and sample... -six hour acute toxicity tests were conducted using...

472

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed Natural Gas (CNG)-Powered Vehicles Lung Toxicity and Mutagenicity of Emissions From Heavy-Duty Compressed...

473

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute cadmium toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cortisol levels were... -113 1. Introduction Cadmium (Cd) is a widely distributed heavy metal, toxic to terrestrial and aquatic... of the toxicant are acutely lethal, the rise in...

474

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute systemic toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

12... that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

475

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute skin toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... skin Reproductive effects of not seen with glycols...

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute toxic potency Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... Hydrocarbons Benzene Acute ... Source: Kane, Andrew S. -...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute methanol toxicity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: that bind to transthyretin, a thyroxine binding protein. 12;Toxicity of Dioxins Acute Toxicity Varies... ) to acetaldehyde to acetate to acetyl CoA Methanol ...

478

Comparative Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Better information on the comparative toxicity of airborne emissions from different types of engines is needed to guide the development of heavy vehicle engine, fuel, lubricant, and exhaust after-treatment technologies, and to place the health hazards of current heavy vehicle emissions in their proper perspective. To help fill this information gap, samples of vehicle exhaust particles and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOC) were collected and analyzed. The biological activity of the combined particle-SVOC samples is being tested using standardized toxicity assays. This report provides an update on the design of experiments to test the relative toxicity of engine emissions from various sources.

JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Barbara Zielinska; John Sagebiel; Kevin Whitney; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

479

Annual Energy Review 2011 - Released September 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

and other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable...

480

Annual Energy Review 2008 - Released June 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

other manufactured and waste gases derived from fossil fuels. 2 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur, miscellaneous technologies, and non-renewable waste...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

periods of nitrate, ammonium, and sulfate were also significant, as indicated in the pie charts. This time series of aerosol chemical composition measured during PACE shows...

482

Chemical Management Volume 3 of 3 - Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 July 2008 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 iii Foreword Numerous requirements have been promulgated to protect workers, equipment, facilities, and the environment. When work is performed, the specific requirements affecting the work must first be identified and incorporated into the work plan. Because such requirements can number in the thousands,

483

Mental retardation and prenatal methylmercury toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methylmercury (MeHg) is a developmental neurotoxicant; exposure results principally from consumption of seafood contaminated by mercury (Hg). In this analysis, the burden of mental retardation (MR) associated with methylmercury exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort is estimated, and the portion of this burden attributable to mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants is identified. The aggregate loss in cognition associated with MeHg exposure in the 2000 U.S. birth cohort was estimated using two previously published dose-response models that relate increases in cord blood Hg concentrations with decrements in IQ. MeHg exposure was assumed not to be correlated with native cognitive ability. Previously published estimates were used to estimate economic costs of MR caused by MeHg. Downward shifts in IQ resulting from prenatal exposure to MeHg of anthropogenic origin are associated with 1,566 excess cases of MR annually (range: 376-14,293). This represents 3.2% of MR cases in the US (range: 0.8%-29.2%). The MR costs associated with decreases in IQ in these children amount to $2.0 billion/year (range: $0.5-17.9 billion). Hg from American power plants accounts for 231 of the excess MR cases year (range: 28-2,109), or 0.5% (range: 0.06%-4.3%) of all MR. These cases cost $289 million (range: $35 million-2.6 billion). Toxic injury to the fetal brain caused by Hg emitted from coal-fired power plants exacts a significant human and economic toll on American children.

Trasande, L.; Schechter, C.B.; Haynes, K.A.; Landrigan, P.J. [CUNY Mt. Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Community & Preventative Medicine

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

SF424 Version 2.5.x Patch Release Notes Released June 11, 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SF424 Version 2.5.x Patch Release Notes Released June 11, 2014 The impact of this patch is visible the changes in this patch.. -This SF424 Patch addresses instances of "white space" for key personnel entries and the budget. -This SF424 Patch addresses the trouble with Subaward Budgets failing to properly populate

Myers, Lawrence C.

485

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) Air Pollution Control Regulations: No. 22 - Air Toxics (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Management Permits are required to construct, install, or modify any stationary source which has the potential to increase emissions of a listed toxic air contaminant by an amount greater than the minimum quantity for that contaminant. Minimum quantities are specified in Table III of these regulations. Permits will be granted based in part on the impact of the projected emissions of the stationary source on acceptable ambient levels