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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reporting ``Qs & As``. Environmental Guidance  

SciTech Connect

This document offers guidance on toxic chemical release inventory reporting, pursuant to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) at DOE sites.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

Ecology and Air Quality Group

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

TRI (Toxic Chemical Release Inventory) for Power Plants RY2012 Version 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TRI for Power Plants is a powerful, user-friendly tool for estimating, tracking, and reporting releases of chemicals—primarily trace substances—from fossil-fired steam electric plants. The spreadsheet-like tool has been applied by numerous energy companies to increase the efficiency and reduce the costs of Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)-related analyses while enhancing compliance ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Spills, Releases, Explosions, Exposures, or Injuries (includes corrosive, reactive, flammable, and toxic chemicals in solid, liquid or gas form) EHS Contact: Kate Lumley-Sapanski (kxl3@psu apply: When to Report: · All chemical exposures or explosions requiring medical attention must

Yener, Aylin

5

Toxic chemical release inventory reporting: Questions and answers (Qs&As)  

SciTech Connect

On September 22, 1992, the Secretary of Energy directed the Department to participate in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program and to initiate Toxic Chemical Release Inventory (TRI) reporting, pursuant to Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The Office of Environmental Guidance, RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-231) issued interim guidance on March 4, 1993, entitled ``Toxic Chemical Release Inventory and 33/50 Pollution Prevention Program`` that provided instructions on implementing the Secretarial directive. As stated in the interim guidance, all DOE sites not currently reporting under EPCRA Section 313, which meet the criteria for DOE TRI reporting, will initiate reporting of all TRI chemical releases and transfers for the 1993 calendar year with the annual report due to EPA, States and a courtesy copy to EH-20 by July 1, 1994. All other DOE sites which currently report under EPCRA Section 313 will also follow the criteria for DOE TRI reporting.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III  

SciTech Connect

The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998.

Marjorie B. Stockton

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect

For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

M. Stockton

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

9

Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) 1987--1996  

SciTech Connect

The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), published annually by the US EPA, is a valuable source of information about over 300 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released into the environment. Using this information, citizens, businesses, and governments can work together to protect the quality of their land, air and water. The new software used in the 1987--1996 TRI CD-ROM, is flexible and powerful, capable of searching over 200 fields (e.g., by chemical, company, kind of release, or zip code, and across multiple years of data). The CD-ROM also allows users to conduct multiple and complex queries, which are especially useful to those who wish to analyze trends or perform statistical analysis. The following information is found on the TRI CD: facility name, location and type of business; off-site locations to which the facility transfers toxic chemicals in waste; whether the chemical is manufactured (including importation), processed, or otherwise used and the general categories of use of the chemical; an estimate (in ranges) of the maximum amounts of the toxic chemical present at the facility at any time during the preceding year; quantity of the chemical entering each medium -- air, land, and water -- annually; waste treatment/disposal methods and efficiency of methods for each waste stream; and optional information on waste minimization. In addition to the TRI data, the CD-ROM provides a wealth of other TRI information, such as: tutorial, Annual TRI Data Release Book, State Fact Sheets; TRI`s reporting Forms R and A; and Chemical Fact Sheets on many of the TRI chemicals. The 1987--1996 TRI CD-ROM is a user-friendly Windows application that includes LANDVIEW III, a geographic information systems (GIS) package. The GIS package allows the user to locate TRI facilities and other EPA sites in relation to roads, rivers, schools, hospitals and more.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect

Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

M. Stockton

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Toxic Chemical Agent Decontamination Emulsions, Their ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This invention is related to decontaminating agents and amethod for the decontamination of ... which have been contaminated with toxic chemical agents ...

12

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Title Assessing Sheltering-In-Place Responses to Outdoor Toxic Releases Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2005 Authors Sohn, Michael D., Richard G. Sextro, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 10th International Conference on Indoor Air Quality and Climate - Indoor Air 2005 Volume 2(6) Pagination 1792-1796 Date Published Sept. 4-9, 2005 Publisher Tsinghua University Press Conference Location Beijing, China Keywords airflow and pollutant transport group, airflow modeling, comis, countermeasures to chemical and biological threats, emergency response, exposure, indoor environment department, shelter-in-place Abstract An accidental or intentional outdoor release of pollutants can produce a hazardous plume, potentially contaminating large portions of a metropolitan area as it disperses downwind. To minimize health consequences on the populace, government and research organizations often recommend sheltering in place when evacuation is impractical. Some reports also recommend "hardening" an indoor shelter, for example by applying duct tape to prevent leakage into a bathroom. However, few studies have quantified the perceived beneficial effects of sheltering and hardening, or examined the limits of their applicability. In this paper, we examine how sheltering and hardening might reduce exposure levels under different building and meteorological conditions (e.g., wind direction). We predict concentrations and exposure levels for several conditions, and discuss the net benefits from several sheltering and hardening options

13

Environmental toxicity of complex chemical mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex chemical mixtures may be released into the environment from a variety of sources including hazardous waste sites. Components of chemical mixtures and their metabolites may be genotoxic leading to cancer and heritable gene mutations. Chemical analysis alone does not always provide the most accurate information from which to estimate the risk of adverse effects associated with exposure to mixtures. Current methods to estimate the human health risk for complex mixtures assume additive effects of the components. Although it is assumed that this approach is protective of human and ecological health, it is also recognized that chemical mixtures may induce a variety of interactions including potentiation, synergism, and antagonism. A combined testing protocol, using chemical analysis coupled with a battery of in vitro, in vivo, and in situ bioassays, provides the most accurate information from which to estimate risk. Such a combined testing protocol provides information to describe the major organic and inorganic constituents, as well as the pharmacokinetics and potential interactions of chemical mixtures. This research was conducted to investigate the potential genotoxic effects of complex chemical mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated aromatics (PCA) using microbial bioassays (Salmonella/microsome assay and the E. coli prophage induction assay), the 32P-postlabeling assay in mice, and in situ measurements of genotoxicity using flow cytometry. Samples of environmental media and wildlife tissues were collected from four National Priority List Superfund sites within the United States. In general, chemical analysis was not always predictive of mixture toxicity. Although biodegradation reduced the concentration of total and carcinogenic PAHs in soils and groundwater, the genotoxicity of extracts from environmental media did not display a corresponding reduction. Mixtures of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) extracted from sediments were found to inhibit the genotoxicity of PAH mixtures when administered dermally to rodents. This inhibition exhibited a dose-response relationship, with the adduct frequency reduced at increasing doses of sediment extract. Finally, PAH concentrations in environmental media and tissues were found to correlate with DNA damage in wildlife receptors. An integrated approach, combining in vitro and in vivo methods to characterize genotoxicity provides more accurate information from which to estimate uptake and risk associated with exposure to complex mixtures and should be considered in both the human and ecological risk assessment process.

Gillespie, Annika Margaret

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

U.S./Mexico Border environmental study toxics release inventory data, 1988--1992  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on industrial toxic chemical releases and transfers based on information reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a database maintained by the USEPA. This document discusses patterns of toxic chemical releases to the atmosphere, to water, to the land, and to underground injection; and transfers of toxic chemicals to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), and for disposal, treatment and other off-site transfers during the TRI reporting years 1988--1992. Geographic coverage is limited to the US side of the ``Border Area``, the geographic area situated within 100 km of the US/Mexico international boundary. A primary purpose of this study is to provide background information that can be used in the future development of potential ``indicator variables`` for tracking environmental and public health status in the Border Area in conjunction with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

O`Brien, R.F.; LoPresti, C.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

LARK-TRIPP RY2007 Version 1.1 update, A Toxic Release Inventory Estimation Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LARK-TRIPP RY2007, Version 1.1, is a software tool that estimates manufacture and release of toxic chemicals for reporting under EPA Toxics Release Inventory Program. This version replaces Version 1.0, product 1015610. Companies that do not fund Program 59 are required to purchase annual membership in a LARK-TRIPP Users Group. Descripton LARK-TRIPP is a powerful, user-friendly tool for estimating, tracking and reporting releases of chemicals primarily trace substances from fossil-fired steam electric pla...

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE contractor's meeting on chemical toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) is required to determine the potential health and environmental effects associated with energy production and use. To ensure appropriate communication among investigators and scientific disciplines that these research studies represent, OHER has sponsored workshops. This document provides a compilation of activities at the Third Annual DOE/OHER Workshop. This year's workshop was broadened to include all OHER activities identified as within the chemical effects area. The workshop consisted of eight sessions entitled Isolation and Detection of Toxic chemicals; Adduct Formation and Repair; Chemical Toxicity (Posters); Metabolism and Genotoxicity; Inhalation Toxicology; Gene Regulation; Metals Toxicity; and Biological Mechanisms. This document contains abstracts of the information presented by session.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.  

SciTech Connect

In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

18

2009 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313  

SciTech Connect

For reporting year 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2009 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2009, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports.

Environmental Stewardship Group (ENV-ES)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis of 1994 Air Force toxic release inventory reporting. Master`s thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to analyze the Air Force`s 1994 Toxic Release Inventory data. Statistical tests were used to meet the following research objectives: (1) review the CY 94 data to determine which chemicals were most often reported and which bases and major commands had the most releases in terms of the number of chemicals reported and the amount of chemicals reported and (2) investigate factors which could influence the reporting status of a facility. An analysis of a survey of Air Force facilities indicated that two factors had an influence on the reporting status of Air Force facilities: (1) whether the TRI point of contact had confidence in the completeness of the data used for threshold computations and (2) whether the primary database used for threshold computations was the Standard Base Supply System.

Pollock, B.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Mobile Source Air Toxics Rule (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

On February 9, 2007, the EPA released its MSAT2 rule, which will establish controls on gasoline, passenger vehicles, and portable fuel containers. The controls are designed to reduce emissions of benzene and other hazardous air pollutants. Benzene is a known carcinogen, and the EPA estimates that mobile sources produced more than 70 percent of all benzene emissions in 1999. Other mobile source air toxics, including 1,3-butadiene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acrolein, and naphthalene, also are thought to increase cancer rates or contribute to other serious health problems.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

1993 Toxics Release Inventory data for the state of South Carolina...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1993 Toxics Release Inventory data for the state of South Carolina Manufacturing DataTools ResearchTech Services Apps Challenges Blogs Let's Talk Manufacturing You are here...

22

Chemical and Radiological Toxicity of Uranium and Its Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of uranyl nitrate required to deliver the radiation dose limit for soluble uranium compounds is larger than the toxicity-based concentration limits. Therefore, for soluble uranium compounds, health consequences of exposure are primarily due to their chemical toxicity. For insoluble compounds of uranium, health consequences (e.g., fibrosis and/or carcinogenesis of the lung) are primarily due to irradiation of pulmonary tissues from inhaled respirable particles.

Tansky, R.R.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

Safety Topic Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Topic ­ Chemical Hood General purpose: prevent exposure to toxic, irritating, or noxious chemical vapors and gases. A face velocity of 100 feet per minute (fpm) provides efficient vapor capture the better. (T) (F) A chemical hood can be used for storage of volatile, flammable, or odiferous materials

Cohen, Robert E.

24

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Consumer Data Apps Challenges Resources About Blogs Let's Talk Feedback Consumer You are here Data.gov » Communities » Consumer » Data TRI.NET data engine for EPA Toxics Release Inventory Dataset Summary Description TRI.NET ("T-R-I-dot-net") is a new application developed by EPA to help you analyze Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) information. This application is capable of easily and quickly performing complex queries to help you understand TRI information. It is especially useful for analysts who need a highly interactive environment in order to refine their queries and analyses in an efficient and productive way. TRI.NET makes heavy use of mashups using the latest mapping technologies to help visualize where TRI releases are occurring.

25

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

NETL: News Release - From Coal to Chemicals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 13, 2003 May 13, 2003 From Coal to Chemicals... Successful Clean Coal-to-Methanol Project Boosts Prospects For "Multi-Product" Coal Plant - The Liquid Phase Methanol Plant at the Eastman Chemicals-from-Coal Complex - The Kingsport, Tenn., clean coal project operated virtually flawlessly throughout its demonstration period and continues its steady operations today. - KINGSPORT, TN - It was 35 years ago that a single word in the smash hit, coming-of-age movie The Graduate made cinema history: "plastics." As a baby-faced Dustin Hoffman learned, the future was "plastics." Now, largely because of one of the Department of Energy's most successful Clean Coal Technology projects, in the next 35 years, the future may well be "plastics?from coal."

27

Reactive formulations for a neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Decontamination formulations for neutralization of toxic industrial chemicals, and methods of making and using same. The formulations are effective for neutralizing malathion, hydrogen cyanide, sodium cyanide, butyl isocyanate, carbon disulfide, phosgene gas, capsaicin in commercial pepper spray, chlorine gas, anhydrous ammonia gas; and may be effective at neutralizing hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, formaldehyde, ethylene oxide, methyl bromide, boron trichloride, fluorine, tetraethyl pyrophosphate, phosphorous trichloride, arsine, and tungsten hexafluoride.

Tucker, Mark D. (Albuqueruqe, NM); Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM)

2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

28

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of Chemical Warfare Agent Percutaneous Vapor Toxicity: Derivation of Toxicity Guidelines for Assessing Chemical Protective Ensembles.  

SciTech Connect

Percutaneous vapor toxicity guidelines are provided for assessment and selection of chemical protective ensembles (CPEs) to be used by civilian and military first responders operating in a chemical warfare agent vapor environment. The agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents, the vesicant sulfur mustard (agent HD) and, to a lesser extent, the vesicant Lewisite (agent L). The focus of this evaluation is percutaneous vapor permeation of CPEs and the resulting skin absorption, as inhalation and ocular exposures are assumed to be largely eliminated through use of SCBA and full-face protective masks. Selection of appropriately protective CPE designs and materials incorporates a variety of test parameters to ensure operability, practicality, and adequacy. One aspect of adequacy assessment should be based on systems tests, which focus on effective protection of the most vulnerable body regions (e.g., the groin area), as identified in this analysis. The toxicity range of agent-specific cumulative exposures (Cts) derived in this analysis can be used as decision guidelines for CPE acceptance, in conjunction with weighting consideration towards more susceptible body regions. This toxicity range is bounded by the percutaneous vapor estimated minimal effect (EME{sub pv}) Ct (as the lower end) and the 1% population threshold effect (ECt{sub 01}) estimate. Assumptions of exposure duration used in CPE certification should consider that each agent-specific percutaneous vapor cumulative exposure Ct for a given endpoint is a constant for exposure durations between 30 min and 2 hours.

Watson, A.P.

2003-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

31

Molecules and materials for the optical detection of explosives and toxic chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical chemosensing, especially using amplifying fluorescent polymers, can allow for the highly sensitive and selective vapor-phase detection of both explosives and highly toxic chemicals, including chemical warfare agents. ...

Thomas, Samuel William, III

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children  

SciTech Connect

Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was constrained by specific requirements in the CSPA, the intent of this work was to identify HPCs and CHCCs that might guide future regulatory actions and inform chemical management policies, aimed at protecting children's health.

Stone, Alex, E-mail: alst461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600 (United States); Delistraty, Damon, E-mail: ddel461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, Spokane, WA 99205-1295 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution winds indicated agreement with fatalities in the immediate area and visible damage to vegetation.

Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Toxicity of chemical compounds used for enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this report is to assess the toxicological nature of compounds used in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) technologies so that the Department of Energy (DOE) can delineate the possible constraints to EOR commercialization that the toxicity of these substances could pose. In addition, research priorities are recommended to the DOE so that these constraints can be overcome in as safe and expedient manner as possible. In evaluating the toxicity of EOR chemicals, priority is given to the many chemicals which are now available commercially and are being used in a significant fashion in current EOR field tests. Specific attention has been paid to those chemicals which are used most extensively and to the human health effects data that are associated with them. These data are presented in Chapter Two. Information on toxicological concepts and a glossary of terms is presented in a separate appendix. Long-term environmental effects are not addressed in this document, but the possibility of impacts due to the toxic properties of certain chemicals is discussed briefly in the research recommendations. A table of aquatic toxicity data is included as Appendix C. The toxicity of EOR chemicals used is given for each of the following major secondary and tertiary recovery methods: micellar/polymer flooding technology; miscible carbon dioxide technology; in situ combustion technology; alkaline flooding and preflush technologies; and steam soak and steam drive technologies.

Silvestro, E.; Crocker, M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Estimation of the annual yield of organic carbon released from carbonates and shales by chemical weathering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimation of the annual yield of organic carbon released from carbonates and shales by chemical matter yield induced by chemical weathering of carbonates and shales, considering their global surface carbonate rocks and shales weathering in major world watersheds, published by numerous authors. The results

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

36

Modeling acute health risks associated with accidental releases of toxic gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CHEM{_}MACCS has been developed from the radiological accident consequence code, MACCS, to perform probabilistic calculations of potential off-site consequences of the accidental atmospheric release of hazardous chemicals. The principal phenomena considered in CHEM{_}MACCS are atmospheric transport, mitigative actions based on dose projection, dose accumulation by a number of pathways, and early and latent health effects. CHEM{_}MACCS provides the following capabilities: (1) statistical weather sampling data (8,760 hourly data points per year), (2) population dose and health effect risk calculations based on site-specific population data, (3) health effects calculations including the consideration of potential site specific mitigative actions (evacuation and shielding), and (4) modeling of multiple release segments. Three different sample problems are contained in this report to show how to use CHEM{_}MACCS. Three test problems are run to compare CHEM{_}MACCS and D2PC. The doses versus the downwind centerline distances from the source for the given doses are in very close agreement.

Haskin, F.E.; Ding, C.; Summa, K.J. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering] [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Young, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Accident Analysis and Consequence Assessment Dept.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Accident Analysis and Consequence Assessment Dept.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NETL: News Release - American Institute of Chemical Engineers Honors DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2009 6, 2009 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Honors DOE Researcher Award Recognizes Accomplishments in Fluidization, Fluidized Processes Washington, D.C. - For his efforts in modeling and simulating fluid-particle flows, a researcher at the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been selected to receive the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Fluidized Processing Recognition Award. AIChE presents the award every two years to an AIChE member "who has made significant contribution to the science and technology of fluidization or fluidized processes and who has shown leadership in the engineering community." This year the award goes to Dr. Madhava Syamlal, Focus Area Leader for Computational and Basic Sciences at NETL. Dr. Syamlal will receive his award during AIChE's 2009 annual meeting set for November 8-13, 2009, in Nashville, Tenn.

38

Toxic chemicals and technological society: decision-making strategies when errors can be catastrophic  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties about chemical dangers are so great that major errors seem inevitable; long lags before feedback may inhibit learning about errors in time to prevent irreversible, catastrophic consequences; the number of chemicals is enourmous, and sensible action requires esoteric knowledge. How have decision makers reponded to this predicament. It is shown that a diverse repertoire of regulatory procedures gradually evolved, encompassing an increasing number of toxics problems, in piecemeal response to poisoning incidents and other negative feedback. Advance testing strategies designed to eliminate lags between introduction of new chemicals and feedback about their dangers are analyzed. Another new regulatory strategy examined is intended to ease the problem of number by focusing attention on especially dangerous substances. Pesticide policy is analyzed. While costly errors occurred using trial and error, diverse forms of feedback led to substitution of less persistent pesticides and to regulatory processes that set priorities, reduce time lag, and use explicit strategies to mitigate the severity of remaining errors. The process by which chemical threats to the ozone layer were diagnosed and acted upon is examined. The author summarizes the analysis, presents a revised conception of decision making on risky technological issues, evaluates the known health effects from toxic chemicals, and suggests additional policy options. Overall, the research reveals surprisingly sensible strategies for preventing and mitigating potentially catastrophic errors; but implementation obstacles are severe.

Woodhouse, E.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Guidance on health effects of toxic chemicals. Safety Analysis Report Update Program  

SciTech Connect

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), and Martin Marietta Utility Services, Inc. (MMUS), are engaged in phased programs to update the safety documentation for the existing US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facilities. The safety analysis of potential toxic hazards requires a methodology for evaluating human health effects of predicted toxic exposures. This report provides a consistent set of health effects and documents toxicity estimates corresponding to these health effects for some of the more important chemicals found within MMES and MMUS. The estimates are based on published toxicity information and apply to acute exposures for an ``average`` individual. The health effects (toxicological endpoints) used in this report are (1) the detection threshold; (2) the no-observed adverse effect level; (3) the onset of irritation/reversible effects; (4) the onset of irreversible effects; and (5) a lethal exposure, defined to be the 50% lethal level. An irreversible effect is defined as a significant effect on a person`s quality of life, e.g., serious injury. Predicted consequences are evaluated on the basis of concentration and exposure time.

Foust, C.B.; Griffin, G.D.; Munro, N.B.; Socolof, M.L.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Is the situation and immediate threat to life and health? Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor? Possible Fire / Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

? Possible Fire / Natural Gas (including chemicals and bio agents") (not including chemicals or bio agents Fire or Flammable Gas Spill/Leak/Release Medical Emergency Fire or Flammable Gas Chemical Odor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

LARK-TRIPP -- A Toxic Release Inventory Estimation Tool for Power Plants Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LARK-TRIPP is software developed to estimate and keep records on land and air releases, primarily trace substance emissions from fuel steam electric plants. Emissions can be tracked for individual plants containing a single unit or multiple units. Data are gathered by single unit/single year, but output can be combinations of current unit/year or all units/years. LARK-TRIPP enables the user to calculate reportable quantities of elements based on coal or ash data. A record of all input data can then be st...

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Protecting buildings from a biological or chemical attack: Actions to take before or during a release  

SciTech Connect

This report presents advice on how to operate a building to reduce casualties from a biological or chemical attack, as well as potential changes to the building (e.g. the design of the ventilation system) that could make it more secure. It also documents the assumptions and reasoning behind the advice. The particular circumstances of any attack, such as the ventilation system design, building occupancy, agent type, source strength and location, and so on, may differ from the assumptions made here, in which case actions other than our recommendations may be required; we hope that by understanding the rationale behind the advice, building operators can modify it as required for their circumstances. The advice was prepared by members of the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group, which is part of the Indoor Environment Department at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The group's expertise in this area includes: tracer-gas measurements of airflows in buildings (Sextro, Thatcher); design and operation of commercial building ventilation systems (Delp); modeling and analysis of airflow and tracer gas transport in large indoor spaces (Finlayson, Gadgil, Price); modeling of gas releases in multi-zone buildings (Sohn, Lorenzetti, Finlayson, Sextro); and occupational health and safety experience related to building design and operation (Sextro, Delp). This report is concerned only with building design and operation; it is not a how-to manual for emergency response. Many important emergency response topics are not covered here, including crowd control, medical treatment, evidence gathering, decontamination methods, and rescue gear.

Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Delp, William W.; Lorenzetti, David M.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Sextro, Richard G.; Derby, Elisabeth A.; Jarvis, Sondra A.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

43

Protecting buildings from a biological or chemical attack: Actions to take before or during a release  

SciTech Connect

This report presents advice on how to operate a building to reduce casualties from a biological or chemical attack, as well as potential changes to the building (e.g. the design of the ventilation system) that could make it more secure. It also documents the assumptions and reasoning behind the advice. The particular circumstances of any attack, such as the ventilation system design, building occupancy, agent type, source strength and location, and so on, may differ from the assumptions made here, in which case actions other than our recommendations may be required; we hope that by understanding the rationale behind the advice, building operators can modify it as required for their circumstances. The advice was prepared by members of the Airflow and Pollutant Transport Group, which is part of the Indoor Environment Department at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The group's expertise in this area includes: tracer-gas measurements of airflows in buildings (Sextro, Thatcher); design and operation of commercial building ventilation systems (Delp); modeling and analysis of airflow and tracer gas transport in large indoor spaces (Finlayson, Gadgil, Price); modeling of gas releases in multi-zone buildings (Sohn, Lorenzetti, Finlayson, Sextro); and occupational health and safety experience related to building design and operation (Sextro, Delp). This report is concerned only with building design and operation; it is not a how-to manual for emergency response. Many important emergency response topics are not covered here, including crowd control, medical treatment, evidence gathering, decontamination methods, and rescue gear.

Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Delp, William W.; Lorenzetti, David M.; Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Sextro, Richard G.; Derby, Elisabeth A.; Jarvis, Sondra A.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

44

The development and application of the chemical mixture methodology in analysis of potential health impacts from airborne release in emergencies  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) is used for emergency response and safety planning by the U.S. Department of Energy, its contractors, and other private and public sector organizations. The CMM estimates potential health impacts on individuals and their ability to take protective actions as a result of exposure to airborne chemical mixtures. They are based on the concentration of each chemical in the mixture at a designated receptor location, the protective action criteria (PAC) providing chemical-specific exposure limit values, and the health code numbers (HCNs) that identify the target organ groupings that may be impacted by exposure to each chemical in a mixture. The CMM has been significantly improved since its introduction more than 10 years ago. Major enhancements involve the expansion of the number of HCNs from 44 to 60 and inclusion of updated PAC values based on an improved development methodology and updates in the data used to derive the PAC values. Comparisons between the 1999 and 2009 versions of the CMM show potentially substantial changes in the assessment results for selected sets of chemical mixtures. In particular, the toxic mode hazard indices (HIs) and target organ HIs are based on more refined acute HCNs, thereby improving the quality of chemical consequence assessment, emergency planning, and emergency response decision making. Seven hypothetical chemical storage and processing scenarios are used to demonstrate how the CMM is applied in emergency planning and hazard assessment.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Craig, Douglas K.; Glantz, Clifford S.; Trott, Donna M.; Ciolek, John T.; Lu, Po-Yung; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Tuccinardi, Thomas E.; Bouslaugh, Philip R.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

MEMS-based resonant sensor arrays : selective detection of volatile and toxic chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With growing concerns about homeland security, public health, and environmental cleanliness, there is a strong need today for robust chemical sensing systems that are portable in addition to being highly sensitive. While ...

Whitfield, George C., 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Toxic and hazardous chemicals, Title III and communities: An outreach manual for community groups  

SciTech Connect

The manual was prepared for State and local government officials, local emergency planning committee (LEPCs), and other community groups that want to make Title III work. It is intended as a practical guide for those who have little or no previous experience in the field of communication, whose time must be snatched from home and office, and whose resources are limited. The manual has three major sections: Part I discusses planning, which is vital to the success of a communication program; Part II suggests ways to get and keep people involved, especially important because Title III affects so many different sectors of the community; Part III, a how-to-do-it section, talks about specific tasks, such as giving a speech or writing a press release. Appendices include a detailed explanation of the law, a glossary, a list of recent studies related to Title III communications, a list of educational materials, and a list of State contacts.

McNeil, C.; Arkin, E.B.; McCallum, D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

How Do I Know? A Guide to the Selection of Personal Protective Equipment for Use in Responding to A Release of Chemical Warfare Agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An incident involving chemical warfare agents requires a unique hazardous materials (HAZMAT) response. As with an HAZMAT event, federal regulations prescribe that responders must be protected from exposure to the chemical agents. But unlike other HAZMAT events, special considerations govern selection of personal protective equipment (PPE). PPE includes all clothing, respirators and monitoring devices used to respond to a chemical release. PPE can differ depending on whether responders are military or civilian personnel.

Foust, C.B.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Changing Trends in the Bulk Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Compared with the experience of the 1990s, rising energy prices in recent years have led to questions about expectations of growth in industrial output, particularly in energy-intensive industries. Given the higher price trends, a review of expected growth trends in selected industries was undertaken as part of the production of AEO2005. In addition, projections for the industrial value of shipments, which were based on the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system in AEO2004, are based on the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) in AEO2005. The change in industrial classification leads to lower historical growth rates for many industrial sectors. The impacts of these two changes are highlighted in this section for two of the largest energy-consuming industries in the U.S. industrial sectorbulk chemicals and pulp and paper.

Information Center

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Results of toxicity tests and chemical analyses conducted on sediments collected from the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit, July 1999  

SciTech Connect

In order to provide unit specific toxicity data that will be used to address critical uncertainty in the ecological risk assessment (ERA) for the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit (TNXOD OU), sediments were collected from eight locations in the Inner Swamp portion of the operable unit and two unit specific background locations. These samples were analyzed for total mercury, total uranium, and sediment toxicity.

Specht, W.L.

2000-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOE/EA-1494; Final Environmental Assessment for Activities Using Biological Simulants and Releases of Chemicals at the Nevada Test Site (June 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

494 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ACTIVITIES 494 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR ACTIVITIES USING BIOLOGICAL SIMULANTS AND RELEASES OF CHEMICALS June 2004 v Table of Contents Section Page ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS.................................................................................................. viii GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................. GL-1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .....................................................................................................................ES-1 CHAPTER 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR ACTION..................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Introduction.................................................................................................................

52

Toxic Pollution Prevention Act (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the purpose of this Act to reduce the disposal and release of toxic substances which may have adverse and serious health and environmental effects, to promote toxic pollution prevention as...

53

Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such as gasoline and/or diesel) combustion as source inputs of combustion by-products to the atmosphere of the region and subsequently to the waters of Puget Sound.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

SciTech Connect

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

55

Process safety management for highly hazardous chemicals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose of this document is to assist US DOE contractors who work with threshold quantities of highly hazardous chemicals (HHCs), flammable liquids or gases, or explosives in successfully implementing the requirements of OSHA Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119). Purpose of this rule is to prevent releases of HHCs that have the potential to cause catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Uranium Chemical and Radiological Risk Assessment for Freshwater Ecosystems Receiving Ore Mining Releases: Principles, Equations and Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium is an element that has the solely characteristic to behave as significant hazard both from a chemical and radiological point of view. Exclusively of natural occurrence

K. Beaugelin?Seiller; J. Garnier?Laplace; R. Gilbin; C. Adam

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

CAirTOX: A compartment model for assessing the fate of and human exposure to toxic-chemical emissions to air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CAirTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in making a risk assessment of toxic air emissions. With CAirTOX, one can address how contaminants released to an air basin can lead to contamination of soil, food, surface water, and sediments. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure assessments. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a steady-state, but non-equilibrium model that can be used to assess concentrations of contaminants released continuously to air. In Part 1, the authors describe the multimedia transport and transformation model used to determine the fate of air emissions. In Part 2, they describe inputs and data needs for CAirTOX and the development of a set of landscape factors, which can be used to represent regional air basin/water-shed systems in California. In Part 3, they describe the multiple-pathway exposure scenarios and exposure algorithms. In Part 4, they compare the HRA approach and results and the CAirTOX exposure equations. In Part 5, they consider model sensitivity and uncertainty to determine how variability and uncertainty in model inputs affects the precision, accuracy, and credibility of the model output.

McKone, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command] [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Enhanced toxic cloud knockdown spray system for decontamination applications  

SciTech Connect

Methods and systems for knockdown and neutralization of toxic clouds of aerosolized chemical or biological warfare (CBW) agents and toxic industrial chemicals using a non-toxic, non-corrosive aqueous decontamination formulation.

Betty, Rita G. (Rio Rancho, NM); Tucker, Mark D. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM); Levin, Bruce L. (Tijeras, NM); Leonard, Jonathan (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

60

Air Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Program Manager Authority: ES&H Manual, Chapter 30, Air Quality1 ACM asbestos-containing material AHA areaAir Quality: Acronym List Department: Chemical and General Safety Program: Air Quality Owner hazard analysis AQPM air quality program manager ARP accidental release prevention ATCM air toxic control

Wechsler, Risa H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The toxicity of X material  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses toxicity (largely chemical) of Manhattan Project materials from the point of worker protection. Known chemical toxicities of X material (uranium), nitrous fumes, fluorine, vanadium, magnesium, and lime are described followed by safe exposure levels, symptoms of exposure, and treatment recommendations. The report closes with an overview of general policy in a question and answer format.

Ferry, J.L.

1943-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

63

Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications  

SciTech Connect

When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on IMAAC/NARAC fate and transport predictions. A case study involving coastal sea breeze circulation patterns in the NYC region was used to investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion results on the source of three-dimensional wind field data.

Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Impact Statement Tens of thousands of chemicals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Because there are so many chemicals—and since traditional chemical toxicity tests using animals are expensive and time consuming—only a small fraction of chemicals have been fully assessed for potential risk. In 2007, EPA scientists began working on ToxCast, a research project that identifies and prioritizes potentially toxic chemicals using rapid, automated tests called highthroughput screening (HTS) assays. ToxCast is currently assessing over 2,000 chemicals from a broad range of sources, including pesticides, industrial and consumer products, food additives, and failed drugs that were never released to the market. Figure 1. The technologies included in ToxCast use non-animal tests called in vitro assays to help understand what might happen when a human is exposed to a chemical. However, it is difficult to determine the relevance of in vitro data when predicting toxicity from realworld exposures. This study focuses on discovering what level of human exposure is required to result in the internal concentrations that caused effects in in vitro tests. To provide insights into this question, this study made experimental measurements and calculated relevant human exposures for 239 of the 309 ToxCast Phase I chemicals. This study indicates that understanding relevant exposure conditions is important when using HTS in vitro data to prioritize chemicals for further testing and risk management.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

SciTech Connect

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Land Release Estimating and Record-Keeping TRI at Power Plants (LARK-TRIPP) RY2009 Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LARK-TRIPP estimates emissions of chemicals from power plants to air, water, and land to support annual reporting under the U.S. EPA Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program. LARK-TRIPP is a powerful, user-friendly tool for estimating, tracking, and reporting releases of chemicals primarily trace substances from fossil-fired steam electric plants. The spreadsheet-like tool has been applied by numerous energy companies to increase the efficiency and reduce the costs of TRI-related analyses while enhancing c...

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

Using ToxCast ™ to Predict Chemicals Potential for Developmental,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Because there are so many chemicals—and since traditional chemical toxicity tests using animals is expensive and time consuming—only a small fraction of chemicals have been fully assessed for potential risk. In 2007, EPA scientists began working on ToxCast, a research project to identify and prioritize potentially toxic chemicals using rapid, automated tests called in vitro assays. ToxCast is currently examining over 1,000 chemicals from a broad range of sources, including pesticides, industrial and consumer products, food additives and failed drugs that were never released to the market. Recently, EPA scientists published papers describing first generation predictive models (see graphic 1 for process of developing models) using ToxCast data. These models show how the ToxCast concept can be used to predict the potential for certain chemicals to be toxic to embryonic development, male and female reproductive function, and vascular development. The models support continued development of this new approach to chemical safety assessment.

Vascular Development Toxicity; Developmental Toxicity

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

70

Activities on the ORR have the potential to release small quantities of radionuclides and hazardous chemicals to the environment. These releases could result in exposures of members of the public to low  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological Effects Quality Assurance in Monitoring programme BFR Brominated flame retardant BNFL British Removal Plant (at BNFL Sellafield) EDCs Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals EDMAR Endocrine Disruption Similarity Percentages Routine SIXEP Site Ion Exchange Effluent Plant (at BNFL Sellafield) SPI Sediment

Pennycook, Steve

71

Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of persistent manmade chemicals invented in the 1950s and used widely as electrical insulating fluid and plasticizers. Due to their toxicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to avoid potential exposure to PCBs. First, contact EH&S to see if PCB sample data is available may release PCBs into the air and soil, or can be transferred to people when they have their hands and maintenance staff to report results and work on interim measures. EH&S maintains a database of sample results

Wilcock, William

72

Toxic Hazard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... cu the zones at each or tll(' ve-nts lx-twccn ... The ani- mal test for acute toxicity would then ... of the needed data would be provided by analytical testing. ...

2009-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

Biological treatment of concentrated hazardous, toxic, andradionuclide mixed wastes without dilution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Approximately 10 percent of all radioactive wastes produced in the U. S. are mixed with hazardous or toxic chemicals and therefore can not be placed in secure land disposal facilities. Mixed wastes containing hazardous organic chemicals are often incinerated, but volatile radioactive elements are released directly into the biosphere. Some mixed wastes do not currently have any identified disposal option and are stored locally awaiting new developments. Biological treatment has been proposed as a potentially safer alternative to incineration for the treatment of hazardous organic mixed wastes, since biological treatment would not release volatile radioisotopes and the residual low-level radioactive waste would no longer be restricted from land disposal. Prior studies have shown that toxicity associated with acetonitrile is a significant limiting factor for the application of biotreatment to mixed wastes and excessive dilution was required to avoid inhibition of biological treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that a novel reactor configuration, where the concentrated toxic waste is drip-fed into a complete-mix bioreactor containing a pre-concentrated active microbial population, can be used to treat a surrogate acetonitrile mixed waste stream without excessive dilution. Using a drip-feed bioreactor, we were able to treat a 90,000 mg/L acetonitrile solution to less than 0.1 mg/L final concentration using a dilution factor of only 3.4. It was determined that the acetonitrile degradation reaction was inhibited at a pH above 7.2 and that the reactor could be modeled using conventional kinetic and mass balance approaches. Using a drip-feed reactor configuration addresses a major limiting factor (toxic inhibition) for the biological treatment of toxic, hazardous, or radioactive mixed wastes and suggests that drip-feed bioreactors could be used to treat other concentrated toxic waste streams, such as chemical warfare materiel.

Stringfellow, William T.; Komada, Tatsuyuki; Chang, Li-Yang

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

WIPP News Release Archives Index  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WIPP News Release Archives 2006 News Releases 2005 News Releases 2004 News Releases 2003 News Releases 2002 News Releases 2001 News Releases 2000 News Releases 1999 News Releases...

75

Dense gas dispersion modeling for aqueous releases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production, transportation, and storage of hazardous chemicals represent potential risks to the environment, the public, and the producers themselves. The release to the atmosphere of… (more)

Lara, Armando

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using data collected from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Model for TCLP Releases from Waste Glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order property model for normalized Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) release as a function of glass composition was developed using collected data from various studies. The normalized boron release is used to estimate the release of toxic elements based on the observation that the boron release represents the conservative release for those constituents of interest. The current TCLP model has two targeted application areas: (1) delisting of waste-glass product as radioactive (not mixed) waste and (2) designating the glass wastes generated from waste-glass research activities as hazardous or non-hazardous. This report describes the data collection and model development for TCLP releases and discusses the issues related to the application of the model.

Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator is disclosed with applications to chemical sensing and analysis. The preconcentrator can be formed by depositing a resistive heating element (e.g. platinum) over a membrane (e.g. silicon nitride) suspended above a substrate. A coating of a sorptive material (e.g. a microporous hydrophobic sol-gel coating or a polymer coating) is formed on the suspended membrane proximate to the heating element to selective sorb one or more chemical species of interest over a time period, thereby concentrating the chemical species in the sorptive material. Upon heating the sorptive material with the resistive heating element, the sorbed chemical species are released for detection and analysis in a relatively high concentration and over a relatively short time period. The sorptive material can be made to selectively sorb particular chemical species of interest while not substantially sorbing other chemical species not of interest. The present invention has applications for use in forming high-sensitivity, rapid-response miniaturized chemical analysis systems (e.g. a "chem lab on a chip").

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

NETL: IEP - Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization Mercury and Air Toxic Element Impacts of CCB Disposal and Utilization The goal of the proposed effort is to evaluate the impact of mercury and other air toxic elements on the management of CCBs. Supporting objectives are to 1) determine the release potential of selected air toxic elements, including mercury and arsenic, from CCBs under specific environmental conditions; 2) increase the database of information on mercury and other air toxic element releases for CCBs; 3) develop comparative laboratory and field data; and 4) develop appropriate laboratory and field protocols. The specific mechanisms of air toxic element releases to be evaluated will be leaching releases, vapor releases to the atmosphere, and biologically induced leaching and vapor releases.

80

--PRESS RELEASE--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEWS RELEASE NEWS RELEASE Global Energy, Inc. For Immediate Release GLOBAL ENERGY INC. AND WABASH VALLEY POWER RELAUNCH WABASH GASIFICATION FACILITY AS SG SOLUTIONS LLC Cincinnati and Indianapolis, February 7, 2005 - Global Energy Inc. and Wabash Valley Power Association announced today that they have formed SG Solutions LLC to move the Wabash Gasification Facility forward to achieve base load operations and future growth. SG Solutions LLC (SGS) is owned 50/50 by Wabash Valley Power Association and Wabash River Energy, a unit of Global Energy Inc. In recent years the Wabash Gasification Facility has operated under a demanding market-based contract which challenged the operation to make very low cost synthetic gas. As a result, Wabash has consistently produced synthetic gas with a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Press Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Release Press Release LLNL garners 'Best in Class' award from NNSA April 30, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) today congratulated its national laboratories and sites for achievements in environmental stewardship, awarding a total of 24 Pollution Prevention (P2) Awards for innovative initiatives across the enterprise. The P2 Awards recognize performance in integrating environmental stewardship practices that helps to reduce risk, protect natural resources and enhance site operations. "I applaud the work done at NNSA's sites in finding creative ways to reduce the environmental impact of our work," said NNSA's Deputy Administrator for

82

Unlimited Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. SAND2012-7341P

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Unlimited Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. SAND2012-7340P

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Apparatus and methods for detecting chemical permeation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Preliminary Release: March 28, 2011",,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April 2013","Released  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 2013","Released: April 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86

Nontoxic foul-release coatings  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) under project RP-1689-9 evaluated 30 non-toxic coatings for biofouling control on steel and concrete surfaces of cooling water intakes and piping. Seven coatings were evaluated at seven sites for 2 year. The remaining 23 coatings were exposed for a variety of time lengths at the Battelle Marine Laboratory at Daytona Beach, Florida. Accelerated corrosion tests and inspection of the test panels to determine coating life were also conducted. Results of several utility conducted tests were also solicited. Silicone-based coatings performed the best with predicted lives of 2 to 4 year. Although the non-toxic coatings can be fouled by biogrowth, the rate of fouling is less and the coating can be easily cleaned. A cost-benefit methodology is presented to aid utilities to assess the potential use of non-toxic foul-release coatings at power plant cooling systems. 12 refs., 16 figs., 35 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Unlimited Release  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Unlimited Release Unlimited Release Printed November 1987 Proceedings of The Wellbore Sampling Workshop Richard K. Traeger, Barry W. Harding Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 9 4 5 5 0 f o r the United States Department of Energy . under Contract DE-AC04-76DP00789 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

88

Development of a relational chemical process safety database and applications to safety improvements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial accidents still show a major concern to both the public and the environment. It has been a governmental objective to minimize these accidents. Several rules and regulations have emerged to reduce the impacts of chemical releases on people and environment. As a result of these rules, many databases were developed to record incidents in an attempt to learn from previous mistakes and hence to reduce accidents. Most of these databases are maintained by federal agencies. However, the taxonomy inconsistencies of these databases make it difficult to develop a national picture of the problem of accidental release. Part of this research presents an analysis of the RMP*Info database, the latest EPA database, to determine the most significant chemicals released and other trends. According to this analysis, 85% of the releases in the chemical industry are due to twelve chemicals. The sources of those releases and their consequences are presented. In addition, the effects of the chemical type, toxic or flammable, and the number of full time employees in the facilities are discussed. To increase the value of the lessons learned from this database, proposed links with failure rate databases and reactive chemical databases were discussed. The objective of the relationship among these databases is to bring all relevant information of both equipment and chemicals into one database. As a result, the new database will make possible a better understanding by plant personnel about the reliability of plant equipment and the danger of the chemicals they are dealing with. Consequently, accidents will be reduced. This research shows that relationships can be established among the three databases. Examples were given to demonstrate the procedure of establishing these relationships. This research is one step in this regard and should be followed by applying the proposed procedure in a development of a more developed and beneficial relational database that can help improve the safety performance of industry.

Al-Qurashi, Fahad

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

MODELING CHEMICAL SPECIATION AND RELEASE FROM CEMENT ...  

System definition Input file (text) ... control? Water treatment Model with percolation ... MULTIELEMENT PREDICTIVE MODELLING OF pH

90

Press Pass - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the Fermilab press release mailing list. Press Releases Recent Releases Discovery of rare decay narrows space for new physics - 071913 Giant electromagnet to conclude its...

91

Unlimited Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release, further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy by Sandia Corporation. NOTICE: This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contractors, subcontractors, or their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represent that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government, any agency thereof, or any of their contractors or subcontractors. The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government, any agency thereof,

B. L. Larsen; Barbara L. Larsen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Relating nanomaterial properties and microbial toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanomaterials are meeting diverse needs in consumer and industrial products. Metal and metal oxide nanoparticles are among the most commonly used materials and their potential for adversely affecting environmental systems raises concern. Complex microbial consortia underlie environmental processes, and the potential toxicity of nanoparticles to microbial systems, and the consequent impacts on trophic balances, is particularly worrisome. The diverse array of metal and metal oxides, the different sizes and shapes that can be prepared and the variety of possible surface coatings complicate toxicity assessments. Further complicating toxicity interpretations are the diversity of microbial systems and their metabolic capabilities. Here, we review various studies focused on nanoparticle-microbial interactions in an effort to correlate the physical-chemical properties of engineered metal and metal oxide nanoparticles to their biological response. Gaining a predictive understanding of nanoparticle toxicity, based on the physical-chemical properties of the material, will be key to the design and responsible use of nanotechnologies. General conclusions regarding the parent material of the nanoparticle and nanoparticle s size and shape on potential toxicity can be made. However, the surface coating of the material, which can be altered significantly by environmental conditions, can ameliorate or promote microbial toxicity. Understanding nanoparticle transformations and how the nanoparticle surface can be designed to control toxicity represents a key area for further study. Additionally, the vast array of microbial species and their intrinsic metabolic capabilities complicates extrapolations of nanoparticle toxicity. A molecular-based understanding of the various microbial responses to nanoparticle-induced stress is needed. Ultimately, to interpret the effect and eventual fate of engineered materials in the environment, an understanding of the relationship between nanoparticle properties and microbial response will be essential.

Suresh, Anil K [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Doktycz, Mitchel John [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Designing plant layouts with toxic releases based on wind statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to optimize the process plant layout problem is formulated in this paper. The model includes statistical information related to the wind in the site where the plant will be installed. This information is typically collected and stored in databases ... Keywords: Monte Carlo method, dispersion models, layout, uncertainty, wind effect

Richart Vázquez-Román; Jin-Han Lee; Seungho Jung; M. Sam Mannan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Sensor Networks for Detecting Toxic Releases in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

quality sensor data. The algorithm, named BASSET, combines deterministic modeling and Bayesian statistics to join prior knowledge of the contaminant transport in the building with...

95

WIPP News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Back to current year news releases 2008 News Releases November 21 WIPP Sets Schedule for Facility Upgrades October 23 New Mexico Environment Department Approves Permit Change for...

96

Press Pass - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 Press Release Archive Recent Releases Beams are Back in the Large Hadron Collider 112009 Fermilab seeks nominations for new Community Advisory Board to assist in future...

97

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA`s Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors.

Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Work Practices for Chemical Fumehoods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Practices for Chemical Fumehoods Practices for Chemical Fumehoods (Reviewed May 16, 2011) Always use a chemical fumehood when working with toxic and/or volatile chemicals, not on an open bench. Chemical fumehoods are designed to provide protection for the user from chemical and radiological contaminants. However, they do not absolutely eliminate exposure, even under ideal conditions. Careless work practices can result in considerable exposure to users who may believe they are protected. To optimize the performance of the chemical hood, adhere to the following work practices: 1. Ensure that your chemical hood has a current inspection sticker (dated within the last year). The face velocity should be between 80 and 120 linear feet per minute (lfpm). 2. Verify that the chemical hood is drawing air.

100

SRNL - News Release Archives  

SRNL Atmospheric Technologies’ Expertise Helps Guide Response to Graniteville Emergency; 2004 News Releases;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RMOTC - News - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases January Sale of Equipment and Materials Janurary 2014 | Press Releases Read Press Release here. Department of Energy to Sell NPR-3 July 2013 | Press Releases Read Press Release here. View Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz's Report to Congress here. Press Releases Archive STWA, Inc. to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs (PDF) June 2011 | Press Releases Geothermal research initiative at RMOTC (PDF) October 2009 | Press Releases RMOTC partner receives award for tech tested at Teapot Dome (PDF) August 2009 | Press Releases Summer interns work with RMOTC engineers August 2009 | Articles | Casper Journal College, business, government officials launch wind project

102

Chemical leukoderma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

104

Chemical Warfare Agent Degradation and Decontamination  

SciTech Connect

The decontamination of chemical warfare agents (CWA) from structures, environmental media, and even personnel has become an area of particular interest in recent years due to increased homeland security concerns. In addition to terrorist attacks, scenarios such as accidental releases of CWA from U.S. stockpile sites or from historic, buried munitions are also subjects for response planning. To facilitate rapid identification of practical and effective decontamination approaches, this paper reviews pathways of CWA degradation by natural means as well as those resulting from deliberately applied solutions and technologies; these pathways and technologies are compared and contrasted. We then review various technologies, both traditional and recent, with some emphasis on decontamination materials used for surfaces that are difficult to clean. Discussion is limited to the major threat CWA, namely sulfur mustard (HD, bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), VX (O-ethyl S-(2-diisopropylaminoethyl) methylphosphonothioate), and the G-series nerve agents. The principal G-agents are GA (tabun, ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate), GB (sarin, isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and GD (soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate). The chemical decontamination pathways of each agent are outlined, with some discussion of intermediate and final degradation product toxicity. In all cases, and regardless of the CWA degradation pathway chosen for decontamination, it will be necessary to collect and analyze pertinent environmental samples during the treatment phase to confirm attainment of clearance levels.

Talmage, Sylvia Smith [ORNL; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Munro, Nancy B [ORNL; King, J. [U.S. Army Environmental Center

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NARAC TOC NARAC TOC The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, NARAC, provides tools and services to the Federal Government, that map the probable spread of hazardous material accidentally or intentionally released into the atmosphere. NARAC provides atmospheric plume predictions in time for an emergency manager to decide if taking protective action is necessary to protect the health and safety of people in affected areas. Located at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, NARAC is a national support and resource center for planning, real-time assessment, emergency response, and detailed studies of incidents involving a wide variety of hazards, including nuclear, radiological, chemical, biological, and natural emissions. In an emergency situation (if lives are at risk), event-specific NARAC

106

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

SRS - News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6/2014 6/2014 SEARCH GO spacer News Releases govDELIVERY Video Releases Fact Sheets Photo Gallery Speakers Media Contacts SRS Home SRS News Releases News releases are in PDF format (requires Acrobat Reader - click here to download). * 2013 News Releases * 2012 News Releases * 2011 News Releases * 2010 News Releases 2013: 12.31.13 Dr. Sam Fink Earns Donald Orth Lifetime Achievement Award 12.31.13 Savannah River Remediation Issues Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Report 12.18.13 Prototype System Brings Advantages of Wireless Technology to Secure Environment 12.16.13 Registration for the 2014 SRS Public Tour Program Begins December 30 12.12.13 Area Children to Benefit from SRS "Toys for Tots" Campaign 12.10.13 Ruth Patrick's Work Opens Doors for SRNL Environmental Remediation

108

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a Global Soil data set : A Global Database of Gas Fluxes from Soils after Rewetting or Thawing, Version 1.0 . Data...

109

SR 2002 News Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 News Releases SRS Environmental Management FY2003 Budget and Top-To-Bottom Review Presented at Friday Meeting - SR-02-01 NNSA Releases Accident Investigation Report On TEF...

110

Dietary guidelines report released  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Report of the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 was released in June by the US Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines report released Health Nutrition Tran

111

Definition: Chemical energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy energy Energy stored in chemical bonds between atoms within molecules. When a chemical reaction occurs, the chemical energy within a molecule can increase or that energy can be released into its surroundings as another form of energy (e.g., heat or light). Fuel combustion is example of the conversion of chemical energy to another form of energy.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In chemistry, Chemical energy is the potential of a chemical substance to undergo a transformation through a chemical reaction or, to transform other chemical substances. Examples include batteries and light bulbs and cells etc. Breaking or making of chemical bonds involves energy, which may be either absorbed or evolved from a chemical system Energy that can be released (or absorbed) because of a reaction between a set of

112

Risk Assessment of Toxic Pollutants From Fossil Fuel Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities operating coal-fired power plants must weigh the cost of controlling toxic releases against the risk of adverse human health effects. An EPRI-developed analytic framework offers guidance for such assessments, outlining mathematical modeling procedures for tracking pollutants in the environment and for estimating potential health risks to nearby populations.

1987-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemical Resources | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Resources Chemical Resources Chemical Inventory All Sample Preparation Labs are stocked with an assortment of common solvents, acids, bases, buffers, and other reagents. See our Chemical Inventories for a list of available reagents. If you need large quantities of any chemicals, please order or bring your own supply (see below). Chemical Inventories Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) If you will be working with any samples or reagents that are significantly toxic, reactive, corrosive, flammable, or otherwise especially hazardous, we may require an approved SOP before you can begin work. Examples: Reagents with an NFPA Rating of 3 or 4 in any category, nanomaterials, heavy metals, pyrophoric materials, water reactive materials. BLANK SOP SSRL BLANK SOP LCLS Ordering Chemicals

114

Microbial stabilization and mass reduction of wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided to treat wastes containing radionuclides and toxic metals with Clostridium sp. BFGl to release a large fraction of the waste solids into solution and convert the radionuclides and toxic metals to a more concentrated and stable form with concurrent volume and mass reduction. The radionuclides and toxic metals being in a more stable form are available for recovery, recycling and disposal. 18 figures.

Francis, A.J.; Dodge, C.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Characterizing Air Toxics Exposure and Risk and Evaluating EPA Modeling Tools for Policy Making Speaker(s): Jennifer Logue Date: October 27, 2009 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines air toxics as pollutants that are known or suspected to cause serious health effects. Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act established 189 chemicals as air toxics or hazardous air pollutants. Large uncertainties still exist regarding exposure, risks, and sources and there has been a heavy reliance on inventories and modeling to determine sources and risks. In January 2002, Carnegie Mellon University in collaboration with the Allegheny County Health Department (ACHD) embarked on a project to investigate air toxics in Allegheny County. This

116

Preliminary Release: August 19, 2011",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Released: April 2013","Releas  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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117

MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM SALTSTONE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested by WSRC Waste Solidification Engineering to characterize the release of ammonia from saltstone curing at 95 C by performing experimental testing. These tests were performed with an MCU-type Tank 50H salt simulant containing 0, 50, and 200 mg/L ammonia. The testing program showed that above saltstone made from the 200 mg/L ammonia simulant, the vapor space ammonia concentration was about 2.7 mg/L vapor at 95 C. An upper 95% confidence value for this concentration was found to be 3.9 mg/L. Testing also showed that ammonia was chemically generated from curing saltstone at 95 C; the amount of ammonia generated was estimated to be equivalent to 121 mg/L additional ammonia in the salt solution feed. Even with chemical generation, the ammonia release from saltstone was found to be lower than its release from salt solution only with 200 mg/L ammonia.

Zamecnik, J; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

AEO2008 Overview - Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Report :DOEEIA-0383(2008) Released Date: December 2007 Next Release Date: December 2008 (full report available early 2008) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)...

119

RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN COMPOSITION AND TOXICITY OF ENGINE EMISSION SAMPLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differences in the lung toxicity and bacterial mutagenicity of seven samples from gasoline and diesel vehicle emissions were reported previously [1]. Filter and vapor-phase semivolatile organic samples were collected from normal and high-emitter gasoline and diesel vehicles operated on chassis dynamometers on the Unified Driving Cycle, and the compositions of the samples were measured in detail. The two fractions of each sample were combined in their original mass collection ratios, and the toxicity of the seven samples was compared by measuring inflammation and tissue damage in rat lungs and mutagenicity in bacteria. There was good agreement among the toxicity response variables in ranking the samples and demonstrating a five-fold range of toxicity. The relationship between chemical composition and toxicity was analyzed by a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares regression (PLS, also known as projection to latent surfaces). The PCA /PLS analysis revealed the chemical constituents co-varying most strongly with toxicity and produced models predicting the relative toxicity of the samples with good accuracy. The results demonstrated the utility of the PCA/PLS approach, which is now being applied to additional samples, and it also provided a starting point for confirming the compounds that actually cause the effects.

(1)Mauderly, J; Seagrave, J; McDonald; J (2)Eide,I (3)Zielinska, B (4)Lawson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Development of a chemical vision spectrometer to detect chemical agents.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes initial work in developing a no-moving-parts hyperspectral-imaging camera that provides both a thermal image and specific identification of chemical agents, even in the presence of nontoxic plumes. The camera uses enhanced stand-off chemical agent detector (ESCAD) technology based on a conventional thermal-imaging camera interfaced with an acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF). The AOTF is programmed to allow selected spectral frequencies to reach the two dimensional array detector. These frequencies are combined to produce a spectrum that is used for identification. If a chemical agent is detected, pixels containing the agent-absorbing bands are given a colored hue to indicate the presence of the agent. In test runs, two thermal-imaging cameras were used with a specially designed vaporizer capable of controlled low-level (low ppm-m) dynamic chemical releases. The objective was to obtain baseline information about detection levels. Dynamic releases allowed for realistic detection scenarios such as low sky, grass, and wall structures, in addition to reproducible laboratory releases. Chemical releases consisted of dimethylmethylphosphonate (DMMP) and methanol. Initial results show that the combination of AOTF and thermal imaging will produce a chemical image of a plume that can be detected in the presence of interfering substances.

Demirgian, J.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ORISE: Current News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases Official announcements released by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) are listed below. News releases are sortable by date, headline or topic. For news releases from previous years, please visit our News Archives. Recent News Releases Date Title 07/15/2013 College of American Pathologists renews accreditation of beryllium laboratory managed by ORAU 06/12/2013 Top graduate students from U.S. convene with Nobel Laureates in Lindau, Germany 12/03/2012 DOE recognizes partnership with ORAU for long-time management of Tennessee Science Bowl 09/10/2012 Evasius selected as ORAU's vice president and director of science education programs 03/12/1012 ORAU Receives Another Safety Site Star of Excellence 01/18/2012 Study finds foreign doctorate recipients' stay rates remain high

122

NREL: News - News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases Releases NREL's Public Relations Office works with media outlets on news stories about the laboratory and renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. You may subscribe to receive new NREL releases by email or via RSS feed. NREL News Releases RSS Feed (XML) Search All News Releases Search Help 2014 News Releases January 6, 2014 NREL Expert Honored for Energy Systems Innovations The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently won several prestigious awards, including honors for innovations in window air-conditioning efficiency, data sharing, and its energy-efficient computer data center. January 2, 2014 NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy

123

NETL 2007 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 News Releases 7 News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 18, 2007 Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project DOE awarded $66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium for the Department's fourth large scale carbon sequestration project. December 06, 2007 DOE Estimates Future Water Needs for Thermoelectric Power Plants The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has released a 2007 update to its groundbreaking study, "Estimating Freshwater Needs to Meet Future Thermoelectric Generation Requirements." December 05, 2007 Tax Credit Program Promotes Advanced Coal Power Generation and Gasification Technologies

124

NACP Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP North American Forest Dynamics Project: Forest Disturbance and...

125

WIPP News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 News Releases December 1 State Renews WIPP Facility Permit November 18 National TRU Program Director Selected November 18 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Receives Second EPA...

126

WIPP News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 News Releases September 20 WIPP Management and Operating Contractor Recognized for Continuous Safety Performance Click on photo below for larger image. September 18 WIPP Receives...

127

NETL News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deep underground. October 27, 2010 Study Examines Benefits of Expanding North Dakota Oil Refinery Capacity - A recent press release through Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-N.D.)...

128

Berkeley Lab News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stronger Now Scientists Know Why (1208) 2007 News Releases First Look at an Enzyme Target for Antibacterial and Cancer Drugs (121907) Helium Isotopes Point to New Sources...

129

Mesoporous silica SBA-16 functionalized with alkoxysilane groups: preparation, characterization, and release profile study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoporous material sphere based on silica, SBA-16, was chemically modified with alkoxysilane using two different solvents: methanol and toluene. The influence of the chemical modification of the matrix on the release rate of a model drug was also ...

Gracielle Ferreira Andrade; Daniel Cristian Ferreira Soares; Ramon Kenned de Sousa Almeida; Edésia Martins Barros Sousa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Storage and Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Proper Segregation of Chemical Classes Partial List of Incompatible chemicals (Toxic Hazards) Substances in the left hand column should be stored and handled so that they cannot possibly accidentally contact corresponding substances in the center column, because toxic materials (right hand column) would be produced. Arsenical Materials Any Reducing Agent Arsine Azides Acids Hydrogen Azide Cyanides Acids Hydrogen Cyanide Hypochlorites Acids Chlorine or Hypochlorous Acid Nitrates Sulfuric Acid Nitrogen Dioxide Nitric acid Copper, Brass, Heavy Metals Nitrogen Dioxide Nitrites Acids Nitrous Fumes Phosphorus Caustic Alkalies/ Reducers Phosphine Selenides Reducers Hydrogen Selenide Sulfides Acids Hydrogen Sulfide Tellurides Reducers Hydrogen Telluride

131

Articles of protective clothing adapted for deflecting chemical permeation and methods therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus and methods for detecting the permeation of hazardous or toxic chemicals through protective clothing are disclosed. The hazardous or toxic chemicals of interest do not possess the spectral characteristic of luminescence. The apparatus and methods utilize a spectrochemical modification technique to detect the luminescence quenching of an indicator compound which upon permeation of the chemical through the protective clothing, the indicator is exposed to the chemical, thus indicating chemical permeation.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

133

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following chemical terrorist attack: Introduction and key assessment considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While restoration timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical terrorist release. What follows is the first of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information, and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. A conceptual site model and human health-based exposure guidelines are developed and reported as an aid to site-specific pre-planning in the current absence of U.S. state or Federal values designated as compound-specific remediation or re-entry concentrations, and to safely expedite facility recovery to full operational status. Chemicals of concern include chemical warfare nerve and vesicant agents and the toxic industrial compounds phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Developing health-based pre-planning clearance goals for airport remediation following a chemical terrorist attack: Decision criteria for multipathway exposure routes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the event of a chemical terrorist attack on a transportation hub, post-event remediation and restoration activities necessary to attain unrestricted facility re-use and re-entry could require hours to multiple days. While timeframes are dependent on numerous variables, a primary controlling factor is the level of pre-planning and decision-making completed prior to chemical release. What follows is the second of a two-part analysis identifying key considerations, critical information and decision criteria to facilitate post-attack and post-decontamination consequence management activities. Decision criteria analysis presented here provides first-time, open-literature documentation of multi-pathway, health-based remediation exposure guidelines for selected toxic industrial compounds, chemical warfare agents, and agent degradation products for pre-planning application in anticipation of a chemical terrorist attack. Guideline values are provided for inhalation and direct ocular vapor exposure routes as well as percutaneous vapor, surface contact, and ingestion. Target populations include various employees as well as transit passengers. This work has been performed as a national case study conducted in partnership with the Los Angeles International Airport and The Bradley International Terminal. All recommended guidelines have been selected for consistency with airport scenario release parameters of a one-time, short-duration, finite airborne release from a single source followed by compound-specific decontamination.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Frederick [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hall, Dr. Linda [ENVIRON International Corporation; Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine; Raber, Ellen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Love, Dr. Adam [Johnson Wright, Inc.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Incentive-based approaches to regulating toxic substances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying incentive-based strategies to toxic substance regulation can be complicated. Potential risks to health and the environment can occur at many stages in the life cycle of a toxic substance, and the risks vary among different products and uses of products containing toxic substances. Thus researchers at Resources for the Future recommend that regulatory intervention be focused on specific stages in the life cycle of toxic substances, but warn that intervention must be broad enough to mitigate incentives to adopt production processes and products that could pose greater risks than the processes and products they replace . Despite this and other potential pitfalls, they find that incentive-based strategies such as product labeling and deposit-refund schemes may be desirable for regulating certain stages of the life cycle of some chemicals.

Macauley, M.K.; Palmer, K.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling of Molten Core Concrete Interactions and Fission Product Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of molten core concrete interactions is important in estimating the possible consequences of a severe nuclear reactor accident. CORCON-Mod2 is a computer program that models the thermal, chemical, and physical phenomena associated with molten core concrete interactions. Models have been added to extend the modeling of these phenomena. An ideal solution chemical equilibrium methodology predicts the fission product vaporization release. Additional chemical species have been added, and the calcula...

1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactor concept for deep space exploration Research directions Weapons chemistry and nuclear performance Radiological, nuclear, and chemical signatures Energy production,...

138

News Releases | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Biosciences Division News Releases Protein crystal samples are placed on a small metal tip so X-rays from the adjacent beam pipe can pass through them and diffract off the atoms inside the crystal. Lessening X-ray damage is healthy for protein discovery data too December 16, 2013 - New recommendations for using X-rays promise to speed investigations aimed at understanding the structure and function of biologically important proteins - information critical to the development of new drugs. Read more. Kayakers and boats traverse the branch of the Chicago River in the downtown area Argonne partners with Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to study Chicago River microbe population

139

WIPP News Releases - 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 News Releases December 27 Empty WIPP truck overturns December 12 Dr. Dave Moody to Lead the Carlsbad Field Office December 7 WIPP Satellite Tracking System Relocates to Carlsbad...

140

WIPP News Releases - 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases December 12 Idaho National Laboratory Waste Stream Cleared for Shipment to WIPP November 15 WIPP Reaches 4-Million-Hour Safety Milestone October 16 State of New Mexico...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

WIPP News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

released by SRS at the same time The three shipments consisted of (left to right) a TRUPACT-III, a RH-72B and one with TRUPACT-IIs, -- marking another first for WIPP. Since...

142

2007 SR News Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 News Releases DOE Seeks Public Input on Scope of Environmental Review for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership SR-07-01 DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposal for SRS Liquid...

143

SR 2005 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases End State Vision at Savannah River Site Made Public SR-05-01 Note To Editors On MOX Ceremony SR-05-03 NNSA Breaks Ground On MOX Facility SR-05-04 Subcontract Awarded for...

144

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] Aerosol Research Heats Up During Summer Fire Season Bookmark and Share Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. While the impacts of wildfires on people and the surrounding environment are apparent, the effect on the atmosphere from smoky soot particles-a type of aerosol-is much less so. Whether from grass, timber, or brush, each type of biological material releases its own sooty chemical signature that interacts differently with sunlight, clouds, and other particles in the sky. How does this mingling affect Earth's climate? Enter the Biomass Burning Observation Project, or BBOP. Beginning in July, scientists funded by the U.S. Department of Energy will maneuver a high-tech research aircraft into the plumes of wildfires to

145

Release Date: August 2010 Next Release Date: August 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: August 2010 Next Release Date: August 2011 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Renewable Energy Annual 2008 Table 1.14 Total Biomass Electricity Net ...

146

Multiscale Local Forcing of the Arabian Desert Daytime Boundary Layer, and Implications for the Dispersion of Surface-Released Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four 6-day simulations of the atmospheric conditions over the Arabian Desert during the time of the 1991 detonation and release of toxic material at the Khamisiyah, Iraq, weapons depot were performed using a mesoscale model run in a data-...

Thomas T. Warner; Rong-Shyang Sheu

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview 3 AEO2014 Early Release Overview decade for the first time ...

148

Radiolabelling of chemicals. [Chemical additives used in geothermal operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Labeling of chemical additives with radioactive isotopes can solve numerous problems in geothermal operations. The physical and chemical behavior of many chemicals slated for geothermal operations can be studied with the required detail at the extremely low concentration of the commercially available (non-labeled) compounds. The problems of labeling and the basics of these radioactively labeled chemicals are described in this report. Conclusions of this study are: (1) chemicals labeled with radioactive isotopes can be used to investigate the chemical and physical behavior of chemical additives used in geothermal operations. The high detection limits make this technology superior to conventional analytical and monitoring methods; (2) severe difficulties exist for utilizing of radioactively labeled chemicals in geothermal operations. The labeling itself can cause technical problems. Another host of problems is caused by the reluctance of chemical manufacturers to release the necessary proprietary information on their chemicals required for proper labeling; and (3) previous attempts to manufacture radioactively labeled flocculants and to utilize them in a geothermal operation were prematurely abandoned for a number of reasons.

Vetter, O.J.; Kandarpa, V.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains the Executive summary; Introduction; Summary of vulnerabilities; Management systems weaknesses; Commendable practices; Summary of management response plan; Conclusions; and a Glossary of chemical terms.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

2010 Report Released | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Our History > NNSA Timeline > 2010 Report Released 2010 Report Released January 12, 1987 Washington, DC 2010 Report Released White House releases "2010 Report," projecting...

151

Press Pass - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Press Release Archive 4 Press Release Archive Recent Releases Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator 12/16/04 NIU launches Institute for Neutron Therapy at Fermilab 12/6/04 Pier Oddone of Berkeley Lab Named Fermilab Director 11/19/04 Fermilab To Host Girl Scout Badge Event on Saturday, November 6 11/4/04 Rocky Kolb to Direct New Fermilab Particle Astrophysics Center 11/1/04 Fermilab Director Witherell One of Eight Directors to Receive Energy Secretary's Gold Award 10/25/04 Fermilab Arts Series Celebrates 30th Anniversary 10/7/04 Fermilab Offers Tours of Antimatter Production Site, October 3 and 24 9/14/04 Fermilab Scientists Present New Physics Results at ICHEP Beijing 8/18/04 How They Spent Their Summer Vacation: QuarkNet Students Experience Real Work of Fermilab Scientists 8/3/04

152

NETL 2008 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 News Releases 8 News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 23, 2008 Fossil Energy Research Grants Awarded to Four Minority Universities Continuing its long-standing minority university research program, DOE has selected four institutions where students and faculty will investigate projects dealing with sensors and controls, computational energy sciences, and advanced materials for use in fossil fuel power systems. December 19, 2008 NETLÂ’s Multiphase Flow Research Group Wins INCITE Award The Multiphase Flow Research Group at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has won a 2009 Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) award from the U.S. Department of Energy for their proposal "Clean and Efficient Coal Gasifier Designs using Large-Scale Simulations."

153

SR 2000 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 News Releases 0 News Releases Nuclear Security Oversight Panel Visits SRS As Part of NNSA Tour - SR-00-01 DOE Security Czar To Visit SRS - SR-00-02 DOE To Present SRS Fiscal Year 2001 Budget - SR-00-03 DOE Releases Accident Investigation Report On FB-Line Workers' Plutonium Intake - SR-00-04 Environmental Management Science Program National Workshop - SR-00-05 DOE Cleanup Science on Display In Atlanta - SR-00-06 Environmental Cleanup Technology Conference Held - SR-00-07 Wackenhut Receives Award Fee - SR-00-08 WSRC Receives Award Fee - SR-00-09 DOE Hosts Radioactive Materials Transportation Workshop - SR-00-10 Energy Secretary To Visit SRS - SR-00-11 "Melt & Dilute" Selected To Treat DOE's Spent Nuclear Fuel At SRS - SR-00-12 Savannah River Operations Office Wins Best Practices Award - SR-00-13

154

NETL 2003 Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Releases 3 Releases News Releases issued in: 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 December 30, 2003 Advanced Natural Gas Turbine Hailed as Top Power Project of 2003 A power plant featuring a next-generation gas turbine developed as part of DOE's advanced turbine systems program has been selected by Power Engineering magazine as one of three 2003 Projects of the Year. December 8, 2003 Historically Black, Other Minority Colleges Encouraged to Compete for Grants for Fossil Energy Research DOE has issued its annual call for fossil fuel research proposals from historically black and other minority colleges and universities. December 5, 2003 Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor is 2003 Lowry Award Winner The Energy Department's 2003 Homer H. Lowry Award will go to a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor emeritus whose combustion research continues to influence the design and commercialization of cleaner, 'low NOx' combustors widely used in the power industry.

155

Feature - WATER Tool Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources (WATER) Tool Released Argonne National Laboratory recently released an open access online tool called WATER (Water Assessment for Transportation Energy Resources), which quantifies water footprint of fuel production stages from feedstock production to conversion process for biofuel with county, state, and regional level spatial resolution. WATER provides analysis on water consumption and its impact on water quality. It contains biofuel pathways for corn grain ethanol, soybean biodiesel, and cellulosic ethanol produced from corn stover and wheat straw. Perennial grass (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) and forest wood residue-based biofuel pathways are currently under development. The WATER tool enables users to conduct pathway comparison, scenario development, and regional specific feedstock analysis in supporting of biofuel industry development and planning. It is available at http://water.es.anl.gov/.

156

News Releases - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases - 2013 News Releases - 2013 /newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2013 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. los alamos acheivements Dateline Los Alamos: Top Science News for 2013 HIV vaccine, Mars water, climate change, birth of a black hole, thwarting terrorists among topics of interest Los Alamos outstanding science and technology achievements for 2013 - 12/24/13 2014 Employee Giving Campaign Nearly $2 million pledged during Los Alamos National Laboratory's 2014 employee giving campaign Lab employee contributions will fund a wide range of programs offered by eligible nonprofit organizations. - 12/17/13 Bradbury Science Museum

157

Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 229 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chemical and biological warfare: Biology, chemistry, and toxicology. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the physiological effects, physicochemical effects, and toxicology of chemical and biological warfare agents. Citations discuss toxic chemicals, chemical agent simulants, detoxification and decontamination, environmental toxicity, and land pollution. Detection techniques and warning systems are examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Chemical microsensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture is provided including a substrate having an oxide surface layer and a selective thin film of a cyclodextrin derivative chemically bound upon said substrate, said film is adapted for the inclusion of a selected organic compound therewith. Such an article can be either a chemical sensor capable of detecting a resultant mass change from inclusion of the selected organic compound or a chemical separator capable of reversibly selectively separating a selected organic compound.

Li, DeQuan (Los Alamos, NM); Swanson, Basil I. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EM Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en Task Order Awarded to Small Business for Natural Gas Services http://energy.gov/em/articles/task-order-awarded-small-business-natural-gas-services Task Order Awarded to Small Business for Natural Gas Services

163

SEPA Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sepa/press-releases Southeastern Power Administration sepa/press-releases Southeastern Power Administration 1166 Athens Tech Rd. Elberton, GA 30635-6711Phone: (706) 213-3800 en ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013 http://energy.gov/sepa/articles/energy-efficiency-and-renewable-energy-report-fy-2013 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013

164

NE Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC press-releases 1000 Independence Ave. SWWashington DC 20585202-586-5000 en Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-announces-new-investment-innovative-small-modular-reactor Energy Department Announces New Investment in Innovative Small Modular Reactor

165

Initial MCNP6 Release Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the Initial Release of MCNP6 / Radiation Transport and Protection

T. Goorley; M. James; T. Booth; F. Brown; J. Bull; L. J. Cox; J. Durkee; J. Elson; M. Fensin; R. A. Forster; J. Hendricks; H. G. Hughes; R. Johns; B. Kiedrowski; R. Martz; S. Mashnik; G. McKinney; D. Pelowitz; R. Prael; J. Sweezy; L. Waters; T. Wilcox; T. Zukaitis

166

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising (a) a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, operatively coupled to (b) a transducer capable of directly converting said expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Bend, OR)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

Provancher, William

168

Chemical Safety: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Safety: What You Don't Know Can Hurt You! Laboratory Safety Colloquium Sponsored by Environmental Health & Safety The Office of Research & Graduate Studies #12;This group of chemicals manifests cytochrome oxidase. Chemical Trivia #12;This group of chemicals manifests its toxicity by way of starving

Farritor, Shane

169

Hometown News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Hometown News Releases News Releases issued in: 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 October 18, 2013 NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award Morgantown, W.Va. - Dr. Stephen E. Zitney of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Mid-Atlantic region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Excellence in Technology Transfer for his work on the 3D Virtual Energy Plant Simulator and Immersive Training System. October 18, 2013 NETL Researcher Honored with 2013 Federal Laboratory Consortium Award Albany, Ore. - Jeffrey Hawk of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been awarded a Far West region Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) award for Outstanding Technology Development for his work on Superior Heat Resistant Alloys through Controlled Homogenization.

170

Press Pass - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Press Release Archive 7 Press Release Archive The Midnight Ride of the CMS Tracking Detector 12/20/07 Industry and Research Heavyweights Collaborate to Demonstrate Data Transport Capability at SC07 11/12/07 Auger Observatory closes in on long-standing mystery, links highest-energy cosmic rays with violent black holes 11/08/07 Fermilab environmental program receives international recognition 10/15/07 Fermilab in Top 10 list of Chicagoland Scientific Achievements 10/02/07 Volunteers Welcome at Fermilab's Prairie Harvest on Oct. 6 and Nov. 3 09/28/07 Fermilab named one of the Chicago area's best places to work 09/25/07 Anna Zuccarini, Naperville, leads Department of Energy education program for undergraduates 08/10/07 Pierre Auger Observatory shares cosmic-ray data with public, students 07/03/07

171

WIPP News Releases - 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 News Releases 4 News Releases November 4 Detwiler Resumes Position at DOE Headquarters October 14 WIPP Mine Rescue Team First in Missouri October 12 DOE Announces WIPP Contract Negotiations October 6 Washington TRU Solutions is Mine Operator of the Year September 28 Washington Group International Named Tops in Safety July 24 No Damage to WIPP Cargo in Roswell Traffic Accident July 22 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins "Overall Contest" at Nationals July 2 DOE Prevails in WIPP Court Case July 1 $1M to Fund Underground Science at WIPP April 6 NMED Approves Safer Testing Requirements for LANL Sealed Source Wastes April 1 WIPP Marks Five Years of Safe Operation March 30 EPA Approves Remote-Handled Waste Procedures for WIPP March 26 DOE Submits WIPP Compliance Recertification Application to EPA

172

SEPA Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

articles/181/1/SEPA Press Releases Southeastern Power articles/181/1/SEPA Press Releases Southeastern Power Administration 1166 Athens Tech Rd. Elberton, GA 30635-6711Phone: (706) 213-3800 en ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013 http://energy.gov/sepa/articles/energy-efficiency-and-renewable-energy-report-fy-2013 ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY REPORT - FY 2013

173

New Releases | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 Features Story Tips Audio Spots Honors and Awards Videos ORNL Review Magazine ORNL Reporter DOE Pulse Media Contacts Media Mentions RSS Feeds News Home | ORNL | News | News Releases News Releases ORNL's Office of Communications works with national, regional, and local media outlets on news stories about the laboratory. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our Media Contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov. 1-25 of 25 Results ORNL-UT researchers invent 'sideways' approach to 2-D hybrid materials ORNL-UT researchers invent 'sideways' approach to 2-D hybrid materials

174

JGI - News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases News Releases December 20, 2013 A gluttonous plant reveals how its cellular power plant devours foreign DNA. Amborella trichopoda, a sprawling shrub that grows on just a single island in the remote South Pacific, is the only plant in its family and genus. It is also one of the oldest flowering plants, having branched off from others about 200 million years ago. November 25, 2013 How Scavenging Fungi Became a Plant's Best Friend. Glomeromycota is an ancient lineage of fungi that has a symbiotic relationship with roots that goes back nearly 420 million years to the earliest plants. More than two thirds of the world's plants depend on this soil-dwelling symbiotic fungus to survive, including critical agricultural crops such as wheat, cassava, and rice. November 22, 2013

175

2009 WIPP News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 News Releases 09 News Releases December 21 Magnum Minerals to Buy WIPP Salt October 14 Agreement Reached Between WTS and Union Employees October 1 Truck Accident Did Not Involve WIPP Shipment September 18 WIPP Completes First RH-TRU Shipment from VNC July 24 DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over Waste Disposal in Salt June 25 DOE Carlsbad Field Office Opens Local Recovery Act Office June 18 DOE Announces the Transfer of the WIPP Water Line to the City of Carlsbad June 3 Los Alamos National Laboratory Ships Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste to WIPP June 1 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Wins Best Overall at Competition April 24 Remote-Handled TRU Waste Shipments from the Savannah River Site Arrive Safely at WIPP March 31 Energy Secretary Chu Announces $384 Million in Recovery Act Funding for Environmental Cleanup in New Mexico

176

SR 2001 News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SR 2001 News Releases SR 2001 News Releases Department of Energy Extends Contract at SRS - R-01-002 Savannah River Site's Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observance - SR-01-01 DOE Announces Availability of Draft SEIS on Salt Processing Alternatives - SR-01-02 Media Availability For WIPP Shipment - SR-01-03 Savannah River Site Sends First Shipment Of Transuranic Waste To WIPP - SR-01-04 DOE Announces Availability Of Draft RFP On Salt Waste Processing Facility - SR-01-05 DOE Announces Wackenhut Services, Inc. - SR-01-06 DOE & DOL Hold Public Meeting For Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act - SR-01-07 DOE Announces Plans For Offsite Treatment & Disposal Of SRS Waste - SR-01-08 DOE Announces Availability Of Final Supplemental EIS And Identifies Preferred Salt Processing Alternative - SR-01-09

177

NACP Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The North American Carbon Program (NACP): NACP: MODIS Daily Land Incident 4-km PAR Images for North America, 2003-2005 . Data set prepared by S. Liang and D. Wang. This data set contains daily Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) Images over North America for the years 2003 - 2005. The daily images were derived by integrating MODIS/Terra and MODIS/Aqua instantaneous PAR data where the instantaneous PAR data is estimated directly from Terra or Aqua MODIS 5-min L1b swath data (Liang et al., 2006 and Wang et al., 2010). The spatial distribution of this data set includes the MODIS tile subsets covering North America, Central America, portions of South America, and

178

WIPP News Releases - 1998  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 News Releases 8 News Releases DOE Notifies States and Tribes That First Shipment To WIPP Could Occur as Early as Mid-January - December 18, 1998 International Scientists, Engineers Make Stop in Carlsbad To Tour WIPP, Environmental Monitoring Center - November 19, 1998 WIPP Exercise Termed Success By Utah, DOE Officials - November 16, 1998 WIPP Contractor To Participate In Lea County Procurement Workshop - November 12, 1998 WIPP Crews Complete One Maintenance Project, On Schedule to Finish Second by Mid-December - November 10, 1998 Energy Department Awards $300,000 to City of Carlsbad To Help Boost Region's Economic Planning - November 4, 1998 Mansour Akbarzadeh Appointed WIPP Laboratories Manager - November 4, 1998 WIPP Mine Rescue Team Members Bring Home Four Awards From Missouri Competition - November 2, 1998

179

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

EIA new releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration. It contains news releases on items of interest to the petroleum, coal, nuclear, electric and alternate fuels industries ranging from economic outlooks to environmental concerns. There is also a listing of reports by industry and an energy education resource listing containing sources for free or low-cost energy-related educational materials for educators and primary and secondary students.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Department of Toxic Substances Control Jump to: navigation, search Name California Environmental Protection Agency Department of Toxic Substances Control Place Sacramento,...

182

Chemical Activation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Activation of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Hydrogen Adsorption Milton R. Smith, Jr., 1 Edward W. Bittner, 1 Wei Shi, 1, 2 J. Karl Johnson, 1, 2 and Bradley C....

183

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

1992-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

184

Chemical sensors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material.

Lowell, Jr., James R. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Bend, OR); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Rayfield, George W. (Eugene, OR)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Seven LBA Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBA-ECO Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of one data set from the CD-06 Carbon Dynamics team, and six data sets from the Land Use-Land Change...

186

Cray XC30 Press Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release Cray XC30 Press Release CRAY UNVEILS THE CRAY XC30 Seattle, WA - November 8, 2012 - Global supercomputer leader Cray Inc. (Nasdaq: CRAY) today announced the launch of...

187

ORNL DAAC: Amazon Data Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiance Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia...

188

PARS II Software Release Notes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

New and improved functionality was released in Version 8.0.20120308 of PARS II. This release offers PARS II Users a significant number of enhancements across all facets of the application. These...

189

Modeling toxic endpoints for improving human health risk assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk assessment procedures for mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present a problem due to the lack of available potency and toxicity data on mixtures and individual compounds. This study examines the toxicity of parent compound PAHs and binary mixtures of PAHs in order to bridge the gap between component assessment and mixture assessment. Seven pure parent compound PAHs and four binary mixtures of PAHs were examined in the Salmonella/Microsome Mutagenicity Assay, a Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) assay and the 7-ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase assay (EROD). These assays were chosen for their ability to measure specific toxic endpoints related to the carcinogenic process (i.e. initiation, promotion, progression). Data from these assays was used in further studies to build Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSARs) to estimate toxic endpoints and to test the additive assumption in PAH mixtures. These QSAR models will allow for the development of bioassay based potential potencies (PPB) or toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) that are derived not only from bioassay data, but also from structure, activity, and physical/chemical properties. These models can be extended to any environmental media to evaluate risk to human health from exposures to PAHs.

Bruce, Erica Dawn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Media Release Media Contact FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Heather Rasmussen  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Release Media Contact Release Media Contact FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Heather Rasmussen September 22, 2011 Communication Specialist (801) 819-7623 hrasmussen@wecc.biz WECC releases its first-ever transmission plan for the Western Interconnection The Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) announced the release of its first 10-Year Regional Transmission Plan (Plan) for the Western Interconnection. Looking ahead to 2020, the Plan focuses on how to meet the Western Interconnection's transmission requirements; including transmission expansion, new generation development, adapting to local, state/provincial, and federal policy changes, and their associated financial and environmental costs.

191

Gas releases from salt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The occurrence of gas in salt mines and caverns has presented some serious problems to facility operators. Salt mines have long experienced sudden, usually unexpected expulsions of gas and salt from a production face, commonly known as outbursts. Outbursts can release over one million cubic feet of methane and fractured salt, and are responsible for the lives of numerous miners and explosions. Equipment, production time, and even entire mines have been lost due to outbursts. An outburst creates a cornucopian shaped hole that can reach heights of several hundred feet. The potential occurrence of outbursts must be factored into mine design and mining methods. In caverns, the occurrence of outbursts and steady infiltration of gas into stored product can effect the quality of the product, particularly over the long-term, and in some cases renders the product unusable as is or difficult to transport. Gas has also been known to collect in the roof traps of caverns resulting in safety and operational concerns. The intent of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge on gas releases from salt. The compiled information can provide a better understanding of the phenomena and gain insight into the causative mechanisms that, once established, can help mitigate the variety of problems associated with gas releases from salt. Outbursts, as documented in mines, are discussed first. This is followed by a discussion of the relatively slow gas infiltration into stored crude oil, as observed and modeled in the caverns of the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. A model that predicts outburst pressure kicks in caverns is also discussed.

Ehgartner, B.; Neal, J.; Hinkebein, T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Riola release report  

SciTech Connect

Eleven hours after execution of the Riola Event (at 0826 PDT on 25 September 1980) in hole U2eq of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a release of radioactivity began. When the seepage stopped at about noon the following day, up to some 3200 Ci of activity had been dispersed by light variable winds. On 26 September, examination of the geophone records showed six hours of low-level, but fairly continuous, activity before the release. Electrical measurements indicated that most cables were still intact to a depth below the stemming platform. A survey of the ground zero area showed that the seepage came through cracks between the surface conductor and the pad, through cracks in the pad, and through a crack adjacent to the pad around the mousehole (a small hole adjacent to the emplacement hole). To preclude undue radiation exposure or injury from a surprise subsidence, safety measures were instituted. Tritium seepage was suffucient to postpone site activities until a box and pipeline were emplaced to contain and remove the gas. Radiation release modeling and calculations were generally consistent with observations. Plug-hole interaction calculations showed that the alluvium near the bottom of the plug may have been overstressed and that improvements in the design of the plug-medium interface can be made. Experimental studies verified that the surface appearance of the plug core was caused by erosion, but, assuming a normal strength for the plug material, that erosion alone could not account for the disappearance of such a large portion of the stemming platform. Samples from downhole plug experiments show that the plug may have been considerably weaker than had been indicted by quality assurance (QA) samples. 19 references, 32 figures, 10 tables.

Woodward, E.C.

1983-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hybridization and Selective Release of DNA Microarrays  

SciTech Connect

DNA microarrays contain sequence specific probes arrayed in distinct spots numbering from 10,000 to over 1,000,000, depending on the platform. This tremendous degree of multiplexing gives microarrays great potential for environmental background sampling, broad-spectrum clinical monitoring, and continuous biological threat detection. In practice, their use in these applications is not common due to limited information content, long processing times, and high cost. The work focused on characterizing the phenomena of microarray hybridization and selective release that will allow these limitations to be addressed. This will revolutionize the ways that microarrays can be used for LLNL's Global Security missions. The goals of this project were two-fold: automated faster hybridizations and selective release of hybridized features. The first study area involves hybridization kinetics and mass-transfer effects. the standard hybridization protocol uses an overnight incubation to achieve the best possible signal for any sample type, as well as for convenience in manual processing. There is potential to significantly shorten this time based on better understanding and control of the rate-limiting processes and knowledge of the progress of the hybridization. In the hybridization work, a custom microarray flow cell was used to manipulate the chemical and thermal environment of the array and autonomously image the changes over time during hybridization. The second study area is selective release. Microarrays easily generate hybridization patterns and signatures, but there is still an unmet need for methodologies enabling rapid and selective analysis of these patterns and signatures. Detailed analysis of individual spots by subsequent sequencing could potentially yield significant information for rapidly mutating and emerging (or deliberately engineered) pathogens. In the selective release work, optical energy deposition with coherent light quickly provides the thermal energy to single spots to release hybridized DNA. This work leverages LLNL expertise in optics, microfluids, and bioinformatics.

Beer, N R; Baker, B; Piggott, T; Maberry, S; Hara, C M; DeOtte, J; Benett, W; Mukerjee, E; Dzenitis, J; Wheeler, E K

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

Press Pass - Press Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Press Release Archive 5 Press Release Archive High Energy Physics Team Captures Network Prize at SC|05 12/6/05 Beyond Einstein: A live Webcast from around the Globe Thursday, December 1, 2005, from 5:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST 11/21/05 Pierre Auger Observatory Celebrates Progress on Detector Array and Presents First Science Results 11/10/05 Science and Reading Combine in Family Literacy Experience at Fermilab on Thursday, November 17 10/11/05 Media invited to attend Pierre Auger Observatory Celebration, to be held November 9-12, 2005 in MalargĂĽe, Argentina 11/2/05 Science and Reading Combine in Family Literacy Experience at Fermilab on Thursday, November 17 10/11/05 Volunteers Welcome at Fermilab's Prairie Harvest on Oct. 1 and 29 9/26/05 Hot Topics Featured at World Year of Physics Symposium for Students and Teachers, Saturday, October 8 from 8 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. at Fermilab's Ramsey Auditorium 9/14/05

195

Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants (diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard) through several, common porous, construction materials. The porous media'' selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with live'' agents.

Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Protocol for determination of chemical warfare agent simulant movement through porous media  

SciTech Connect

In the event of an unplanned release of chemical warfare agent during any phase of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program (CSDP), a (small) potential exists for contamination of buildings and materials used in their construction. Guidelines for unrestricted access to potentially agent-contaminated private and public property are presently undefined due to uncertainties regarding the adequacy of decontaminating porous surfaces such as wood, masonry and gypsum wall board. Persistent agents such as VX or mustard are particularly problematic. The report which follows documents a measurement protocol developed in a scoping investigation characterizing the permeation of chemical warfare agent simulants [diisopropylmethyl phosphonate (DIMP) for warfare agent GB, dimethylmethyl phosphonate (DMMP) for warfare agent VX and chlorethylethyl sulfide (CEES) for warfare agent sulfur mustard] through several, common porous, construction materials. The ``porous media`` selected for examination were wood, brick, cinder block, and gypsum wall board. Simulants were tested rather than actual warfare agents because of their low toxicity, commercial availability, and the lack of surety capability at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The present work is considered a protocol for confirmation testing with ``live`` agents.

Jenkins, R.A.; Buchanan, M.V.; Merriweather, R.; Ilgner, R.H.; Gayle, T.M.; Moneyhun, J.H.; Watson, A.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Press Releases | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Press Releases Home > Media Room > Press Releases Press Releases...

198

Program on Technology Innovation: Cumulative Risk Assessment of Urban Air Toxics: Pilot Modeling Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cumulative risk modeling for estimating the burden of exposure to urban air toxics requires consideration of a range of factors influencing population health. These factors include multiple toxic compounds, a variety of pollutant sources, background levels of air pollutants, and non-chemical stressors not historically considered in regulatory risk assessments. To date, quantitative methods to account for all these factors remain sporadic and relatively untested. However, the United States ...

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Evaluation of radium and toxic element leaching characteristics of Florida phosphogypsum stockpiles. Report of investigations/1983  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Mines conducted studies to determine if phosphogypsum, a waste material from the processing of phosphate rock, contains hazardous toxic materials as defined by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and whether leaching of these toxic materials and radium may occur. Samples of the phosphogypsum stockpiled material were evaluated using the EPA extraction procedure, atomic absorption, neutron activation, X-ray diffraction, and chemical and physical means. Radiological tests performed used both the germanium-lithium and emanation methods.

May, A.; Sweeney, J.W.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

Francesca Matteucci

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

News Releases | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alaska Soil Research Alaska Soil Research BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Alaska Soil Research Project Aiming to Improve Understanding of Global Climate November 26, 2012 A research team being led by Julie Jastrow, an ecologist at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, recently traveled to the North Slope of Alaska as part of a soil research project that aims to ultimately help improve and validate global climate models. Using jackhammer to dig a sampling pit in frozen soil After removing the seasonally thawed soil active layer in coastal plain tundra near Prudhoe Bay, members of the Argonne research team use a jackhammer to dig through frozen soil, creating a soil pit from which different soil layers can be viewed and sampled.

202

News Releases - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2011 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory announces top 10 science stories of 2011 Stories include alternative energy research, magnetic fields, disease tracking, the study of Mars, climate change, fuel cells, solar wind, and magnetic reconnection. - 12/23/11 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

203

News Releases - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2010 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). - 12/21/10 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. LANL announces Top 10 science & technology developments of 2010 Top 10 developments based on major programmatic milestones, strategic

204

Efficient Sugar Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sugar Sugar Release by the Cellulose Solvent-Based Lignocellulose Fractionation Technology and Enzymatic Cellulose Hydrolysis GEOFFREY MOXLEY, † ZHIGUANG ZHU, † AND Y.-H. PERCIVAL ZHANG* ,†,‡,§ Biological Systems Engineering Department, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 210-A Seitz Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, Institute for Critical Technology and Applied Science (ICTAS), Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Virginia 24061, and Department of Energy (DOE) BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Efficient liberation of fermentable soluble sugars from lignocellulosic biomass waste not only decreases solid waste handling but also produces value-added biofuels and biobased products. Industrial hemp, a special economic crop, is cultivated for its high-quality fibers and high-value seed oil, but its hollow

205

News Releases - 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2008 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. New airport liquid analysis system undergoes testing at Albuquerque International Sunport A new tool that distinguishes potential-threat liquids from the harmless shampoos and sodas a regular traveler might take aboard an aircraft. - 12/16/08 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

206

News Releases - 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/newsroom/_assets/images/newsroom-icon.jpg News Releases - 2009 We are your source for reliable, up-to-date news and information; our scientists and engineers can provide technical insights on our innovations for a secure nation. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Science satellites seek Santa Los Alamos scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the course taken by the elfin traveler. - 12/16/09 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

207

Release Date: April 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2009/04Q) April 2010 DOE/EIA-0121 (2009/04Q) Next Release Date: June 2010 Quarterly Coal Report October - December 2009 April 2010 U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 _____________________________________________________________________________ This report is available on the Web at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/cneaf/coal/quarterly/qcr.pdf _____________________________________________ This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this

208

QUICK RELEASABLE DRIVE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quick releasable mechanical drive system suitable for use in a nuclear reactor is described. A small reversible motor positions a control rod by means of a worm and gear speed reducer, a magnetic torque clutch, and a bell crank. As the control rod is raised to the operating position, a heavy coil spring is compressed. In the event of an emergency indicated by either a''scram'' signal or a power failure, the current to the magnetic clutch is cut off, thereby freeing the coil spring and the bell crank positioner from the motor and speed reduction gearing. The coil spring will immediately act upon the bell crank to cause the insertion of the control rod. This arrangement will allow the slow, accurate positioning of the control rod during reactor operation, while providing an independent force to rapidly insert the rod in the event of an emergency.

Dickson, J.J.

1958-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL: News Release - DOE National Laboratory Releases Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases Annual Accomplishments Report NETL Cites Research Successes that Balance Energy Supply, Economy, Environment Washington, D.C. -The National Energy Technology...

210

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ATSDR health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

Borit Asbestos Site

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in...

214

Next Release Date: September 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

October 2010 DOEEIA-0121 (201002Q) Next Release Date: September 2012 Revised: July 2012 Quarterly Coal Report April - June 2010 October 2010 U.S. Energy Information...

215

NREL: News - Release Archives 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engines and vehicles. September 10, 2010 NREL Releases Estimate of National Offshore Wind Energy Potential The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory...

216

Enhanced Detection of Toxic Agents  

in the development of their AquaSentinel water quality monitoring system by ... chemical, biological, or radiological agents in the fluid. Integration of biased AC

217

Press release For Immediate Release Seattle, USA. June 6, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press release ­ For Immediate Release Seattle, USA. June 6, 2008 Global trade of woody biomass has almost doubled in five years With the increasing demand for woody biomass, global trade of particularly fiber source for energy generation but because of higher demand for renewable energy and increasing

218

AEO2014 Early Release Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. The early release provides a basis for the examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or possible technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2014 is released in 2014, exploring key

219

AEO2013 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 Early Release Overview 3 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Executive summary Projections in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Reference case focus on the factors that shape U.S. energy markets through 2040, under the assumption that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged throughout the projection period. This early release focuses on the AEO2013 Reference case, which provides the basis for examination and discussion of energy market trends and serves as a starting point for analysis of potential changes in U.S. energy policies, rules, or regulations or potential technology breakthroughs. Readers are encouraged to review the full range of cases that will be presented when the complete AEO2013 is released in early 2013, exploring key uncertainties in the Reference case. Major highlights in the AEO2013 Reference case include:

220

Chemical Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Science Chemical Science Compton double ionization of helium in the region of the cross-section maximum B. Krässig, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, E.P. Kanter, H. Schmidt-Böcking, W. Schmitt, S.H. Southworth, Th. Weber, and L. Young Crystal structure analysis of microporous Na16Nb12.8Ti3.2O44.8(OH)3.2l8H2O and Na/Nb/Zr/O/H2O phases A. Tripathi, J. Parise, M. Nyman, T.M. Nenoff, and W. Harrison Double K-photoionization of heavy atoms R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, E.P. Kanter, B. Krässig, and S.H. Southworth Forward-backward asymmetries of atomic photoelectrons S.H. Southworth, B. Krässig, E.P. Kanter, J.C. Bilheux, R.W. Dunford, D.S. Gemmell, S. Hasegawa, and L. Young In situreduction of various iron oxides to form high-surface-area Fe-metal catalysts as studied by high-resolution powder diffraction

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Excursions in Chemical Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009). [118] F. A. Cotton, Chemical Applications of GroupExcursions in Chemical Dynamics by Shervin Fatehi AFall 2010 Excursions in Chemical Dynamics Copyright 2010 by

Fatehi, Shervin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

223

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

224

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 3 consists of eleven appendices containing the following: Field verification reports for Idaho National Engineering Lab., Rocky Flats Plant, Brookhaven National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., and Sandia National Laboratories (NM); Mini-visits to small DOE sites; Working Group meeting, June 7--8, 1994; Commendable practices; Related chemical safety initiatives at DOE; Regulatory framework and industry initiatives related to chemical safety; and Chemical inventory data from field self-evaluation reports.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Conley, William R. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for pre-release plastic packaging of MEMS and IMEMS devices. The method can include encapsulating the MEMS device in a transfer molded plastic package. Next, a perforation can be made in the package to provide access to the MEMS elements. The non-ablative material removal process can include wet etching, dry etching, mechanical machining, water jet cutting, and ultrasonic machining, or any combination thereof. Finally, the MEMS elements can be released by using either a wet etching or dry plasma etching process. The MEMS elements can be protected with a parylene protective coating. After releasing the MEMS elements, an anti-stiction coating can be applied. The perforating step can be applied to both sides of the device or package. A cover lid can be attached to the face of the package after releasing any MEMS elements. The cover lid can include a window for providing optical access. The method can be applied to any plastic packaged microelectronic device that requires access to the environment, including chemical, pressure, or temperature-sensitive microsensors; CCD chips, photocells, laser diodes, VCSEL's, and UV-EPROMS. The present method places the high-risk packaging steps ahead of the release of the fragile portions of the device. It also provides protection for the die in shipment between the molding house and the house that will release the MEMS elements and subsequently treat the surfaces.

Peterson, Kenneth A. (Albuquerque, NM); Conley, William R. (Tijeras, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

NETL: News Release - Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking Resurgence of Coal-Fired Power Plants Department of Energy Releases Updated Report Tracking Resurgence of Coal-Fired Power Plants Report Shows 151 Proposed and New Plants, 90 Gigawatts of Capacity by 2020 WASHINGTON, DC - A newly released Department of Energy report shows that many power producers are turning to coal as the most economic and abundant national resource for electricity generation. The report, titled Tracking New Coal-Fired Power Plants, was developed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide a snapshot of coal's resurgence in the generation of electric power. The report was derived from a database that NETL maintains to track proposals for new coal-fired power plants. Created in 2002, the database is updated quarterly as new information is released and cataloged. The results contained in the database are derived from information publicly available from a variety of tracking organizations and news groups.

229

Comparative Toxicity of Nanoparticulate CuO and ZnO to Soil Bacterial Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing industrial application of metal oxide Engineered Nano-Particles (ENPs) is likely to increase their environmental release to soils. While the potential of metal oxide ENPs as environmental toxicants has been shown, lack of suitable control treatments have compromised the power of many previous assessments. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of ENP (nano) forms of Zn and Cu oxides in two different soils by measuring their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. We could show a direct acute toxicity of nano-CuO acting on soil bacteria while the macroparticulate (bulk) form of CuO was not toxic. In comparison, CuSO4 was more toxic than either oxide form. Unlike Cu, all forms of Zn were toxic to soil bacteria, and the bulk-ZnO was more toxic than the nano-ZnO. The ZnSO4 addition was not consistently more toxic than the oxide forms. Consistently, we found a tight link between the dissolved concentration of metal in solution and the inhibition of bacterial growth. The inconsistent toxicological response between soils could be explained by different resulting concentrations of metals in soil solution. Our findings suggested that the principal mechanism of toxicity was dissolution of metal oxides and sulphates into a metal ion form known to be highly toxic to bacteria, and not a direct effect of nano-sized particles acting on bacteria. We propose that integrated efforts toward directly assessing bioavailable metal concentrations are more valuable than spending resources to reassess ecotoxicology of ENPs separately from

Johannes Rousk; Kathrin Ackermann; Simon F. Curling; Davey L. Jones

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies could provide an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. This analysis, however, does not take credit for the additional barrier and establishes only the total release fractions for bare unconfined intact commercial SNF assemblies, which may be conservatively applied to confined intact commercial I SNF assemblies.

J. Schulz

2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

Controlled release liquid dosage formulation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid dual coated dosage formulation sustained release pharmaceutic having substantial shelf life prior to ingestion is disclosed. A dual coating is applied over controlled release cores to form dosage forms and the coatings comprise fats melting at less than approximately 101.degree. F. overcoated with cellulose acetate phthalate or zein. The dual coated dosage forms are dispersed in a sugar based acidic liquid carrier such as high fructose corn syrup and display a shelf life of up to approximately at least 45 days while still retaining their release profiles following ingestion. Cellulose acetate phthalate coated dosage form cores can in addition be dispersed in aqueous liquids of pH <5.

Benton, Ben F. (Centerburg, OH); Gardner, David L. (Bellville, OH)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About On The Toxicity of Flame Retardants in Buildings and What Can Be Done About It Speaker(s): Arlene Blum Date: November 3, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: William Fisk Polystyrene, polyisocyanurate, and polyurethane are insulation materials that increase energy efficiency and whose use in buildings, especially energy efficient buildings, is growing rapidly. At the same time, the flame retardants currently in use with these materials are often chemicals that are known to be toxic or have not been adequately evaluated for their impact on human health and the environment. For example, all polystyrene foam insulation used in buildings is treated with HBCD, a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic flame retardant. The impacts of exposure to

233

ARM - Features and Releases Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive CenterFeaturesFeatures and Releases Archive Media Contact Lynne Roeder lynne-dot-roeder-at-pnnl-dot-gov @armnewsteam Field Notes Blog Topics Field Notes89 AGU 3 AMIE 10 ARM Aerial Facility 2 ARM Mobile Facility 1 6 ARM Mobile Facility 2 47 BAECC 1 BBOP 4 MAGIC 12 MC3E 17 SGP 2 STORMVEX 29 TCAP 3 Search News Search Blog News Center All Categories What's this? Social Media Guidance News Center All Categories Features and Releases Facility News Field Notes Blog feed Events feed Employment Research Highlights Data Announcements Education News Archive What's this? Social Media Guidance Features and Releases Archive 2013 Dec 30 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Nov 13 Research Flights Completed for Biomass Burning Field Campaign Nov 07 MAGIC Takes a Bow

234

Diffusion Models for Transient Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plume models were developed to predict the concentration due to a nonbuoyant release from a source whose strength decreases exponentially with time of a pollutant that reacts in the atmosphere at a first-order rate. Models were developed that ...

Thomas J. Overcamp

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final Green Zia Award Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plant P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 For Immediate Release WIPP Receives Green Zia Award for Environmental Excellence CARLSBAD, N.M., August 16, 2012- The Waste...

236

AEO2012 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2012 Early Release Overview Total U.S. consumption of liquid fuels, including both fossil fuels and biofuels, grows from 37.2 quadrillion Btu (19.2 million barrels per day)...

237

Hazard-free connection release.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fault-tolerant communication in a distributed system requires reliable connection management and message delivery. Reliable connection management includes the guarantee of hazard-free release, in which no… (more)

Walter, Jennifer E.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional...

239

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Press Releases | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases 2012 Press Releases December 10, 2012 Experiment Finds Ulcer Bug's Achilles' Heel (see Press Release) June 6, 2012 New secrets from "Bay of the Pirates" warship that sunk 2,300 years ago (see Press Release) March 5, 2012 X-rays Reveal How Soil Bacteria Carry Out Surprising Chemistry (see Press Release) 2011 Press Releases July 3, 2011 Researchers Decipher Protein Structure of Key Molecule in DNA Transcription System (see Press Release) June 30, 2011 X-rays Reveal Patterns in the Plumage of the First Birds (see Press Release) March 24, 2011 High-temperature Superconductor Spills Secret: A New Phase of Matter (see Press Release) March 23, 2011 First Image of Protein Residue in 50 Million Year Old Reptile Skin (see Press Release) 2010 Press Releases

243

Press Releases | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Press Releases Press Releases Press Releases provide information about what has been happening in and around Y-12. December 2013 B&W Y-12 donates 75,000 to Emory Valley...

244

Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency Release...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Environmental Protection Agency Release Fuel Economy Tool for Used Vehicles Energy Department and Environmental Protection Agency Release Fuel Economy Tool for Used Vehicles...

245

VEMAP Data Release, Dec. 13, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Release, Dec. 13 The ORNL DAAC announces the release of data from the VegetationEcosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP). VEMAP is an international project studying...

246

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

1 Release Date: July 8, 2011 | Next Release Date: June 2012 | Report Number: DOEEIA-0554(2011) Introduction This report presents the major assumptions of the National Energy...

247

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases The World's Largest Radar Laboratory New suite of scanning radars document life and death of clouds For Immediate Release: Thursday, December 8, 2011 Deployed in...

248

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Release Schedule: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2013)

249

Information Release Notice - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The test file will be automatically delivered to you when it is released at the scheduled test release times listed below.

250

CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-31, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate the chemical management against DOE policy, regulatory requirements. Primary attention will be given to activities governed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Hazard Communication Standards (29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59) and Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450). However, review of any activities for managing, storing, or using hazardous chemicals, pesticides, and toxic

251

CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 CRAD, Chemical Management Implementation - June 30, 2011 June 30, 2011 Chemical Management Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-31, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate the chemical management against DOE policy, regulatory requirements. Primary attention will be given to activities governed by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Hazard Communication Standards (29 CFR 1910.1200 and 29 CFR 1926.59) and Occupational Exposure to Chemicals in Laboratories (29 CFR 1910.1450). However, review of any activities for managing, storing, or using hazardous chemicals, pesticides, and toxic

252

Method for detecting toxic gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method capable of detecting low concentrations of a pollutant or other component in air or other gas, utilizing a combination of a heating filament having a catalytic surface of a noble metal for exposure to the gas and producing a derivative chemical product from the component, and an electrochemical sensor responsive to the derivative chemical product for providing a signal indicative of the product. At concentrations in the order of about 1-100 ppm of tetrachloroethylene, neither the heating filament nor the electrochemical sensor is individually capable of sensing the pollutant. In the combination, the heating filament converts the benzyl chloride to one or more derivative chemical products which may be detected by the electrochemical sensor.

Stetter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Zaromb, Solomon (Hinsdale, IL); Findlay, Jr., Melvin W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Intermedia transfer factors for fifteen toxic pollutants released to air basins in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary definition of the intermedia-transfer factors (ITFs). Methods are discussed for estimating these parameters in the absence of measured values, and the estimation errors inherent in these estimation methods are considered. A detailed summary is provided of measured and estimated ITF values for fifteen air contaminants. They include: 1,3 butadiene; cadmium; cellosolve; cellosolve acetate; chloroform; di-2-ethylhexylphthalate; 1,4-dioxame; hexachlorobenzene; inorganic arsenic; inorganic lead; nickel; tetrachloroethylene; toluene; toluene-2,4-diisocyanate; and 1,3-xylene. Recommendations are made regarding the expected value and variance in these values for use in exposure models.

McKone, T.E.; Daniels, J.I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chiao, F.F.; Hsieh, D.P.H. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Oxygen scavenger/metal passivator reduces corrosion, toxicity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haverhill Paper board, a Haverhill, MA manufacturer of recycled paperboard, generates about 120,000 lb/hr of 650 psi, 650/sup 0/F (superheated) steam. Boiler deposition and condensate return corrosion problems were always high on the list of things to avoid. A water treatment firm provided the solution with a recently developed oxygen scavenger. The new scavenger, a Chemical Processing Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November, 1986, p. 130), is a patented formulation containing methyl ethyl ketoxime (MEKO). The formulation is designed to provide protection comparable to hydrazine but without the toxicity concerns. Used in conjunction with the mechanical deaerator, MEKO scavenges the remaining 5-7 ppb of oxygen from the feed water, producing methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), N/sub 2/O, and water. High volatility gives it the ability to leave the boiler with the steam, protecting the entire generating system. MEKO also acts as a metal surface passivator, protecting iron surfaces from corrosion by forming passivated oxide films. In use since December, 1985, the MEKO-based oxygen scavenger has coupled with the other chemical and mechanical water treatment methods to maintain the boiler in operating condition. The MEKO is performing as well or better than the hydrazine at about the same cost - while avoiding the toxicity problem.

Barry, J.; Toy, D.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

Sneddon, Larry G.

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Choose building products that avoid toxic emissions. ... (PVC or vinyl) products have a wide range of chlorine that ... and also the plasticizers in ...

259

News Releases | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News & Awards News & Awards News Releases Honors & Awards News Features Advanced Materials Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials | News & Awards | News Releases News Releases 1-7 of 7 Results ORNL devises recipe to fine-tune diameter of silica rods December 16, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 16, 2013 - By controlling the temperature of silica rods as they grow, researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory could be setting the stage for advances in anti-reflective solar cells, computer monitors, TV screens, eye glasses and more. ORNL's Bruce Pint elected 2014 NACE fellow December 13, 2013 - OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 13, 2013 - Bruce Pint, a research staff member at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been elected a 2014 National Association of Corrosion

260

Five LBA Data Sets Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use-Land Change Data Sets Released Use-Land Change Data Sets Released The ORNL DAAC and the LBA DIS announce the release of three data sets from the Land Use-Land Change teams, components of the LBA-ECO Large Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). LBA-ECO LC-09 Land Cover Transitions Maps for Study Sites in Para, Brazil: 1970-2001 . Data set prepared by E.S. Brondizio and E.F. Moran. This data set includes classified land cover transition maps at 30-m resolution derived from Landsat TM, MSS, ETM+ imagery and aerial photos of Altamira, Santarem, and Ponta de Pedras, in the state of Para, Brazil. The Landsat images were classified into several types of land use and subjected to change detection analysis to create transition matrices of land cover change. LBA-ECO LC-22 Post-deforestation Land Use, Mato Grosso, Brazil:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SAFARI 2000 Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Set Released Set Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "SAFARI 2000 MISR Level 2 Data, Southern Africa, Dry Season 2000". This data set is a product of the Southern African Regional Science Initiative containing 240 HDF-EOS formatted MISR Level 2 Top-of-Atmosphere/Cloud and Aerosol/Surface Products focused in a southern African study area which includes: Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The MISR Level 2 Products are geophysical measurements derived from the Level 1B2 data which consists of parameters that have been geometrically corrected and projected to a standard map grid. The products are in swaths, each derived from a single MISR orbit, where the imagery is 360 km wide and

262

Two Ecosystem Demography Models Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecosystem Demography Models Released Ecosystem Demography Models Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of two Ecosystem Demography Models: Ecosystem Demography Model: U.S. Ecosystem Carbon Stocks and Fluxes, 1700-1990 . Data set prepared by G. Hurtt, S.W. Pacala, P.R. Moorcroft, J. Caspersen, E. Shevliakova, R.A. Houghton, B. Moore III, and J. Fisk. This model product contains the source code for the Ecosystem Demography Model (ED version 1.0) as well as model input and output data files for the conterminous United States. The ED is a mechanistic ecosystem model built around established sub-models of leaf level physiology, organic matter decomposition, hydrology, and functional biodiversity. It was used herein to estimate ecosystem carbon stocks and fluxes in the conterminous U.S. at

263

ORNL DAAC: Amazon Data Release  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amazon Data Released Amazon Data Released The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set associated with the LBA-ECO component of the Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (LBA). The data set "LBA-ECO CD-07 GOES-8 L3 Gridded Surface Radiation and Rain Rate for Amazonia: 1999" contains surface down-welling solar radiation, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and infrared radiation, as well as precipitation rates for the LBA study area at 8x8-km and half-hourly resolutions. The data cover the time periods March 1, 1999 - April 30, 1999, and September 1, 1999 - October 31, 1999. LBA is an international research initiative under the leadership of Brazil. The project focuses on the climatological, ecological, biogeochemical, and hydrological functions of Amazonia; the impact of land use change on these

264

doi:10.1155/2012/460508 Review Article Mercury Toxicity and Treatment: A Review of the Literature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2012 Robin A. Bernhoft. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Mercury is a toxic heavy metal which is widely dispersed in nature. Most human exposure results from fish consumption or dental amalgam. Mercury occurs in several chemical forms, with complex pharmacokinetics. Mercury is capable of inducing a wide range of clinical presentations. Diagnosis of mercury toxicity can be challenging but can be obtained with reasonable reliability. Effective therapies for clinical toxicity have been described. 1.

Robin A. Bernhoft

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

EM Recovery Act Press Releases  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

press-releases Office of Environmental press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility http://energy.gov/em/articles/idaho-site-completes-demolition-cold-war-era-nuclear-fuel-reprocessing Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility

266

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic energies of a few electron volts. Most studies of chemical kinetics made by traditional thermochemical. It is obvious that while some methods of theoretical chemical kinetics (for instance, "absolute" rate theory

Zare, Richard N.

267

Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Laser induced chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences Division of theINFRARED LASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

Orel, Ann E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 6771 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 181 2001 67­71 www.elsevier.comrlocaterchemgeo Hydrogen-isotope analysis Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Hydrogen; Isotopes; Organic; Toxic materials; Water 1. Introduction Hydrogen-isotope analysis of potentially haz- ardous organic materials is problematic. Conti

Edwards, Thomas W.D.

270

Draft Guidance: Response, Remediation, and Recovery Checklist for Chemically Contaminated Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A key part of preparedness in the event of a chemical warfare agent (CWA) or toxic industrial chemical (TIC) release at a large facility, such as an airport or subway, is to develop a concept of operations that allows for an effective incident response and recovery. This document is intended as a component of the concept of operations and will be used in the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) as a decision tool for the Unified Command (UC). The Checklist for Facility Response, Remediation, and Recovery presented in this document is principally focused on the Consequence Management Phase (see Figure 1; LLNL 2007a and 2007b) of a chemical release. Information in this document conforms to the National Response Plan (NRP) (DHS 2004) and the National Incident Management System (NIMS 2004). Under these two guidance documents, personnel responsible for managing chemical response and recovery efforts--that is, the decision-makers--are members of an Incident Command (IC), which is likely to transition to a UC in the event of a CWA or TIC attack. A UC is created when more than one agency has incident jurisdiction or when incidents cross political jurisdictions. The location for primary, tactical-level command and management is referred to as the Incident Command Post (ICP), as described in the NRP. Thus, regardless of whether an IC or a UC is used, the responsible entities are located at an ICP. Agencies work together through designated members of the UC to establish their designated Incident Commanders at a single ICP and to establish a common set of objectives and strategies and a single Incident Action Plan. Initially during the Crisis Management Phase (see Figure 1), the Incident Commander is likely to be the Chief of the fire department that serves the affected facility. As life-safety issues are resolved and the Crisis Management Phase shifts to the Consequence Management Phase, the work of characterization, decontamination, and facility clearance begins. There will likely be a coincident transition in organizational structure as well, and new remediation-focused groups, units, and personnel will be added as remediation needs are anticipated. In most cases, a UC would be formed, if not formed already, to direct the cleanup process jointly and to take ultimate responsibility for all cleanup decisions. The UC would likely include the Transportation Facility Manager or Emergency Operations Manager; representatives from state and local public health, environmental, and emergency management agencies; and Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Raber, E; Mancieri, S; Carlsen, T; Fish, C; Hirabayashi-Dethier, J; Intrepido, A; MacQueen, D; Michalik, R; Richards, J

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

271

Planning and Facilitating Release Retrospectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fundamental principles in Agile methods is to have feedback loops so that the team and organization can be learning and improving their approach to accomplishing goals. As a Scrum Master, I found lots of resources on short feedback loops from ... Keywords: Retrospective, Release, Agile

Michael Maham

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Exhibitor: MURLIN CHEMICAL INC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Murlin Chemical, Inc. manufactures Bone Ash at its plant located in West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania, USA. Established in 1978, Murlin Chemical supplies ...

273

Efficieny handling effluent gases through chemical scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

This paper is presented as an information source for efficiencies of chemical scrubbing. In it, we will discuss the specific problems of scrubbing silane, disilane, diborane, phosphine, hydrogen selenide and arsine. We will explain the scrubber dynamics, gases and flow rates used along with liquid mediums. The equipment and procedures used for testing, as well as the determination of the results, will be discussed. We intend to give examples of possible reactions and documentation of our efficiencies. Installation and maintenance will be touched, as well as our experiments into accidental catastrophic releases. From all of this we will derive conclusions as to the best possible means of wet chemical scrubbing.

Herman, T.; Soden, S.

1988-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 148 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 2 consists of seven appendices containing the following: Tasking memorandums; Project plan for the CSV Review; Field verification guide for the CSV Review; Field verification report, Lawrence Livermore National Lab.; Field verification report, Oak Ridge Reservation; Field verification report, Savannah River Site; and the Field verification report, Hanford Site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Chemical Safety Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Home Chemical Safety Topical Committee Library Program Contacts Related Links Site Map Tools 2013 Chemical Safety Workshop Archived Workshops Contact Us Health and Safety HSS Logo Chemical Safety Program logo The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Chemical Safety web pages provide a forum for the exchange of best practices, lessons learned, and guidance in the area of chemical management. This page is supported by the Chemical Safety Topical Committee which was formed to identify chemical safety-related issues of concern to the DOE and pursue solutions to issues identified. Noteworthy products are the Chemical Management Handbooks and the Chemical Lifecycle Cost Analysis Tool, found under the TOOLS menu. Chemical Management Handbook Vol (1) Chemical Management Handbook Vol (2)

276

released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Arctic algae, a cereal crop whose genetic code is nearly equivalent to sequencing two full human genomes, and microbial communities in deep- sea hydrothermal vents are among the 35 projects selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI) for its 2011 Community Sequencing Program (CSP) to be character- ized for bioenergy and environ- mental applications. Enabling scientists from universities and national labo- ratories around the world to probe the hidden world of microbes and plants to meet the DOE missions of bioenergy, carbon cycling and biogeo- chemistry, this year's CSP portfolio is composed mostly of large-scale projects, which DOE JGI Director Eddy Rubin said was in keeping with the facility's mission of large-scale genomics and analysis. "Advances in sequencing technologies are really chang- ing the landscape and have dramatically

277

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 17, 2008 November 17, 2008 DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration Atlas New Version Provides Additional Information on Carbon Dioxide Storage 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas II WASHINGTON, D. C.- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of its second Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada, which documents more than 3,500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential in oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams, and saline formations. Preliminary estimates suggest the availability of more than 1,100 years of CO2 storage for the United States and Canada in these geologic formations. "In the year since it was first published, the carbon sequestration atlas has proven to be an invaluable tool to the entire sequestration community," said Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy James Slutz. "The second edition will bolster our efforts to find environmentally sound, cost-effective methods to sequester carbon dioxide."

278

NETL: News Release -Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7, 2007 7, 2007 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 WASHINGTON, DC - The Treasury Department and the Department of Energy (DOE) released today new instructions for applying for the tax credits for advanced coal projects and gasification projects. The new instructions provide additional time to submit applications for the credits. For the 2007-2008 allocation round, applications for DOE certification are not due to the Energy Department until October 31, 2007. "To further advance our nation's energy security, this Administration had made sustained investments in research, development, and wider use of advanced coal technologies a priority," Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell said. "Through new and innovative programs such as the Clean Coal Power Initiative and FutureGen demonstration, private sector partnerships, and use of tax credits and loan guarantees, the Department of Energy is advancing research to further develop and deploy advanced coal technologies to meet growing energy demand."

279

NETL: News Release - DOE Releases Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 4, 2007 October 4, 2007 DOE Releases Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for CCPI Round 3 Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has released for public comment the draft Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), Model Cooperative Agreement, and Model Payment Agreement for Round 3 of the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). CCPI invites private industries to partner with Government to demonstrate new clean coal technologies at commercial scale. MORE INFO Read the Draft FOA Register for the Public Workshop [beginning 10.05.07] The draft FOA allows interested parties to voice concerns and seek answers to questions regarding the cost-shared partnership. The public comment period begins immediately and continues through November 9, 2007. In addition, a public meeting will be held on November 1, 2007, at the Hyatt

280

Chemical Sensors for the Detection of Chlorine and Nitrogen Trichloride at ppb Level  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The control of air quality is of great importance, in particular for the protection of the workers who can be exposed to toxic gas. The present work reports the development of new chemical sensors for the detection of halogenated gases. These sensors ... Keywords: chemical sensors, chlorine, nitrogen trichloride, tribromide ion, sol-gel process, UV-Visible absorption

Julien Garcia; Thi-Dinh Nguyen; Thu-Hoa Tran-Thi; Anne-Marie Laurent

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Disposal Matrix Type of Chemical University-related Waste Personal Waste Batteries, used or unwanted including lithium, alkaline, lead ­ acid or lithium aluminum hydride Chemical Waste Check Disposal of Toxics website for disposal options or Take to Bookstore Biological Waste Biological Waste Residential

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

282

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AEO2013 Early Release Overview AEO2013 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 5, 2012 | Report Release Schedule: April 15 - May 2, 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2013) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2013 will be released between April 15 and May 2. See release schedule. . Download the AEO2013 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2013 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2013 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2012 Reference case

283

NIST Releases Successor to Venerable Handbook of Math ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Releases Successor to Venerable Handbook of Math Functions. For Immediate Release: May 11, 2010. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Chapter 13. Chemical Kinetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of chemical reactions. · Only gases, for which the kinetic theory of Chapter 4 is applicable, are consideredChapter 13. Chemical Kinetics #12;· Why do some chemical reactions proceed with lighting speed when the way in which molecules combine to form products? · All of these questions involve chemical kinetics

Ihee, Hyotcherl

285

and Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biological and Chemical Engineering Building #12;2 Biological and Chemical Engineering Building sta is constructing a new building that will house the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department and Chemical Engineering Building will provide critically needed space for innovators in multiple disciplines

Prinz, Friedrich B.

286

Chemical Sciences Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Development of Measurements and Standards for Biofuels; Chemical Metrology in Support of the US Hydrogen Infrastructure; ...

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of Sediment Toxicity Using a Suite of Assessment Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate characterization of risk of adverse ecological effects related to contaminated sediment presents a particularly difficult challenge. A series of studies has been conducted to investigate the utility of various tools for assessment of sediment toxicity. The goal of this research was to provide information which could help increase the accuracy with which predictions of toxicity could be made at hazardous sites. A calibration study was conducted using model PAHs, PCBs, a binary PAH mixture and a coal-tar mixture. This study was a collaborative effort among five university-based Superfund Research Programs (SRPs). Each program, with the help of funding through the NIEHS Superfund Research Program, has developed a chemical-class specific assay to estimate toxicity of contaminants in sediment. This suite of bioassays expands the range of data typically obtained through the use of standard aquatic toxicity assays. A series of caged in situ exposure studies has been conducted using juvenile Chinook salmon and Pacific staghorn sculpin in the Lower Duwamish Waterway. The study aimed to investigate the utility of selected biomarkers in evaluating the relationship between contaminants present in environmental samples and response in receptors following an in situ caged exposure. Results found that DNA adducts detected in exposed fish were significantly higher than controls in 2004 and 2006, and DNA adducts appear to be a reliable indicator of exposure, although no dose-response relationship was present. Western blot analysis of CYP1A1 was not indicative of exposure levels. The final study conducted was concerned with evaluating the utility of using solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers in situ to evaluate contaminated sediment. Levels of PAHs and PCBs in sediment often exceeded sediment quality guidelines; however, results from aquatic toxicity bioassays using Hyalella azteca were mostly negative, thus levels of contaminants detected on SPME fibers could not be associated with adverse effects in Hyalella. However, regression analysis of total PAHs present in sediment and levels of PAHs detected in porewater SPME fiber samplers, which were placed 5 cm into the sediment for 30 days, revealed a strongly correlated linear relationship (R2 = .779). Normalization of the sediment data to total organic carbon was performed to determine if the trend would remain present, and the linear relationship was again confirmed (R2 =.709).

Kelley, Matthew A

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

About Chemical Hazards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Hazards Chemical Hazards What Is a Chemical Hazard? chemical hazards.jpg A chemical hazard is any substance that can cause harm, primarily to people. Chemicals of all kinds are stored in our homes and can result in serious injuries if not properly handled. Household items such as bleach can result in harmful chlorine gas or hydrochloric acid if carelessly used. Gasoline fumes from containers for lawnmowers or boats can result in major health hazards if inhaled. DOE Oak Ridge uses thousands of chemicals in its varied research and other operations. New chemicals are or can be created as a result of the research or other activities. DOE follows national safety requirements in storing and handling these chemicals to minimize the risk of injuries from its chemical usage. However, accidents can occur despite careful attention to proper handling and storage procedures.

289

Toward a New U.S. Chemicals Policy: Rebuilding the Foundation to Advance New Science, Green Chemistry, and Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Programs. GAO-05-746R. Washington, DC:U.S. GovernmentToxic Chemicals (GAO-07-825). Washington, DC:U.S. GovernmentAn Update. GAO-09-271. Washington, DC:U.S. Government

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

NREL: News - Release Archives 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version News Release Archives 2009 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 23, 2009 New NREL Web Site Helps Campuses Go Green The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Cornell University have launched a Web site to help campus-based institutions develop clean energy and carbon-reduction strategies. December 22, 2009 NREL Evaluates UPS Hybrid-Electric Van Performance The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has collected and analyzed fuel economy, maintenance and other

291

BOREAS Release, Oct. 15, 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oct. 15 Oct. 15 Six new data sets from the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) were released by the ORNL DAAC on October 15, 1999. The release brings the total number to 186 data sets currently available. The newest data are related to hydrology, remote sensing, and background measurements (called "staff science"): BOREAS HYD-09 Hourly and Daily Radar Rainfall Maps for the Southern Study Area - Radar data that can be used to construct hourly and daily rainfall maps. BOREAS RSS-02 Extracted Reflectance Factors Derived from ASAS Imagery - Reflectance factors for small homogeneous areas around ground measurement sites, derived from remote sensing imagery. BOREAS Daedalus TMS Level-0 Imagery Digital Counts in BIL Format - Remotely sensed images showing radiant energy in the visible,

292

NREL: News - Release Archives 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version News Release Archives 2008 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 11, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center Creates New Tool to Calculate Ways to Cut Gas Use A business owner with a fleet of 10 heavy-duty diesel trucks wants to cut diesel use by 10 percent. Would using a biodiesel blend or investing in onboard power sources that reduce engine idling achieve the biggest drop in petroleum use? An average driver, using 600 gallons of gas a year in a typical sedan, wants to reduce gas consumption by 20 percent. Would using

293

AEO2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 10 Early Release Overview December 2009 Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO- 2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and com- pared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 2009 1 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties in- herent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market trans- formation, or active changes in legislation, the refer- ence case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is re- leased in order to gain perspective on how variations

294

Recommended plutonium release fractions from postulated fires. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was written at the request of EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. in support of joint emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) by EG&G and the State of Colorado. The intent of the report is to provide the State of Colorado with an independent assessment of any respirable plutonium releases that might occur in the event of a severe fire at the plant. Fire releases of plutonium are of interest because they have been used by EG&G to determine the RFP emergency planning zones. These zones are based on the maximum credible accident (MCA) described in the RFP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) of 1980, that MCA is assumed to be a large airplane crashing into a RFP plutonium building.The objective of this report was first, to perform a worldwide literature review of relevant release experiments from 1960 to the present and to summarize those findings, and second, to provide recommendations for application of the experimental data to fire release analyses at Rocky Flats. The latter step requires translation between experimental and expected RFP accident parameters, or ``scaling.`` The parameters of particular concern are: quantities of material, environmental parameters such as the intensity of a fire, and the physico-chemical forms of the plutonium. The latter include plutonium metal, bulk plutonium oxide powder, combustible and noncombustible wastes contaminated with plutonium oxide powder, and residues from plutonium extraction processes.

Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Reevaluation of 1999 Health-Based Environmental Screening Levels (HBESLs) for Chemical Warfare Agents  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates whether new information and updated scientific models require that changes be made to previously published health-based environmental soil screening levels (HBESLs) and associated environmental fate/breakdown information for chemical warfare agents (USACHPPM 1999). Specifically, the present evaluation describes and compares changes that have been made since 1999 to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) risk assessment models, EPA exposure assumptions, as well as to specific chemical warfare agent parameters (e.g., toxicity values). Comparison was made between screening value estimates recalculated with current assumptions and earlier health-based environmental screening levels presented in 1999. The chemical warfare agents evaluated include the G-series and VX nerve agents and the vesicants sulfur mustard (agent HD) and Lewisite (agent L). In addition, key degradation products of these agents were also evaluated. Study findings indicate that the combined effect of updates and/or changes to EPA risk models, EPA default exposure parameters, and certain chemical warfare agent toxicity criteria does not result in significant alteration to the USACHPPM (1999) health-based environmental screening level estimates for the G-series and VX nerve agents or the vesicant agents HD and L. Given that EPA's final position on separate Tier 1 screening levels for indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments has not yet been released as of May 2007, the study authors find that the 1999 screening level estimates (see Table ES.1) are still appropriate and protective for screening residential as well as nonresidential sites. As such, risk management decisions made on the basis of USACHPPM (1999) recommendations do not require reconsideration. While the 1999 HBESL values are appropriate for continued use as general screening criteria, the updated '2007' estimates (presented below) that follow the new EPA protocols currently under development are also protective. When EPA finalizes and documents a position on the matter of indoor and outdoor worker screening assessments, site-specific risk assessments should make use of modified models and criteria. Screening values such as those presented in this report may be used to assess soil or other porous media to determine whether chemical warfare agent contamination is present as part of initial site investigations (whether due to intentional or accidental releases) and to determine whether weather/decontamination has adequately mitigated the presence of agent residual to below levels of concern. However, despite the availability of scientifically supported health-based criteria, there are significant resources needs that should be considered during sample planning. In particular, few analytical laboratories are likely to be able to meet these screening levels. Analyses will take time and usually have limited confidence at these concentrations. Therefore, and particularly for the more volatile agents, soil/destructive samples of porous media should be limited and instead enhanced with headspace monitoring and presence-absence wipe sampling.

Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL; Dolislager, Fredrick G [ORNL

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AEO2013 continues to model the implementation of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards ... Electricity generation from nuclear power plants grows by 14 percent in ...

297

Chemical Analysis News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Save the Date for the free Emerging Trends in Synthetic Drugs ... NIST Measurements May Help Optimize Organic Solar Cells Release Date: 03/06 ...

2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

298

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stories and Releases Taking the Heat in the U.S. Great Plains When the National Weather Service released their predictions for the summer of 2013, it was difficult to miss...

299

BigFoot Data Set Released  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Meteorological Data Set Released The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of a data set associated with The BigFoot project: BIGFOOT Meteorological Data for North and South...

300

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AEO2014 Early Release Overview AEO2014 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2013 | Full Report Release Date: Early Spring 2014 | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2014) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The AEO2014 full version will be released early Spring 2014. Download the AEO2014 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2014 Reference case, the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview presents the AEO2014 Reference case and compares it with the AEO2013 Reference case

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases Mobile Apps to Users NERSC Releases Mobile Apps to Users Job Status, MOTD and Pilot of VASP Submission Available with More to Come April 23, 2012 In an effort to make...

302

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Chemicals--Safety measures. 3. Hazardous wastes. I. National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Prudent) produced two major reports on laboratory safety and laboratory waste disposal: Prudent Practices Nanomaterials, 77 4.G Biohazards, 79 4.H Hazards from Radioactivity, 79 5 Management of Chemicals 83 5.A

Tai, Yu-Chong

303

Chemical Reference Data Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Reference Data Group. Welcome. The Chemical Reference Data Group compiles, evaluates, correlates and measures ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Estimating Contaminant Release Concentrations from Hanford ...  

& Transport Model Long-Term Performance Assessment ... sludge provide upper limit on future releases. 9 Metals Concentrations in Hanford Tank ...

305

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): News Releases...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trek: Into Darkness" (5162013) Renewable energy demonstration project (5142013) LLNL announces voluntary separation program (582013) RFI released for Livermore Valley...

306

Chemical Management (Vol. 2 of 3)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i TS DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 AUGUST 2006 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 2 of 3) Chemical Safety and Lifecycle Management U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site http://standards.doe.gov DOE-HDBK-1139/2-2006 iii Foreword During the last several years, the Department of Energy (DOE) complex has averaged one chemical incident per day. DOE considers this rate to be unacceptable. In an effort to address

307

CHANGING RELEASE CRITERIA FROM PAST TO PRESENT  

SciTech Connect

Beginning with the decommissioning of nuclear power plants the release, criteria for radioactive materials has gained importance significantly. After decommissioning and dismantling, most of the residues need not be treated as radioactive waste, since they contain only small amounts of radioactivity. The Karlsruhe Research Center already dismantled two research reactors completely (the Karlstein Super Heated Steam Reactor and the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant), while several additional decommissioning projects are currently in progress. About 70 % of the total waste mass within each project can be released from the area of atomic regulations and licenses. At the Niederaichbach and Karlstein sites the release procedures and the release criteria were determined in the decommissioning license, where issues such as controlling and release values were fixed. Additionally, each step of the release process has to be coordinated with the regulator. Today the general release criteria are contained in the atomic act. Depending on the nature of the material to be released (e.g. building structures or metallic waste), and depending on the further use of the material, such as unrestricted reuse or waste disposal, release values for each nuclide are established. To prepare the release of materials, a release plan including the release measurement results is sent to the regulator, who has to officially approve the concept.

Graf, A.; Valencia, L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

THE RAVE CATALOG OF STELLAR ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES: FIRST DATA RELEASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present chemical elemental abundances for 36,561 stars observed by the RAdial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), an ambitious spectroscopic survey of our Galaxy at Galactic latitudes |b| > 25 Degree-Sign and with magnitudes in the range 9 pipeline in which the curve of growth of individual lines is obtained from a library of absorption line equivalent widths to construct a model spectrum that is then matched to the observed spectrum via a {chi}{sup 2} minimization technique. We plan to extend this pipeline to include estimates for other elements, such as oxygen and sulfur, in future data releases.

Boeche, C.; Williams, M.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Siebert, A.; Bienayme, O. [Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Fulbright, J. P.; Ruchti, G. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bland-Hawthorn, J. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics A28, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Campbell, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States); Freeman, K. C. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australia National University, Weston Creek, Canberra ACT 2611 (Australia); Gibson, B. K. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute, University of Central Lancashire, Preston PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Gilmore, G. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Grebel, E. K. [Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum fuer Astronomie der Universitaet Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Helmi, A. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Munari, U. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Asiago I-36012 (Italy); Navarro, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Parker, Q. A.; Reid, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Seabroke, G. M. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury, St. Mary RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); and others

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

NREL: News - Release Archives 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 21, 2004 NREL Recognizes Solar Pioneer with National Honor November 23, 2004 NREL Recognizes Solar Pioneer with National Honor November 17, 2004 Basalt Middle School Teacher Recognized for Renewable Energy Efforts October 5, 2004 NREL Theorist Recognized for Highest Citation Impact September 24, 2004 NREL Selects Contractor for New Science & Technology Facility August 26, 2004 NREL Praised for Efforts in Sustainable Pollution Prevention August 19, 2004 FLC Recognizes Laboratory's Technology Transfer Activities

310

Application of leaching tests for toxicity evaluation of coal fly ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The toxic properties of coal fly ash samples obtained from various coal combustion power plants were evaluated in this work using physicochemical analyses and bioassays. Physicochemical analyses showed that heavy metals present in solid samples included Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn. The results of the chemical analysis of eluates deduced by the application of standard leaching tests according to EN 12457-2 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) methods indicated that the compounds contained in fly ashes could potentially be transferred to the liquid phase depending upon the leaching method used. Heavy metal concentrations were higher in TCLP eluates, indicating that the initial pH value of the leaching medium significantly affected the transfer of these elements to the liquid phase. Tests conducted with the photobacterium Vibrio fischeri (Microtox test), the crustacean Daphnia magna, and the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus were used to assess toxicity of eluates obtained by both leaching tests. Daphnia magna was the most sensitive test organism. The EN 12457-2 method proved to be more reliable for toxicity evaluation of eluates. In contrast, the TCLP method showed some interference owing to acetic acid toxicity, and precipitation occurred after pH adjustment of eluates from acid to neutral range. The toxicity of both fly ashes and the corresponding solid leaching residues of EN 12457-2 and TCLP leaching tests was also measured using the Microtox Basic Solid phase Test. The results generated with this bioassay indicated that toxicity was greatly influenced by the pH status of the solid samples.

Tsiridis, V.; Samaras, P.; Kungolos, A.; Sakellaropoullos, G.P. [Technological Educational Institute for West Macedonia, Kozani (Greece). Dept. for Pollution Control Technology

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Application of Chemically Accelerated Biotreatment to Reduce Risk in Oil-Impacted Soils  

SciTech Connect

Research was conducted in six major focus areas: (1) Evaluation of the process using 6 test soils with full chemical and physical characteristics to determine controlling factors for biodegradation and chemical oxidation; (2) Determination of the sequestration time on chemical treatment suspectability; (3) Risk factors, i.e. toxicity after chemical and biological treatment; (4) Impact of chemical treatment (Fenton's Reagent) on the agents of biodegradation; (5) Description of a new genus and its type species that degrades hydrocarbons; and (6) Intermediates generate from Fenton's reagent treatment of various polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons.

Paterek, J.R.; Bogan, W.W.; Sirivedhin; Tanita

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Short History of Hanford Waste Generation, Storage, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nine nuclear reactors and four reprocessing plants at Hanford produced nearly two-thirds of the plutonium used in the United States for government purposes . These site operations also created large volumes of radioactive and chemical waste. Some contaminants were released into the environment, exposing people who lived downwind and downstream. Other contaminants were stored. The last reactor was shut down in 1987, and the last reprocessing plant closed in 1990. Most of the human-made radioactivity and about half of the chemicals remaining onsite are kept in underground tanks and surface facilities. The rest exists in the soil, groundwater, and burial grounds. Hanford contains about 40% of all the radioactivity that exists across the nuclear weapons complex. Today, environmental restoration activities are under way.

Gephart, Roy E.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

314

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of ChemicalD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description of chemical engineering: "chemical engineers seek to understand, manipulate, and control the molecular basis

Collins, Gary S.

315

Chemical Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... spectroscopy. Ultrafast lasers are used to … more. >> see all Chemical Physics programs and projects ... *. Bookmark and Share. ...

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Chemical Sciences Division - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD Chemical Sciences Division CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Research Areas Research Highlights Organization Contacts Publications Awards Employment...

317

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

318

Chemical biology drug discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords Chemical biology drug discovery high-throughput screening protein ligands proteases novel chemical and biochemical methods for the identification and optimization of protein ligands us of pro- tein ligands. Results of this research are translated into protein-specific, chemical probes

SchĂĽler, Axel

319

Chemical engineering Research !!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical engineering Research !! www.chemeng.lth.se Updated August 2012 #12;WWT Fermentation University/Faculty of Engineering-LTH/Department of Chemical Engineering Membrane Group Ann-Sofi Jönsson More research projects. #12;Lund University/Faculty of Engineering-LTH/Department of Chemical Engineering

320

Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes University (Brigitte Servatius -- WPI) #12;Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites. Chemical Zeolites · crystalline solid · units: Si + 4O Si O O O O · two covalent bonds per oxygen #12

Servatius, Brigitte

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

CHEMICAL AND PAPER ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAFETY HANDBOOK For CHEMICAL AND PAPER ENGINEERING 2010-2011 #12;Page 1 Safety Guidelines Department of Chemical and Paper Engineering Miami University - Oxford, Ohio 45056 The following safety and Laboratory Coordinator Responsibilities III. Emergency Procedures IV. Chemical Storage V. Routine

Dollar, Anna

322

NREL: News - NREL Releases Renewable Energy Data Book Detailing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release NR-6113 NREL Releases Renewable Energy Data Book Detailing Growing Industry in 2012 November 21, 2013 The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has released the 2012...

323

CCE CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 VIII. Electrical Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IX. Hazardous Waste: Hazardous Chemicals Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Appendix B: Means of Lab Waste Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Appendix C: Where to put specific wastes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Appendix D

Elowitz, Michael

324

NREL: News - Release Archives 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 4, 2007 Energy Lab Sets Aggressive Greenhouse Gas Reduction Goal The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has pledged to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 75 percent from 2005 to 2009. The new goal is part of NREL's participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Climate Leaders program. November 8, 2007 Wakonda Technologies is the Clean Energy Entrepreneur of the Year A small company commercializing a novel solar energy technology has been

325

NREL: News - Release Archives 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 2003 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 22, 2003 Renewable Energy a Smart Choice for Farmers and Ranchers December 10, 2003 Georgia Tech's Rohatgi Wins Second Annual Rappaport Award December 9, 2003 Acclaim for Three Leaders at Annual NREL Stakeholders Reception November 14, 2003 World Renewable Energy Congress Provides International Forum November 12, 2003 NREL and Company Researchers Team Up on Thin-Film Solar Cells October 30, 2003 NREL's Art Nozik Elected AAAS Fellow October 21, 2003 Workshop Tackles Biological Hydrogen Production

326

NREL: News - Release Archives 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 News releases covering laboratory activities, scientific discoveries, projects and more are archived below, chronologically. For more information about NREL and its research in renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies, e-mail public_affairs@nrel.gov. December 14, 2006 Experimental "Wind to Hydrogen" System Up and Running Xcel Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory unveiled a unique facility that uses electricity from wind turbines to produce and store pure hydrogen. November 28, 2006 University of Denver High School Teacher Recognized for Commitment to Renewable Energy Don Cameron, physics and astronomy teacher at the University of Denver High School (DUHS), earned this year's Renewable Energy Teacher Award from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory's

327

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed. 13 figs.

Goldstein, A.H.; Rogers, R.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

Goldstein, Alan H. (Beverly Hills, CA); Rogers, Robert D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesfor a class of nonlinear chemical equations. SIAM J. Appl.to persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. , Ed. , Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. J. Chem.Łd. Amer/can Chemical Society. Easlon. PA. 18042. Vol. Lof Laboratory Safety. the Chemical Rubber Company Cleveland.

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

MODELING ATMOSPHERIC RELEASES OF TRITIUM FROM NUCLEAR INSTALLATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tritium source term analysis and the subsequent dispersion and consequence analyses supporting the safety documentation of Department of Energy nuclear facilities are especially sensitive to the applied software analysis methodology, input data and user assumptions. Three sequential areas in tritium accident analysis are examined in this study to illustrate where the analyst should exercise caution. Included are: (1) the development of a tritium oxide source term; (2) use of a full tritium dispersion model based on site-specific information to determine an appropriate deposition scaling factor for use in more simplified, broader modeling, and (3) derivation of a special tritium compound (STC) dose conversion factor for consequence analysis, consistent with the nature of the originating source material. It is recommended that unless supporting, defensible evidence is available to the contrary, the tritium release analyses should assume tritium oxide as the species released (or chemically transformed under accident's environment). Important exceptions include STC situations and laboratory-scale releases of hydrogen gas. In the modeling of the environmental transport, a full phenomenology model suggests that a deposition velocity of 0.5 cm/s is an appropriate value for environmental features of the Savannah River Site. This value is bounding for certain situations but non-conservative compared to the full model in others. Care should be exercised in choosing other factors such as the exposure time and the resuspension factor.

Okula, K

2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

333

NETL: News Release - DOE Releases Feasibility Study for Conceptual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21 , 2007 21 , 2007 DOE Releases Feasibility Study for Conceptual Coal-to-Liquids Facility in Midwest Report Outlines the Path Toward Future Domestic Energy Facilities WASHINGTON, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has issued a report that examines the feasibility of a commercial 50,000 barrel per day coal-to-liquids (CTL) facility in the Illinois coal basin. The conceptual design study provides a performance baseline that can be used to show how CTL could capitalize on domestic energy resources while providing a much-needed bulwark against rising petroleum and natural gas prices. The price of coal-derived liquid fuels has traditionally been unable to compete with the price of fuels derived from crude oil. As oil prices continue to rise, however, domestic sources of transportation fuels are becoming more affordable. The economic and national security concerns related to non-domestic liquid fuels have more eyes turning to alternative sources of liquid fuels, and, with coal being America's most abundant energy resource, CTL facilities may provide a winning option.

334

SRP radioactive waste releases. Startup through 1959  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes and documents radioactive waste released to the environs of the Savannah River Plant from startup through 1959. During this period, the quantity of beta-emitting radioisotopes released was determined by a total or ``gross`` analysis. However, advanced instrumentation and technology now permit an economical determination of most individual radionuclides. Therefore, future waste audit reports, beginning with January 1960, will record the quantity of specific radioisotopes released rather than gross amounts.

Ashley, C.

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

GROA AIRBORNE RELEASE DISPERSION FACTOR CALCULATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to calculate airborne release dispersion factors ({chi}/Q) for the surface and subsurface facilities at the Geological Repository Operations Area (GROA). The calculated {chi}/Q values may be used to estimate radiological consequences to workers for potential releases from normal operations and event sequences for License Application. The scope of this document is to provide estimates of {chi}/Q values at potential onsite receptors from facility releases, under normal operating conditions and event sequences.

J. Wang

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

336

Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline Absorption Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES 8. Absorption; chemical evolution Piet Piet van der Kruit, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute Absorption; chemical evolution #12;Outline Absorption Chemical evolution Outline Absorption Holmberg's analysis Analysis of Disney et al. Edge

Kruit, Piet van der

337

NETL: IEP - Mercury Emissions Control: News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Releases The following are links to various recent news stories related to mercury in the environment. These links are provided strictly as a convenience to the general...

338

NIST Releases Updates to Digital Signature Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has released a revision to the digital standard used to ensure the integrity of electronic ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

339

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Feature Stories and Releases Open House Draws Crowd to ARM Climate Research Facility Display Mild summer temperatures helped bring thousands of visitors through the gates of...

340

DOE National Laboratory Releases Annual Accomplishments Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Accomplishments Report June 2, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has released its annual accomplishments report,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Information Release Notice - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On February 22, 2010, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) will change the web addresses for key information releases in the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ...

342

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 26, 2012 Feature Stories and Releases Capturing Aerosol Evolution at Cape Cod From July 2012 to June 2013, nearly sixty instruments are obtaining atmospheric data from the...

343

Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Recent News Releases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Recent News Releases News Categories Science People Business News Archive Story Tips Story Tips Archive Audio Spots Technical Calendar ORNL in the News DOE Pulse About ORNL...

344

NNSA releases summary of Stockpile Stewardship experiments |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA...

345

NREL: Science and Technology - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosts its annual Industry Growth Forum. September 25, 2013 NREL Releases New Roadmap to Reducing Solar PV "Soft...

346

Louisiana Coastal Land Loss Video Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today, the U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center is pleased to announce the release of a new Louisiana coastal land loss video, ...

347

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 11, 2007 Feature Stories and Releases National User Facility Leads to Multidisciplinary Climate Research Contact: Lynne Roeder, ARM Public Information Officer,...

348

2012 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 70 Results Prev 12345 Next Supercomputers, materials and bears: ORNL marks eventful 2012 Supercomputers, materials and bears: ORNL marks eventful 2012...

349

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics.

350

NIST 'Catch and Release' Program Could Improve ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST 'Catch and Release' Program Could Improve Nanoparticle Safety Assessment. ... surface (left), the NIST team can apply a mild electric field and ...

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases Research Flights Completed for Biomass Burning Field Campaign Bookmark and Share The Gulstream-1 heads toward a smoke plume during a...

352

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collaboration with India Instrumented sites will gather data to study impact of aerosols on cloud formation and precipitation For Immediate Release: June 10, 2011 ARM Mobile...

353

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 31, 2008 Feature Stories and Releases Aerosols and Clouds: A Complex Climate Connection New data will help researchers examine cloud composition and resulting effects on...

354

SG Network System Requirements Specification- Interim Release...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specification- Interim Release 3 This document has been created to support NIST Smart Grid Interoperability Priority Action Plans (PAP) 1 & 2 and provide Utilities,...

355

Chemical Structure and Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2154-3 2154-3 UC-400 Annual Report 2000 Chemical Structure and Dynamics Steven D. Colson, Associate Director Robin S. McDowell, Program Manager and the Staff of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program April 2001 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Contents Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report Chemical Structure and Dynamics 2000 Annual Report 1. Introduction Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program......................................................... 1-3 2. Reaction Mechanisms at Liquid Interfaces Structure and Reactivity of Ice Surfaces and Interfaces G. A. Kimmel, Z. Dohnálek, K. P. Stevenson, R. S. Smith,

356

APPLICATION OF CHEMICALLY ACCELERATED BIOTREATMENT TO REDUCE RISKIN OIL-IMPACTED SOILS  

SciTech Connect

The drilling and operation of gas/petroleum exploratory wells and the operations of natural gas and petroleum production wells generate a number of waste materials that are usually stored and/or processed at the drilling/operations site. Contaminated soils result from drilling operations, production operations, and pipeline breaks or leaks where crude oil and petroleum products are released into the surrounding soil or sediments. In many cases, intrinsic biochemical remediation of these contaminated soils is either not effective or is too slow to be an acceptable approach. This project targeted petroleum-impacted soil and other wastes, such as soil contaminated by: accidental release of petroleum and natural gas-associated organic wastes from pipelines or during transport of crude oil or natural gas; production wastes (such as produced waters, and/or fuels or product gas). Our research evaluated the process designated Chemically-Accelerated Biotreatment (CAB) that can be applied to remediate contaminated matrices, either on-site or in situ. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) had previously developed a form of CAB for the remediation of hydrocarbons and metals at Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites and this research project expanded its application into Exploration and Production (E&P) sites. The CAB treatment was developed in this project using risk-based endpoints, a.k.a. environmentally acceptable endpoints (EAE) as the treatment goal. This goal was evaluated, compared, and correlated to traditional analytical methods (Gas Chromatography (GC), High Precision Liquid Chromatography (HPLC), or Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (CGMS)). This project proved that CAB can be applied to remediate E&P contaminated soils to EAE, i.e. those concentrations of chemical contaminants in soil below which there is no adverse affect to human health or the environment. Conventional approaches to risk assessment to determine ''how clean is clean'' for soils undergoing remediation have been based on total contaminant concentrations in soil, as determined by laboratory extraction methods that use vigorous physical and chemical procedures. Numerous data collected from bioavailability studies in this study and others carried out by GTI and other organizations conducted on contaminated soils and sediments continue to show that not all contaminants are available to environmental receptors including man or ecologically forms. In short, there exist fractions of contaminants in soil that cannot be released from the soil matrix by normal means. These sequestered contaminant fractions should not be considered a risk to human health or the environment. This project focused on CAB technology to treat soil contaminants to these acceptable levels. Therefore, the primary objective of this project was to determine what these contaminant levels are and to reach or exceed cleanup standards using CAB. These determinations were demonstrated and verified using toxicity and chemical mobility tests. Based on GTI's experience with a form of CAB for the remediation of soils at Manufactured Gas Plant sites, use of the technology demonstrated in this project could save the oil and gas industry an estimated $200 million to $500 million over the next ten years. The merging of CAB with the use of EAE for calibration and evaluation of treatment effectiveness addressed the following research objectives: (1) Determination of the kinetics of contaminant desorption and bioavailability; (2) Further development of CAB technology for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; (3) Finalization of the methods, procedures and processes needed to apply CAB technology using EAE; and (4) Verification of the applicability of EAE for the remediation of contaminated soils.

J.R. Paterek; W.W.Bogan; V. Trbovic; W. Sullivan

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions  

SciTech Connect

An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

Tschritter, Kenneth L. (Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Shepodd, Timothy J. (Livermore, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); DiBerardo, Raymond A. (Baltimore, MD)

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

359

ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING CORROSION TESTING  

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Corrosion Testing 3 Background: Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Process Treatment Tank Deposition Tank 3000 gpm Mixers Oxalic ...

360

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Safety Plan m Chemical$torase Guidelines Chemical Is Incompatible llll i With ii Hydrocarbons (such as butane, propane,

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Chemical Testing of Textiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Testing of Textiles is edited by Qinguo Fan and covers more subjects than the title implies. These subjects include fiber and yarn identification, ...

362

American Chemical Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. American Chemical Society (ACS). Purpose: Air and water mediate chemistry on Earth. ... Related Project(s): ACS. Details: ...

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

363

Apparatus for chemical synthesis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chemical Sciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& CENTERS RESEARCH STUDENT & POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITIES NEWS & EVENTS CSD CONTACTS LBNL HOME logo Privacy & Security Notice DOE UC Berkeley Chemical Sciences Division imagemap...

365

Chemical Name Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Enter a chemical species name or pattern: (eg, methane, *2-hexene); Select the desired units for thermodynamic data: SI calorie-based; ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Brookhaven Chemical Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Physics While the field of physics generally strives to find compact and universal explanations for how the components of our universe interact, chemistry is traditionally...

368

Chemicals from biomass: an assessment of the potential for production of chemical feedstocks from renewable resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This assessment of the potential for production of commodity chemicals from renewable biomass resources is based on (1) a Delphi study with 50 recognized authorities to identify key technical issues relevant to production of chemicals from biomass, and (2) a systems model based on linear programming for a commodity chemicals industry using renewable resources and coal as well as gas and petroleum-derived resources. Results from both parts of the assessment indicate that, in the absence of gas and petroleum, coal undoubtedly would be a major source of chemicals first, followed by biomass. The most attractive biomass resources are wood, agricultural residues, and sugar and starch crops. A reasonable approximation to the current product slate for the petrochemical industry could be manufactured using only renewable resources for feedstocks. Approximately 2.5 quads (10/sup 15/ Btu (1.055 x 10/sup 18/ joules)) per year of oil and gas would be released. Further use of biomass fuels in the industry could release up to an additional 1.5 quads. however, such an industry would be unprofitable under current economic conditions with existing or near-commercial technology. As fossil resources become more expensive and biotechnology becomes more efficient, the economics will be more favorable. Use of the chemicals industry model to evaluate process technologies is demonstrated. Processes are identified which have potential for significant added value to the system if process improvements can be made to improve the economics. Guidelines and recommendations for research and development programs to improve the attractiveness of chemicals from biomass are discussed.

Donaldson, T.L.; Culberson, O.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemical Management (Volume 3 of 3)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 April 2005 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2005 i This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. It is available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. It is available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161;

370

Fission Energy Release for 16 Fissioning Nuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of a study of fission energy releases and the components of this energy. Energy releases for primary isotopes, for which relatively good experimental quantities exist, were determined by a combination of mass-defect systematics and least-square fits with the experimental data. Only the systematic study was carried out for the remaining isotopes.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Selection of Hydrological Model for Waterborne Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This evaluation will aid in determining the potential impacts of liquid releases to downstream populations on the Savannah River. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the two available models and determine the appropriate model for use in following waterborne release analyses. Additionally, this report will document the Design Basis and Beyond Design Basis accidents to be used in the future study.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Chemical Plume Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of estimating a likelihood map for the location of the source of a chemical plume using an autonomous vehicle as a sensor probe in a fluid flow. The fluid flow is assumed to have a high Reynolds number. Therefore, the ... Keywords: Autonomous vehicles, Bayesian inference methods, chemical plume tracing, online mapping, online planning, plume source localization

Shuo Pang; J. A. Farrell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) This release is an abridged version of the Annual Energy Outlook that highlights changes in the AEO Reference case projections for key energy topics. The Early Release includes data tables for the Reference case only. The full AEO2011 will be released April 26, 2011. Download the AEO2011 Early Release Report Introduction In preparing the AEO2011, EIA evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2011 Reference case, which is presented and compared with the AEO2010 Reference case released in December 2009 (see Table 1). Because of the uncertainties inherent in any energy market projection, the Reference case results should not be viewed in

374

Environmental release summary (ERS) database CY 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the Environmental Release Summary (ERS) database. The current needs of the Effluent and Environmental database is continually modified to fulfill monitoring (EEM) program (managed by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Incorporated, Air and Water Services Organization). Changes are made to accurately calculate current releases, to affect how past releases are calculated. This document serves as a snap-shot of the database and software for the CY-1997 data and releases. This document contains all of the relevant data for calculating radioactive-airborne and liquid effluent. The ERS database is the official repository for the CY-1997 ERS release reports and the settings used to generate those reports. As part of the Tri-Party Agreement, FDH is committed to provide a hard copy of the ERS database for Washington State Department of Ecology, upon request. This document also serves as that hard copy for the last complete calendar year.

Gleckler, B.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

. . . . . . -- SRP RADIOACTIVE WASTE RELEASES S t a r t u p t h r o u g h 1 9 5 9 September 1 9 6 0 _- R E C O R D - W O R K S T E C H N I C A L D E P A R T M E N T 1 J. E. C o l e , W i l n i 1 4 W. P. 3ebbii 3 H. Worthington, Wilm 16 C. $?. P~.t-Lei-s~:; - 5 J. D. E l l e t t - 17 E. C. Morris 6 F. H. Endorf 19 3 . L. &tier 7 K. W. F r e n c h 20 bi. C . 3 e i n i g 8 J. K. Lower 2 1 2. 3 . 3 G : - x r 9 K. W. M i l l e t t 22 R . FJ . V 2 x 7 : W ~ ~ C k 1 c - 2 J. B. Tinker, W i h L-, i . c . E?-ens 4 W F i l e P. 3 . K t B U ? & J. A. Monier, Jr. 13. : . A. KcClesrer. 1 0 M. 2 . Wahl . - 23 C. Ashley C. W. J. Wende 24 T I S F i l e 11 J. W. Morris - 2s T'pC File D. E. Waters 26 P3D F i l e , 736-C R. B. Fenninger 33 V l ~ a l Records F i l e 12 W. P. Overbeck - 27 -23 P3D % x : r a Czpies P33 2e:ol.d C ~ p l *iB+ ' / - - & OF THIS DQCUMENT I S UNuMITEI) E. 1. ciu /'(I,\ 7' d

376

Enhanced Chemical Cleaning  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process and plan 3 Chemical Cleaning * Oxalic Acid can get tanks clean - Tank 16 set a standard in 1982 - Tanks 5-6 Bulk OA cleaning results under evaluation * However, the downstream flowsheet and financial impacts of handling the spent acid were unacceptable Before After Tank 16 Tank 16 4 Oxalic Acid Flowsheet Impacts Evap Sludge Washing Evap Feed/Drop Tank 8 Wt% Oxalic Acid Neutralization Tank Solids Liquid High oxalate concentration Negligible oxalate concentration * Oxalates from chemical cleaning impact salt processing * A process change was needed Evaporator Saltstone Vaults DWPF Filled Canisters 5 Vision * Eliminate the impacts to the Tank Farm

377

Modelling the chemical evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced observational facilities allow to trace back the chemical evolution of the Universe, on the one hand, from local objects of different ages and, secondly, by direct observations of redshifted objects. The chemical enrichment serves as one of the cornerstones of cosmological evolution. In order to understand this chemical evolution in morphologically different astrophysical objects models are constructed based on analytical descriptions or numerical methods. For the comparison of their chemical issues, as there are element abundances, gradients, and ratios, with observations not only the present-day values are used but also their temporal evolution from the first era of metal enrichment. Here we will provide some insight into basics of chemical evolution models, highlight advancements, and discuss a few applications.

Hensler, Gerhard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Speciality conference on: toxic substances in the air environment  

SciTech Connect

Papers presented are divided into the following categories: toxic substances legislation; arsenic; vinyl chloride; and emerging problems in toxic emission. Seven papers were abstracted and indexed individually for ERA/EDB. (JGB)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical engineering Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

Wang, Hai

380

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Enrollment by petition only. CHE 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor

Wang, Hai

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Acute and chronic toxicity of uranium compounds to Ceriodaphnia-Daphnia dubia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study to determine the acute and chronic toxicity of uranyl nitrate, hydrogen uranyl phosphate, and uranium dioxide to the organism Ceriodaphnia dubia was conducted. The toxicity tests were conducted by two independent environmental consulting laboratories. Part of the emphasis for this determination was based on concerns expressed by SCDHEC, which was concerned that a safety factor of 100 must be applied to the previous 1986 acute toxicity result of 0.22 mg/L for Daphnia pulex, This would have resulted in the LETF release limits being based on an instream concentration of 0.0022 mg/L uranium. The NPDES Permit renewal application to SCDHEC utilized the results of this study and recommended that the LETF release limit for uranium be based an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. This is based on the fact that the uranium releases from the M-Area LETF will be in the hydrogen uranyl phosphate form, or a uranyl phosphate complex at the pH (6--10) of the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility effluent stream, and at the pH of the receiving stream (5.5 to 7.0). Based on the chronic toxicity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate, a lower uranium concentration limit for the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility outfall vs. the existing NPDES permit was recommended: The current NPDES permit ``Guideline`` for uranium at outfall M-004 is 0.500 mg/L average and 1.0 mg/L maximum, at a design flowrate of 60 gpm. It was recommended that the uranium concentration at the M-004 outfall be reduced to 0.28 mg/L average, and 0.56 mg/L, maximum, and to reduce the design flowrate to 30 gpm. The 0.28 mg/L concentration will provide an instream concentration of 0.004 mg/L uranium. The 0.28 mg/L concentration at M-004 is based on the combined flows from A-014, A-015, and A-011 outfalls (since 1985) of 1840 gpm (2.65 MGD) and was the flow rate which was utilized in the 1988 NPDES permit renewal application.

Pickett, J.B.; Specht, W.L.; Keyes, J.L.

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Microwave-enhanced chemical processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for disposal of toxic wastes including chlorinated hydrocarbons, comprising, establishing a bed of non-metallic particulates having a high dielectric loss factor. Effecting intimate contact of the particulates and the toxic wastes at a temperature in excess of about 400.degree. C. in the presence of microwave radiation for a time sufficient to break the hydrocarbon chlorine bonds and provide detoxification values in excess of 80 and further detoxifying the bed followed by additional disposal of toxic wastes.

Varma, Ravi (Hinsdale, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail New Papers Indicate Climate Change May Intensify Chemical Risks Print E-mail Climate Change and Chemical Risks Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Featured by NIEHS a member of the U.S. Global Change Research Program Pesticides, air pollutants, and other contaminants could become increasingly harmful to human health due to climate change, according to a new series of papers published in Environmental Toxicology Chemistry (ET&C). The seven publications, which appeared in ET&C's January 2013 issue, present evidence that climate change could affect how chemicals are transported and cause toxicity in both ecosystems and people. These impacts could mean that chemical risk assessment practices will demand swift modification and adaptation. "Risk assessors and public health practitioners need to understand how climate change may alter chemical risks to people in the future," said one of the papers' lead authors John Balbus, M.D., who is leading the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences's (NIEHS) Global Environmental Health and Sustainable Development projects. "Existing data sources and assumptions used in exposure and risk assessment may not apply. Environmental health researchers and risk assessors will need to consider interactions between climate-related stressors and chemical stressors and other ways that future risks may be changing," he added.

384

Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. Volume 1 contains a discussion of the chemical safety improvements planned or already underway at DOE sites to correct facility or site-specific vulnerabilities. The main part of the report is a discussion of each of the programmatic deficiencies; a description of the tasks to be accomplished; the specific actions to be taken; and the organizational responsibilities for implementation.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Argonne Historical News Releases about Nuclear Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases Releases About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

386

Selection of Hydrological Model for Waterborne Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Following a request from the States of South Carolina and Georgia, downstream radiological consequences from postulated accidental aqueous releases at the three Savannah River Site nonreactor nuclear facilities will be examined. This evaluation will aid in determining the potential impacts of liquid releases to downstream populations on the Savannah River. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the two available models and determine the appropriate model for use in following waterborne release analyses. Additionally, this report will document the accidents to be used in the future study.

Blanchard, A.

1999-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Toxicity Data to Determine Refrigerant Concentration Limits  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews toxicity data, identifies sources for them, and presents resulting exposure limits for refrigerants for consideration by qualified parties in developing safety guides, standards, codes, and regulations. It outlines a method to calculate an acute toxicity exposure limit (ATEL) and from it a recommended refrigerant concentration limit (RCL) for emergency exposures. The report focuses on acute toxicity with particular attention to lethality, cardiac sensitization, anesthetic and central nervous system effects, and other escape-impairing effects. It addresses R-11, R-12, R-22, R-23, R-113, R-114, R-116, R-123, R-124, R-125, R-134, R-134a, R-E134, R-141b, R-142b, R-143a, R-152a, R-218, R-227ea, R-236fa, R-245ca, R-245fa, R-290, R-500, R-502, R-600a, R-717, and R-744. It summarizes additional data for R-14, R-115, R-170 (ethane), R-C318, R-600 (n-butane), and R-1270 (propylene) to enable calculation of limits for blends incorporating them. The report summarizes the data a nd related safety information, including classifications and flammability data. It also presents a series of tables with proposed ATEL and RCL concentrations-in dimensionless form and the latter also in both metric (SI) and inch-pound (IP) units of measure-for both the cited refrigerants and 66 zerotropic and azeotropic blends. They include common refrigerants, such as R-404A, R-407C, R-410A, and R-507A, as well as others in commercial or developmental status. Appendices provide profiles for the cited single-compound refrigerants and for R-500 and R-502 as well as narrative toxicity summaries for common refrigerants. The report includes an extensive set of references.

Calm, James M.

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Effect of pretreatment and additives on boron release during pyrolysis and gasification of coal  

SciTech Connect

Boron is one of the most toxic and highly volatile elements present in coal. As part of a series of studies carried out on coal cleaning to prevent environmental problems and to promote efficient coal utilization processes, the removal of boron by leaching with water and acetic acid has been investigated. The effects of the addition of ash components, that is, SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and CaO on the control of boron release during pyrolysis and gasification were investigated. Here, 20-70% of boron in coal was removed by leaching the coal with water and acetic acid. Boron leached by water and acetic acid was related to the volatiles released from coal in pyrolysis below 1173 K. The addition of ash components such as SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was found to be effective in suppressing the release of boron during pyrolysis at temperatures below and above 1173 K, respectively. The addition of CaO to coal was effective in suppressing the release of boron during gasification at 1173 K. 26 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Yuuki Mochizuki; Katsuyasu Sugawara; Yukio Enda [Akita University, Akita (Japan). Faculty of Engineering and Resources Science

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

391

Chemicals from coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter contains sections titled: Chemicals from Coke Oven Distillate; The Fischer-Tropsch Reaction; Coal Hydrogenation; Substitute Natural Gas (SNG); Synthesis Gas Technology; Calcium Carbide; Coal and the Environment; and Notes and References

Harold A. Wittcoff; Bryan G. Reuben; Jeffrey S. Plotkin

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Soil Data Release, Aug. 18, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Release, Aug. 18 The ORNL DAAC now offers a data set entitled "Global Distribution of Plant-Extractable Water Capacity of Soil (Dunne)." The data set was added to the holdings in...

393

Global Soil Data Release, Dec. 20, 2000  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Data Available The ORNL DAAC has released a data set entitled "Global Gridded Surfaces of Selected Soil Characteristics (IGBP-DIS)." The data surfaces were generated by the...

394

EM Press Releases | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 19, 2011 September 19, 2011 Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released The National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has released the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. September 15, 2011 DOE Hosts German Energy Official, Signs MOU to Share WIPP Information CARLSBAD, N.M. - A high-ranking energy official from Germany formalized a partnership between her country and the United States during a recent visit to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). September 15, 2011 Third Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public - Chapter Dedicated to Those Who Helped Complete Projects Funded by Recovery Act RICHLAND, Wash. - The Department of Energy is releasing the third chapter of The Hanford Story today to the public. September 13, 2011

395

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Release) > Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 (Early Release) The early release version of the AEO2008 reference case does not include consideration of the H.R.6, "Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007," that was signed into law on December 19, 2007. EIA is compiling a revised reference case that includes the impact of H.R.6. Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables (2005-2030) Table Title Formats Summary Reference Case Tables Year-by-Year Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply and Disposition Summary Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source Table 3. Energy Prices by Sector and Source Table 4. Residential Sector Key Indicators and Consumption Table 5. Commercial Sector Indicators and Consumption

396

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

August 17, 2009 Feature Stories and Releases The Air is Rare Up There Science team ascends nearly to height of Everest's base camp for atmospheric data Dave Turner (left) and...

397

Differentially private data release through multidimensional partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differential privacy is a strong notion for protecting individual privacy in privacy preserving data analysis or publishing. In this paper, we study the problem of differentially private histogram release based on an interactive differential privacy ...

Yonghui Xiao; Li Xiong; Chun Yuan

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

1995 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 1995 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 166 Results Prev 12345 Next Bayne wins "Statistics in Chemistry" award OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 19, 1995 - Charles K. Bayne, group leader in the...

399

NREL: Biomass Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than 15,000 votes. September 28, 2010 NREL Releases BioEnergy Atlas - a Comprehensive Biomass Mapping Application BioEnergy Atlas, a Web portal that provides access to two...

400

NETL: News Release - Methane Hydrate Production Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of CO2 molecules for methane molecules in the solid-water hydrate lattice, the release of methane gas, and the permanent storage of CO2 in the formation. This field experiment will...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

VAP Development: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release  

SciTech Connect

This white paper provides a plan to formalize the evaluation of newly developed VAPs and a framework for the development of value-added products through four different stages: Initiation, Development, Evaluation, and Release.

Jensen, M; Collis, Fast, J; Flynn, C; Mather, J; McFarlane, S; Monroe, J; Sivaraman, C; Xie, S

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

402

2006 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 2006 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 83 Results Prev 12345 Next SNS completion highlights year of ORNL achievements OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 28, 2006 - Creation of the first neutrons...

403

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

December 7, 2010 Feature Stories and Releases User Facility Highlights at 2010 AGU Fall Meeting Scientists from around the world use data from the U.S. Department of Energy's...

404

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10, 2009 Facility News, Feature Stories and Releases Highlights from DOE Scientific User Facility at AGU Fall Meeting 2009 Scientists from around the world use data from the U.S....

405

2005 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 113 Results Prev 12345 Next Operation cleaner fuels OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 28, 2005 - Ships powered with low-sulfur diesel fuels may have cleaner...

406

2001 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 2001 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 52 Results Prev 12345 Next Transportation research opportunities to increase at NTRC OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 27, 2001 - Scientists studying...

407

2009 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 100 Results Prev 12345 Next New ORNL building observes top-off ceremony OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 22, 2009 - Construction crews have installed the final...

408

2008 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 98 Results Prev 12345 Next UT-Battelle-funded children's home opens in India UT-Battelle-funded children's home opens in India OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec....

409

1997 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 1997 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 109 Results Prev 12345 Next ORNL environmental researcher honored with award from YWCA OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 15, 1997 - Dr. Carolyn Hunsaker, a...

410

2002 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2002 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 36 Results Prev 1234 Next ORNL researcher elected fellow OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 30, 2002 - Vince Mei, a researcher in the Engineering Science and...

411

2010 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 91 Results Prev 12345 Next Upgrading dams suggested as strong renewable energy option OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 22, 2010 - Upgrading existing dams with new...

412

1994 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 1994 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 19 Results Prev 12 Next Nuclear physics device for ORNL accelerator due in from England OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 19, 1994 - Although the Daresbury...

413

2007 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 88 Results Prev 12345 Next Shopping on-line reduces a midnight clear's carbon dioxide Shopping on-line reduces a midnight clear's carbon dioxide OAK...

414

2000 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2000 2000 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 57 Results Prev 12345 Next David named Minerals, Metals, Materials fellow OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 22, 2000 - Stan David, an Oak Ridge National...

415

2003 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 42 Results Prev 12345 Next Giving spirit strong in 2003 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 23, 2003 - Employees at Oak Ridge...

416

2011 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 68 Results Prev 12345 Next ORNL image analysis prowess advances retina research ORNL image analysis prowess advances retina research December 21, 2011 -...

417

1998 ORNL Press Releases | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 1998 ORNL Press Releases 1-10 of 96 Results Prev 12345 Next Joseph M. Wagovich named ORNL Public Affairs Director OAK RIDGE, Tenn., Dec. 30, 1998 - Joseph M. Wagovich has been...

418

STI Releasing Officials | Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

release of STI in the public domain (i.e., unlimited announcement) or the application of DOE-approved access limitations, as well as other Public Law, Executive Orders, and...

419

Capture and release of mixed acid gasses with binding organic liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reversible acid-gas binding organic liquid systems that permit separation and capture of one or more of several acid gases from a mixed gas stream, transport of the liquid, release of the acid gases from the ionic liquid and reuse of the liquid to bind more acid gas with significant energy savings compared to current aqueous systems. These systems utilize acid gas capture compounds made up of strong bases and weak acids that form salts when reacted with a selected acid gas, and which release these gases when a preselected triggering event occurs. The various new materials that make up this system can also be included in various other applications such as chemical sensors, chemical reactants, scrubbers, and separators that allow for the specific and separate removal of desired materials from a gas stream such as flue gas.

Heldebrant, David J. (Richland, WA); Yonker, Clement R. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

865.574.4399 865.574.4399 ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. OAK RIDGE, Oct. 3, 2013 -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie led the 12-member committee that developed new chemical safety guidelines described in the report, "Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories," released by the American Chemical Society (ACS) at its 246th National Meeting & Exposition held in September. Jeskie was also appointed last spring to serve on the National Research Council Committee on Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Laboratory Research. That panel is examining chemical research laboratory safety in nonindustrial settings.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

towards shop operations. H-1 Chemic_l Hygiene and Safety ,of this section, any chemic:ads per kflop'am of body welshtUNSUPPORTED CHEMIC. -M. VITON NITrlI.E NATI'R.4I. BUTYL

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues.

Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Int J Hyg Environ Health. Author manuscript Comparative assessing for radiological, chemical, and physical exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, chemical, and physical exposures at the French uranium conversion plant: Is uranium the only stressor to be potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic or toxic and used at the main uranium conversion plant in France for further investigation of association between exposure and mortality among uranium conversion workers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

424

Controlled drug release from bifunctionalized mesoporous silica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Serial of trimethylsilyl-carboxyl bifunctionalized SBA-15 (TMS/COOH/SBA-15) have been studied as carriers for controlled release of drug famotidine (Famo). To load Famo with large capacity, SBA-15 with high content of carboxyl groups was successfully synthesized by one-pot synthesis under the assistance of KCl. The mesostructure of carboxyl functionalized SBA-15 (COOH/SBA-15) could still be kept even though the content of carboxyl groups was up to 57.2%. Increasing carboxyl content could effectively enhance the loading capacity of Famo. Compared with pure SBA-15, into which Famo could be hardly adsorbed, the largest drug loading capacity of COOH/SBA-15 could achieve 396.9 mg/g. The release of Famo from mesoporous silica was studied in simulated intestine fluid (SIF, pH=7.4). For COOH/SBA-15, the release rate of Famo decreased with narrowing pore size. After grafting TMS groups on the surface of COOH/SBA-15 with hexamethyldisilazane, the release of Famo was greatly delayed with the increasing content of TMS groups. - Graphical abstract: Trimethylsilyl-carboxyl bifunctionalized SBA-15 has been studied as carrier for controlled release of drug famotidine. To load drug with large capacity, SBA-15 with high content of carboxyl groups was successfully synthesized. After grafting trimethylsilyl groups on the surface of carboxyl functionalized SBA-15, the release of Famo was greatly delayed with the increasing content of TMS groups.

Xu Wujun; Gao Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu Yao [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China)], E-mail: xuyao@sxicc.ac.cn; Wu Dong; Sun Yuhan [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Shen Wanling [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Deng Feng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

The current state of the science related to the re-release of mercury from coal combustion products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of mercury associated with CCPs is an issue that has only recently been under investigation but has become a prominent question as the industry strives to determine if current management options for CCPs will need to be modified. Mercury and other air toxic elements can be present in fly ash, FGD material and bottom ash and boiler slag. Mercury concentrations ranging from {lt} 0.01 to 2.41 ppm in fly ash and from 0.001 to 0.342 ppm in bottom ash have been reported. Stability of mercury must be evaluated by tests that include 1) direct leachability; 2) vapor-phase release at ambient and elevated temperatures; and 3) microbiologically induced leachability and vapor-phase release. The amount of mercury leached from currently produced CCPs is extremely low and does not appear to represent an environmental or re-release hazard. Concentrations of mercury in leachates from fly ashes and FGD material using either the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) or the synthetic groundwater leaching procedure (SGLP) are generally below detection limits. The release of mercury vapor from CCPs resulting from the use of mercury control technologies has been evaluated on a limited basis. Research indicates that mercury bound to the ash or activated carbon is fairly stable. The EERC found that organomercury species were detected at very low levels both in the vapor and leachate generated from the microbiologically mediated release experiments. The current state of the science indicates that mercury associated with CCPs is stable and highly unlikely to be released under most management conditions, including utilisation and disposal. The exception to this is exposure to high temperatures such as those that may be achieved in cement and wallboard production. Therefore, existing CCPs management options are expected to be environmentally sound options for CCPs from systems with mercury control technologies installed. 2 refs., 2 photos.

Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink; Tera D. Buckley [University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco Chemical Change in Secondhand Tobacco Smoke: Data from the Tobacco Documents - and - Tobacco Companies Sucessfully Prevented Tobacco Control Legislation in Argentina Speaker(s): Ernesto Sebrie Suzaynn Schick Date: November 10, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Two seminars will be presented by two speakers. "Chemical change in secondhand tobacco smoke...." (by Dr. Schick): The major US tobacco companies responded to Hirayama et al's 1981 paper showing secondhand smoke can cause lung cancer in nonsmokers by intensifying their study of the chemistry and toxicity of secondhand smoke. Using a variety of experimental approaches, RJ Reynolds and Philip Morris studied the effects of aging, dilution and contact with typical room surfaces on secondhand

427

Corrosion-Product Release in Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion products released from construction materials containing cobalt are a major source of radiation buildup in LWRs. Measures of released products vary under different PWR and BWR coolant chemistry conditions, suggesting possible strategies for reducing such releases.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

428

Waste Form Release Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect

This data package documents the experimentally derived input data on the representative waste glasses; LAWA44, LAWB45, and LAWC22. This data will be used for Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multi-phases (STORM) simulations of the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) for immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW). The STORM code will be used to provide the near-field radionuclide release source term for a performance assessment to be issued in July 2005. Documented in this data package are data related to 1) kinetic rate law parameters for glass dissolution, 2) alkali (Na+)-hydrogen (H+) ion exchange rate, 3) chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form in accelerated weathering tests, and 4) thermodynamic equilibrium constants assigned to these secondary phases. The kinetic rate law and Na+-H+ ion exchange rate were determined from single-pass flow-through experiments. Pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF) and product consistency (PCT) tests where used for accelerated weathering or aging of the glasses in order to determine a chemical reaction network of secondary phases that form. The majority of the thermodynamic data used in this data package were extracted from the thermody-namic database package shipped with the geochemical code EQ3/6, version 8.0. Because of the expected importance of 129I release from secondary waste streams being sent to IDF from various thermal treatment processes, parameter estimates for diffusional release and solubility-controlled release from cementitious waste forms were estimated from the available literature.

Pierce, Eric M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Saripalli, Prasad; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, P. F.; Baum, Steven R.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Reed, Lunde R.; Shaw, Wendy J.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Chemical Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage in Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of 2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions, ammonia borane (AB) is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications in transportation sector. Several systems models for chemical hydride materials such as solid AB, liquid AB and alane were developed and evaluated at PNNL to determine an optimal configuration that would meet the 2010 and future DOE targets for hydrogen storage. This paper presents an overview of those systems models and discusses the simulation results for various transient drive cycle scenarios.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluation of the potential for significant ammonia releases from Hanford waste tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ammonia is ubiquitous as a component of the waste stored in the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). Because ammonia is both flammable and toxic, concerns have been raised about the amount of ammonia stored in the tanks and the possible mechanisms by which it could be released from the waste into the head space inside the tanks as well as into the surrounding atmosphere. Ammonia is a safety issue for three reasons. As already mentioned, ammonia is a flammable gas and may contribute to a flammability hazard either directly, if it reaches a high enough concentration in the tank head space, or by contributing to the flammability of other flammable gases such as hydrogen (LANL 1994). Ammonia is also toxic and at relatively low concentrations presents a hazard to human health. The level at which ammonia is considered Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) is 300 ppm (WHC 1993, 1995). Ammonia concentrations at or above this level have been measured inside the head space in a number of SSTs. Finally, unlike hydrogen and nitrous oxide, ammonia is highly soluble in aqueous solutions, and large amounts of ammonia can be stored in the waste as dissolved gas. Because of its high solubility, ammonia behaves in a qualitatively different manner from hydrogen or other insoluble gases. A broader range of scenarios must be considered in modeling ammonia storage and release.

Palmer, B.J.; Anderson, C.M.; Chen, G.; Cuta, J.M.; Ferryman, T.A.; Terrones, G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Management response plan for the Chemical Safety Vulnerability Working Group report. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Safety Vulnerability (CSV) Working Group was established to identify adverse conditions involving hazardous chemicals at DOE facilities that might result in fires or explosions, release of hazardous chemicals to the environment, or exposure of workers or the public to chemicals. A CSV Review was conducted in 146 facilities at 29 sites. Eight generic vulnerabilities were documented related to: abandoned chemicals and chemical residuals; past chemical spills and ground releases; characterization of legacy chemicals and wastes; disposition of legacy chemicals; storage facilities and conditions; condition of facilities and support systems; unanalyzed and unaddressed hazards; and inventory control and tracking. Weaknesses in five programmatic areas were also identified related to: management commitment and planning; chemical safety management programs; aging facilities that continue to operate; nonoperating facilities awaiting deactivation; and resource allocations. To address the facility-specific and site-specific vulnerabilities, responsible DOE and site-contractor line organizations have developed initial site response plans. These plans, presented as Volume 2 of this Management Response Plan, describe the actions needed to mitigate or eliminate the facility- and site-specific vulnerabilities identified by the CSV Working Group field verification teams. Initial site response plans are described for: Brookhaven National Lab., Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Lab., Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Los Alamos National Lab., Oak Ridge Reservation, Rocky Flats Plant, Sandia National Laboratories, and Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemically enhanced oil recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yet when conducted according to present state of the art, chemical flooding (i.e., micellar/polymer flooding, surfactant/polymer flooding, surfactant flooding) can mobilize more residual crude oil than any other method of enhanced oil recovery. It also is one of the most expensive methods of enhanced oil recovery. This contribution will describe some of the technology that comprises the state of the art technology that must be adhered to if a chemical flood is to be successful. Although some of the efforts to reduce cost and other points are discussed, the principle focus is on technical considerations in designing a good chemical flooding system. The term chemical flooding is restricted here to methods of enhanced oil recovery that employs a surfactant, either injected into the oil reservoir or generated in situ, primarily to reduce oil-water interfacial tension. Hence, polymer-water floods for mobility or profile control, steam foams, and carbon dioxide foams are excluded. Some polymer considerations are mentioned because they apply to providing mobility control for chemical flooding systems.

Nelson, R.C.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Russian Land Cover Data Sets Released, January 7, 2004 The ORNL DAAC announces the release of 12 map data products -- land cover, forested area, forest carbon content, and...

434

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Petroleum Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Heating Oil Reserve Naval Reserves International...

435

Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for 2007-2008 Treasury, Energy Departments Release New Advanced Coal Project Tax Credit Applications for...

436

NETL: News Release - Anthony Cugini Named Director of DOE's National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Release Release Date: April 1, 2010 Anthony Cugini Named Director of DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory Extensive Background Includes Leading Lab's Office of...

437

EIA - Press Releases - Note to Editors: EIA to Change Web ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The test file will be automatically delivered to you when it is released at the scheduled test release times listed below.

438

NETL: News Release - DOE-Funded Pipeline Robot Revolutionizes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Go to US DOE Publications News Release Release Date: December 04, 2007 DOE-Funded Pipeline Robot Revolutionizes Inspection Process Explorer II Demonstrates Huge Potential for...

439

T-526: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

526: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote Code Execution Vulnerability T-526: Microsoft Internet Explorer 'ReleaseInterface()' Remote Code Execution...

440

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

WASHINGTON DC 20585. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE September 30, 2013. MEDIA ADVISORY: EIA to Release Winter Fuels Outlook. WHO: Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Energy ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

WASHINGTON DC 20585. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 1, 2012. MEDIA ADVISORY: EIA to Release Winter Fuels Outlook. WHO: Adam Sieminski, Administrator ...

442

Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act, State Superfund Law (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Oil and Hazardous Material Release Prevention and Response Act,...

443

Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating Oil Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve - Guidelines for Release Petroleum Reserves Strategic...

444

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON DC 20585. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 25, 2013. The U.S. Energy Information Administration releases bimonthly report ...

445

Sandia Sled Track PNOV Press Release | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sandia Sled Track PNOV Press Release Sandia Sled Track PNOV Press Release On October 18, 2010, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a Preliminary Notice of...

446

NERSC Releases Software Test for Its Next Supercomputer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home News & Publications News Center News NERSC Releases Software Test for Its Next Supercomputer NERSC Releases Software Test for Its Next Supercomputer September 12,...

447

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter Dedicated to Potential Future Uses of the Hanford Site Fifth Chapter of Hanford Story Released to Public: Chapter...

448

Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Agencies You are here Home Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale Gas Recommendations Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee Releases Shale Gas...

449

NOON TUESDAY: Energy Department to Release New Report on Progress...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NOON TUESDAY: Energy Department to Release New Report on Progress of Electric Vehicle Deployment NOON TUESDAY: Energy Department to Release New Report on Progress of Electric...

450

Department of Energy Planning Cookstoves Research, Releases Biomass...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Cookstoves Research, Releases Biomass Technical Meeting Summary Department of Energy Planning Cookstoves Research, Releases Biomass Technical Meeting Summary May 10, 2011...

451

NETL: News Release - Energy Department Seeks Projects to Improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Publications News Release Release Date: February 6, 2001 Energy Department Seeks Projects To Improve Coal-Fired Power Plants Abraham Says Initiative Part of a Balanced And...

452

DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Deployment of Advanced Technology DOE Releases Draft Strategic Plan for Reducing Greenhouse Gas...

453

Chemical Management Volume 3 of 3 - Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 July 2008 DOE HANDBOOK CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT (Volume 3 of 3) Consolidated Chemical User Safety and Health Requirements U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1139/3-2008 iii Foreword Numerous requirements have been promulgated to protect workers, equipment, facilities, and the environment. When work is performed, the specific requirements affecting the work must first be identified and incorporated into the work plan. Because such requirements can number in the thousands,

454

UNO Chemical Safety Manual Acronyms and Abbreviations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) (EPA document) TCLP Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure #12;TLV Threshold Limit Values TSCA

Lu, Guoiqng

455

Idaho Chemical Processing Plant safety document ICPP hazardous chemical evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a hazardous chemical evaluation performed for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). ICPP tracks chemicals on a computerized database, Haz Track, that contains roughly 2000 individual chemicals. The database contains information about each chemical, such as its form (solid, liquid, or gas); quantity, either in weight or volume; and its location. The Haz Track database was used as the primary starting point for the chemical evaluation presented in this report. The chemical data and results presented here are not intended to provide limits, but to provide a starting point for nonradiological hazards analysis.

Harwood, B.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Chemical profiles of switchgrass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

profiles profiles of switchgrass Zhoujian Hu a,b , Robert Sykes a,c , Mark F. Davis a,c , E. Charles Brummer a,d , Arthur J. Ragauskas a,b,e, * a BioEnergy Science Center, USA b School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332, USA c National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, CO 80401, USA d Institute for Plant Breeding, Genetics, and Genomics, Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA e Forest Products and Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg, Sweden a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 15 April 2009 Received in revised form 10 December 2009 Accepted 10 December 2009 Available online 13 January 2010 Keywords: Switchgrass Morphological components Chemical

457

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

458

Chemical Cleaning Program Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chemical Cleaning Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview Preliminary results Lessons learned Path forward 3 Regulatory Drivers The Federal Facilities Agreement establishes milestones for the removal of bulk waste and closure of each non-compliant tank Per the Dispute Resolution: - "DOE shall complete operational closure of Tanks 19 and 18 by 12/31/2012" - "DOE shall complete operational closure of 4 tanks by 9/30/2015" SRR intention to close 4 tanks by 9/30/2010, or as soon as possible Tanks 5 & 6 will be 2 of the 4 tanks 4 Tank Closure Process Bulk Waste Removal Mechanical Heel Removal Chemical Cleaning Annulus

459

Chemical Label Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Label Information Chemical Label Information Chemical Name CAS No. NFPA 704 Label Data Hazard Information Health Fire Reactivity Other acetone 67641 1 3 0 Eye, skin and mucous membrane irritatiion. Central nervous system depression. chloroform 67663 2 0 0 CAR [1] and TERAT [2] Liver and kidney disorders. Eye and skin irritation. Central nervous system depression. Cardiac arrythmia. ethanol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. ethyl alcohol 64175 0 3 0 Skin and eye irritation. hydrofluoric acid 7664393 4 0 0 Acute [3] - Skin contact can lead to bone damage. Skin, eye and mucous membrane irritation. hydrogen peroxide (35 to 52%) 7722841 2 0 1 OX Very irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract. hydrogen peroxide (> 52%) 7722841 2 0 3 OX Extremely irritating to the skin, eye and respiratory tract.

460

Chemical Storage-Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage - Storage - Overview Ali T-Raissi, FSEC Hydrogen Storage Workshop Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois August 14-15, 2002 Hydrogen Fuel - Attributes * H 2 +½ O 2 → H 2 O (1.23 V) * High gravimetric energy density: 27.1 Ah/g, based on LHV of 119.93 kJ/g * 1 wt % = 189.6 Wh/kg (0.7 V; i.e. η FC = 57%) * Li ion cells: 130-150 Wh/kg Chemical Hydrides - Definition * They are considered secondary storage methods in which the storage medium is expended - primary storage methods include reversible systems (e.g. MHs & C-nanostructures), GH 2 & LH 2 storage Chemical Hydrides - Definition (cont.) * The usual chemical hydride system is reaction of a reactant containing H in the "-1" oxidation state (hydride) with a reactant containing H in the "+1" oxidation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "toxic chemical release" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gas Release During Saltwell Pumping: Interpretation of Operational Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive waste that is a complex mix of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid into the surrounding soil, while 82 are considered sound (Hanlon 1999). To minimize the amount of material that potentially could leak into the surrounding soil, all of the SSTs are scheduled to have drainable liquid removed and to be designated as interim stabilized. Of the SSTs, 119 have been declared stabilized, and only 30 require further processing (Hanlon 1999). Many of the tanks have been declared stabilized administratively, with only 45 tanks having had drainable liquid removed. The pending consent decree between the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Office of River Protection. (U.S. District Court Eastern District of Washington, 1999) sets a milestone to complete interim stabilization by September 2004. While process equipment exists for removing drainable liquid, and its operation is well known from previous pumping campaigns, a number of safety issues associated with the release and potential ignition of flammable gases within the tanks needs to be addressed. The safety concerns associated with flammable gases stem from the observation that some of the waste in the SSTs generates and retains hazardous quantities of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Of the 30 SSTs remaining to be declared interim stabilized, 29 need to have drainable liquid removed by saltwell pumping (waste in tank 241-C-106 will be removed by sluicing), and 16 of these are on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) (Hopkins 1995; Hanlon 1999). Most of these tanks are in Facility Group 2 (Noorani 1997); that is, it is believed that tank operations may induce the release of significant quantities of flammable gas, but gas release does not occur spontaneously. In particular, saltwell pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, both insoluble (principally hydrogen) and soluble (principally ammonia), posing a number of safety concerns (Peurrung et al. 1997; Meader 1996).

J.L. Huckaby; L.M. Peurrung; P.A. Gauglitz

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

462

Physical and Chemical Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data image data image Physical and Chemical Applications Research in this area includes: Chemical analysis (femtosecond laser ablation). Advanced sensors (laser ultrasonics). Advanced materials and nanotechnology for clean energy- hydrogen storage, nanostructured organic light-emitting diodes, nanowires, and nanoparticles). Photons to fuels (biosynthetic pathways for generating hydrocarbon biofuels in photosynthetic organisms). Advanced Sensor Development Sensor-based control of industrial processes can help companies: Decrease production costs; Reduce waste of raw materials on manufacturing lines; Lower manufacturing downtime from equipment maintenance; Increase the energy efficiency of manufacturing processes; Detect equipment failure early, before it becomes a major liability;

463

Helium release from radioisotope heat sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diffusion of helium in /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel was characterized as a function of the heating rate and the fuel microstructure. The samples were thermally ramped in an induction furnace and the helium release rates measured with an automated mass spectrometer. The diffusion constants and activation energies were obtained from the data using a simple diffusion model. The release rates of helium were correlated with the fuel microstructure by metallographic examination of fuel samples. The release mechanism consists of four regimes, which are dependent upon the temperature. Initially, the release is controlled by movement of point defects combined with trapping along grain boundaries. This regime is followed by a process dominated by formation and growth of helium bubbles along grain boundaries. The third regime involves volume diffusion controlled by movement of oxygen vacancies. Finally, the release at the highest temperatures follows the diffusion rate of intragranular bubbles. The tendency for helium to be trapped within the grain boundaries diminishes with small grain sizes, slow thermal pulses, and older fuel.

Peterson, D.E.; Early, J.W.; Starzynski, J.S.; Land, C.C.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release. Progress report, November 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A review of the toxicity of biomass pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The scaleup of biomass fast pyrolysis systems to large pilot and commercial scales will expose an increasingly large number of personnel to potential health hazards, especially during the evaluation of the commercial use of the pyrolysis condensates. Although the concept of fast pyrolysis to optimize liquid products is relatively new, low-temperature pyrolysis processes have been used over the aeons to produce charcoal and liquid by-products, e.g., smoky food flavors, food preservatives, and aerosols containing narcotics, e.g., nicotine. There are a number of studies in the historical literature that concern the hazards of acute and long-term exposure to smoke and to the historical pyrolysis liquids formed at low temperatures. The reported toxicity of smoke, smoke food flavors, and fast pyrolysis oils is reviewed. The data found for these complex mixtures suggest that the toxicity may be less than that of the individual components. It is speculated that there may be chemical reactions that take place that serve to reduce the toxicity during aging. 81 refs.

Diebold, J.P. [Thermalchemie, Inc., Lakewood, CO (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Reducing Boron Toxicity by Microbial Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

While electricity is a clean source of energy, methods of electricity-production, such as the use of coal-fired power plants, often result in significant environmental damage. Coal-fired electrical power plants produce air pollution, while contaminating ground water and soils by build-up of boron, which enters surrounding areas through leachate. Increasingly high levels of boron in soils eventually overcome boron tolerance levels in plants and trees, resulting in toxicity. Formation of insoluble boron precipitates, mediated by mineral-precipitating bacteria, may sequester boron into more stable forms that are less available and toxic to vegetation. Results have provided evidence of microbially-facilitated sequestration of boron into insoluble mineral precipitates. Analyses of water samples taken from ponds with high boron concentrations showed that algae present contained 3-5 times more boron than contained in the water in the samples. Boron sequestration may also be facilitated by the incorporation of boron within algal cells. Experiments examining boron sequestration by algae are in progress. In bacterial experiments with added ferric citrate, the reduction of iron by the bacteria resulted in an ironcarbonate precipitate containing boron. An apparent color change showing the reduction of amorphous iron, as well as the precipitation of boron with iron, was more favorable at higher pH. Analysis of precipitates by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy revealed mineralogical composition and biologicallymediated accumulation of boron precipitates in test-tube experiments.

Hazen, T.; Phelps, T.J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Limitations for heavy metal release during thermo-chemical treatment of sewage sludge ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphate recycling from sewage sludge can be achieved by heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash (SSA) producing a fertilizer product: mixing SSA with chloride and treating this mixture (eventually after granulation) in a rotary kiln at 1000 {+-} 100 deg. C leads to the formation of volatile heavy metal compounds that evaporate and to P-phases with high bio-availability. Due to economical and ecological reasons, it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption of this technology. Generally, fluidized bed reactors are characterized by high heat and mass transfer and thus promise the saving of energy. Therefore, a rotary reactor and a fluidized bed reactor (both laboratory-scale and operated in batch mode) are used for the treatment of granulates containing SSA and CaCl{sub 2}. Treatment temperature, residence time and - in case of the fluidized bed reactor - superficial velocity are varied between 800 and 900 deg. C, 10 and 30 min and 3.4 and 4.6 m s{sup -1}. Cd and Pb can be removed well (>95 %) in all experiments. Cu removal ranges from 25% to 84%, for Zn 75-90% are realized. The amount of heavy metals removed increases with increasing temperature and residence time which is most pronounced for Cu. In the pellet, three major reactions occur: formation of HCl and Cl{sub 2} from CaCl{sub 2}; diffusion and reaction of these gases with heavy metal compounds; side reactions from heavy metal compounds with matrix material. Although, heat and mass transfer are higher in the fluidized bed reactor, Pb and Zn removal is slightly better in the rotary reactor. This is due the accelerated migration of formed HCl and Cl{sub 2} out of the pellets into the reactor atmosphere. Cu is apparently limited by the diffusion of its chloride thus the removal is higher in the fluidized bed unit.

Nowak, Benedikt, E-mail: benedikt.nowak@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Perutka, Libor [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Aschenbrenner, Philipp [Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/226, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kraus, Petra [ASH DEC Umwelt AG, Donaufelderstrasse 101/4/5, A-1210 Vienna (Austria); Rechberger, Helmut [Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/226, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Winter, Franz, E-mail: franz.winter@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Stress and release : chemical modulation of secondary metabolite production in Aspergillus sp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyclosporin A induced biosynthesis of colored compounds in three species of Aspergillus. Diode array HPLC MS analysis of culture extracts revealed Aspergillus terreus demonstrated the most profound response, with upregulation ...

Hanlon, Amy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Impact of Nuclear Power Plant Operations on Carbon-14 Generation, Chemical Forms, and Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants continue to implement best practices to reduce the total radioactivity in plant effluents, other radionuclides that were not previously significant fractions of the effluent streams will need to be quantified and reported. Carbon-14 can become a principal radionuclide for the gaseous effluent pathway as the concentrations of other radionuclides decrease. This report documents the potential opportunities for further understanding the impact of nuclear power plant operations on Carb...

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

470

Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Logging Chemical Logging Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Chemical Logging Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Log Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Log Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Presence and geochemical composition of fluid producing zones Thermal: Calcium-alkalinity ratios versus depth assist in defining warm and hot water aquifers Dictionary.png Chemical Logging: Chemical logging produces a chemical profile of the formation fluid within a well based on the measurement of changes in the chemical composition of the drilling fluid during drilling operations.

471

Study on the Release Property of Nitrogen in Sustained-release Fertilizer with Carrier of Bentonite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral bentonite as the carrier of raw fertilizer NH4H2PO4", " added urea-formaldehyde resin to bond and mixed them, then made the bentonite carrier slow release nitrogen fertilizer by electric tablet press machine. Through the method of water dissolution ... Keywords: Bentonite, Sustained-release fertilizer, Carrier, Nitrogen element

Li Wangwang, Huang Chengcheng, Xie Huixing, Bi Yafan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Press Releases: BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Press Releases Press Releases Current Press Releases BESC researchers tap into genetic reservoir of heat-loving bacteria - 2012 Foxtail Millet Offers Clues for Assembling the Switchgrass Genome - 2012 Gerald A. Tuskan named Forest Biotechnologist of the Year - 2012 ORNL explores proteins in Yellowstone bacteria for biofuel inspiration - 2012 UGA discovery changes how scientists think about plant cell wall formation - 2011 Research collaboration at the Samuel Roberts Noble