Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management October 8, 2013 - 9:39am Addthis Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower primarily through evaporation. Therefore, by design, cooling towers consume significant amounts of water. Overview The thermal efficiency and longevity of the cooling tower and equipment used to cool depend on the proper management of water recirculated through the tower. Water leaves a cooling tower system in any one of four ways: Evaporation: This is the primary function of the tower and is the method that transfers heat from the cooling tower system to the

2

Convection towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Convection towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

Prueitt, M.L.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

4

Convection towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Convection towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Convection towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

towers of Hanoi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST. towers of Hanoi. (classic problem). Definition: Given three posts (towers) and n disks of decreasing sizes, move the ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor is described which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing, where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor. 12 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1992-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Recirculating rotary gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A positive displacement, recirculating Roots-type rotary gas compressor which operates on the basis of flow work compression. The compressor includes a pair of large diameter recirculation conduits (24 and 26) which return compressed discharge gas to the compressor housing (14), where it is mixed with low pressure inlet gas, thereby minimizing adiabatic heating of the gas. The compressor includes a pair of involutely lobed impellers (10 and 12) and an associated port configuration which together result in uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas. The large diameter recirculation conduits equalize gas flow velocities within the compressor and minimize gas flow losses. The compressor is particularly suited to applications requiring sustained operation at higher gas compression ratios than have previously been feasible with rotary pumps, and is particularly applicable to refrigeration or other applications requiring condensation of a vapor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Loop, NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

11

High ratio recirculating gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor.

Weinbrecht, John F. (601 Oakwood Pl., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87123)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

High ratio recirculating gas compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high ratio positive displacement recirculating rotary compressor is disclosed. The compressor includes an integral heat exchanger and recirculation conduits for returning cooled, high pressure discharge gas to the compressor housing to reducing heating of the compressor and enable higher pressure ratios to be sustained. The compressor features a recirculation system which results in continuous and uninterrupted flow of recirculation gas to the compressor with no direct leakage to either the discharge port or the intake port of the compressor, resulting in a capability of higher sustained pressure ratios without overheating of the compressor. 10 figs.

Weinbrecht, J.F.

1989-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

?? / Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

question when considering science and technology in Japanese?? /Kagaku / ?? /Ky?ri: Science Tsukahara T?go Translationto incorporate and develop science and technology from the

Tsukahara, T?go

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Twenty-one papers presented at a 2003 conference in Charleston, South Carolina discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2003-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

15

Cooling tower waste reduction  

SciTech Connect

At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the two main cooling tower systems (central and northwest) were upgraded during the summer of 1997 to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. In 1996, these two tower systems generated approximately 135,400 lbs (61,400 kg) of hazardous sludge, which is more than 90 percent of the hazardous waste for the site annually. At both, wet decks (cascade reservoirs) were covered to block sunlight. Covering the cascade reservoirs reduced the amount of chemical conditioners (e.g. algaecide and biocide), required and in turn the amount of waste generated was reduced. Additionally, at the northwest cooling tower system, a sand filtration system was installed to allow cyclical filtering and backflushing, and new pumps, piping, and spray nozzles were installed to increase agitation. the appurtenance upgrade increased the efficiency of the cooling towers. The sand filtration system at the northwest cooling tower system enables operators to continuously maintain the cooling tower water quality without taking the towers out of service. Operational costs (including waste handling and disposal) and maintenance activities are compared for the cooling towers before and after upgrades. Additionally, the effectiveness of the sand filter system in conjunction with the wet deck covers (northwest cooling tower system), versus the cascade reservoir covers alone (south cooling tower south) is discussed. the overall expected return on investment is calculated to be in excess of 250 percent. this upgrade has been incorporated into the 1998 DOE complex-wide water conservation project being led by Sandia National Laboratory/Albuquerque.

Coleman, S.J.; Celeste, J.; Chine, R.; Scott, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Category:Providence, RI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RI RI Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Providence, RI" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVFullServiceRestauran... 66 KB SVQuickServiceRestaurant Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVQuickServiceRestaura... 66 KB SVHospital Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVHospital Providence ... 60 KB SVLargeHotel Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVLargeHotel Providenc... 61 KB SVLargeOffice Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVLargeOffice Providen... 61 KB SVMediumOffice Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png SVMediumOffice Provide... 63 KB SVMidriseApartment Providence RI The Narragansett Electric Co.png

17

A Stratified Model of the Inertial Recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inertial gyre with characteristics very similar to the recirculation observed in eddy-resolving general circulation models is obtained with a simple, analytically tractable, two-layer model. The recirculating gyre is contained in a box of ...

Paola Cessi

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units are large structures, Illustration 1. Big budget money and engineering time goes into gleaming stainless steel equipment and exotic process apparatus, the poor cooling tower is the ignored orphan of the system. Knowledgeable Engineers, however, are now looking into the function of the cooling tower, which is to produce colder water- and question the quality of water discharged from that simple appearing box. These cross-flow structures are quite large, ranging up to 60 feet tall with as many as 6 or more cells in a row. With cells up to 42 feet long so immense in aspect, with fans rotating, operators assume, just by appearances, that all is well, and usually pay no attention to the quality of cold water returning from the cooling tower. The boxes look sturdy, but the function of the cooling tower is repeated ignored production of water as cold as possible.

Burger, R.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

China Solar Tower Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tower Development Jump to: navigation, search Name China Solar Tower Development Place China Sector Solar Product Joint venture for development of solar towers in China, announced...

20

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country's first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar power towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high desert near Barstow, California, has witnessed the development of this country`s first two solar power towers. Solar One operated successfully from 1982 to 1988 and proved that power towers work efficiently to produce utility-scale power from sunlight. Solar Two was connected to the utility grid in 1996 and is operating today. Like its predecessor, Solar Two is rated at 10 megawatts. An upgrade of the Solar One plant, Solar Two demonstrates how solar energy can be stored in the form of heat in molten salt for power generation on demand. The experience gained with these two pilot power towers has established a foundation on which industry can develop its first commercial plants. These systems produce electricity on a large scale. They are unique among solar technologies because they can store energy efficiently and cost effectively. They can operate whenever the customer needs power, even after dark or during cloudy weather.

Not Available

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!

Smith, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Proceedings: Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affect availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-two papers presented at the 1997 Cooling Tower Technology Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

Pueblo Towers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towers Towers Jump to: navigation, search Name Pueblo Towers Facility Pueblo Towers Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Vestas Towers Developer Vestas Towers Energy Purchaser Vestas Towers Location CO Coordinates 38.205834°, -104.588141° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.205834,"lon":-104.588141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Distribution plate for recirculating fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A distribution plate for a recirculating fluidized bed has a centrally disposed opening and a plurality of apertures adjacent the periphery to eliminate dead spots within the bed.

Yang, Wen-ching (Export, PA); Vidt, Edward J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keairns, Dale L. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Abstract On the Automorphism Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis I study the automorphism tower of free nilpotent groups. Our main tool in studying the automorphism tower is to embed every group as a lattice in some Lie group. Using known rigidity results the automorphism group of the discrete group can be embedded into the automorphism group of the Lie group. This allows me to lift the description of the derivation tower of the free nilpotent Lie algebra to obtain information about the automorphism tower of the free nilpotent group. The main result in this thesis states that the automorphism tower of the free nilpotent group ?(n, d) on n generators and nilpotency class d, stabilizes after finitely many steps. If the nilpotency class is small compared to the number of generators we have that the height of the automorphism tower is at most

Of Free Nilpotent Groups; Martin Dimitrov Kassabov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Seismic analysis of lattice towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the absence of specific guidelines for the seismic analysis of self-supporting telecommunication towers, designers may be tempted to apply simplified building code approaches to (more)

Khedr, Mohamed Abdel Halim.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

Kolb, Gregory J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Suction-recirculation device for stabilizing particle flows within a solar powered solid particle receiver  

SciTech Connect

A suction-recirculation device for stabilizing the flow of a curtain of blackened heat absorption particles falling inside of a solar receiver with an open aperture. The curtain of particles absorbs the concentrated heat from a solar mirror array reflected up to the receiver on a solar power tower. External winds entering the receiver at an oblique angle can destabilize the particle curtain and eject particles. A fan and ductwork is located behind the back wall of the receiver and sucks air out through an array of small holes in the back wall. Any entrained particles are separated out by a conventional cyclone device. Then, the air is recirculated back to the top of the receiver by injecting the recycled air through an array of small holes in the receiver's ceiling and upper aperture front wall. Since internal air is recirculated, heat losses are minimized and high receiver efficiency is maintained. Suction-recirculation velocities in the range of 1-5 m/s are sufficient to stabilize the particle curtain against external wind speeds in excess of 10 m/s.

Kolb, Gregory J. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. After it is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, they look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: (1) The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for; (2) 'Slippage' due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation; (3) The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome; and (4) New plant expansion needs colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Thermal performance of cooling towers  

SciTech Connect

Wet cooling towers are often used in HVAC applications to reject heat to the atmosphere. Heat rejection is accomplished within the tower by heat and mass transfer between hot water droplets and ambient air. These heat and mass transfer processes and the resulting coefficient of performance are often misunderstood and misinterpreted. To demystify these concepts, the heat and mass transfer exchange at the water droplet level are reviewed. This is followed by an analysis of an idealized spray-type tower to show how cooling tower performance is affected by fill height, water retention time, and air and water mass flow rates. Finally, the so-called coefficient of performance of cooling towers is examined.

Bernier, M.A. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Property:Recirculating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recirculating Recirculating Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Recirculating Property Type String Pages using the property "Recirculating" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + No + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel + Yes + Carderock Subsonic Wind Tunnel + Yes + Conte Large Flume + No + Conte Small Flume + No + D DeFrees Flume 1 + No + DeFrees Flume 2 + No + DeFrees Flume 3 + No +

35

Inertial Recirculation in a ?-Plane Corner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sub-basin scale recirculation can be driven by imposing low values of potential vorticity in the northwest corner of a ?-Plane box. Mesoscale eddies parametrized by lateral potential vorticity diffusion, carry this anomaly into the interior and ...

G. R. Ierley; W. R. Young

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Ya ri a bsod Collection 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

last updated by World Oral Literature Project staff on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 This Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Ya ri a bsod Collection/Sha bo don grub rdo rje and Skal dbang skyid ???????...

Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

37

Ya ri a bsod Collection 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

last updated by World Oral Literature Project staff on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Ya ri a bsod Collection/Sha bo don grub rdo rje and Skal dbang skyid ???????... of title Unknown Description (to be used in archive entry) At one time, Ya ri a bsod went to steal horses in Rta bo and was shot and injured. As he lay dying he sang this song to describe his situation. ???????????????????????????? ?????????...

Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

38

OUT Success Stories: Power Towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers convert the thermal energy of the sun to electricity. They are large-scale power plants producing clean energy and suited for operation in sunny, semi-arid regions of the world.

Jones, J.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water returning from the cooling tower, greater chemical product volume can be condensed and less energy is required to run compressors. This paper will discuss two case histories and the rapid cost-effective savings thereby accruing through retrofit.

Burger, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

Cook, DR

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Oriented spray-assisted cooling tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apparatus useful for heat exchange by evaporative cooling when employed in conjunction with a conventional cooling tower. The arrangement includes a header pipe which is used to divert a portion of the water in the cooling tower supply conduit up stream of the cooling tower to a multiplicity of vertical pipes and spray nozzles which are evenly spaced external to the cooling tower so as to produce a uniform spray pattern oriented toward the central axis of the cooling tower and thereby induce an air flow into the cooling tower which is greater than otherwise achieved. By spraying the water to be cooled towards the cooling tower in a region external to the cooling tower in a manner such that the spray falls just short of the cooling tower basin, the spray does not interfere with the operation of the cooling tower, proper, and the-maximum increase in air velocity is achieved just above the cooling tower basin where it is most effective. The sprayed water lands on a concrete or asphalt apron which extends from the header pipe to the cooling tower basin and is gently sloped towards the cooling tower basin such that the sprayed water drains into the basin. By diverting a portion of the water to be cooled to a multiplicity of sprays external to the cooling tower, thermal performance is improved. 4 figs.

Bowman, C.F.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

SMUD Kokhala Power Tower Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kokhala is the name of a new hybridized power tower design which integrates a nitrate-salt solar power tower with a gas turbine combined-cycle power plant. This integration achieves high value energy, low costs, and lower investor risk than a conventional solar only power tower plant. One of the primary advantages of this system is that it makes small power tower plants much more economically competitive with conventional power generation technologies. This paper is an overview of a study that performed a conceptual evaluation of a small (30 MWe) commercial plant suitable for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s (SMUD) Rancho Seco power plant site near Sacramento, California. This paper discusses the motivation for using a small hybrid solar plant and provides an overview of the analysis methodology used in the study. The results indicate that a power tower integrated with an advanced gas turbine, combined with Sacramento`s summer solar resource, could produce a low- risk, economically viable power generation project in the near future.

Price, Henry W. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Whitney, Daniel D.; Beebe, H.I. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

ARM - Campaign Instrument - aerosol-tower-eml  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsaerosol-tower-eml Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : EML Tower based Aerosol...

44

Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid...

45

Sorting in Patrick Geddes' Outlook Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i n g in P a t r i c k Outlook Tower Geddes' J Joyce Barleythree months at the Outlook 'lower in Edinburgh, sorting theand services. The Outlook Tower was a disused observatory

Earley, Joyce

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

GreenTower | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenTower Jump to: navigation, search Name GreenTower Place Haiger 6, Germany Zip 35708 Sector Solar Product Developer of a solar chimney technology, with greenhouses for food...

47

Proceedings of the Cooling Tower Technology Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of cooling towers and associated systems strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Twenty-four papers presented at the 2012 Cooling Tower Technology Conference, held August 89, 2012, in Pensacola, Florida, discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. ...

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

48

Proceedings: Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems performance strongly affects availability and heat rate in fossil and nuclear power plants. Papers presented at EPRI's 1994 Cooling Tower and Advanced Cooling Systems Conference discuss research results, industry experience, and case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions. Specific topics include cooling tower upgrades and retrofits, cooling tower performance, cooling tower fouling, and dry and hybrid cooling systems.

1995-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cooling Tower Fan Motor Power Optimization Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers are in use at more than 200 major electric generating plants in the United States, representing approximately 800 units and a total of more than 210,000 MW. The auxiliary power consumed by cooling tower fan motors can significantly reduce the net power output of steam-cycle power plants. Cooling tower specifications are established by the economic and operational requirements of maximum unit load and the most demanding environmental conditions expected in the towers locale. Since power pl...

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

WA_02_015_AIR_PRODUCTS_AND_CHEMICALS_INC_Waiver_of_Patent_Ri...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatentRi.pdf WA02015AIRPRODUCTSANDCHEMICALSINCWaiverofPatent...

51

Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. This study has three objectives: (1) Identify the paramount considerations associated with using a wind turbine tower for hydrogen storage; (2)Propose and analyze a cost-effective design for a hydrogen-storing tower; and (3) Compare the cost of storage in hydrogen towers to the cost of storage in conventional pressure vessels. The paramount considerations associated with a hydrogen tower are corrosion (in the form of hydrogen embrittlement) and structural failure (through bursting or fatigue life degradation). Although hydrogen embrittlement (HE) requires more research, it does not appear to prohibit the use of turbine towers for hydrogen storage. Furthermore, the structural modifications required to store hydrogen in a tower are not cost prohibitive.

Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A serious problem of scale and other solid material settling in heat transfer equipment was threatening to shut down our ethylene plant. All evidence pointed to the cooling tower as the source of the contamination. Visual inspection of the cooling tower pump suction basin was accomplished by diving into the basin using SCUBA gear. It was possible to see a build-up of debris on the pump suction basket strainers and on the floor of the sumps. Also, it was discovered that one of the four baskets had been installed incorrectly. Photographs of the basket strainers were taken to aid in describing their exact condition. With the aid of SCUBA it was possible to sufficiently clean the pump sumps so that costly downtime was avoided. Likewise, using this technique, steps were taken to greatly reduce the chance for further contamination of the circulating cooling water system.

Brenner, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ya ri a bsod Collection 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

last updated by World Oral Literature Project staff on Wednesday, Tuesday, June 8, 2010 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Ya ri a bsod Collection/Sha bo don grub rdo rje and Skal dbang skyid ???????... ??????????????????????????????? Genre or type (i.e. epic, song, ritual) Persuasion Song ??? ??????????????? Name of recorder (if different from collector) Date of recording February 2007 ????? ?????????????????????????? Place of recording Gtsang Village, Rta bo Town...

Sha bo don 'grub rdo rje; Skal dbang skyid

54

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior from Cooling Towers, Volume 2: Mathematical Model for Sin gle Source (Single Tower) Cooling Tower Plume Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presents an improved model for plumes from single natural-draft cooling towers. This model is expanded to treat multiple tower plumes in Volume 4.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, J.E. Jr.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Failure of Cooling Tower West Virginia 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Willow Island disaster was the collapse of a cooling tower under ... In response to this request, NBS carried out field, laboratory and analytical ...

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

58

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Tower Manufacturing and ...  

... and Lower Cost of Energy" intends to support partnerships leading to innovative designs and processes for wind turbine tower manufacturing and ...

59

Induced Flue Gas Recirculation Performance Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Induced Flue Gas Recirculation (IFGR) is a proven, low-cost method for controlling NOx emissions on gas-fired utility boilers. In 1997, IFGR technology for power generation applications was first demonstrated at Entergy's Willow Glen station, near Baton Rouge, LA. Following the success with IFGR at Willow Glen, four members of the Gas/Oil Fired Boiler Performance and Combustion NOx Control Target (No.55 in 2000) installed, or plan to install, IFGR on an additional 27 units. American Electric Power has im...

2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

60

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Combined-cycle power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates a new power tower concept that offers significant benefits for commercialization of power tower technology. The concept uses a molten nitrate salt centralreceiver plant to supply heat, in the form of combustion air preheat, to a conventional combined-cycle power plant. The evaluation focused on first commercial plants, examined three plant capacities (31, 100, and 300 MWe), and compared these plants with a solar-only 100-MWe plant and with gas-only combined-cycle plants in the same three capacities. Results of the analysis point to several benefits relative to the solar-only plant including low energy cost for first plants, low capital cost for first plants, reduced risk with respect to business uncertainties, and the potential for new markets. In addition, the concept appears to have minimal technology development requirements. Significantly, the results show that it is possible to build a first plant with this concept that can compete with existing gas-only combined-cycle plants.

Bohn, M.S.; Williams, T.A.; Price, H.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA 9/1/06-11/30/06 Prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) Golden the closest tower leg The data from the SecondWind Nomad2 logger is emailed to the Renewable Energy Research Energy Research Laboratory Page 10 University of Massachusetts, Amherst Amherst, MA 01003 #12;Wind Speed

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

63

Radar Measurement of Cooling Tower Drift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of radar measurement of drift, generated by the wet cooling towers of power plants, is proposed. The water given off by the evaporative towers consists of two kinds of droplets: the recondensation dropletsgenerally less than 20 ?m in ...

Henri Sauvageot

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

2006 EPRI Cooling Tower Technology Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Fifteen papers presented at a 2006 Conference in Des Moines, Iowa discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SunShot Initiative: CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: CSP Tower Air Brayton...

66

Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Composite Tower Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Composite Tower Solutions Place Provo, Utah Zip 84604 Sector Wind energy Product Composite Tower Solutions manufactures equipment for wind resource assessment needs, including meteorological towers, weather towers, and data collection and instrumentation towers. Coordinates 40.233765°, -111.668509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.233765,"lon":-111.668509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

Cooling Tower Report, October 2008 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2008 Electricity Reliability Impacts of a Mandatory Cooling Tower Rule for Existing Steam Generation Units Cooling Tower Report, October 2008 More Documents & Publications...

69

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

70

Building a Better Transmission Tower | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

software that helped them build cheaper but sturdier towers for new high-voltage transmission lines. Their new towers are stronger but use less steel. They better...

71

Capacity Assessment of a Transmission Tower under Wind Loading.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transmission towers play a vital role in power distribution networks and are often subject to strong wind loads. Lattice tower design is often based on (more)

Mara, Thomas G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Model of the Inertial Recirculation Driven by Potential Vorticity Anomalies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some essential features of a recirculating inertial gyre (the recirculation) can be analyzed with a very simple, analytically tractable model. In wind-driven eddy-resolving general circulation models the recirculation appears as a strong sub-...

Paola Cessi; Glenn Ierley; William Young

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Recirculating Molten Metal Supply System And Method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The melter furnace includes a heating chamber (16), a pump chamber (18), a degassing chamber (20), and a filter chamber (22). The pump chamber (18) is located adjacent the heating chamber (16) and houses a molten metal pump (30). The degassing chamber (20) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the pump chamber (18), and houses a degassing mechanism (36). The filter chamber (22) is located adjacent and in fluid communication with the degassing chamber (20). The filter chamber (22) includes a molten metal filter (38). The melter furnace (12) is used to supply molten metal to an externally located holder furnace (14), which then recirculates molten metal back to the melter furnace (12).

Kinosz, Michael J. (Apollo, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Recirculation bubbler for glass melter apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas bubbler device provides enhanced recirculation of molten glass within a glass melter apparatus. The bubbler device includes a tube member disposed within a pool of molten glass contained in the melter. The tube member includes a lower opening through which the molten glass enters and upper slots disposed close to (above or below) the upper surface of the pool of molten glass and from which the glass exits. A gas (air) line is disposed within the tube member and extends longitudinally thereof. A gas bubble distribution device, which is located adjacent to the lower end of the tube member and is connected to the lower end of the gas line, releases gas through openings therein so as to produce gas bubbles of a desired size in the molten glass and in a distributed pattern across the tube member.

Guerrero, Hector (Evans, GA); Bickford, Dennis (Folly Beach, SC)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Noise from cooling towers of power parks  

SciTech Connect

A study is presented of the noise pollution problem for large power parks proposed for the future. Such parks might have an area of about 75 sq. miles, and a generating capacity up to 48000 MW. A comparative analysis has been done for natural and mechanical-draft wet towers as the major sources of acoustic power. Noise radiation from single isolated towers as well as from a dispersed array of towers has been considered for both types of cooling systems. Major noise attenuation effects considered are due to the atmospheric absorption and A- weighting. Conditions of 60F and 70 percent relative humidity in a still atmosphere have been assumed. (auth)

Zakaria, J.; Moore, F.K.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

76

Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

Turner, Jessica K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

78

Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers, and other associates heat rejection equipment.

Matson, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

On thermal performance of seawater cooling towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seawater cooling towers have been used since the 1970s in power generation and other industries, so as to reduce the consumption of freshwater. The salts in seawater are known to create a number of operational problems, ...

Sharqawy, Mostafa H.

80

Cooling Tower Considerations for Energy Optimizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy conservation strategies and production economies involve more than examining the cooling tower fan consumption of horse power. Colder water provides vast potentials for savings. Ask yourself, "What is the dollar and energy utilization value if I can obtain 1F colder water off my cooling tower than I am now getting?" Therefore, let us first examine the elements of the cooling tower to determine the areas of greatest potential improvement to generate that colder water. The air flow generated by the fan should first be looked at In both counterflow or crossflow towers to determine that maximum flow is available through pitching fans up to within the motor plate amperage limitations and fan stall point calculations. If applicable, new fiberglass state of the art fans can be installed and additional motor horse power added. However, the most dramatic improvement that can be obtained in producing colder water is to retrofit modern film fill to replace the old fashioned wood splash bar slats.

Burger, R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Assessment of Tall Wind Tower Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technologies that enable wind turbines to capture more energy at a given site have the potential to reduce the overall cost of energy, thereby making wind power more competitive against conventional power generation. Because wind speed generally increases with height above ground, one way to increase energy capture is to elevate the rotor by means of a taller tower. To exploit this potential, a number of tall tower models are under development or have recently been introduced to the wind energy market. I...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Eddy-Driven Recirculations from a Localized Transient Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of time-mean recirculation gyres from the nonlinear rectification of an oscillatory, spatially localized vorticity forcing is examined analytically and numerically. Insights into the rectification mechanism are presented and the ...

Stephanie Waterman; Steven R. Jayne

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

FILES- COOLING TOWER PLUME MODELING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ladies and Gentlemen:? In the referenced letter, Progress Energy Carolinas, Inc. (PEC) noted that the input and output' files for the modeling analysis for cooling tower plumes would be provided under a separate cover. due to the requirements for native file submittal (see NRC RAI # 5.3.3.1-1 and PGN RAI # H-295). The purpose of this letter is to submit these calculation native files. The supplemental information contained in the files on the attached CD is provided to support the NRC's review of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant Units 2 and 3 (HAR) Environmental Report (ER), but does not comply with the requirements for electronic submission in the NRC Guidance Document. The NRC staff requested the files be submitted in their native formats, required for utilization in the software employed to support the ER development. As discussed with the NRC's environmental project manager responsible for review of the HAR ER, the data provided on the attached CD are of a nature that is not easily convertible to PDF output files. Furthermore, PEC understands that converting the information to PDF output files; would not serve the underlying purpose of the submittal; i.e., to provide the raw, unprocessed data to enable reviewers to evaluate software used in the HAR application. Enclosure 1 provides a list of folders with the requested data files that are included on the attached CD (Attachment 5.3.3.1-1 SACTI Native Files). If you have any further questions, or need additional information, please contact Bob Kitchen at

Garry D. Mi Er

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Heat recirculating cooler for fluid stream pollutant removal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process by which heat is removed from a reactant fluid to reach the operating temperature of a known pollutant removal method and said heat is recirculated to raise the temperature of the product fluid. The process can be utilized whenever an intermediate step reaction requires a lower reaction temperature than the prior and next steps. The benefits of a heat-recirculating cooler include the ability to use known pollutant removal methods and increased thermal efficiency of the system.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wet cooling towers: rule-of-thumb design and simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey of wet cooling tower literature was performed to develop a simplified method of cooling tower design and simulation for use in power plant cycle optimization. The theory of heat exchange in wet cooling towers is briefly summarized. The Merkel equation (the fundamental equation of heat transfer in wet cooling towers) is presented and discussed. The cooling tower fill constant (Ka) is defined and values derived. A rule-of-thumb method for the optimized design of cooling towers is presented. The rule-of-thumb design method provides information useful in power plant cycle optimization, including tower dimensions, water consumption rate, exit air temperature, power requirements and construction cost. In addition, a method for simulation of cooling tower performance at various operating conditions is presented. This information is also useful in power plant cycle evaluation. Using the information presented, it will be possible to incorporate wet cooling tower design and simulation into a procedure to evaluate and optimize power plant cycles.

Leeper, S.A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- C I Haynes Inc - RI 02  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C I Haynes Inc - RI 02 C I Haynes Inc - RI 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: C. I. Haynes, Inc. (RI.02 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: C.I. Hayes, Incorporated RI.02-1 Location: Cranston , Rhode Island RI.02-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 RI.02-2 RI.02-3 Site Operations: Performed limited scale tests on heat treating uranium in a vacuum cold-wall furnace in 1964 RI.02-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on the limited quantities of material handled RI.02-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium RI.02-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to C. I. Haynes, Inc.

87

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water OptimizationCleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization2 Cooling tower and condenser water

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Case study that summarizes the Wind Tower Systems and its Space Frame tower. Describes their new wind tower design and explains how DOE funding made this possible.

89

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser WaterEfficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water2 Cooling tower and condenser water

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radio Towers Geothermal Area Radio Towers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Radio Towers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.03666667,"lon":-115.4566667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

91

Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings) Place Manitowoc, Wisconsin Zip 54221-1957 Sector Wind energy Product US-based manufacturer of wind turbine towers, turbine assemblies such as nacelles, and monopiles. References Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings) is a company located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Broadwind_Energy_Formerly_Tower_Tech_Holdings&oldid=343059"

92

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

93

BOREAS SSA-YJP Tower Flux Data Revised  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tower Flux Data Revised A revised version of the BOREAS TF04 tower flux data is now available from the ORNL DAAC. Data providers have revised the data set entitled "BOREAS TF-04...

94

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model is employed to predict the cooling tower performance at various conditions. Natural convection when the fan is off is accounted by using an assumed airflow rate. The energy savings at five cities representing different typical climates are studied using typical meteorological year data. The results show that, if the tower capacity can be increased by 50% and 100% by running extra tower cells, the annual total fan power usage can be reduced by 44% and 61%, respectively. A cumulative saving percent curve is generated to help estimate the annual total savings percent when extra cooling tower capacity is available during only part of a year.

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loving care is paid to the compressors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration systems. When problems arise, operator: run around in circles with expensive "fixes", but historically ignore the poor orphan, the cooling tower perched on the roof or located somewhere in the backyard. When the cooling water is too hot, high temperature cut-outs occur and more energy must be provided to the motors to maintain the refrigeration cycle. Cooling Towers: 1) . . . are just as important a link in the chain as the other equipment, 2) ... are an important source of energy conservation, 3) ... can be big money makers, and 4 ) .. . operators should be aware of the potential of maximizing cold water. Most towers designed over 20 years ago were inefficiently engineered due to cheap power and the "low bidder" syndrome. Operating energy costs were ignored and purchasing criteria was to award the contract to the lowest bidder. This paper investigates internal elements of typical towers, delineates their functions and shows how to upgrade them in the real world for energy savings and profitability of operation.

Burger, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loving care is paid to the compressors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration and air conditioning systems. When problems arise, operators and engineers run around in circles with expensive "fixes" , but historically ignore the poor orphan of the system, the cooling tower perched on the roof or located somewhere in the backyard. When cooling water is too hot, high temperature cut-outs occur and more energy must be provided to the motors to maintain the refrigeration cycle. Cooling towers: 1) are just as important a link in the chain as the other equipment; 2) are an important source of energy conservation; 3) can be big money makers; 4) operators should be aware of the potential of maximising cold water. Most towers were designed over 20 years ago and were inefficiently engineered due to cheap power and the "low bidder gets the sale" syndrome. Operating energy costs were ignored and purchasing criteria was to award the contract to the lowest bidder. All too often the low bidder - even though some of the most respected firms were involved - cut thermal corners for the sale. This paper investigates the internal elements of the typical types of cooling towers currently used, delineates their functions and shows how to upgrade them in the real world for energy savings and profitability of operation. Hard before and after statistics of costs and profits obtained through optimization of colder water by engineered thermal upgrading will be discussed. Salient points will be reenforced with on-the-job, hands-on, slides and illustrations.

Burger, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling tower is often an overlooked source of easy energy savings. As long as it's running not much thought is usually given to it, but when numbers are applied to how much a degree of colder water is worth it can become a valuable and ready source of energy and monetary savings. Many of these savings can come from simple maintenance or by changing the way the tower is operated. The more dramatic savings can come from changing to advanced fill concepts. Over our 40 years of working in the cooling tower industry we have measured the effects of doing simple maintenance, the effects of blocking air flow with seemingly good ideas like maintenance walkways, the effects of nearby heat sources, and what fill changes are likely to get. We have put numbers to what a degree is worth to a large petrochemical company so you can get an idea of the magnitude of what these sometimes simple changes are actually worth. Also, we've included a way to monitor your tower for changes in performance.

Phelps Jr., P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Wastewater Reuse as Cooling-Tower Makeup  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many parts of the United States begin to face shortages, utilities will look for reliable new water sources. Focusing on the use of wastewater as makeup to cooling towers, this report describes commercially available wastewater treatments for power plant applications and highlights the need for research to control biologic slime and phosphate scale formation.

1987-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

99

PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER  

SciTech Connect

Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has cross-flow and counter-current MDCT's consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to simulate the cooling tower performance for the counter-current cooling tower and to conduct a parametric study under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and performed the benchmarking analysis against the integral measurement results to accomplish the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of parametric calculations was performed to investigate the impact of wind speeds and ambient conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was also benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS integral test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be published here.

Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Automatic HVAC Air Recirculation Made Easy with Stepper Motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TND416/D Abstract: This paper highlights the system requirements and operating conditions of automatic air recirculation valves and reviews compatibility of existing actuator types with these requirements. When comparing the available technologies, it becomes clear that air recirculation flap actuators containing a bipolar stepper motor offer key advantages over actuators with other motor types. It is shown how specific bipolar stepper motor drive techniques can contribute to the overall system performance while the total system cost is minimized. The paper elaborates on availability and key features of motor driver integrated circuits that allow advanced control of these novel actuators. 1.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Tower Systems to develop the Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly optimized design of five custom-shaped legs and interlaced steel struts. With this design, Space Frame towers can support turbines at greater heights, yet weigh and cost less than traditional steel tube towers. Wind Tower Systems LLC (now

102

Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006  

SciTech Connect

The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

MT Ritsche

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

Use of low temperature blowers for recirculation of hot gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for maintaining motors at low operating temperatures during recirculation of hot gases in fuel cell operations and chemical processes such as fluidized bed coal gasification. The apparatus includes a means for separating the hot process gas from the motor using a secondary lower temperature gas, thereby minimizing the temperature increase of the motor and associated accessories.

Maru, H.C.; Forooque, M.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

104

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics August 20, 2013 - 5:06pm Addthis In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid heated in the receiver is used to generate steam, which, in turn, is used in a conventional turbine generator to produce electricity. Some power towers use water/steam as the heat-transfer fluid. Other advanced designs are experimenting with molten nitrate salt because of its superior heat-transfer and energy-storage capabilities. Individual commercial plants can be sized to produce up to 200 megawatts of electricity. Illustration of a power tower power plant. Sunlight is shown reflecting off a series of heliostats surrounding the tower and onto the receiver at the top of the tower. The hot heat-transfer fluid exiting from the receiver flows down the tower, into a feedwater reheater, and then into a turbine, which generates electricity that is fed into the power grid. The cool heat-transfer fluid exiting the turbine flows into a steam condenser to be cooled and sent back up the tower to the receiver.

105

SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

106

RI&E Nano particles*) Carried out by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 RI&E Nano particles*) Carried out by: Faculty: CTW/EWI/TNW Department: 1. Information Nano characteristics of nano material (or parent material) **) Carcinogenic Mutagenic Reprotoxic Density (kg/dm3 ) kg/dm3 State of aggregation of the nano material Liquid Solid 2. Health hazard nano material Danger

Twente, Universiteit

107

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Side Stream Filtration Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Pacific Northwest National Laboratory X. Duan, J.L. Williamson, K.L McMordie Stoughton and B.K. Boyd October 2012 FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM i Contact Will Lintner, PE Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-3120 E-mail: william.lintner@ee.doe.gov Cover photo: Cooling Towers. Photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ii Acknowledgements The authors of the report would like to thank the following individuals that provided support to

108

Wet/dry cooling tower and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Update: Cooling tower and spray pond technology  

SciTech Connect

The 9th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium, under the auspices of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, took place at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Belgium, in September 1994. Technical topics discussed included cooling system design, performance, operation, environmental effects, modeling and components. Symposium proceedings will not be published. However, information of primary interest to staffs of power plants in the United States is summarized in this article.

Bartz, J.A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Predict particle collection in spray towers  

SciTech Connect

Spray tower wet scrubbers are used for control of particulates (as well as gaseous pollutants). The author has found that in cocurrent spray scrubbers, the most important parameter in determining particle collection efficiency is inlet dust particle size, followed by (in decreasing order of importance) gas velocity, collector droplet size, liquid-to-gas ratio, and length of scrubber. In countercurrent scrubbers, the most important parameters are collector droplet size, liquid-to-gas ratio, length of scrubber, and gas velocity. Note that some of these factors are directly related to collection, and some are related indirectly. This article provides equations, based on theoretical considerations and empirical data, for predicting particle collection efficiencies. The parameter ranges covered are typical of those encountered in the practical operation of conventional spray towers that use a ``cool`` (or cooled) inlet gas stream, so the equations are applicable to many industrial spray tower systems. The results are limited based on the ranges of the parameters evaluated, and while it may be possible to extrapolate beyond that, this has not been verified. (The initial model was for a flue-gas desulfurization system at a large power station that requires both particulate removal and SO{sub 2} absorption.)

Hesketh, H.E. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Spin-Isospin responses via charge exchange reactions of RI beams at SHARAQ  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear spectroscopy via direct reactions of RI beams is discussed focusing on characteristics of charge-exchange reactions of RI beams. Recent experiments using the SHARAQ spectrometer at the RIBF are presented, where isovector spin monopole and spin-non-flip monopole responses are studied by charge exchange reaction of RI beams. Some experimental plans and perspectives are also presented.

Shimoura, Susumu [Center for Nuclear Study (CNS), University of Tokyo Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

112

Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge’s K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. Oak Ridge's K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program recently demolished one of the most iconic structures at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The 382-foot checkerboard water tower - the tallest in North America - dominated the site's skyline since its construction in 1958. The K-1206 F Fire Water Tower operated as part of the site's fire protection system, but it was drained, disconnected and permanently taken

113

A Microcomputer Model of Crossflow Cooling Tower Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy use characteristics of evaporative cooling towers are of interest because, although such towers are widely used in industry, they do require a substantial amount of energy. Evaporative cooling towers are basically large heat exchangers that use both sensible heat transfer and mass transfer to cool. The heat and mass transfer process for a crossflow cooling tower has been modeled on an Apple II microcomputer. Various heat loads or weather conditions can be imposed on a given tower to evaluate its response; moreover, a subprogram can evaluate pressure drop and motor/fan characteristics. Determination of the energy required to operate the tower enables its performance to be compared against energy-saving operations such as variable speed drive or changes in fill height or type.

Reichelt, G. E; Jones, J. W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Xenon Recirculation-Purification with a Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid-xenon based particle detectors have been dramatically growing in size during the last years, and are now exceeding the one-ton scale. The required high xenon purity is usually achieved by continuous recirculation of xenon gas through a high-temperature getter. This challenges the traditional way of cooling these large detectors, since in a thermally well insulated detector, most of the cooling power is spent to compensate losses from recirculation. The phase change during recondensing requires five times more cooling power than cooling the gas from ambient temperature to -100C (173 K). Thus, to reduce the cooling power requirements for large detectors, we propose to use the heat from the purified incoming gas to evaporate the outgoing xenon gas, by means of a heat exchanger. Generally, a heat exchanger would appear to be only of very limited use, since evaporation and liquefaction occur at zero temperature difference. However, the use of a recirculation pump reduces the pressure of the extracted liquid, forces it to evaporate, and thus cools it down. We show that this temperature difference can be used for an efficient heat exchange process. We investigate the use of a commercial parallel plate heat exchanger with a small liquid xenon detector. Although we expected to be limited by the available cooling power to flow rates of about 2 SLPM, rates in excess of 12 SLPM can easily be sustained, limited only by the pump speed and the impedance of the flow loop. The heat exchanger operates with an efficiency of (96.8 +/- 0.5)%. This opens the possibility for fast xenon gas recirculation in large-scale experiments, while minimizing thermal losses.

K. L. Giboni; E. Aprile; B. Choi; T. Haruyama; R. F. Lang; K. E. Lim; A. J. Melgarejo; G. Plante

2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS ADVANCE CLASS WAIVER OF PATENT RI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RI RI GHTS FOR TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPED UNDER DOE FUNDING AGREEMENTS RELATING TO DOE'S SOLID STATE LIGHTING PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT ROUND 8; DOE FUNDING OPPORTUNITY ANNOUNCMEN T DE-FOA-0000563; W(C)-2011-012 ; CH1632 The Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy anticipates providing federal financial assistance in the form of cooperative agreements that develop or improve commercially viable materials, devices, or systems for solid-state lighting general illumination applications. Successful applicants will engage in applied resea rch in the Solid State Lighting (SSL) Product Development Program . Product Development is the systematic use of knowledge gained from basic and applied research to develop or improve commercially viable materials, devices, or systems. Technical

116

Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, Jr., John E. (Aiken, SC)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Competitive Landscape of Mobile Telecommunications Tower Companies in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the entry of 3G and WiMAX players, the Indian mobile subscriber base is expected to reach 1110 million by the end of 2015. To meet mobile infrastructure demand, India will require approximately 350,000 to 400,000 mobile telecommunications towers ... Keywords: Business Models, Infrastructure Sharing, Joint Venture Companies, Mobile Network Operators MNO, Mobile Telecommunication Tower Valuation, Mobile Telecommunications Towers, Telecommunication Circles

N.P. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Solar power tower development: Recent experiences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent experiences with the 10 MW{sub e} Solar Two and the 2.5 MW{sub t} TSA (Technology Program Solar Air Receiver) demonstration plants are reported. The heat transfer fluids used in these solar power towers are molten-nitrate salt and atmospheric air, respectively. Lessons learned and suggested technology improvements for next-generation plants are categorized according to subsystem. The next steps to be taken in the commercialization process for each these new power plant technologies is also presented.

Tyner, C.; Kolb, G.; Prairie, M. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

H-FACET: Alignment Tool for Power Tower Heliostats  

H-FACET: Alignment Tool for Power Tower Heliostats ... for the U.S. Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2011-4640P

122

Application of upspray type water distribution systems in cooling towers  

SciTech Connect

The efficient and uniform distribution of the warm circulating water on to the filling of cooling towers has been the continuing goal of the tower designer. The final element in the water distribution system, the sprayer, plays an important role in achieving this objective. This paper discusses the performance and operational characteristics of a sprayer utilized in counterflow towers that directs the water leaving the sprayer nozzle in an upward direction and briefly compares its performance with that of downward sprayers. The discussion also covers relative tower economics and application data of the sprayer.

Fay, H.P.; Hesse, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spray tower: the workhorse of flue-gas desulfurization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recently developed spray tower system for use in a utility flue gas desulfurization system is simple, durable, and capable of achieving very high sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies, possibly approaching 100%. The principles behind the design and operation of the spray tower are discussed. The quality of water used for washing, tower size limitations, construction materials liquid distribution, gas-inlet design, gas distribution, mass transfer, and operating characteristics are examined. Procedures to maintain the reliability and high performance of the spray tower are described. (5 diagrams, 5 photos, 12 references, 1 table)

Saleem, A.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

THE STEEL TOWER: A 21st CENTURY TALL BUILDING.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper outlines the need for a new mixed use high-rise project for the commercial business district of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The proposed tower combines (more)

Duke, Peter Guldenshuh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Out of Ashes and Rubble: The Pirelli Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tower was novel, experimental architecture because it was the first skyscraper to be built in Italy; it was an extremely tall

Ziegler, Claudia J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Performance evaluation of natural draught cooling towers with anisotropic fills.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: In the design of a modern natural draught wet-cooling tower (NDWCT), structural and performance characteristics must be considered. Air flow distortions and resistances (more)

Reuter, Hanno Carl Rudolf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluation and performance enhancement of cooling tower spray zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The performance of wet cooling towers can be improved by installing spray nozzles that distribute the cooling water uniformly onto the fill whilst (more)

Roux, Daniel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Evaluation and performance prediction of cooling tower spray zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling tower spray nozzle performance characteristics such as the water distribution onto the fill material, air side pressure drop, pump head, drop size distribution and (more)

Viljoen, D. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation and performance prediction of cooling tower rain zones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cooling tower rain zone performance characteristics such as the loss coefficient and the Merkel number are evaluated and simulated. To this end the influence of (more)

Pierce, Darren John

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Lattice Tower Design of Offshore Wind Turbine Support Structures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Optimal design of support structure including foundation and turbine tower is among the most critical challenges for offshore wind turbine. With development of offshore wind (more)

Gong, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

California Code of Regulations, Title 8, Section 1646. Tower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subchapter 4. Construction Safety Orders Article 22. Scaffolds--Various Types New query 1646. Tower Scaffolds and Rolling Scaffolds, Wood or Metal. (a) The minimum...

132

Comparative evaluation of cooling tower drift eliminator performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of standard industrial evaporative cooling tower drift eliminators is analyzed using experiments and numerical simulations. The experiments measure the

Chan, Joseph Kwok-Kwong

133

The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers  

SciTech Connect

Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered.

Abedi-Nik, Farhad [SADRA Institute of Higher Education, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid [K.N.T University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hydraulic Cooling Tower Driver- The Innovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the weaknesses of present day cooling tower drives are fan wrecks caused by shaft couplings breaking, gear box malfunctions due to inadequate lubrication, gear tooth wear, and inaccessibility for inspection and routine maintenance. The hydro-drive eliminates these items from the drive train and puts the same electric motor HP at ground level close coupled to a hydraulic pump, filters, and oil reservoir. Hydraulic lines bring oil pressure to the hydraulic motor, which is more than 75% less weight than comparable gear boxes and presents a smooth practically trouble free performance. In this three cell installation, the original 75 horsepower motors and 18 diameter fans were cooling a total of 14,000 GPM which were CTI tested and 74.7% of capability. The upgrading and retrofit consisted of installing at ground level 100 horse power motors, 22 diameter fans, 14 high velocity recovery fan cylinders, V PVC splash bars, and high efficiency cellular drift eliminators. Testing after completion indicated a 92% tower now circulating 21,000 GPM instead of the original 14,000.

Dickerson, J. A.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Refrigerant Phase-Change Stirling-Cycle Solar Power Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper firstly introduces the principles of Refrigerant Phase-Change Stirling-Cycle solar power towers This heat engines use solar reservoire. When the refrigerant in an engine cylinder absorbs heat from high-temperature heat sources, refrigerant ... Keywords: refrigerant phase-change cycle, heat engines, solar power tower, finite-time thermodynamics

Dezhong Huang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The cyclic multi-peg Tower of Hanoi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variants of the classical Tower of Hanoi problem evolved in various directions. Allowing more than 3 pegs, and imposing limitations on the possible moves among the pegs, are two of these. Here, we deal with the case of h?3 pegs arranged on ... Keywords: Multi-peg tower of Hanoi

Daniel Berend; Amir Sapir

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Modification of the Colony Tower for the RIO BLANCO detonation  

SciTech Connect

The tower is a 180-ft tall steel-frame experimental oil shale processing retort structure with heavy process equipment on various levels. The structural response of the tower to the ground motion from Project Rio Blanco is analyzed and the necessary structural modifications described. (TFD)

Blume, J.A.; Lee, L.A.; Freeman, S.A.; Honda, K.K.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

2009 EPRI Cooling Tower Technology Seminar and Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling towers and associated systems cause significant loss of availability and heat rate degradation in both nuclear and fossil-fired power plants. Twenty-five papers presented at a 2009 conference in Cincinnati, Ohio discussed industrial experience and provided case histories of cooling tower problems and solutions.

2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Experiment Study on Tower Cooling Energy-Saving Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the transition season periods the technology of tower cooling is used to cool the internal heat source region in the buildings, which is energy saving and environment friendly technology. To aim at climatic conditions of the transition season ... Keywords: towers cooling, experiments, fluence factors, energy saving

Ji Amin; He Li; Yue Zhiqiang; Jie Li; Gang Yin; Zhang Qinggang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-58634 Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenser Water Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization Tengfang Xu Contents HVAC WATER SYSTEMS.............................................................................................. 2 Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Design Considerations; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paramount considerations associated with a hydrogen tower are corrosion (in the form of hydrogen embrittlement) and structural failure (through bursting or fatigue life degradation). Although hydrogen embrittlement (HE) requires more research and experimentation, it does not appear to prohibit the use of turbine towers for hydrogen storage. Furthermore, the structural modifications required to store hydrogen in a tower are technically feasible. We discovered that hydrogen towers have a''crossover pressure'' at which their critical mode of failure crosses over from fatigue to bursting. The crossover pressure for many turbine towers is between 10 and 15 atm. The cost of hydrogen storage per unit of storage capacity is lowest near the crossover pressure. Above the crossover pressure, however, storage costs rise quickly.

Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE UBV(RI){sub C} COLORS OF THE SUN  

SciTech Connect

Photometric data in the UBV(RI){sub C} system have been acquired for 80 solar analog stars for which we have previously derived highly precise atmospheric parameters T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectra. UBV and (RI){sub C} data for 46 and 76 of these stars, respectively, are published for the first time. Combining our data with those from the literature, colors in the UBV(RI){sub C} system, with {approx_equal} 0.01 mag precision, are now available for 112 solar analogs. Multiple linear regression is used to derive the solar colors from these photometric data and the spectroscopically derived T{sub eff}, log g, and [Fe/H] values. To minimize the impact of systematic errors in the model-dependent atmospheric parameters, we use only the data for the 10 stars that most closely resemble our Sun, i.e., the solar twins, and derive the following solar colors: (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.005, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.166 {+-} 0.022, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.352 {+-} 0.007, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.702 {+-} 0.010. These colors are consistent, within the 1{sigma} errors, with those derived using the entire sample of 112 solar analogs. We also derive the solar colors using the relation between spectral-line-depth ratios and observed stellar colors, i.e., with a completely model-independent approach, and without restricting the analysis to solar twins. We find (B - V){sub Sun} = 0.653 {+-} 0.003, (U - B){sub Sun} = 0.158 {+-} 0.009, (V - R){sub Sun} = 0.356 {+-} 0.003, and (V - I){sub Sun} = 0.701 {+-} 0.003, in excellent agreement with the model-dependent analysis.

Ramirez, I. [McDonald Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Michel, R.; Schuster, W. J. [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 877, Ensenada, B.C., CP 22800 (Mexico); Sefako, R.; Van Wyk, F. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Tucci Maia, M. [UNIFEI, DFQ-Instituto de Ciencias Exatas, Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Itajuba MG (Brazil); Melendez, J. [Departamento de Astronomia do IAG/USP, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Sao Paulo, 05508-900 SP (Brazil); Casagrande, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Postfach 1317, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Castilho, B. V. [Laboratorio Nacional de Astrofisica/MCT, Rua Estados Unidos 154, 37504-364 Itajuba, MG (Brazil)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoas conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

None

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

Nguyen, Q.A.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is disclosed for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material. The apparatus consists of a tower bioreactor which has mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

Nguyen, Q.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards of downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (winter average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:...

149

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

150

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

151

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

152

Performance evaluation of wet-cooling tower fills with computational fluid dynamics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: A wet-cooling tower fill performance evaluation model developed by Reuter is derived in Cartesian coordinates for a rectangular cooling tower and compared to (more)

Gudmundsson, Yngvi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems  

SciTech Connect

The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

Sullivan; Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM), Carlson; Bryan J. (Ojo Caliente, NM), Wingo; Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM), Robison; Thomas W. (Stilwell, KS)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

154

Dynamic analysis of guyed towers subjected to wind loads incorporating nonlinearity of the guys.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Guyed masts are unique civil engineering structures, structurally efficient, selfsupporting lattice towers. High structural efficiency of guyed towers is achieved by the use of pre-tensioned (more)

Kaul, Rohit

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

156

Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies Preservative Spray Treatment Maintains Cooling Tower  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several problems common to most industrial wood framed cooling towers can be easily controlled with annual preservative spray treatment applications to the plenum area framework and drift eliminators. It eliminates the expensive periodic repairs due to wood decay which sooner or later will occur without preservative protection. Preventing or minimizing the destructive effect of internal wood decay of the framework also avoids unexpected down time due to emergency maintenance or unexpected collapse of the main supporting framework.

Reidenback, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nondestructive Evaluation: Conversion of RI-ISI Programs to Code Case N716  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work is under way to convert several plants from their existing risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) programs to the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) streamlined RI-ISI methodology. This streamlined RI-ISI approach has been codified in ASME Code Case N-716. This report provides a status of these activities and identifies interim results as well as lessons learned that will streamline future applications of this technology.

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

WA_1993_020_GENERAL_MOTORS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Foreign_Ri...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORSWaiverofDomesticandForeignRi.pdf More Documents & Publications WA04020GENERALELECTRICWaiverofDomesticandForeignIn.pdf WA03019GENERALMOTORSCORPWaiverofDom...

159

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

SciTech Connect

Confronted with contaminated land from the world wars and the postwar industrialization period, German researchers and practicing professionals have worked to develop processes for effective environmental restoration. This presentation documents efforts by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers to (1) identify collaborators and German technologies exhibiting near-term potential for clean-up of volatile organic contaminated soil and groundwater at Department of Energy sites, (2) critically assess performance, and (3) inform interested agencies. The project was limited to identification and preliminary evaluation and included engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. Two processes were identified: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well (PP/HW). Both technologies induce a recirculation flow field in the aquifer and enable simultaneous down hole treatment of the aquifer and vadose zone. University of Karlsruhe researchers have demonstrated the UVB/GZB technology in shallow aquifers with moderately high saturated thickness and hydraulic conductivities. The PP/HW technology offers potential for VOC treatment in sites with thin aquifers or heterogeneities. This paper describes identified German technologies and includes critical evaluations of well performance, associated treatment processes, operating variables, and aquifer-well interactions.

Webb, O.F.; Siegrist, R.L.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States). Environmental Science Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Experimental Investigation of the Padding Tower for Air Dehumidifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air conditioning with all fresh air is founded on the principle of dehumidifying by liquid desiccant. It has the characteristics of being clean, power-saving, easy to operate, and requiring low-grade heat. It is suitable for applying waste heat, and solar power as the heat source for regeneration. Hence, this system has a great latent potential for energy savings and environmental protection. The system chooses the padding tower as a dehumidifier and regenerator, which are often used in petrochemical industry. The system chooses a padding tower as a dehumidifier, and LiCl-Water as a liquid desiccant. The vapor in the air is absorbed by the spray of the LiCl solution, and then the absorbed vapor will be released by heating the absorbent. These processes form the circle of absorptive refrigeration operating in atmospheric pressure. This paper describes studies on the theory and experiment of the padding tower of the dehumidifying air conditioning, including selecting different padding and measuring the speed of the air flow and the solution flow and the pressure drop between the layers of the padding. The experimental and computational results indicate that the design parameters of the padding tower significantly influence the characteristics of the liquid desiccant air conditioning. Of these design parameters, the framework of the padding tower, ratio of the air and the concentration of the inlet solution is largest through the tower, the temperature and effects of the dehumidifying capability of the tower.

Wang, J.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, G.; An, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.  

SciTech Connect

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Altman, Susan Jeanne; Ciferno, Jared

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Brief paper: Output tracking of continuous bioreactors through recirculation and by-pass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose to regulate the output of an auto-catalytic bioprocess (a biological process associated with a growth of a micro-organism) by means of a recirculation loop and by-pass. We give conditions on the volume of the reactor and the ... Keywords: Continuous bioreactor, Nonlinear control design, Output regulation, Recirculation loop

Jrme Harmand; Alain Rapaport; Frdric Mazenc

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Line Measurement and Tuning of Multi-Pass Recirculation Time in the CEBAF Linacs Michael, USA Abstract CEBAF is a CW, recirculating electron accelerator, us- ing on-crest RF acceleration the beam to drift off-crest with respect to the accelerating fields. Figure 1: Layout of CEBAF Accelerator

166

Circulo: Saving Energy with Just-In-Time Hot Water Recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average home in the US flushes 1000's of gallons of water down the drain each year while standing at the fixture and waiting for hot water. Some households use a pump for hot water recirculation (HWR) to ensure that hot water is always immediately ... Keywords: Energy and Water Conservation, Hot Water Recirculation

Andrew Frye, Michel Goraczko, Jie Liu, Anindya Prodhan, Kamin Whitehouse

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Evaluation of numerical strategies for large eddy simulation of particulate two-phase recirculating flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Predicting particle dispersion in recirculating two-phase flows is a key issue for reacting flows and a potential application of large eddy simulation (LES) methods. In this study, Euler/Euler and Euler/Lagrange LES approaches are compared in the bluff ... Keywords: Euler/Euler, Euler/Lagrange, LES, Particles, Two-phase recirculating flows

E. Riber; V. Moureau; M. Garca; T. Poinsot; O. Simonin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

American Tower Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Company Jump to: navigation, search Name American Tower Company Address P.O. Box 29 Place Shelby, Ohio Zip 44875 Sector Wind energy Product Agriculture;Business and legal services; Energy audits/weatherization; Engineering/architectural/design; Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 419-347-1185 Website http://www.amertower.com Coordinates 40.8814452°, -82.6618424° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8814452,"lon":-82.6618424,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

169

The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

Muckenthaler, F.J.

1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

170

Meteorological Tower Measurements of a Surface Cold Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

measurements from the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory meteorological research tower are used to describe the structure and physical processes of a strong surface cold front. Analysis reveals that the horizontal gradients in temperature and wind ...

M. A. Shapiro

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Dragan...

172

Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Offshore Tower Shading Effects on In-Water Optical Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was performed to estimate the shading effect induced on in-water irradiance and radiance measurements taken in the immediate vicinity of the Acqua Alta Oceanographic Tower (AAOT), located in the northern Adriatic Sea, which is ...

Giuseppe Zibordi; John Piero Doyle; Stanford B. Hooker

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid heated in the receiver is used to generate steam, which, in turn, is...

175

Introducing an Online Cooling Tower Performance Analysis Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers are used extensively for numerous industrial, residential, and commercial applications. Yet despite how common their uses, operators often do not know how to properly evaluate and optimize their performance. This is due to the complex and variable nature of all of the factors that can influence performance; fan speed, wind speed, sump temperature, heat load, ambient temperature, relative humidity, etc. This can be overwhelming for a regular operator resulting in many cooling towers being set to a default operating condition and forgotten. This paper will introduce a web-based cooling tower analysis tool being developed to help users understand and optimize operational efficiency. The calculations, evaluations, and models will be discussed in detail to highlight important design considerations and issues. This will include how the Merkel Theory, psychometric properties, tower types, and historical weather data are incorporated into the analysis.

Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.; Rao, P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

User's Manual: Cooling-Tower-Plume Prediction Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities planning to build generating plants that use evaporative cooling are required to estimate potential seasonal and annual environmental effects of cooling-tower plumes. An easy-to-use computerized method is now available for making such estimates.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Facility Don Ana Sun Tower Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer NRG Energy/eSolar Location Dona Ana County, New Mexico Coordinates 32.485767°, -106.7234639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.485767,"lon":-106.7234639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

178

Alpine SunTower Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunTower Solar Power Plant SunTower Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Alpine SunTower Solar Power Plant Facility Alpine SunTower Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer NRG Energy/eSolar Location Lancaster, California Coordinates 34.6867846°, -118.1541632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6867846,"lon":-118.1541632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

DRIFT : a numerical simulation solution for cooling tower drift eliminator performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method for the analysis of the performance of standard industrial evaporative cooling tower drift

Chan, Joseph Kwok-Kwong

180

Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condenser water optimization Tengfang Xu Contents HVAC WATERHVAC Water Systems Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

Xu, Tengfang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

"Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System"  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Self Cooled Recirculating Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Wall System" Inventor ..--.. Richard P. Majeski Disclosed is a design for a fully axisymmetric, fast flowing liquid lithium plasma facing "wall" or surface which, in its present form, is intended for implementation in a tokamak. The design employs JxB forces to form a free-surface flow along a guide wall at the outer boundary of the plasma. The implementation of the disclosure design includes a system for recirculating the liquid metal within the volume of the toroidal field coils using inductive pumping, an approach wich allows independent energizing of the wall-forming and recirculating pumping systems, cooling of the recirculating liquid using fluid heat exchange with a molten salt,

182

Nondestructive Evaluation: RI-ISI Status, Extensions and Resolution of Implementation Issues - 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) Support project for the first three quarters of 2009. The RI-ISI Support project provides for the coordination and participation of risk technology to various industry groups and identifies and extends the use of risk technology to other components and programs.

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

QuRiNet: A Wide-Area Wireless Mesh Testbed for Research and Experimental Evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in QuRiNet are powered by solar panels, running with multiple radios. QuRiNet provides the backbone in Figure 1. All nodes, except the gateway nodes, use solar power due to the lack of connectivity as a commu- nity rooftop wireless mesh network [2]. This network has to compete with home wireless networks

California at Davis, University of

184

2010sr27[cooling_tower_complete].doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friday, September 17, 2010 Friday, September 17, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov K Cooling Tower Project Reaches Completion Aiken, S.C. - One of the most visual milestones of cleanup projects underway within the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management was the demolition of the K-Reactor Cooling Tower at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Now, this American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project has been

185

International cooling-tower and spray pond symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains the manuscripts of sixty-one papers that were presented at the 7th Cooling Tower and Spray Pond Symposium of the International Association for Hydraulic Research, organized by the B.E. Vedeneev Institute (VNIIG) and held in Leningrad, USSR, in June 1990. This report represents a worldwide state-of-the-art survey of recent work on cooling towers and spray ponds. Individual papers are indexed separately on the energy database.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Environmental Impacts from the Operation of Cooling Towers at SRP  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made of the environmental effects that would occur from the operation of cooling towers at the SRP reactors. A more realistic numerical model of the cooling tower plume has been used to reassess the environmental impacts. The following effects were considered: (1) the occurrence of fog and ice and their impact on nearby structures, (2) drift and salt deposition from the plume, (3) the length and height of the visible plume, and (4) the possible dose from tritium.

Smith, F.G. III

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cooling Tower Optimization Study Technical Update for 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a technical update on the progress of testing three different configurations of cooling tower fan drives. The particular focus is upon the gear box where most disabling failures are occurring. It will describe the configurations and instrumentation used to track the ongoing operational conditions being monitored.The standard mode of operation for a cooling tower fan motor is either on or off, as it may be cost-effective to take some cells out of service under certain ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

Numerical investigation of recirculation in the UTSI MHD combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies were carried out to investigate the gross structure of flow in cylindrical combustors. The combustor configurations studied are variations of a working design used at the University of Tennessee Space Institute to burn pulverized coal at temperatures in excess of 3000K for generation of a plasma feeding a magnetohydrodynamic channel. The numerical studies were conducted for an isothermal fluid; the main objective of the calculations was to study the effect of the oxidant injection pattern on the gross structure of recirculating flows within the combustor. The calculations illustrate the basic features of the flow in combustors of this type and suggest implications for the injection of coal and oxidizer in this type of combustor.

Schulz, R.J.; Lee, J.J.; Giel, T.V. Jr.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

RECENT PROGRESS TOWARD A MUON RECIRCULATING LINEAR ACCELERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Both Neutrino Factories (NF) and Muon Colliders (MC) require very rapid acceleration due to the short lifetime of muons. After a capture and bunching section, a linac raises the energy to about 900 MeV, and is followed by one or more Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA), possibly followed by a Rapid Cycling Synchnotron (RCS) or Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) ring. A RLA reuses the expensive RF linac section for a number of passes at the price of having to deal with different energies within the same linac. Various techniques including pulsed focusing quadruopoles, beta frequency beating, and multipass arcs have been investigated via simulations to improve the performance and reduce the cost of such RLAs.

Slawomir Bogacz, Vasiliy Morozov, Yves Roblin, Kevin Beard

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Computation of turbulent recirculating flows using a hybrid adaptive grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid adaptive gridding procedure is applied to the computation of two-dimensional turbulent, recirculating flows. The procedure combines both the local refinement method and the global moving grid method. The moving grid method is applied to obtain the initial adaptive solution. The local refinement method is then used on the large error regions flagged by using the weight function approach. The test cases are a backward facing step flow, a two-dimensional side jet flow, and an axisymmetric swirling flow. By comparing with the fine uniform grid solution, the numerical efficiencies ranging from 20 to 40 are obtained in the test problems. The most attractive feature of the procedure is its ease of application.

Lee, D.; Yeh, C.L. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Caldwell and Johnson, Exeter, RI  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caldwell and Caldwell and Johnson Exeter, RI BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-e cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

192

Cooling-tower rebuild, treatment overhaul halt fouling  

SciTech Connect

Partial fixes over a period of time were insufficient to meet cooling requirements at this four-tower powerplant. The eventual remedy involved complete fill replacement and chemistry-program revision. Cooling-tower performance hinges on many factors. Assuming the proper water and air distribution and unhindered operation of spray nozzles, pumps, valves, etc, fill design is the key element. However, a decade of experience at Keystone station (operated by Pennsylvania Electric Co for a consortium of East Coast utilities) showed that more than just changing to a fouling-resistant fill was required to provide and maintain design performance. As described in this article, careful analysis, revision, and continuous monitoring of the chemical water-treatment program were needed as well. At each of Keystone's two units, two natural-draft, hyperbolic towers provide cooling for main-condenser circulating water and service water. The 325-ft-tall towers are counter-current flow, and measure 247 ft across the basin. Film-type fill originally installed in the towers consisted of assemblies of fiber-cement board, 9 ft deep in the center and 7 ft in the peripheral regions. Fiber-cement was also the construction material used in the drift eliminators, and in the piping connected to concrete distribution flumes within the towers.

Gall, G.P.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object of this study is to analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States. The hub heights of modern turbines used for wind farm projects are now 70 meters (m) to 100 m above ground and some advanced turbines under development for deployment during the second half of this decade are rated at 2-5 megawatts of energy generation with rotor diameters near 100 m and hub heights of 100-120 m. These advanced turbines will take advantage of the higher wind speeds aloft to generate more wind energy. Specific knowledge of important wind shear characteristics near and at turbine hub height is needed to optimize turbine design and wind farm layout. Unfortunately, wind speed shear measurements at heights of 80-120 m were virtually nonexistent a few years ago and are still quite uncommon today. The Central Plains is a prime wind energy development region and knowledge about the wind shear characteristics will reduce uncertainty about the resource and enhance wind farm design. Previous analyses of tall tower data (Schwartz and Elliott, 2005) concentrated on data from specific states. The wind energy community has recognized the need to fill the gap of direct wind speed measurements at levels 70 m and higher above the ground. Programs instituted during the last 5 years at the state level and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) State Energy Program initiative have placed anemometers and vanes at several levels on existing tall (70 m+) communication towers. The Central Plains has a fairly high concentration of tall tower sites. The distribution of tall tower sites varies among the states in the Central Plains, because the tall tower program is new and the available state and federal funding to establish tall towers is variable. Our wind resource assessment group at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has obtained much of these necessary measurement data from both individual state sources and regional organizations. Most of the data are available to the public, though data from one tower in Colorado are proprietary. We have begun to analyze important wind climate parameters, including wind shear from the tall towers. A total of 13 tall towers were used for this study. Eleven of the towers had the highest anemometer level between 100 m and 113 m. Two towers had the highest measurement level between 70 m and 85 m above ground. The distribution of the towers among the states is: two sites in Texas and Oklahoma; six sites in Kansas; and one site each in Colorado, South Dakota, and North Dakota. Figure 1 shows the locations and names of the thirteen towers. The wind resource at these sites can be classified as ranging from good-to-excellent. Eight tall tower sites have Class 3 resource, four sites have Class 4 resource, and one has Class 5 resource at 50 m.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nondestructive Evaluation: EPRI's Participation in the RI-ISI Benchmark Study--Applications and Results: 2008 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although methodologies for risk-informed in-service inspection (RI-ISI) programs have been developed and implemented in several countries, no direct comparison of various RI-ISI methodologies has been applied to the same plant.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

195

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance  

SciTech Connect

This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Analysis of mass transfer performance in an air stripping tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carryover of working solution in a traditional stripping tower is of serious concern in real applications. A U-shaped spray tower to prevent carryover has been designed to study the stripping of water vapor from aqueous desiccant solutions of 91.8 to 95.8 wt% triethylene glycol. In this study, water vapor was removed from the diluted desiccant solution by heating the solution and stripping it with the ambient air. Therefore, the solution was concentrated to a desired concentration. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 3.2 to 5.13 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 1.6 to 2.76 kg/min. Since the literature data on air stripping towers are limited, studies on the mass transfer coefficient and other mass transfer parameters were carried out in this study. Under the operating conditions, the overall mass transfer coefficient calculated from the experimental data varied from 0.053 to 0.169 mol/m{sup 3}{center{underscore}dot}s. These corresponded to heights of a transfer unit of 2.3 to 0.71 m, respectively. The rates of stripping in this spray tower were typically varied from 2.28 to 12.15 kg H{sub 2}O/h. A correlation of the mass transfer coefficient for the air stripping process was also developed in this study.

Chung, T.W.; Lai, C.H.; Wu, H.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Integrated reactor-containment hyperbolic-cooling-tower system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary feasibility analysis has been conducted to evaluate placing a nuclear reactor containment building inside a large hyperbolic cooling tower, a concept previously suggested for fossil-fired units but for reasons other than those that motivate this evaluation. The geometry of the design, the amount of water available, and the shielding provided by the cooling tower are beneficial to the safety characteristics of the containment under accident conditions. Three means of decay heat management are employed: an initial water spray on the containment exterior, long-term air convection on side of the containment, and creation of a water pool inside the containment. A continuously spraying water tank on top of the containment allows for a completely passive decay heat removal system. An annular air chimney around the containment is effective in long-term removal of {approximately} 1O MW (thermal) through air convection. Five percent of the water inventory in the cooling-tower pond surrounding the containment is sufficient to flood the containment interior to a depth of 14.6 ft, thereby providing an internal containment heat sink. The packing and the height of the tower provide major scrubbing and dispersing sources for any uncontrolled radioactive leak. The cooling tower veil also protects the containment from external events such as lane crashes.

Patel, A.R.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Efficiency of an AMTEC recirculating test cell, experiments and projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) is an electrochemical device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy with efficiencies potentially near Carnot. The future usefulness of AMTEC for space power conversion depends on the efficiency of the devices. Systems studies have projected from 15% to 35% thermal to electric conversion efficiencies, and one experiment has demonstrated 19% efficiency for a short period of time. Recent experiments in a recirculating test cell (RTC) have demonstrated sustained conversion efficiencies as high as 10.2% early in cell life and 9.7% after maturity. Extensive thermal and electrochemical analysis of the cell during several experiments demonstrated that the efficiency could be improved in two ways. First, the electrode performance could be improved. The electrode for these tests operated at about one third the power density of state of the art electrodes. The low power density was caused by a combination of high series resistance and high mass flow resistance. Reducing these resistances could improve the efficiency to greater than 10%. Second, the cell thermal performance could be improved. Efficiencies greater than 14% could be realized through reducing the radiative thermal loss. Further improvements to the efficiency range predicted by systems studies can be accomplished through the development and use of an advanced condenser with improved reflectivity, close to that of a smooth sodium film, and the series connecting of individual cells to further reduce thermal losses.

Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

In situ treatment of VOCs by recirculation technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project described herein was conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to identify processes and technologies developed in Germany that appeared to have near-term potential for enhancing the cleanup of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated soil and groundwater at DOE sites. Members of the ORNL research team identified and evaluated selected German technologies developed at or in association with the University of Karlsruhe (UoK) for in situ treatment of VOC contaminated soils and groundwater. Project activities included contacts with researchers within three departments of the UoK (i.e., Applied Geology, Hydromechanics, and Soil and Foundation Engineering) during fall 1991 and subsequent visits to UoK and private industry collaborators during February 1992. Subsequent analyses consisted of engineering computations, groundwater flow modeling, and treatment process modeling. As a result of these project efforts, two processes were identified as having near-term potential for DOE: (1) the vacuum vaporizer well/groundwater recirculation well and (2) the porous pipe/horizontal well. This document was prepared to summarize the methods and results of the assessment activities completed during the initial year of the project. The project is still ongoing, so not all facets of the effort are completely described in this document. Recommendations for laboratory and field experiments are provided.

Siegrist, R.L.; Webb, O.F.; Ally, M.R.; Sanford, W.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Kearl, P.M.; Zutman, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

High-Power Laser Pulse Recirculation for Inverse Compton Scattering-Produced Gamma-Rays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inverse Compton scattering of high-power laser pulses on relativistic electron bunches represents an attractive method for high-brightness, quasi-monoenergetic {gamma}-ray production. The efficiency of {gamma}-ray generation via inverse Compton scattering is severely constrained by the small Thomson scattering cross section. Furthermore, repetition rates of high-energy short-pulse lasers are poorly matched with those available from electron accelerators, resulting in low repetition rates for generated {gamma}-rays. Laser recirculation has been proposed as a method to address those limitations, but has been limited to only small pulse energies and peak powers. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate an alternative method for laser pulse recirculation that is uniquely capable of recirculating short pulses with energies exceeding 1 J. Inverse Compton scattering of recirculated Joule-level laser pulses has a potential to produce unprecedented peak and average {gamma}-ray brightness in the next generation of sources.

Jovanovic, I; Shverdin, M; Gibson, D; Brown, C

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Wind-Driven Recirculations and Exchange in the Labrador and Irminger Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is demonstrated that recently observed cyclonic recirculation gyres in the Irminger and Labrador Seas may be forced by the strong cyclonic wind stress curl that develops each winter seaward of the east coast of Greenland. Idealized analytical ...

Michael A. Spall; Robert S. Pickart

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Guangzhou West Tower Faade System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guangzhou West Tower is an extremely tall public building. The energy efficiency evaluation of its faade should be different than that of ordinary public buildings. Based on the national code GB50189-2005, Design Standard for Energy efficiency of Public Buildings, typical meteorological yearly data for Guangzhou were used and revised according to architectural character of Guangzhou West Tower. The energy efficiency design of a single skin faade and active airflow curtain wall was analyzed by a dynamic energy simulation tool and modified weather data. The payback period of initial investment in the faade system was evaluated based on simulation results. In addition, the results confirm the faade system scheme of Guangzhou West Tower.

Meng, Q.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cooling Towers - Energy Conservation and Money Making Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The utilization of colder water conserves energy, creates profits, increases product output. In an effort to obtain greater efficiencies and conserve both energy and dollars, all too many engineers neglect the potential of the cooling tower. Many cooling towers in operation are performing at levels as low as 50% of capability. This is energy wasteful and financially foolish. There are many reasons for this deficiency, among them the present service is greater than the original requirements, slippage due to age and deterioration, or the installation could have been originally installed undersized. This paper will investigate the various elements, their functions and methods of upgrading their performance by retrofit with the use of modern technology. Case histories will be examined in three major industries, chemicals, refrigeration and petrochemical illustrating how intelligent rebuilding can produce profits and conserve energy. Actual statistics will be cited showing that the return of investment (ROI) can be quite rapid by optimizing the performance of the cooling tower.

Burger, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Conversion of Solar Two to a Kokhala hybrid power tower  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The continued drop in energy prices and restructuring of the utility industry have reduced the likelihood that a follow-on commercial 100-MW, power tower project will be built immediately following the Solar Two demonstration project. Given this, it would be desirable to find a way to extend the life of the Solar Two project to allow the plant to operate as a showcase for future power tower projects. This paper looks at the possibility of converting Solar Two into a commercial Kokhala hybrid power tower plant at the end of its demonstration period in 1998. The study identifies two gas turbines that could be integrated into a Kokhala cycle at Solar Two and evaluates the design, expected performance, and economics of each of the systems. The study shows that a commercial Kokhala project at Solar Two could produce power at a cost of less than 7 e/kWhr.

Price, H.W.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

206

Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Cooling Towers (photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) * Scaling: Scaling is the precipitation of dissolved mineral components that have become saturated in solution, which can lower efficiency of the system. * Fouling: Fouling occurs when suspended particles or biologic growth forms an insulating film on heat transfer surfaces. Common foulants include organic matter, process oils, and silt, which can also lower system performance. * Microbiological Activity: Microbiological activity refers to microorganisms that live and grow in the cooling system that can contribute

207

Dry cooling tower operating experience in the LOFT reactor  

SciTech Connect

A dry cooling tower has been uniquely utilized to dissipate heat generated in a small experimental pressurized water nuclear reactor. Operational experience revealed that dry cooling towers can be intermittently operated with minimal wind susceptibility and water hammer occurrences by cooling potential steam sources after a reactor scram, by isolating idle tubes from the external atmosphere, and by operating at relatively high pressures. Operating experience has also revealed that tube freezing can be minimized by incorporating the proper heating and heat loss prevention features.

Hunter, J.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Comparison of Second Wind Triton Data with Meteorological Tower Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the increased interest in remote sensing of wind information in recent years, it is important to determine the reliability and accuracy of new wind measurement technologies if they are to replace or supplement conventional tower-based measurements. In this study, we present the results of an analysis characterizing the measurement performance of a state-of-the-art SOund Detection And Ranging (sodar) device when compared to a high-quality tower measurement program. Second Wind Inc. (Somerville, MA, USA) provided NREL with more than six months of data from a measurement program conducted near an operating wind farm in western Texas.

Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Modeling, loading, and preliminary design considerations for tall guyed towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors first summarize the results of an investigation they carried out on the collapse of a 1900 ft tall guyed tower under ice and wind loads. Based on this investigation, they then proceed to present some structural analysis recommendations relating to loading and modeling concerns. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of ice loading, and on the level of accuracy required in modeling the nonlinear response behavior. Finally, the conclusions drawn from this study are used to formulate preliminary design guidelines. This facilitates a systematic approach for the design of tall guyed towers. 23 refs.

Gantes, C.; Khoury, R.; Connors, J.J.; Pouangare, C. [Engg Information Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

On Why Disks Generate Magnetic Towers and Collimate Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that accretion disks with magnetic fields in them ought to make jets provided that their electrical conductivity prevents slippage and there is an ambient pressure in their surroundings. We study equilibria of highly wound magnetic structures. General Energy theorems demonstrate that they form tall magnetic towers whose height grows with every turn at a velocity related to the circular velocity in the accretion disk. The pinch effect amplifies the magnetic pressures toward the axis of the towers whose stability is briefly considered.

D Lynden-Bell

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

211

On Why Disks Generate Magnetic Towers and Collimate Jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that accretion disks with magnetic fields in them ought to make jets provided that their electrical conductivity prevents slippage and there is an ambient pressure in their surroundings. We study equilibria of highly wound magnetic structures. General Energy theorems demonstrate that they form tall magnetic towers whose height grows with every turn at a velocity related to the circular velocity in the accretion disk. The pinch effect amplifies the magnetic pressures toward the axis of the towers whose stability is briefly considered.

Lynden-Bell, Donald

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Solar Two: A successful power tower demonstration project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar Two, a 10MWe power tower plant in Barstow, California, successfully demonstrated the production of grid electricity at utility-scale with a molten-salt solar power tower. This paper provides an overview of the project, from inception in 1993 to closure in the spring of 1999. Included are discussions of the goals of the Solar Two consortium, the planned-vs.-actual timeline, plant performance, problems encountered, and highlights and successes of the project. The paper concludes with a number of key results of the Solar Two test and evaluation program.

REILLY,HUGH E.; PACHECO,JAMES E.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

213

SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Power Tower Improvements Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential to Reduce Costs on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power

214

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseAnnlAvgGross Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Gross. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

215

Microphysical Measurements from an Aircraft Ascending with a Growing Isolated Maritime Cumulus Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of precipitation in the top of an isolated maritime cumulus tower is traced by four rapid penetrations with an instrumented aircraft between 400 and 1000 m below the visible top of the growing tower. The hydrometeor distribution ...

Paul T. Willis; John Hallett

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A New Tall-Tower Meteorological Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Technologies Group of the Savannah River Technology Center operates an extensive meteorological monitoring network of 13 tower in and near the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. The data from this system are available in ''real-time'' for emergency response atmospheric release modeling and operational weather forecasting.

Parker, M.J.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

800mm luxury : pencil tower phenomenon in Hong Kong, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

150m2 - 40m2 - 60m3. Pencil Towers are slender pencil-like apartment buildings. They are commonly found in high-dense Asian cities such as Hong Kong, Tokyo and Singapore. Focusing on Hong Kong as the context of research, ...

Yam, Hiu Lan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers (presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites for diverse areas in the central plains (Texas to North Dakota)--Turbines hub heights are now 70-100 m above ground and Wind measurements at 70-100+ m have been rare. (2) Present conclusions about wind shear characteristics for prime wind energy development regions.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Executive Summary: Assessment of Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Solar Technology Cost and Performance Forecasts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sargent& Lundy LLC conducted an independent analysis of parabolic trough and power tower solar technology cost and performance.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Assessment of Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Solar Technology Cost and Performance Forecasts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sargent and Lundy LLC conducted an independent analysis of parabolic trough and power tower solar technology cost and performance.

Not Available

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NREL: MIDC/National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (39.91 N...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center collects Irradiance and Meterological data from the National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower....

223

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction CENTER FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal

Salvaggio, Carl

224

Model and Seismic Analysis of Large-scale Wind Turbine Tower Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The working condition of wind turbine tower structure with a massive engine room and revolving wind wheels is very complex. The paper simplify the wind turbine tower model with finite element analysis software --ANSYS, completed modal analysis firstly, ... Keywords: wind turbine tower, model analysis, resonance, time-history analysis, dynamic

Xiang Liu; Jiangtao Kong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor Zuerst. The adaptive controller was successlullytesteclover il pcriod of tu'o nonths at a biogas tower reuetoriu pilot are not applicable to the biogas tower reüctor.since a dontinatingf-eatureof the new reactol' prir-rciplc-is its

Knobloch,Jürgen

226

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2004 Authors Kristoffersen, Astrid H., Ashok J. Gadgil, and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 9th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms - RoomVent 2004, Pagination pp 6 Date Published September 5-8, 2 Conference Location Coimbra, Portugal Abstract Tracer gas measurements are commonly used to estimate the fresh air exchange rate in a room or building. Published tracer decay methods account for fresh air supply, infiltration, and leaks in ductwork. However, the time delay associated with a ventilation system recirculating tracer back to the room also affects the decay rate. We present an analytical study of tracer gas decay in a well-mixed, mechanically-ventilated room with recirculation. The analysis shows that failing to account for delays can lead to under- or over-estimates of the fresh air supply, depending on whether the decay rate calculation includes the duct volume

227

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Title Effect of room air recirculation delay on the decay rate of tracer gas concentration Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2007 Authors Lorenzetti, David M., Astrid H. Kristoffersen, and Ashok J. Gadgil Journal Indoor Air Pagination 7 Keywords recirculating ventilation, tracer decay rate Abstract Tracer gas measurements are used to estimate the flow rate of fresh air into a room or building. These methods commonly account for the decay of tracer gas concentration as the result of ventilation air supply and infiltration, using a well-mixed model of the space. Some researchers also have considered the effect of leakage in the ventilation ductwork. This paper considers the effect of recirculation through ventilation ducts on the calculated fresh air supply rate. Transport delay in the ducts can significantly alter the time evolution of tracer concentration, and hence alter the estimated air change rate.

228

&RPSXWHU (QJLQHHULQJ DW WKH 8QLYHUVLW\\ RI ,OOLQRLV 3URI 6WHYHQ 6 /XPHWWD VWHYH#FUKFXLXFHGX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 &RPSXWHU (QJLQHHULQJ DW WKH 8QLYHUVLW\\ RI ,OOLQRLV 3URI 6WHYHQ 6 /XPHWWD VWHYH#FUKFXLXFHGX 3URI 6

Lumetta, Steve

229

Theoretical analysis of natural-convection towers for solar-energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A theoretical study of solar-powered natural convection tower (chimney) performance is presented. Both heated and cooled towers are analyzed, the latter using evaporating water as the cooling mechanism. The results, which are applicable to any open-cycle configuration, show that the ideal conversion efficiencies of both heated and cooled natural convection towers are linear functions of height. The performance of a heated tower in an adiabatic atmospheric ideally approaches the Carnot efficiency limit of approx. 3.4%/km(1.0%/1000 ft). Including water pumping requirements, the ideal limit to cooled tower performance is approx. 2.75%/km(0.85%/1000 ft). Ambient atmospheric conditions such as vertical temperature gradient (lapse rate) and relative humidity can have significantly adverse effects on natural convection tower performance. The combined effects of lapse rate and ambient relative humidity are especially important for cooled natural convection towers.

Lasier, D.D.; Jacobs, E.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Computer Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional buildings are cooled and ventilated by mechanically induced drafts. Natural ventilation aspires to cool and ventilate a building by natural means, such as cross ventilation or wind towers, without mechanical equipment. A simple computer program was developed to simulate airflow through a wind tower based on tower dimensions and air temperature. The program was compared to experimental results with reasonable agreement. Parametric analysis indicates that interior air temperature approaches outdoor air temperature asymptotically as tower height and cross-sectional area are increased, and that it may be more cost effective to increase the tower?s height than its cross sectional area. The program was then used to simulate hour-by-hour indoor air temperatures of an occupied auditorium in Dayton, OH. The results indicate that a large wind tower was able to keep the temperature of an occupied auditorium at a comfortable level year round.

Seryak, J.; Kissock, J. K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Environmental performance of air staged combustor with flue gas recirculation to burn coal/biomass  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental and thermal performance of a 1.07 m diameter, 440 kW atmospheric fluidized bed combustor operated at 700{degrees}C-920{degrees}C and burning coal was studied. Flue gas recirculation was incorporated to enhance the thermal performance and air staging was used to control emissions of SO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O. Studies focused on the effect of excess air, firing rate, and use of sorbent on system performance. The recirculation-staging mode with limestone had the highest thermal efficiency (0.67) using the firing equation. Emission data showed that flue gas recirculation (ratio of 0.7) significantly reduced NO{sub x} emissions; and that use of limestone sorbent at a Ca/S ratio of 3 reduced SO{sub 2} emissions by 64% to approximately 0.310 g/MJ.

Anuar, S.H.; Keener, H.M.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tower City, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tower City, North Dakota: Energy Resources Tower City, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.9227548°, -97.6739889° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.9227548,"lon":-97.6739889,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Advanced Lighting Controls - My Venture from the Ivory Tower Speaker(s): Charlie Huizenga Date: June 15, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Dragan Charlie Curcija Lighting energy represents 30-40% of commercial building electricity consumption, yet very few buildings have advanced lighting controls. The potential energy savings are tremendous as is the opportunity to reduce demand on the grid during critical peak use periods. Charlie will describe how low-cost wireless radio technology developed at UC Berkeley and commercialized by Adura Technologies is creating a paradigm shift in the way we think about controlling lighting. Beyond deep energy savings and demand response, the technology offers personal control for occupants and

234

Microsoft Word - Final_NineCanyon_CommunicationTowerInstall_CX  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2013 1, 2013 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Kelly Gardner, PMP Project Manager, TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Nine Canyon Substation Communication Tower Addition: 331800 McNary Sub Bus Tie Relay Replacements and 310427 McNary-Badger Canyon Transfer Trip Install Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 - Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Kennewick, Benton County, Washington Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install a 60-foot communications tower and associated communication equipment at the Benton County Public Utility District's Nine Canyon Substation in Benton County, Washington. The upgrade would involve replacing the

235

No Chemical, Zero Bleed Cooling Tower Water Treatment Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a process to treat cooling tower water by means of a fully automated and chemical free mechanical water treatment process. This is an alternative to conventional chemical treatment. Beginning with a suction pump to draw water out of the tower sump, water goes through a permanent magnetic descaler to increase the water solubility and begin the scale inhibition process. This also descales existing scale build-up in the system. Ozone is manufactured from ambient air and injected into the bypass system through a venturi type injector. This kills algae, slime and bacteria and enhances the magnetic descaling process. The final stage filter separates solids from the water to prevent corrosion from impingement. These solids are automatically purged to the sanitary drain. Clarified water is returned to the sump where the process repeats on a 10%-20% by volume side stream basis.

Coke, A. L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

237

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011 CERN Waste Heat EN-CV February 28th 2012 1 2011 Power Dissipated by the Cooling Towers The cooling circuits at CERN use evaporative open cooling towers to discharge into the atmosphere the heat towers per complex depend on the amount of cooling power required. LHC one cooling tower per even LHC

Wu, Sau Lan

238

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges  

SciTech Connect

This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

Daily III, W D

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Life Sciences Animal Facility Handbook Life Science Animal Facility Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Closed-loop Systems with Cooling Towers.......................................... V-10 Recirculating-loop Systems with Cooling Towers.......................................... V-22 #12;vii Recirculating Systems Closed-loop Systems with Cooling Towers...........................................VI-3 Recirculating

Scott, Robert A.

240

High Flux Isotopes Reactor (HFIR) Cooling Towers Demolition Waste Management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a joint initiative between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, operated by UT-Battelle, and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) to characterize, package, transport, treat, and dispose of demolition waste from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), Cooling Tower. The demolition and removal of waste from the site was the first critical step in the planned HFIR beryllium reflector replacement outage scheduled. The outage was scheduled to last a maximum of six months. Demolition and removal of the waste was critical because a new tower was to be constructed over the old concrete water basin. A detailed sampling and analysis plan was developed to characterize the hazardous and radiological constituents of the components of the Cooling Tower. Analyses were performed for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals and semi-volatile constituents as defined by 40 CFR 261 and radiological parameters including gross alpha, gross beta, gross gamma, alpha-emitting isotopes and beta-emitting isotopes. Analysis of metals and semi-volatile constituents indicated no exceedances of regulatory limits. Analysis of radionuclides identified uranium and thorium and associated daughters. In addition 60Co, 99Tc, 226Rm, and 228Rm were identified. Most of the tower materials were determined to be low level radioactive waste. A small quantity was determined not to be radioactive, or could be decontaminated. The tower was dismantled October 2000 to January 2001 using a detailed step-by-step process to aid waste segregation and container loading. The volume of waste as packaged for treatment was approximately 1982 cubic meters (70,000 cubic feet). This volume was comprised of plastic ({approx}47%), wood ({approx}38%) and asbestos transite ({approx}14%). The remaining {approx}1% consisted of the fire protection piping (contaminated with lead-based paint) and incidental metal from conduit, nails and braces/supports, and sludge from the basin. The waste, except for the asbestos, was volume reduced via a private contract mechanism established by BJC. After volume reduction, the waste was packaged for rail shipment. This large waste management project successfully met cost and schedule goals.

Pudelek, R. E.; Gilbert, W. C.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single-Effect Absorption Chiller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Numerical Model for the Dynamic Simulation of a Recirculation Single- Effect Absorption Chiller A dynamic model for the simulation of a new single-effect water/lithium bromide absorption chiller. Keywords: absorption; chiller; modelling; transient; water-lithium bromide; falling film hal-00713904

Recanati, Catherine

242

Application of LEED and SPiRiT to a Proposed Building Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The planned U.S. Army Environmental Center (AEC) administrative and command functions facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD has been designated an Army Showcase Project, which must incorporate the principles of sustainable design and development (SDD), and be worthy of the Sustainable Project Rating Tool (SPiRiT) platinum level rating, and the U.S. Green Building Counsels (USGBC) rating of platinum for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The U.S. Army Engineer Research Development Center, Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC/CERL) was tasked with performing an independent review of the preliminary DD Form 1391 to: (1) determine if the proposed design will rate platinum in SPiRiT and LEED, and if not, how to improve the design to ensure the platinum rating; (2) determine the proposed energy savings from the base case model to the proposed design, and (3) review the SPiRiT and LEED credits claimed by the A/E, and determine if any new credits will be associated with CERL-recommended design features. This study concluded that, with appropriate funding and review, this project has the potential to earn the platinum rating on both LEED and SPiRiT criteria, and to achieve

Sarah Nemeth; Donald Fournier; Richard Schneider; Ducey Franklin Holcomb; Richard Scholze; Megan Tooker; John Vavrin; Julie Webster; Sarah Nemeth; Richard Schneider; Roch Ducey; Franklin Holcomb; Eric Johnson; Andrew Phelps; Richard Scholze; David Schwenk; Annette Stumpf; William Taylor; Megan Tooker; John Vavrin; Julie Webster; Gary Phetteplace; Donald Fournier; Perrin Pellegrin

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Hybrid Tower Study: Volume 3: Phase 3 -- Scale Model Development and Full-Scale Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid towers maximize the power transmission efficiency of the available space whenever there is the need to have both ac and dc lines in the same corridor. This study developed calculation techniques and design rules for the placement of conductors energized with HVAC and HVDC circuits on the same towers. Significantly, the study did not identify any hybrid interactions that would prevent the successful operation of a hybrid corridor or hybrid tower transmission line.

1994-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Atqasuk meteorology station (AMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point, and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a chilled mirror hygrometer (CMH) is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity (RH) probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower.

Ritsche, MT

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Design of Light Weight Structure for Wind Turbine Tower by Using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports a new design scheme of light weight structure for wind turbine tower. This design scheme is based on the integration of the nano-structured...

246

An investigation of design alternatives for 328-ft (100-m) tall wind turbine towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As wind turbines are continued to be placed at higher elevations, the need for taller wind turbine towers becomes necessary. However, there are multiple challenges (more)

Lewin, Thomas James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

RECIPIENT:Desert Research Institute STATE:NV PROJECT Tall Tower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Institute STATE:NV PROJECT Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Southern Nevada; NREl Tracking TITLE: No. 11-012 Funding Opportunity...

248

Enhancement of CN Tower lightning current derivative signals using a modified power spectral subtraction method.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lightning current measurements are possible using instrumental tall structures or rocket-triggered lightning. The CN Tower has been a source of lightning current data for the (more)

Mehmud, Huma

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A tall tower flux measurement setup was established in metropolitan Houston, Texas, to measure trace gas fluxes from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in (more)

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Performance analysis of heat transfer processes from wet and dry surfaces : cooling towers and heat exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Numerical modelling of heat and mass transfer and optimisation of a natural draft wet cooling tower.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main contribution of this work is to answer several important questions relating to natural draft wet cooling tower (NDWCT) modelling, design and optimisation. Specifically, (more)

Williamson, Nicholas J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Performance Analysis of Heat Transfer Processes from Wet and Dry Surfaces: Cooling Towers and Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this work is to study the thermal and hydraulic performance of evaporatively cooled heat exchangers, including closed wet cooling towers, and dry (more)

Hasan, Ala Ali

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Impact of nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation on gaseous releases from a landfill bioreactor cell  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the impact of nitrate injection on a full scale landfill bioreactor through the monitoring of gaseous releases and particularly N{sub 2}O emissions. During several weeks, we monitored gas concentrations in the landfill gas collection system as well as surface gas releases with a series of seven static chambers. These devices were directly connected to a gas chromatograph coupled to a flame ionisation detector and an electron capture detector (GC-FID/ECD) placed directly on the field. Measurements were performed before, during and after recirculation of raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate. Raw leachate recirculation did not have a significant effect on the biogas concentrations (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O) in the gas extraction network. However, nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation induced a marked increase of the N{sub 2}O concentrations in the gas collected from the recirculation trench (100-fold increase from 0.2 ppm to 23 ppm). In the common gas collection system however, this N{sub 2}O increase was no more detectable because of dilution by gas coming from other cells or ambient air intrusion. Surface releases through the temporary cover were characterized by a large spatial and temporal variability. One automated chamber gave limited standard errors over each experimental period for N{sub 2}O releases: 8.1 {+-} 0.16 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 384), 4.2 {+-} 0.14 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 132) and 1.9 {+-} 0.10 mg m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (n = 49), during, after raw leachate and nitrate-enhanced leachate recirculation, respectively. No clear correlation between N{sub 2}O gaseous surface releases and recirculation events were evidenced. Estimated N{sub 2}O fluxes remained in the lower range of what is reported in the literature for landfill covers, even after nitrate injection.

Tallec, G.; Bureau, C. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France); Peu, P.; Benoist, J.C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Lemunier, M. [Suez-Environnement, CIRADE, 38 Av. Jean Jaures, 78440 Gargenville (France); Budka, A.; Presse, D. [SITA France, 132 Rue des 3 Fontanot, 92000 Nanterre Cedex (France); Bouchez, T. [Cemagref, UR HBAN, Parc de Tourvoie, BP44, F-92163 Antony (France)], E-mail: theodore.bouchez@cemagref.fr

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Regenerative High-Rise Tower in Shreveport, Louisiana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zero Net Energy Buildings are increasingly being designed and constructed in response to the demand for sustainable buildings. But, we must now go beyond merely sustaining our environment for future generations we must provide regenerative designs that restore our natural environment. This paper will document the design of a regenerative high-rise tower in Shreveport, Louisiana, which will serve as a facility to train individuals in a non-profit organizations renewal strategies and demonstrate by example the pedagogy of regenerative design. The 16-story structure built in the 1950s and named the Petroleum Tower, reflecting the commodity that then ruled the local economy was vacant and asbestos-laden when given to the non-profit Community Renewal International (CRI) in 2001. In 2006, funded by a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, workers removed the asbestos. Through a follow up grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to support the design process of a new CRI headquarters building, the University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture completed architectural design studies for the building renewal. The principles of this new design include: day lighting, envelope configuration, building integrated photovoltaic systems, green surfaces, ventilation strategies, advanced mechanical cooling systems, regenerative elevator systems, energy management systems, water harvesting, grey water systems, trigeneration systems and a combined heating, hot water and power biodiesel plant.

Garrison, M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC TOWER JETS  

SciTech Connect

Modern theoretical models of astrophysical jets combine accretion, rotation, and magnetic fields to launch and collimate supersonic flows from a central source. Near the source, magnetic field strengths must be large enough to collimate the jet requiring that the Poynting flux exceeds the kinetic energy flux. The extent to which the Poynting flux dominates kinetic energy flux at large distances from the engine distinguishes two classes of models. In magneto-centrifugal launch models, magnetic fields dominate only at scales {approx}< 100 engine radii, after which the jets become hydrodynamically dominated (HD). By contrast, in Poynting flux dominated (PFD) magnetic tower models, the field dominates even out to much larger scales. To compare the large distance propagation differences of these two paradigms, we perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations of both HD and PFD stellar jets formed via the same energy flux. We also compare how thermal energy losses and rotation of the jet base affects the stability in these jets. For the conditions described, we show that PFD and HD exhibit observationally distinguishable features: PFD jets are lighter, slower, and less stable than HD jets. Unlike HD jets, PFD jets develop current-driven instabilities that are exacerbated as cooling and rotation increase, resulting in jets that are clumpier than those in the HD limit. Our PFD jet simulations also resemble the magnetic towers that have been recently created in laboratory astrophysical jet experiments.

Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 600 Wilson Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon (France); Hartigan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, TX 77521-1892 (United States); Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW London (United Kingdom)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.  

SciTech Connect

The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fuel cell tower plant self-controlling coolant cleaning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an automated process for deaerating and purifying both the water which is recirculated in a coolant loop through a stack of fuel cells and the make-up water for the coolant loop, a portion of the water from the coolant loop is blown down into a deaerator water reservoir to which make-up water is added by condensing water from the fuel cell stack reactant gas streams into a deaeration column disposed above the reservoir. The blowdown provides some of the heat for deaeration; and the amount of blowdown is controlled as a function of the amount of make-up water added to the coolant loop by sensing the location of a steam/liquid interface within the deaeration column. Water is withdrawn from the reservoir, purified, and then introduced into the coolant loop at a rate sufficient to maintain the desired amount of water circulating in the coolant loop.

Grasso, A.P.; Lane, J.W.

1982-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Microsoft Word - CX-Driscoll Sustation Tower.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6HSWHPEHU   6HSWHPEHU   REPLY TO ATTN OF: .(& SUBJECT: (QYLURQPHQWDO &OHDUDQFH 0HPRUDQGXP -LP 0DPPDUHOOD 3URMHFW 0DQDJHU ± 7(&7&6% Proposed Action: 'ULVFROO 6XEVWDWLRQ 5DGLR 7RZHU DQG $QWHQQD ,QVWDOODWLRQ Budget Information: :RUN 2UGHU  7DVN  Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): % 6LWLQJ FRQVWUXFWLRQ DQG RSHUDWLRQ RI PLFURZDYH DQG UDGLR FRPPXQLFDWLRQ WRZHUV DQG DVVRFLDWHG IDFLOLWLHV« Location: &ODWVRS &RXQW\ 2UHJRQ Proposed by: %RQQHYLOOH 3RZHU $GPLQLVWUDWLRQ %3$ Description of the Proposed Action: %3$ LV SURSRVLQJ WR LQVWDOO D QHZ UDGLR WRZHU DQG DQWHQQD DW LWV

260

Solar Two: A Molten Salt Power Tower Demonstration* Craig E.Tyner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Two: A Molten Salt Power Tower Demonstration* Craig E.Tyner Sandia National Laboratories.S. Department of Energy (DOE),Sandia National Laboratories, and industry to convert the 10-MwSolar One Power, is $48.5 million. The plant will begin operation in early 1996. Introduction A solar power tower plant

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Research for the Crane Boom Length Coefficient Considering the Tower Head Flexibility in Rotary Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When the crane boom length in rotary plane is determined, the traditional methods only consider support condition, non-uniform, boom end lateral displacement constraint effect of amplitude dragline and hoist rope tensile forces. Ignoring tower head elastic ... Keywords: Equivalent elastic support method, Rotary plane, Tower head flexibility, Non-conservative loading, Length coefficient

Zhang Guangyun; Lan Peng; Lu Nianli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Guideline for Cooling Tower Inspection and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling tower structural failures have recently become a focus area for the nuclear industry based on events that have resulted in lost generation as well as high repair costs. Environmental concerns regarding thermal pollution and water usage have also recently increased the need for guidance for cooling tower inspection and maintenance.

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

263

UT tower goes dark to conserve energy by KVUE.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UT tower goes dark to conserve energy by KVUE.com Posted on November 22, 2013 at 5:12 PM Updated, but the first time the tower turned off its lights for the initiative. In previous initiatives, the UT Energy) assisted with turning off lights and electronics across campus to conserve energy. While the clock faces

264

Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, A. Vahab (Golden, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cooling-Tower Performance Prediction and Improvement: Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New data and methods enable engineers to predict and improve the thermal performance of evaporative cooling towers. Current EPRI research focuses on analytic tools that will help utilities avoid costly operating penalties associated with cooling towers that do not meet thermal performance specifications.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal via upwardly directed recirculating fluidization  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to an improved device and method for the high gradient magnetic beneficiation of dry pulverized coal, for the purpose of removing sulfur and ash from the coal whereby the product is a dry environmentally acceptable, low-sulfur fuel. The process involves upwardly directed recirculating air fluidization of selectively sized powdered coal in a separator having sections of increasing diameters in the direction of air flow, with magnetic field and flow rates chosen for optimum separations depending upon particulate size.

Eissenberg, David M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Yin-An (Opelika, AL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Design and Operating Guidelines Manual for Cooling-Water Treatment - Treatment of Recirculated Cooling Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This preliminary manual was developed to provide a systematic procedure for evaluating candidate strategies for the treatment of recirculated cooling water. It presents (1) a means of selecting optimal treatment methods and facilities on the basis of technical and economic considerations, and (2) guidelines for proper cooling-water system operation. Descriptions of, and user's manuals for, the cooling-system process and chemical equilibrium computer simulation models are included.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Response of the Inertial Recirculation to Intensified Stratification in a Two-Layer Quasigeostrophic Ocean Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous observation and model studies show that the upper-ocean stratification is enhanced under global warming (Capotondi et al.; Cravatte et al.; Deser et al., etc.). The response of the recirculation, which is associated with the western ...

Shantong Sun; Lixin Wu; Bo Qiu

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Verification of BModes: Rotary Beam and Tower Modal Analysis Code; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes verification of BModes, a finite-element code developed to provide coupled modes for the blades and tower of a wind turbine. The blades, which may be rotating or non-rotating, and the towers, whether onshore or offshore, are modeled using specialized 15-dof beam finite elements. Both blade and tower models allow a tip attachment, which is assumed to be rigid body with six moments of inertia, and a mass centroid that may be offset from the blade or tower axis. Examples of tip attachments are aerodynamic brakes for blades and nacelle-rotor subassembly for towers. BModes modeling allows for tower supports including tension wires, floating platforms, and monopiles on elastic foundations. Coupled modes (implying coupling of flap, lag, axial, and torsional motions) are required for modeling major flexible components in a modal-based, aeroelastic code such as FAST1. These are also required for validation of turbine models using experimental data, modal-based fatigue analysis, controls design, and understanding aeroelastic-stability behavior of turbines. Verification studies began with uniform tower models, with and without tip inertia, and progressed to realistic towers. For the floating turbine, we accounted for the effects of hydrodynamic inertia, hydrostatic restoring, and mooring lines stiffness. For the monopole-supported tower, we accounted for distributed hydrodynamic mass on the submerged part of the tower and for distributed foundation stiffness. Finally, we verified a model of a blade carrying tip mass and rotating at different speeds (verifications of other blade models, rotating or non-rotating, have been reported in another paper.) Verifications were performed by comparing BModes-generated modes with analytical results, if available, or with MSC.ADAMS results. All results in general show excellent agreement.

Bir, G.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p* #e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p*?#e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L*6?ɢ??O? 42^*a ? ????l*ex?fA7???*?4TE?u\\??X ...

2005-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

271

Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 1 Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height An ASES Small Wind Webinar Mick Sagrillo-Wisconsin's Focus on Energy © 2008 by Mick Sagrillo 2 Definitions: rotor L&S Tech. Assoc., Inc. Rotor = "collector" for a wind system 3 Definitions: wind * Wind = the 'fuel' * Wind has two 'components' - Quantity = wind speed (velocity or V) - Quality = 'clean' flowing wind 4 Quantity * = average annual wind speed * Climate, not weather * Akin to annual average sun hours for PV or head and flow for hydro * Wind speed increases with height above ground... * ...Due to diminished ground drag (friction) 5 Power in the wind V³ * Wind speed = V * Power available is proportional to wind speed x wind speed x wind speed - or P ~ V x V x V - or P ~ V ³ * Therefore, 10% V = 33% P * Lesson !

272

Solar two: A molten salt power tower demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A consortium of United States utility concerns led by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) is conducting a cooperative project with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories, and industry to convert the 10-MW Solar One Power Tower Pilot Plant to molten nitrate salt technology. The conversion involves installation of a new receiver, a new thermal storage system, and a new steam generator; it utilizes Solar One`s heliostat field and turbine generator. Successful operation of the converted plant, called Solar Two, will reduce economic risks in building initial commercial power tow projects and accelerate the commercial acceptance of this promising renewable energy technology. The estimated cost of Solar Two, including its three-year test period, is $48.5 million. The plant will begin operation in early 1996.

Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sutherland, J.P. [Southern California Edison, Rosemead, CA (United States); Gould, W.R. Jr. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Cooling Tower Energy Conservation Through Hydraulic Fan Drives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many companies offer gearboxes, shafts, and couplings for cooling tower fan drives, with little or no innovation. These companies have traditionally been purchased with an emphasis on cost and not "Return on Investment!" In the past, when energy conservation or "Return on Investment" was emphasized, the only alternative was to add an expensive frequency inverter for variable speed control. This meant expensive rewiring, placing additional controls in an already crowded control room, or constructing a special building for them. However, with H.E.M.'s patented Hydraulic Fan Drive, one receives variable speed control and more efficiency for approximately the price of a mechanical drive. The new, more efficient Hydraulic Drive allows for a variable speed control and the ability to sense water temperature to control fan speed.

Dickerson, J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy (Cost) Savings by Zero Discharge in Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum reuse of cooling tower blowdown by the incorporation of a sidestream softening system to recycle water can allow for significant savings in energy costs for industry. The system design parameters described in this paper are based upon calcium sulfate, calcium carbonate, and silica solubility equations for the resultant high ionic strength of a zero blowdown system. Operational aspects are highlighted in terms of deposition, corrosion, and biofouling potentials as well as currently-practiced, successful treatment procedures. The effects and history of corrosion and scale inhibitors, as well as other treatment chemicals, have been evaluated for numerous plants utilizing zero blowdown, and a summation of this knowledge is presented here. The cost analysis of conventional systems versus recycle systems is based upon a computer model's predictions for makeup waters of various qualities and costs.

Matson, J. V.; Gardiner, W. M.; Harris, T. G.; Puckorius, P. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

The evolution of magnetic tower jets in the laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evolution of laboratory produced magnetic jets is followed numerically through three-dimensional, non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The experiments are designed to study the interaction of a purely toroidal field with an extended plasma background medium. The system is observed to evolve into a structure consisting of an approximately cylindrical magnetic cavity with an embedded magnetically confined jet on its axis. The supersonic expansion produces a shell of swept-up shocked plasma which surrounds and partially confines the magnetic tower. Currents initially flow along the walls of the cavity and in the jet but the development of current-driven instabilities leads to the disruption of the jet and a re-arrangement of the field and currents. The top of the cavity breaks-up and a well collimated, radiatively cooled, 'clumpy' jet emerges from the system.

A. Ciardi; S. V. Lebedev; A. Frank; E. G. Blackman; J. P. Chittenden; C. J. Jennings; D. J. Ampleford; S. N. Bland; S. C. Bott; J. Rapley; G. N. Hall; F. A. Suzuki-Vidal; A. Marocchino; T. Lery; C. Stehle

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

276

Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of the Cooling Tower Complex for the North Experimental Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of the Cooling Tower Complex for the North Experimental Area

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Flue gas injection control of silica in cooling towers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO{sub 2}-laden flue gas can decrease the potential for silica and calcite scale formation in cooling tower blowdown by lowering solution pH to decrease equilibrium calcite solubility and kinetic rates of silica polymerization. Flue gas injection might best inhibit scale formation in power plant cooling towers that use impaired makeup waters - for example, groundwaters that contain relatively high levels of calcium, alkalinity, and silica. Groundwaters brought to the surface for cooling will degas CO{sub 2} and increase their pH by 1-2 units, possibly precipitating calcite in the process. Recarbonation with flue gas can lower the pHs of these fluids back to roughly their initial pH. Flue gas carbonation probably cannot lower pHs to much below pH 6 because the pHs of impaired waters, once outgassed at the surface, are likely to be relatively alkaline. Silica polymerization to form scale occurs most rapidly at pH {approx} 8.3 at 25 C; polymerization is slower at higher and lower pH. pH 7 fluids containing {approx}220 ppm SiO{sub 2} require > 180 hours equilibration to begin forming scale whereas at pH 8.3 scale formation is complete within 36 hours. Flue gas injection that lowers pHs to {approx} 7 should allow substantially higher concentration factors. Periodic cycling to lower recoveries - hence lower silica concentrations - might be required though. Higher concentration factors enabled by flue gas injection should decrease concentrate volumes and disposal costs by roughly half.

Brady, Patrick Vane; Anderson, Howard L., Jr.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction108, Aiken, SC, USA ABSTRACT Determining the internal temperature of a mechanical draft cooling tower is to estimate the temperature of the air exiting a mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) through the use

Salvaggio, Carl

279

A case history of a coal gasification wastewater cooling tower at the Great Plains coal gasification project  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the conceptual process design of the Great Plains cooling water system, the fouling history of the cooling tower, and the results of the design modifications. In addition, general design guidelines for future wastewater reuse cooling towers are recommended. By following these guidelines, design engineers can minimize the risk of fouling that could impair a wastewater cooling tower's thermal performance.

Crocker, B.R.; Bromel, M.C.; Pontbriand, M.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Improvement of risk estimate on wind turbine tower buckled by hurricane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind is one of the important reasonable resources. However, wind turbine towers are sure to be threatened by hurricanes. In this paper, method to estimate the number of wind turbine towers that would be buckled by hurricanes is discussed. Monte Carlo simulations show that our method is much better than the previous one. Since in our method, the probability density function of the buckling probability of a single turbine tower in a single hurricane is obtained accurately but not from one approximated expression. The result in this paper may be useful to the design and maintenance of wind farms.

Li, Jingwei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Recirculating Beam Breakup Study for the 12 GeV Upgrade at Jefferson Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new high gradient C100 cryomodules with a total of 16 new cavities were installed at the end of the CEBAF south linac during the 2011 summer shutdown as part of the 12-GeV upgrade project at Jefferson Lab. We surveyed the higher order modes (HOMs) of these cavities in the Jefferson Lab cryomodule test facility and CEBAF tunnel. We then studied recirculating beam breakup (BBU) in November 2011 to evaluate CEBAF low energy performance, measure transport optics, and evaluate BBU thresholds due to these HOMs. This paper discusses the experiment setup, cavity measurements, machine setup, optics measurements, and lower bounds on BBU thresholds by new cryomodules.

Ilkyoung Shin, Todd Satogata, Shahid Ahmed, Slawomir Bogacz, Mircea Stirbet, Haipeng Wang, Yan Wang, Byung Yunn, Ryan Bodenstein

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Study of NO{sub x} Reduction by Fuel Injection Recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments in natural-gas fired boilers have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub X}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of the present investigation is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub X} reduction observed between FIR and FGR by studying laminar diffusion flames. The purpose of studying laminar flames is to isolate chemical effects from the effects of turbulent mixing and heat transfer, which are inherent in practical boilers. Numerical simulations of H{sub 2}-air and CH{sub 4}-air counterflow diffusion flames using full kinetics were performed and NO{sub X} emission indices calculated for various conditions. Studies were conducted in which a N{sub 2} diluent was added either on the fuel- or air-side of the flame for conditions of either fixed initial velocities or fixed fuel mass flux. Results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in diluent effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side verses air-side dilution. Simulations in which flow velocities were fixed as diluent was added either to the air or fuel stream showed lower NO{sub X} emissions for air-side dilution; however, if instead, fuel mass fluxes were fixed as diluent was added, which results in an increase in the velocity of the streams, fuel-side dilution was more effective. These results were independent of whether H{sub 2} or Ch{sub 4} was used as the fuel.

Feese, J.J.; Turns, S.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Experimental Approach to Stellar Reactions with RI Beams - Overview of Experiments on Hydrogen Burning -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a short review on resent developments achieved in astrophysics in the past years since last NN conference, experimental efforts in nuclear astrophysics primarily with RI beams were revisited, especially on the works relevant to neutron-deficient nuclei, the other half of the nuclear chart reviewed by Rehm in this conference. A new interesting recognition discussed in the past years is the important role of explosive hydrogen burning process in the very early stage of type II supernovae. A new broadening research field related to the first generation stars both from observations as well as from nuclear astrophysics was also discussed.

S. Kubono

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Lab Helps FAA Build Energy-Efficient Control Towers | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lab Helps FAA Build Energy-Efficient Control Towers Lab Helps FAA Build Energy-Efficient Control Towers Lab Helps FAA Build Energy-Efficient Control Towers April 23, 2010 - 10:57am Addthis With help from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its subcontractor, Redhorse Corporation, the agency that keeps our country's airports running is bolstering its energy efficiency. The Federal Aviation Administration is developing building plans that save energy - and money - at five airports in the western U.S. Government agencies are required by law to audit their buildings, so the FAA saw some Recovery Act funding as an opportunity to help fund its energy audits. Air traffic control towers are a vital service for travelers, keeping air traffic free of accidents. Their accompanying base buildings house administrative offices and support systems.

285

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the

286

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the

287

BREN Tower: A Monument to the Material Culture of Radiation Dosimetry Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a height of more than 1,500 feet, the BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower dominates the surrounding desert landscape of the Nevada Test Site. Associated with the nuclear research and atmospheric testing programs carried out during the 1950s and 1960s, the tower was a vital component in a series of experiments aimed at characterizing radiation fields from nuclear detonations. Research programs conducted at the tower provided the data for the baseline dosimetry studies crucial to determining the radiation dose rates received by the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Today, BREN Tower stands as a monument to early dosimetry research and one of the legacies of the Cold War.

Susan Edwards

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world ... BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog Some 345 tons of steel came tumbling down yesterday as a world

289

Economic and design analysis of daylighting a commercial tower in a hot and humid climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A forty story commercial office tower in Tampa, Florida was redesigned for daylighting. The methods are outlined and results illustrated, A cooling load comparison is done to determine the economic feasibility of such a ...

Roscow, Robert F

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

From Hot Towers to TRMM: Joanne Simpson and Advances in Tropical Convection Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Joanne Simpson began contributing to advances in tropical convection about half a century ago. The hot tower hypothesis jointly put forth by Joanne Simpson and Herbert Riehl postulated that deep convective clouds populating the equatorial trough ...

Robert A. Houze Jr.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electrically Active Hot Towers in African Easterly Waves prior to Tropical Cyclogenesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been hypothesized that intense convective-scale hot towers play a role in tropical cyclogenesis via dynamic and thermodynamic feedbacks on the larger-scale circulation. In this study the authors investigate the role that widespread and/...

Kenneth D. Leppert II; Walter A. Petersen

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Evaluation of the Reanalysis Products from GSFC, NCEP, and ECMWF Using Flux Tower Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reanalysis products produced at the various centers around the globe are utilized for many different scientific endeavors, including forcing land surface models and creating surface flux estimates. Here, flux tower observations of temperature, ...

Mark Decker; Michael A. Brunke; Zhuo Wang; Koichi Sakaguchi; Xubin Zeng; Michael G. Bosilovich

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Quality Control and Flux Sampling Problems for Tower and Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of automated tests is developed for tower and aircraft time series to identify instrumentation problems, flux sampling problems, and physically plausible but unusual situations. The automated procedures serve as a safety net for quality ...

Dean Vickers; L. Mahrt

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Finestructure of Elevated Stable Layers Observed by Sounder and In Situ Tower Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the finestructure within elevated stable atmospheric layers is described. The observational program consisted of measurements made with fast-response turbulence sensors on a carriage traversing a 300 m tower and comparison of the ...

E. E. Gossard; J. E. Gaynor; R. J. Zamora; W. D. Neff

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Estimation of Blade and Tower Properties for the Gearbox Research Collaborative Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the structural and modal properties of the blade and tower of a 3-bladed 750-kW upwind turbine to develop an aeroelastic model of the wind turbine.

Bir, G.S.; Oyague, F.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Some Turbulence and Diffusion Parameter Estimates within Cooling Tower Plumes Derived from Sodar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Temperature and velocity fluctuations within a cooling tower plume in stable conditions at the Keystone power plant in Pennsylvania have been measured by use of a calibrated sodar. Monostatic and bistatic systems probed the plume at several ...

R. L. Coulter; K. H. Underwood

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Study of Wind Stress Determination Methods from a Ship and an Offshore Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between surface wind stress measurements obtained by the inertial-dissipation and direct covariance methods on a stable offshore tower and by the inertial-dissipation and bulk methods on a ship. The shipboard inertial-...

Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; James B. Edson

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design; Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-cost hydrogen storage is recognized as a cornerstone of a renewables-hydrogen economy. Modern utility-scale wind turbine towers are typically conical steel structures that, in addition to supporting the rotor, could be used to store hydrogen. The most cost-effective hydrogen tower design would use substantially all of its volume for hydrogen storage and be designed at its crossover pressure. An 84-m tall hydrogen tower for a 1.5-MW turbine would cost an additional $84,000 (beyond the cost of the conventional tower) and would store 950 kg of hydrogen. The resulting incremental storage cost of $88/kg is approximately 30% of that for conventional pressure vessels.

Kottenstette, R.; Cotrell, J.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Atmospheric Solitary Gust Observed with a Doppler Radar, a Tall Tower and a Surface Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doppler radar and a 444 m tall instrumented tower provide a detailed view of the kinematic and thermodynamic structure of a solitary gust. A study of the data fields, and comparison with theoretical and laboratory work leads to the conclusion ...

Richard J. Doviak; Runsheng Ge

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Beyond the ivory tower : in search of a new form for campus-community relationships  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The terms "ivory tower" and "town-gown" have long been used to characterize the relationship between institutions of higher education and the communities in which they reside. While these adversarial phrases reflect the ...

Bowman, Anne (Anne Renee)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Global Distribution of Hot Towers in Tropical Cyclones Based on 11-Yr TRMM Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global distribution of hot towers in tropical cyclones (TCs) is statistically quantified using an 11-yr Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Tropical Cyclone Precipitation Feature (TCPF) database. From 6003 individual TRMM overpasses of 869 ...

Cheng Tao; Haiyan Jiang

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Test of a Phased Array Sodar by Intercomparison with Tower Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phased array sodar PA2 recently manufactured by the French REMTECH enterprise was tested using tower data for comparison. Wind speed, wind direction, and the standard deviation of the horizontal wind direction (??) were measured continuously ...

S. Vogt; P. Thomas

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior From Cooling Towers, Executive Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the contents of a five-volume work on new models for predicting plume rise and drift deposition from single and multiple natural-draft and mechanical-draft cooling towers.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world ... BREN Tower comes tumbling down as world record is set Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog Some 345 tons of steel came tumbling down yesterday as a world

305

Vertical sampling flights in support of the 1981 ASCOT cooling tower experiments: field effort and data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the month of August 1981, three nights of experimental sampling of tracers released into the cooling tower plume of a geothermal power plant were conducted. In these experiments a tethered balloon was used to lift a payload so as to obtain vertical profiles of the cooling tower plume and the entrained tracers. A description of the equipment used, the field effort and the data acquired are presented here.

Gay, G.T.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Demolition of Cooling Towers from the World's First Commercial Reactors - the Nuclear Factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The demolition of hyperbolic cooling towers would be a relatively routine demolition project because the method of demolition has been proven straightforward and repeatable with the successful demolition of over 200 similar structures in the last 30 years. This paper will detail the unique aspects of the planning and execution of the cooling tower demolition project due to its location on a nuclear site and proximity to active nuclear operations. (authors)

Foss, D.L. [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Explosive Demolition of a Fire-Water Tower At East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge TN  

SciTech Connect

On June 17, 2006, the Department of Energy (DOE) successfully demolished a {approx}60 year old fire-water tower (K-1206-E), located at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, TN, using strategically placed explosive charges. The subject demolition project was executed by MCM Management Corporation and Demolition Dynamics under the management of DoE's prime contractor Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). The K-1206-E Fire Water Tower (Tower) supported the ETTP fire water protection system from the mid- 1950's until 1991. The 378,500-L (100,000-gallon) Tower, elevated 53-m (175-feet) above grade, was located in a grassy area within 152-m (500-feet) of several other occupied facilities. Electrical, control circuits and supply water servicing the Tower were deactivated in 2003. Free liquids and sludge were removed from the tank prior to demolition. Demolition of a facility employing explosive demolition at a federal site in the 'post-9/11 era' was a substantial challenge. The subject paper discusses: - the planning and coordination steps that were taken to successfully overcome the challenges prior to the demolition of the empty, deactivated Tower; - the method used for the engineered demolition of the Tower; and - the factors responsible for the successful execution of this demolition project. At least two previous attempts were made to demolish the Tower. In the first attempt, the execution of the project was deferred by the re-allocation of funds. In the subsequent attempt in 2004, the execution of this project was postponed due to concerns that an adjacent facility would have to shut down operations during the duration of mobilization and execution of the project and thereby incur potential financial losses. A total of 51 cubic meters (1,800 cubic feet) of demolition debris was generated, which was compliantly disposed of at a local landfill followed by site restoration.

Brooksbank, R.D.; Rood, M.S.; Amrit, S.K.; Harper, M.S.; Dypolt, D.J.; Brehse, Mike [Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, P.O. Box 4699 Oak Ridge, TN 37931 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

Ritsche, MT

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An Evaluation of Molten-Salt Power Towers Including Results of the Solar Two Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report utilizes the results of the Solar Two project, as well as continuing technology development, to update the technical and economic status of molten-salt power towers. The report starts with an overview of power tower technology, including the progression from Solar One to the Solar Two project. This discussion is followed by a review of the Solar Two project--what was planned, what actually occurred, what was learned, and what was accomplished. The third section presents preliminary information regarding the likely configuration of the next molten-salt power tower plant. This section draws on Solar Two experience as well as results of continuing power tower development efforts conducted jointly by industry and Sandia National Laboratories. The fourth section details the expected performance and cost goals for the first commercial molten-salt power tower plant and includes a comparison of the commercial performance goals to the actual performance at Solar One and Solar Two. The final section summarizes the successes of Solar Two and the current technology development activities. The data collected from the Solar Two project suggest that the electricity cost goals established for power towers are reasonable and can be achieved with some simple design improvements.

REILLY, HUGH E.; KOLB, GREGORY J.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science  

SciTech Connect

We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX - Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10 s fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free-electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by four passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.

Corlett, J.N; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A.; Heimann, P.; Leone, S.; Lidia, S.; Li, D.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Wan, W.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.; Placidi, M.; Pirkl, W.; Parmigiani, F.

2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

311

Linear Fixed-Field Multi-Pass Arcs for Recirculating Linear Accelerators  

SciTech Connect

Recirculating Linear Accelerators (RLA's) provide a compact and efficient way of accelerating particle beams to medium and high energies by reusing the same linac for multiple passes. In the conventional scheme, after each pass, the different energy beams coming out of the linac are separated and directed into appropriate arcs for recirculation, with each pass requiring a separate fixed-energy arc. In this paper we present a concept of an RLA return arc based on linear combined-function magnets, in which two and potentially more consecutive passes with very different energies are transported through the same string of magnets. By adjusting the dipole and quadrupole components of the constituting linear combined-function magnets, the arc is designed to be achromatic and to have zero initial and final reference orbit offsets for all transported beam energies. We demonstrate the concept by developing a design for a droplet-shaped return arc for a dog-bone RLA capable of transporting two beam passes with momenta different by a factor of two. We present the results of tracking simulations of the two passes and lay out the path to end-to-end design and simulation of a complete dog-bone RLA.

V.S. Morozov, S.A. Bogacz, Y.R. Roblin, K.B. Beard

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Offering Songs, Festive Songs, Processional Songs mGar-gLu, Khro-Glu, Phebsnga: Khang Lhamo, Yandol & Pema Dolma Music: Ri Gya ri mendal bulsa re, 'The hill of the king is filled with offerings'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name khro glu / Katey Blumenthal Tape No. / Track / Item No. 06_09_2010_Ri Gya ri mendal bulsa re.MP3 Length of track 00:08:53 Title of track... ) Medium (i.e. reel to reel, web-based file, DVD) Digital Recording Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Name of recorder (if different from collector) Date of recording 06/09/2010 Place of recording Lo Monthang, Mustang...

Blumenthal, Katey

313

Ozone (o3) efficacy on reduction of phytophthora capsici in recirculated horticultural irrigation water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microorganisms that cause plant disease have been isolated in recirculated irrigation water and increase the risks of disease incidence in horticultural operations. Ozone is an effective oxidizer used to disinfect drinking water supplies and treat industrial wastewater. The objective of this research was to investigate using ozone gas as part of a strategy to reduce the incidence of Phytophthora deBary in recirculated irrigation water. An isolate of Phytophthora capsici Leonian was cultured to induce sporulation. Spore dilutions were placed in aliquots of reverse osmosis water and bubbled with ozone gas (O3) to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mgL-1. Ozonated samples were plated and observed for colony forming units. Increasing ozone concentrations reduced the number of colony forming units to 0 at 1.5 mg L-1 03. Turbidity effects on efficacy on Phytophthora capsici were tested using bentonite clay at 0 to 2.0 nephelometric turbidity units and ozone concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mg L-1. Increasing bentonite did not affect the efficacy of increasing ozone concentrations on reducing colony formation to 0 at 1.5 mgL-1 O3. Bioassays using Phytophthora capsici on Capsicum annuum L. seedlings confirmed apparent pathogenicity. Reverse osmosis water, containing a soluble fertilizer at 0 to 300 mg L-1 N, was ozonated to concentrations of 0 to 1.5 mgL-1 O3 and used to irrigate Chrysanthemum x morifolium T. de Romatuelle. Increasing ozone concentrations did not interact with increasing fertilizer levels to affect the final growth parameters. Chrysanthemum exposed to ozone gas concentrations of 0.5 to 1.5 mgL-1 showed symptomatic ozone damage. Complete soluble fertilizer solutions with micronutrients were ozonated from 0 to 1.5 mgL-1 O3 and analysed for nutrient content. Increasing ozone levels did not interact with fertilizers to affect macronutrients. Increasing ozone interacted with iron at a high fertilizer level. Ozone did not affect the efficacy of paclobutralzol in controlling growth in Viola x wittrockiana. Ozone was effective in controlling Phytophthora capsici in recirculated irrigation water with minimum impact on plant growth. Adjustments in fertility regiemes may be needed to counteract the oxidizing affect of ozone on micronutrients.

McDonald, Garry Vernon

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior From Cooling Towers, Volume 1: Review of European Researc h  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results to date of an effort to develop, improve, and validate mathematical models of plume dispersion from individual and clustered mechanical- and natural-draft cooling towers. This effort is focusing on prediction of visible plume trajectory and deposition of saline droplet drift. The goal is to provide useful tools for assessing the environmental impact of cooling tower plumes. Volume 1 summarizes European research on cooling-tower-plume dispersion.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot  

SciTech Connect

This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Approximating the Seismic Amplification Effects Experienced by Solar Towers Mounted on the Rooftops of Low-Rise Industrial Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis investigates the acceleration amplification experienced by solar towers mounted on the rooftops of low-rise industrial buildings during a seismic event. Specifically, this (more)

Balla, Peter Luiz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Radiometric modeling of mechanical draft cooling towers to assist in the extraction of their absolute temperature from remote thermal imagery.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Determination of the internal temperature of a mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) from remotely-sensed thermal imagery is important for many applications that provide input to (more)

Montanaro, Matthew

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A field-scale test of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ chemical oxidation is a developing class of remediation technologies in which organic contaminants are degraded in place by powerful oxidants. Successful implementation of this technology requires an effective means for dispersing the oxidant to contaminated regions in the subsurface. An oxidant delivery technique has been developed wherein the treatment solution is made by adding an oxidant to extracted groundwater. The oxidant-laden groundwater is then injected and recirculated into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and/or vertical wells. This technique, referred to as in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR), can be applied to saturated and hydraulically conductive formations and used with relatively stable oxidants such as potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}). A field-scale test of ISCOR was conducted at a site (Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) where groundwater in a 5-ft thick silty gravel aquifer is contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE) at levels that indicate the presence of residual dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). The field test was implemented using a pair of parallel horizontal wells with 200-ft screened sections. For approximately one month, groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, dosed with crystalline KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into the other horizontal well 90 ft away. Post-treatment characterization showed that ISCOR was effective at removing TCE in the saturated region. Lateral and vertical heterogeneities within the treatment zone impacted the uniform delivery of the oxidant solution. However, TCE was not detected in groundwater samples collected from monitoring wells and soil samples from borings in locations where the oxidant had permeated.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Siegrist, R.L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Houk, T.C. [Bechtel-Jacobs, Piketon, OH (United States). Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The Influence of Flue Gas Recirculation on the Formation of NOx in the Process of Coal Grate-Fired  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the improvement of environmental protection requirements, the problems of NOx emission from industrial boiler become more and more notable. To explore a real effective method of low NOx combustion, the article discusses the influence of flue gas ... Keywords: flue gas recirculation, grate-fired, temperature, Nox

Li Xu; Jianmin Gao; Guangbo Zhao; Laifu Zhao; Zhifeng Zhao; Shaohua Wu

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

IRFM Temperature Calibrations for the Vilnius, Geneva, RI(C) and DDO Photometric Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the infrared flux method (IRFM) temperatures of a large sample of late type dwarfs given by Alonso et al. (1996a) to calibrate empirically the relations Teff = f (colour, [Fe/H]) for the Vilnius, Geneva, RI(C) and DDO photometric systems. The resulting temperature scale and intrinsic colour-colour diagrams for these systems are also obtained. From this scale, the solar colours are derived and compared with those of the solar twin 18 Sco. Since our work is based on the same Teff and [Fe/H] values used by Alonso et al. (1996b) to calibrate other colours, we now have an homogeneous calibration for a large set of photometric systems.

Jorge Melendez; Ivan Ramirez

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microsoft Word - CX-SpringCreek-WineCountry-TowerRelocationFY13_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 29, 2012 November 29, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Justin Estes Project Manager - TELM-TPP-3 Proposed Action: Spring Creek - Wine County No. 1 Transmission Tower Relocation Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Multnomah County, OR Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to relocate one transmission tower, located on private agricultural land, which has been damaged by farm equipment. Currently, tower 29/3 on BPA's Spring Creek - Wine Country No. 1 transmission line, resides on an agricultural access road that is bordered on both sides by active agricultural fields. This

322

Wind energy conversion. Volume IX. Aerodynamics of wind turbine with tower disturbances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lifting line theory which is the counterpart of Prandtl's lifting line theory for rotating wing is employed for the overall performance analysis of a horizontal axis wind turbine rotor operating in a uniform flow. The wake system is modeled by non-rigid wake which includes the radial expansion and the axial retardation of trailing vortices. For the non-uniform flow which are caused by the ground, the tower reflection, or the tower shadow, the unsteady airloads acting on the turbine blade are computed, using lifting line theory and a non-rigid wake model. An equation which gives the wind profile in the tower shadow region is developed. Also, the equations to determine pitch angle control are derived to minimize the flapping moment variations or the thrust variations due to the non-uniform flow over a rotation.

Chung, S.Y.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Microsoft Word - CX-Marion and Sand Springs Substation Towers Revised.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

KEC-4 KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Dave Tripp Project Manager - TEP-CSB-1 Proposed Action: Marion and Sand Springs Substations Radio Tower Projects Budget Information: Work Orders 00243411 and 00243190; Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.19 Siting, construction, and operation of microwave and radio communication towers and associated facilities... Location: Marion and Deschutes counties, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to install new radio towers at the Marion Substation and Sand Springs Substation communication sites in Oregon. BPA must vacate radio frequencies in the 1710-1755MHz band to comply with a Federal law mandating reallocation of

324

Thermodynamic modeling and optimization of a screw compressor chiller and cooling tower system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a thermodynamic model for a screw chiller and cooling tower system for the purpose of developing an optimized control algorithm for the chiller plant. The thermodynamic chiller model is drawn from the thermodynamic models developed by Gordon and Ng (1996). However, the entropy production in the compressor is empirically related to the pressure difference measured across the compressor. The thermodynamic cooling tower model is the Baker & Shryock cooling tower model that is presented in ASHRAE Handbook - HVAC Systems and Equipment (1992). The models are coupled to form a chiller plant model which can be used to determine the optimal performance. Two correlations are then required to optimize the system: a wet-bulb/setpoint correlation and a fan speed/pump speed correlation. Using these correlations, a "quasi-optimal" operation can be achieved which will save 17% of the energy consumed by the chiller plant.

Graves, Rhett David

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Tower Design Load Verification on a 1-kW Wind Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has been done to characterize both tower top loads and thrust loads for small wind turbines, which is part of an ongoing effort to model and predict small wind turbine behavior and the resulting stresses imposed on the supporting tower. To these ends, a 1-kW furling wind turbine mounted on a 10-meter tower was instrumented and monitored via a data acquisition system for nearly a year. This test was conducted to verify the design loads as predicted by the simple design equations provided in the draft revision of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Small Wind Turbine Safety Standard 61400-02 CDV (hereafter called ''the draft Standard''). Data were captured for several operating conditions covered by the draft Standard. This paper addresses the collected data and what conclusions can be made from it.

Prascher, D.; Huskey, A.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Use of Produced Water in Recirculating Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. This deliverable describes possible test configurations for produced water demonstration projects at SJGS. The ability to host demonstration projects would enable the testing and advancement of promising produced water treatment technologies. Testing is described for two scenarios: Scenario 1--PNM builds a produced water treatment system at SJGS and incorporates planned and future demonstration projects into the design of the system. Scenario 2--PNM forestalls or decides not to install a produced water treatment system and would either conduct limited testing at SJGS (produced water would have to be delivered by tanker trucked) or at a salt water disposal facility (SWD). Each scenario would accommodate demonstration projects differently and these differences are discussed in this deliverable. PNM will host a demonstration test of water-conserving cooling technology--Wet Surface Air Cooling (WSAC) using cooling tower blowdown from the existing SJGS Unit 3 tower--during the summer months of 2005. If successful, there may be follow-on testing using produced water. WSAC is discussed in this deliverable. Recall that Deliverable 4, Emerging Technology Testing, describes the pilot testing conducted at a salt water disposal facility (SWD) by the CeraMem Corporation. This filtration technology could be a candidate for future demonstration testing and is also discussed in this deliverable.

Kent Zammit; Michael N. DiFilippo

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Strategy for the Operation of Cooling Towers with variable Speed Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within the SPS Cooling Water Project at CERN aimed at the reduction of water consumption, this primary open cooling loop will be closed and all the primary cooling circuit components will be upgraded to the new required duty and brought to the necessary safety and operability standards. In particular the tower fans will be fitted with variable frequency drives to replace the existing two speed motors. This paper presents a study to optimize the operation of SPS cooling towers taking into account outdoor conditions (wet and dry bulb temperatures) and the entirety of the primary circuit in which they will operate.

Iigo-Golfn, J

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Elementary-Particle Propagation via 3-Scale ``Towers of Quartet Rings'' Within a Dyonic History Lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Massless elementary-particle propagation is represented historically (cosmologically) through 3-scale ``towers of quartet rings'' within a lattice of magneto-electrodynamically communicating ``pre-events''. The lightlike intervals within a ring of 4 pre-events (discrete ``closed string'') display transverse GUT-scale and longitudinal ``particle scale''. The lightlike (longitudinal) spacing between successive rings of a tower is at Planck scale. Ratio between GUT scale and Planck scale relates quantum-dynamically to elementary magnetic charge. Permutations of a ring quartet, in conjunction with Lorentz-group representations, control elementary-particle quantum numbers.

G. F. Chew

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

Defective insulators in live working on a 550kV compact steel lattice tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research was conducted to determine the minimum number of healthy insulator units needed to ensure worker safety in live working on a compact 550 kV steel lattice tower. A large variety of worksite conditions was investigated. Test results confirm the conservative nature of the CIGRE formula for defective insulator units, and modifications to the formula are suggested. The recommended number of healthy units is 12 in a string of 24 units for the case of live work on the compact 550 kV tower, when the Portable Protective Gap (PPG) is used. Adjustment for altitude should be made above 900 m (3,000 ft).

Gela, G. [EPRI Power Delivery Center, Lenox, MA (United States); Kientz, H. [Western Area Power Administration, Golden, CO (United States); Fox, H.J. Jr. [Public Service Electric and Gas, Bridgewater, NJ (United States); Mitchell, J.D. [Alabama Power Co., Birmingham, AL (United States); Lyons, P.F. [EPRI, Haslet, TX (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reuse of cooling tower blow down cannot only provide energy conservation, but can provide water conservation and chemical conservation. To be effective, it is critical that the water treatment program be coordinated with the treatment of the blow down for reuse into the cooling tower system. Several plants have been built and operated with considerable difficulty regarding effective operation of the softener due to improper chemical selection. However, other plants have utilized the proper chemicals which not only improve the softener's performance and operation, but also effectively reduces the size of the softener. Thus, initial capital and operating savings are obtained. Detailed information is provided on guidelines and case histories of operating units.

Puckorius, P. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Calder Hall Cooling Tower Demolition: Landmark Milestone for Decommissioning at Sellafield  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

September 2007 saw a very visible change to the Sellafield site following the culmination of a major decommissioning project; the demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers. A key part of the UK's nuclear industrial heritage, Calder Hall, the world's first commercial nuclear power station, was opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II in October 1953 and continued to generate electricity until its closure in 2003. Following the decision to decommission the Calder Hall site, explosive demolition was identified as the safest and most cost effective route for the removal of the towers. The technique, involving the placement of explosive in 60% of the circumference of both shell and legs, is a tried and tested method which had already been used successfully in more than 200 cooling towers in the UK in the last 30 years. The location and composition of the four 88 metre high towers also created additional challenges. Situated only 40 metres away from the UK's only nuclear Fuel Handling Plant, as well as other sensitive structures on the Sellafield site, the project had to address the impact of a number of key areas, including dust, ground vibration and air over pressure, to ensure that the demolition could be carried out safely and without significant impact on other operational areas on the site. At the same time, the towers had to be prepared for demolition in a way that minimised the amounts of radioactive or hazardous waste materials arising. This paper follows the four year journey from the initial decision to demolish the towers right through to the demolition itself as well as the clean up of the site post demolition. It will also consider the massive programme of work necessary not only to carry out the physical work safely but also to gain regulatory confidence and stakeholder support to carry out the project successfully. In summary: The demolition of the four Calder Hall cooling towers was a highly visible symbol of the changes that are occurring on the Sellafield site as it moves forward towards a decommissioning future. Although in itself the demolition was both straightforward and standard, the various complexities posed by the towers situation at Sellafield introduced an entirely new element to the project, with a number of complex challenges which had to be overcome or resolved before the demolition could take place. It is a testament to the skill and dedication of the project team and its associated contractors that the project was delivered safely and successfully without a single accident, injury or event throughout the entire four years, and with minimal impact on both site operations and the local community. (authors)

Williamson, E.J. [Nuclear Decommissioning and Major Projects Group, Sellafield Ltd, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Near-Neutral Surface Layer Turbulence at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Tower: Evidence of Increasing Vertical Turbulence with Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind and turbulence profiles were analyzed during breezy, near-neutral conditions at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory tower to quantify the effects of an abrupt 20- to 30-m increase in terrain located 35 km west of the tower. Results indicate ...

Brent M. Bowen

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Investigations into the reproductive performance and larval rearing of the Brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus aztecus, using closed recirculating systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of unilateral eyestalk ablation, diets and sex ratios were evaluated on two wild populations of Farfantepenaeus aztecus in a closed recirculating maturation system. Ovarian development and spawning frequencies of ablated females in both studies were higher than the non-ablated females. Replacement of bloodworms in maturation diet with enriched adult Artemia sp. had no negative effect on the number of eggs spawned and resulted in increased hatch and survival rates from Nauplius I to Zoea I. Life span of ablated females fed enriched Artemia sp. was longer than ablated females fed bloodworms. Replacement of the expensive bloodworm diet component with adult enriched Artemia sp. is possible without negative impact on female reproductive performance. Reducing male to female ratio from 2:1 to 1:1 resulted in a 1.25% decrease in spawning activities of ablated females. The life cycle of pond-raised F1 generation F. aztecus also was completed in the closed recirculating system using unilateral eyestalk ablation as previously described. This study found diets that contained an enriched adult Artemia sp. component performed superior (i.e. hatch rate, nauplii and zoea production) to a diet containing bloodworms. Six consecutive larval rearing trials evaluated changes in select water quality indicators and their effect on growth, survival, and stress tolerance of F. aztecus postlarvae cultured in artificial seawater under closed recirculating and flow-through conditions. The closed recirculating larval rearing system successfully produced five-day-old postlarvae (PL) from Zoea I (Z1) with similar dry weights, lengths and stress resistance to PL produced under standard water exchange practices. The trickling biofilters were found to be a limiting component of this system. A submerged coral biofilter was added to the system and effectively processed culture water for re-use. Addition of the submerged biofilter resulted in improved survival rates in Trials 4, 5 and 6. These studies demonstrate maturation and larval rearing of F. aztecus is feasible in closed recirculating systems. Implementation of these systems in hatcheries bolsters biosecurity while reducing the environmental impact of hatchery effluent. Recirculating and re-use systems are therefore essential in the further development of sustainable hatchery programs for endemic species.

Gandy, Ryan Leighton

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Eastgate seen from the south-east, in front of Harare's glass and concrete towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastgate seen from the south-east, in front of Harare's glass and concrete towers #12;Eastgate officesEastgate offices Level two #12;Sections showing the passive cooling system #12;Cooling the office the degree of internal cooling achieved during April 1998 #12;· The termitary model · The termitary is an i f

Behmer, Spencer T.

335

Gaskell Sun Tower and 2 others Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gaskell Sun Tower and 2 others Solar Power Plant Gaskell Sun Tower and 2 others Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Gaskell Sun Tower and 2 others Solar Power Plant Facility Gaskell Sun Tower and 2 others Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Facility Status Proposed Developer NRG Energy/eSolar Location Kern County, California Coordinates 35.4937274°, -118.8596804° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4937274,"lon":-118.8596804,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

The Passage of a Weak Thunderstorn Downburst over an Instrumented Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 5 November 1977 a weak downburst associated with a multicell storm passed over an instrumented tower at Bald Hills, a suburb of Brisbane, Australia. Associated with the thunderstorm was a dome of cold air estimated to be 1200 to 1800 m deep. ...

Douglas J. Sherman

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Sea-Tower Measurements of Wind-Wave Spectra in the Caspian Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High frequency spectra of wind generated waves corresponding to mean wind speeds from 3.5 to 13.5 m s?1 were measured at the research tower in the Caspian Sea. The techniques used made it possible to evaluate spectra S(?) in the frequency range ...

I. A. Leykin; A. D. Rozenberg

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

An iterative solution to the four-peg Tower of Hanoi problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the variations of the Towers of Hanoi puzzle allows for p pegs, and for four pegs the solution to this variation is shown to have a simple structure which can be used to derive an iterative solution to the problem.

Appie van de Liefvoort

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Vibration Frequencies of Wind Turbine Steel Tower by Transfer Matrix Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale wind turbine structure is simplified as a slender cantilever beam with variable sections subject to complex loads configuration. An analytical procedure to estimate not only natural frequencies but also vibration mode shapes of thin-walled ... Keywords: horizontal axis wind turbine tower, natural frequency, transfer matrix method, free vibration

Wang Meng; Wang Zhangqi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Wind Profiler and RASS Measurements Compared with Measurements from a 450-m-Tall Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 915-MHz boundary layer wind profiler with radio acoustic sounding system (RASS) was sited 8 km from a very tall (450 m) television transmitting tower in north-central Wisconsin during the spring, summer, and autumn of 1995. The profiler ...

Wayne M. Angevine; Peter S. Bakwin; Kenneth J. Davis

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Experimental Study on Energy Efficiency of Heat-source Tower Heat Pump Units in Winter Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Building energy consumption in China has been increasing rapidly. And a small increase in the operation efficiency of the air-conditioning system can substantially decrease it. In this paper a new type heat pump is developed to improve the performance ... Keywords: Heat-source tower, Heat pump, Seasonal energy efficiency ratio(SEER), Hermal properties

Li Nianping; Zhang Wenjie; Wang Lijie; Liu Qiuke; Hu Jinhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Design for Unattended Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide on a Very Tall Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unattended measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratio at three altitudes up to 496 m above the surface on a television transmitter tower in the southeastern United States have been made for a period of 4 yr. This report describes the ...

Cong Long Zhao; Peter S. Bakwin; Pieter P. Tans

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

New Ozone Measurement Systems for Autonomous Operation on Ocean Buoys and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two autonomous ozone measurement systems for use on ocean buoys and towers have been built and are discussed herein. They are based on low-power atmospheric ozone sensors from Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and 2B Technologies. The PSI sensor ...

E. J. Hintsa; G. P. Allsup; C. F. Eck; D. S. Hosom; M. J. Purcell; A. A. Roberts; D. R. Scott; E. R. Sholkovitz; W. T. Rawlins; P. A. Mulhall; K. Lightner; W. W. McMillan; J. Song; M. J. Newchurch

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wind Tunnel Experiment for Predicting a Visible Plume Region from a Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current paper introduces a wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of the cooling tower of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) on the flow and the characteristics of visible plume regions. The relevant characteristics of the flow field near the ...

Guo Dong-peng; Yao Ren-tai; Fan Dan

345

Study of Operating Control Strategies for Hybrid Ground Source Heat Pump System with Supplemental Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground source heat pump for cooling-dominated commercial buildings may utilize supplemental cooling towers to reduce system first cost and to improve system performance. The use of hybrid ground source heat pump (HGSP) can reduce the size of the ground-loop ... Keywords: hybrid ground source heat pump, supplement heat rejection, control strategies, operating performance

Wang Jinggang; Gao Xiaoxia; Yin Zhenjiang; Li Fang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

The Binary Cooling Tower Process: An Energy Conserving Water Reuse Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Binary Cooling Tower (BCT) harnesses cooling system waste heat to accomplish concentration of waste and process streams. The BCT can also be integrated to isolate and improve the efficiency of critical cooling loops. This paper describes the BCT, its integration into a cooling system, and some energy saving applications

Lancaster, R. L.; Sanderson, W. G.; Cooke, R. L., Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Marginal Hilbert Spectrum Based on EMD Reconstruction and its Application in Fault Diagnosis of Cooling Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HHT (Hilbert-Huang Transform) is one kind of adaptive signal processing method and it is suitable for processing nonlinear and non-stationary signal. Amplitude-frequency characteristics of signal are accurately demonstrated through marginal Hilbert spectrum ... Keywords: Vibration signal, marginal Hilbert spectrum, Reconstruction filter, Fault diagnosis, Cooling tower

He Dhengyun, Yi Ding

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of a Cloud Model to Cooling Tower Plumes and Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A steady-state, one-dimensional cloud model has been modified to simulate the growth of plumes (both wet and dry) and clouds from natural and forced draft cooling towers. The modifications to the cloud model are discussed and comparisons are made ...

Harold D. Orville; John H. Hirsch; Laurence E. May

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Advanced Horizontal Well Recirculation Systems for Geothermal Energy Recovery in Sedimentary Formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is increased recognition that geothermal energy resources are more widespread than previously thought, with potential for providing a significant amount of sustainable clean energy worldwide. Recent advances in drilling, completion, and production technology from the oil and gas industry can now be applied to unlock vast new geothermal resources, with some estimates for potential electricity generation from geothermal energy now on the order of 2 million megawatts. Terralog USA, in collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), are currently investigating advanced design concepts for paired horizontal well recirculation systems, optimally configured for geothermal energy recovery in permeable sedimentary and crystalline formations of varying structure and material properties. This two-year research project, funded by the US Department of Energy, includes combined efforts for: 1) Resource characterization; 2) Small and large scale laboratory investigations; 3) Numerical simulation at both the laboratory and field scale; and 4) Engineering feasibility studies and economic evaluations. The research project is currently in its early stages. This paper summarizes our technical approach and preliminary findings related to potential resources, small-scale laboratory simulation, and supporting numerical simulation efforts.

Mike Bruno; Russell L. Detwiler; Kang Lao; Vahid Serajian; Jean Elkhoury; Julia Diessl; Nicky White

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CFD MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR A-AREA AND H-AREA COOLING TOWERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanical draft cooling towers are designed to cool process water via sensible and latent heat transfer to air. Heat and mass transfer take place simultaneously. Heat is transferred as sensible heat due to the temperature difference between liquid and gas phases, and as the latent heat of the water as it evaporates. Mass of water vapor is transferred due to the difference between the vapor pressure at the air-liquid interface and the partial pressure of water vapor in the bulk of the air. Equations to govern these phenomena are discussed here. The governing equations are solved by taking a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The purpose of the work is to develop a three-dimensional CFD model to evaluate the flow patterns inside the cooling tower cell driven by cooling fan and wind, considering the cooling fans to be on or off. Two types of the cooling towers are considered here. One is cross-flow type cooling tower located in A-Area, and the other is counterflow type cooling tower located in H-Area. The cooling tower located in A-Area is mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) consisting of four compartment cells as shown in Fig. 1. It is 13.7m wide, 36.8m long, and 9.4m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud without any flow communications between two adjacent cells. There are water distribution decks on both sides of the fan shroud. The deck floor has an array of about 25mm size holes through which water droplet falls into the cell region cooled by the ambient air driven by fan and wind, and it is eventually collected in basin area. As shown in Fig. 1, about 0.15-m thick drift eliminator allows ambient air to be humidified through the evaporative cooling process without entrainment of water droplets into the shroud exit. The H-Area cooling tower is about 7.3 m wide, 29.3 m long, and 9.0 m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud, but each of two corner cells has two panels to shield wind at the bottom of the cells. There is some degree of flow communications between adjacent cells through the 9-in gap at the bottom of the tower cells as shown in Fig. 2. Detailed geometrical dimensions for the H-Area tower configurations are presented in the figure. The model was benchmarked and verified against off-site and on-site test results. The verified model was applied to the investigation of cooling fan and wind effects on water cooling in cells when fans are off and on. This report will discuss the modeling and test results.

Lee, S.; Garrett, A.; Bollinger, J.

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Reactor Coolant Pump/Reactor Recirculation Pump Motor Lubrication Oil Systems Maintenance G uide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RCP and RRP Motor Lubrication system issues have ranked high on NMAC maintenance Issues Surveys in recent years. Problems reported have included oil leakage at power, the need for additional reservoirs to accommodate leakage, oil degradation (foaming, particulate) as well as sludge problems due to the design of the motor and some as a result of new oil formulations and other changes made by the oil suppliers. Reactor Coolant Pumps (RCP) used in Pressurized Water Reactors and Reactor Recirculation Pumps ...

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

354

A study of NO{sub x} reduction by fuel injection recirculation. Topical report, January 1995--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments by Carnot (Tustin, CA) have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub x}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. One speculation is that introducing the diluent gases on the fuel side of the flame affects the prompt-NO mechanism causing the greater effectiveness. The objective of our research is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub x} reduction observed between FIR and FGR. This knowledge will aid in the rational application and optimization of FIR in a wide variety of industrial applications. A combined modeling and experimental program is in progress to achieve the research objectives. This report discusses computer modeling studies of counterflow diffusion flames employing detailed chemical kinetics for fuel (hydrogen or methane) combustion and NO{sub x} formation. These simulations allow the calculation of NO{sub x} emission indices for a wide range of conditions. Parametric studies were conducted in which the diluent was added either on the fuel or air side of the flame for a wide range of flow conditions. Preliminary results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in FIR effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side versus air-side dilution.

Turns, S.R.; Feese, J.J.; Frenklach, M.Y.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Sixth Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection (RI-ISI) Workshop: Living Requirements, Lessons Learned, and New Initiatives Meeting No tes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sixth Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection (RI-ISI) Workshop was held in Hilton Head, South Carolina, USA, on July 29 and 30, 2004. It consisted of two days of training, presentations, a discussion forum, and evaluation of plant-specific results. Attendees included representatives from domestic and international utilities and support organizations. This workshop provided training to personnel investigating the feasibility of implementing RI-ISI methodologies, lessons learned in the development and impl...

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

358

SELECTIVE NOx RECIRCULATION FOR STATIONARY LEAN-BURN NATURAL GAS ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program conducted at the West Virginia University Engine and Emissions Research Laboratory (EERL) is working towards the verification and optimization of an approach to remove nitric oxides from the exhaust gas of lean burn natural gas engines. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under contract number: DE-FC26-02NT41608. Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves three main steps. First, NOx is adsorbed from the exhaust stream, followed by periodic desorption from the aftertreatment medium. Finally the desorbed NOx is passed back into the intake air stream and fed into the engine, where a percentage of the NOx is decomposed. This reporting period focuses on the NOx decomposition capability in the combustion process. Although researchers have demonstrated NOx reduction with SNR in other contexts, the proposed program is needed to further understand the process as it applies to lean burn natural gas engines. SNR is in support of the Department of Energy goal of enabling future use of environmentally acceptable reciprocating natural gas engines through NOx reduction under 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The study of decomposition of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) during combustion in the cylinder was conducted on a 1993 Cummins L10G 240 hp lean burn natural gas engine. The engine was operated at different air/fuel ratios, and at a speed of 800 rpm to mimic a larger bore engine. A full scale dilution tunnel and analyzers capable of measuring NOx, CO{sub 2}, CO, HC concentrations were used to characterize the exhaust gas. Commercially available nitric oxide (NO) was used to mimic the NOx stream from the desorption process through a mass flow controller and an injection nozzle. The same quantity of NOx was injected into the intake and exhaust line of the engine for 20 seconds at various steady state engine operating points. NOx decomposition rates were obtained by averaging the peak values at each set point minus the baseline and finding the ratio between the injected NO amounts. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity and engine operating points affected the NOx decomposition rates of the natural gas engine. A highest NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine. A separate exploratory tests conducted with a gasoline engine with a low air/fuel ratio yielded results that suggested, that high NOx decomposition rates may be possible if a normally lean burn engine were operated at conditions closer to stoichiometric, with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a brief period of time during the NOx decomposition phase and with a wider range of air/fuel ratios. Chemical kinetic model predictions using CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with the established rate and equilibrium models. NOx decomposition rates from 35% to 42% were estimated using the CHEMKIN software. This provided insight on how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for a large bore engine. In the future, the modeling will be used to examine the effect of higher NO{sub 2}/NO ratios that are associated with lower speed and larger bore lean burn operation.

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Chamila Tissera; Matt Swartz; Emre Tatli; Ramprabhu Vellaisamy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines  

SciTech Connect

Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) generated by internal combustion (IC) engines are implicated in adverse environmental and health effects. Even though lean-burn natural gas engines have traditionally emitted lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions compared to their diesel counterparts, natural gas engines are being further challenged to reduce NOx emissions to 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) approach for NOx reduction involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the NOx from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By sending the desorbed NOx back into the intake and through the engine, a percentage of the NOx can be decomposed during the combustion process. SNR technology has the support of the Department of Energy (DOE), under the Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program to reduce NOx emissions to under 0.1 g/bhp-hr from stationary natural gas engines by 2010. The NO decomposition phenomenon was studied using two Cummins L10G natural gas fueled spark-ignited (SI) engines in three experimental campaigns. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio ({lambda}), injected NO quantity, added exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) percentage, and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates within the engine. Chemical kinetic model predictions using the software package CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with established rate and equilibrium models. The model was used to predict NO decomposition during lean-burn, stoichiometric burn, and slightly rich-burn cases with added EGR. NOx decomposition rates were estimated from the model to be from 35 to 42% for the lean-burn cases and from 50 to 70% for the rich-burn cases. The modeling results provided an insight as to how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for the experimental engine. Results from this experiment along with chemical kinetic modeling solutions prompted the investigation of rich-burn operating conditions, with added EGR to prevent preignition. It was observed that the relative air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity, added EGR fraction, and engine operating points affected the NO decomposition rates. While operating under these modified conditions, the highest NO decomposition rate of 92% was observed. In-cylinder pressure data gathered during the experiments showed minimum deviation from peak pressure as a result of NO injections into the engine. A NOx adsorption system, from Sorbent Technologies, Inc., was integrated with the Cummins engine, comprised a NOx adsorbent chamber, heat exchanger, demister, and a hot air blower. Data were gathered to show the possibility of NOx adsorption from the engine exhaust, and desorption of NOx from the sorbent material. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a benchtop adsorption system was constructed. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while data were gathered on the characteristics of the sorbent material for development of a system model. A simplified linear driving force model was developed to predict NOx adsorption into the sorbent material as cooled exhaust passed over fresh sorbent material. A mass heat transfer analysis was conducted to analyze the possibility of using hot exhaust gas for the desorption process. It was found in the adsorption studies, and through literature review, that NO adsorption was poor when the carrier gas was nitrogen, but that NO in the presence of oxygen was adsorbed at levels exceeding 1% by mass of the sorbent. From the three experimental campaigns, chemical kinetic modeling analysis, and the scaled benchtop NOx adsorption system, an overall SNR system model was developed. An economic analysis was completed, and showed that the system was impractical in cost for small engines, but that economies of scale favored the technology.

Nigel N. Clark

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Investigation of groundwater recirculation for the removal of RDX from the Pantex Plant perched aquifer  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Past and present operations at Pantex include the creation of chemical high explosives components for nuclear weapons and assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons. The Pantex Plant is underlain by the Ogallala aquifer, which in this area, consists of the main water-bearing unit and a perched water zone. These are separated by a fine-grained zone of low permeability. Multiple contaminant plumes containing high explosive (HE) compounds have been detected in the perched aquifer beneath the plant. The occurrence of these contaminants is the result of past waste disposal practices at the facility. RDX is an HE compound, which has been detected in the groundwater of the perched aquifer at significant concentrations. A pilot-scale, dual-phase extraction treatment system has been installed at one location at the plant, east of Zone 12, to test the effectiveness of such a system on the removal of these contaminants from the subsurface. A tracer test using a conservative tracer, bromide (Br), was conducted at the treatment site in 1996. In addition to the bromide, RDX and water elevations in the aquifer were monitored. Using data from the tracer test and other relevant data from the investigations at Pantex, flow and contaminant transport in the perched aquifer were simulated with groundwater models. The flow was modeled using MODFLOW and the transport of contaminants in the aqueous phase was modeled using MT3D. Modeling the perched aquifer had been conducted to characterize the flow in the perched aquifer; estimate RDX retardation in the perched aquifer; and evaluate the use of groundwater re-circulation to enhance the extraction of RDX from the perched aquifer.

Woods, A.L. [ed.; Barnes, D.L. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Boles, K.M.; Charbeneau, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Black, S.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Water Resources Center

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Feasibility study for a recirculating linac-based facility for femtosecond dynamics  

SciTech Connect

LBNL is pursuing design studies and the scientific program for a facility dedicated to the production of x-ray pulses with ultra-short time duration, for application in dynamical studies of processes in physics, biology, and chemistry. The proposed x-ray facility has the short x-ray pulse length ({approx}60 fs FWHM) necessary to study very fast dynamics, high flux (up to approximately 10E11 photons/sec/0.1 percentBW) to study weakly scattering systems, and tuneability over 1-12 keV photon energy. The hard x-ray photon production section of the machine accommodates seven 2-m long undulators. Design studies for longer wavelength sources, using high-gain harmonic generation, are in progress. The x-ray pulse repetition rate of 10 kHz is matched to studies of dynamical processes (initiated by ultra-short laser pulses) that typically have a long recovery time or are not generally cyclic or reversible and need time to allow relaxation, replacement, or flow of the sample. The technique for producing ultra-short x-ray pulses uses relatively long electron bunches to minimize high-peak-current collective effects, and the ultimate x-ray duration is achieved by a combination of bunch manipulation and optical compression. Synchronization of x-ray pulses to sample excitation signals is expected to be of order 50 - 100 fs. Techniques for making use of the recirculating geometry to provide beam-based signals from early passes through the machine are being studied.

Corlett, J.N.; Barry, W.; Barletta, W.A.; Byrd, J.M.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.; Green, M.A.; Hartman, N.; Heimann, P.; Kairan, D.; Kujawski, E.; Li, D.; Lidia, S.; Luft, P.; McClure, R.; Parmigiani, F.; Petroff, Y.; Pirkl, W.; Placidi, M.; Reavill, D.; Reichel, I.; Rimmer, R.A.; Ratti, A.; Robinson, K.E.; Sannibale, F.; Schoenlein, R.; Staples, J.; Tanabe, J.; Truchlikova, D.; Wan, W.; Wang, S.; Wells, R.; Wolski, A.; Zholents, A.

2002-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

362

Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Current and Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems in the US Market: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, C.; Mehos, M.; Ho, C. K.; Kolb, G. J.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Proposal for the award of a contract for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document concerns the award of a contract for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers. Following a market survey carried out among 56 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2740/ST/SPS) was sent on 14 February 2000 to 10 firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received seven tenders from seven firms. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with SPIG (IT), the lowest bidder, for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers, for an amount of 1 073 757 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. SPIG has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: IT-73%; FI-24%; DE-3%.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Proposal for the award of a contract for the construction of cooling-tower structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document concerns the award of a contract for the construction of reinforced-concrete cooling-tower structures at LHC Point 1. Following a market survey carried out among 79 firms in 17 Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2710/ST/LHC) was sent on 13 August 1999 to eight firms and two consortia, both consisting of three firms, in eight Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract for the construction of reinforced-concrete cooling towers at LHC Point 1 with the consortium PAT (AT), BARESEL (DE) and ZSCHOKKE LOCHER (CH), the lowest bidder complying with the specification, for an amount of 3 393 493 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the supply covered by this adjudication proposal: BE-60%, AT-18%, CH-11% and DE-11%.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evaluation of cooling tower and wastewater treatment operations at the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to provide a technical assessment of the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant Wastewater Treatment System. This Scope of Work consisted of five primary tasks described as follows: Task 1 - Determine the quantity of hydantoins in the stripped gas liquor (SGL), their precursors, and the kinetics of their formation in condensed liquor for the Great Plains Gasification Associates (GPGA) gasification facility. The University of North Dakota Energy Research Center (UNDERC) has measured a high concentration of hydantoins in the gas liquor from their slagging gasifier. UNDERC has tested the use of SGL in a pilot cooling tower and they witnessed some adverse effects in the cooling tower and heat exchanger systems. Task 2 - Investigate the adverse Department of Energy (DOE) findings at UNDERC with regard to corrosion, foaming, biological and organic fouling, chemical attack on concrete and organic emissions resulting from the use of SGL in a pilot plant cooling tower. Task 3 - Validate the heat load on the cooling tower for both summer and winter operation and determine the adequacy of the surge pond to store the maximum predicted amount of excess water accumulated during winter operation. Task 4 - Assess potential fouling, foaming and organic carry-over problems associated with operability of the multiple-effect evaporator and develop recommendations on possible alternate use of evaporator condensate to alleviate possible problems in disposing of excess wastewater. Task 5 - Provide DOE with recommendations on the wastewater treatment backup design and test program already committed to by GPGA. This paper presents Fluor's findings regarding the five primary tasks. 12 refs., 4 figs., 15 tabs.

Lang, R.A.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Establishing Tower-Top Equipotential Zones--Case-Study of Incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires employers to provide protection and training for workers who perform work on de-energized and energized lines. This Technical Update report contains the draft script of a new training video on DVD under development on establishing tower-top equipotential zones. The script contains case studies and analysis of specific selected incidents that have occurred in the field. It also includes recommendations for minimizing risks and avoiding elec...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

LOOP CALCULUS AND BELIEF PROPAGATION FOR Q-ARY ALPHABET: LOOP TOWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Loop calculus introduced in [1], [2] constitutes a new theoretical tool that explicitly expresses symbol Maximum-A-Posteriori (MAP) solution of a general statistical inference problem via a solution of the Belief Propagation (BP) equations. This finding brought a new significance to the BP concept, which in the past was thought of as just a loop-free approximation. In this paper they continue a discussion of the Loop Calculus, partitioning the results into three Sections. In Section 1 they introduce a new formulation of the Loop Calculus in terms of a set of transformations (gauges) that keeping the partition function of the problem invariant. The full expression contains two terms referred to as the 'ground state' and 'excited states' contributions. The BP equations are interpreted as a special (BP) gauge fixing condition that emerges as a special orthogonality constraint between the ground state and excited states, which also selects loop contributions as the only surviving ones among the excited states. In Section 2 they demonstrate how the invariant interpretation of the Loop Calculus, introduced in Section 1, allows a natural extension to the case of a general q-ary alphabet, this is achieved via a loop tower sequential construction. The ground level in the tower is exactly equivalent to assigning one color (out of q available) to the 'ground state' and considering all 'excited' states colored in the remaining (q-1) colors, according to the loop calculus rule. Sequentially, the second level in the tower corresponds to selecting a loop from the previous step, colored in (q-1) colors, and repeating the same ground vs excited states splitting procedure into one and (q-2) colors respectively. The construction proceeds till the full (q-1)-levels deep loop tower (and the corresponding contributions to the partition function) are established. In Section 3 they discuss an ultimate relation between the loop calculus and the Bethe-Free energy variational approach of [3].

CHERTKOV, MICHAEL [Los Alamos National Laboratory; CHERNYAK, VLADIMIR [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Some Views On Hot Towers after 50 Years of Tropical Field Programs and Two Years of TRMM Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hot tower hypothesis requires the existence of deep cumulonimbus clouds in the deep Tropics as essential agents, which accomplish the mass and energy transport essential for the maintenance of the general circulation. As the role of the ...

Edward J. Zipser

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Annual Forcing of the Surface Radiation Balance Diurnal Cycle Measured from a High Tower near Boulder, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation balance consisting of upward and downward components of solar and thermal infrared broadband irradiances is continuously measured from the top of a 300-m tower situated on the Colorado high plains. The data are representative of a ...

Ellsworth G. Dutton

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

Galenianou, Olympia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Hybrid power towers: A solar boost for natural gas in the Southwest  

SciTech Connect

A new concept to combine central receiver technology with highly efficient natural gas turbines has sparked interest among key utilities in the southwestern United States. The result is a fully dispatchable hybrid power tower that`s expected to use 30% less natural gas than its conventional counterpart. Developed by researcher at the US DOE`s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the hybrid power tower is the focus of a developing partnership with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) in California. Although some solar advocates criticize the use of nonrenewable natural gas, the hybrid concept mitigates many of the current barriers to commercializing solar thermal technology. NREL`s innovative concept uses a small central receiver plant to preheat combustion air for natural gas turbines. Solar thermal energy displaces the use of nonrenewable fossil fuel throughout much of the day. When solar heat is no longer available, the natural gas turbines ensure continuous operation to meet a utility`s need for baseload, intermediate, or peaking power, as desired. The combined-cycle power tower has many attractive features, but the bottom line is it can be commercialized in today`s utility market.

Brown, L.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dehumidification of air by aqueous triethylene glycol solution in a spray tower  

SciTech Connect

A spray tower in the absorber-stripper system has been designed to study the absorption of water vapor from moist air by contact with aqueous solutions that contained from 87.7 to 95.2% triethylene glycol (TEG). The design of a U-shape air tunnel with eliminators in the absorber and stripper is to prevent the carryover of the solution and to increase the absorption rate and the regeneration rate. This spray tower was capable of handling air flow rates from 1.94 to 3.77 kg/min and liquid flow rates from 2.17 to 3.,31 kg/min. Under the operating conditions of this study, the overall mass transfer coefficients calculated from the experimental data of 95.2% TEG solution varied from /1.78 to 1.95 mol/m{sup 3}s. These corresponded to the heights of a transfer unit of 0.63 to 0.38 m, respectively. The efficiencies of the spray tower typically varied from 64 to 86%.

Chung, T.W.; Wu, H. [Chung-Yuan Christian Univ., Chungli (Taiwan, Province of China). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A virtual tall tower network for understanding continental sources and sinks of CO2  

SciTech Connect

Our understanding of the North American terrestrial carbon cycle is limited by both a lack of continental atmospheric CO2 data, and by a need for methods to interpret these and other continental data with confidence. In response to this challenge a rapid expansion of the N. American carbon cycle observational network is underway. This expansion includes a network of continuous, continental CO2 mixing ratio observations being collected at a subset of AmeriFlux towers. Progress in developing this resource includes instrument development, site installation, calibration and intercalibration efforts, and initiation of a uniform data product. Progess in applying these data include proposed methods for interpreting surface layer measurements in atmospheric inversions (the virtual tall towers approach), examination of coherence patterns in continental mixing ratios in response to weather and climate, and application of these mixing ratio measurements in formal atmospheric inversions. Future work will merge these methods with interpretation of flux towers observations of terrestrial carbon fluxes in an effort to create a single coherent diagnosis of North American terrestrial carbon fluxes over a multi-year period.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

Stability and Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer: A Comparison of Remote Sensing and Tower Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When monitoring winds and atmospheric stability for wind energy applications, remote sensing instruments present some advantages to in-situ instrumentation such as larger vertical extent, in some cases easy installation and maintenance, measurements of vertical humidity profiles throughout the boundary layer, and no restrictions on prevailing wind directions. In this study, we compare remote sensing devices, Windcube lidar and microwave radiometer, to meteorological in-situ tower measurements to demonstrate the accuracy of these measurements and to assess the utility of the remote sensing instruments in overcoming tower limitations. We compare temperature and wind observations, as well as calculations of Brunt-Vaisala frequency and Richardson numbers for the instrument deployment period in May-June 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado. The study reveals that a lidar and radiometer measure wind and temperature with the same accuracy as tower instruments, while also providing advantages for monitoring stability and turbulence. We demonstrate that the atmospheric stability is determined more accurately when the liquid-water mixing ratio derived from the vertical humidity profile is considered under moist-adiabatic conditions.

Friedrich, K.; Lundquist, J. K.; Aitken, M.; Kalina, E. A.; Marshall, R. F.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

378

Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Worlds First Ever Cooling Tower Acceptance Test Using Process Data Reconciliation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cooling capacity of cooling towers is influenced by multiple constructive and atmospheric parameters in a very complex way. This leads to strong variations of the measured cold-water temperature and causes unacceptable unreliability of conventional acceptance tests, which are based on single point measurements. In order to overcome this lack of accuracy a new approach to acceptance test based on process data reconciliation has been developed by BTB Jansky and applied at a nuclear power plant. This approach uses process data reconciliation according to VDI 2048 to evaluate datasets over a long period covering different operating conditions of the cooling tower. Data reconciliation is a statistical method to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95% by considering closed material-, mass-and energy balances. Datasets which are not suitable for the evaluation due to strong transient gradients are excluded beforehand, according to well-defined criteria. The reconciled cold-water temperature is then compared, within a wet bulb temperature range of 5 deg. C to 20 deg. C to the manufacturer's guaranteed temperature. Finally, if the average deviation between reconciled and guaranteed value over the evaluated period is below zero, the cooling tower guarantee is fulfilled. (authors)

Magnus Langenstein; Jan Hansen-Schmidt [BTB-Jansky GmbH, Gerlingerstrasse 151, D-71229 Leonberg (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Economic evaluation of solar-only and hybrid power towers using molten salt technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several hybrid and solar-only configurations for molten-salt power towers were evaluated with a simple economic model, appropriate for screening analysis. The solar specific aspects of these plants were highlighted. In general, hybrid power towers were shown to be economically superior to solar-only plants with the same field size. Furthermore, the power-booster hybrid approach was generally preferred over the fuel-saver hybrid approach. Using today`s power tower technology, economic viability for the solar power-boost occurs at fuel costs in the neighborhood of $2.60/MBtu to $4.40/ MBtu (low heating value) depending on whether coal-based or gas-turbine-based technology is being offset. The cost Of CO[sub 2] avoidance was also calculated for solar cases in which the fossil fuel cost was too low for solar to be economically viable. The avoidance costs are competitive with other proposed methods of removing CO[sub 2] from fossil-fired power plants.

Kolb, G.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Program on Technology Innovation: Review of Advanced Cooling Tower Technologies with Reduced Cooled Water Temperature and Evaporatio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews current technologies and solutions for advanced cooling towers with reduced cooled water temperature and evaporation losses. This is the first report for the dew-point cooling tower fill development project, funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Program on Technology Innovation, Water Conservation program. It is prepared by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI).This review is based on a literature and patent survey; it summarizes advancements in cooling ...

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

WindPACT Rotor Design Study: Hybrid Tower Design; Period of Performance: 29 June 2000 -- 28 February 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost of a wind turbine tower can represent as much as 20% of the cost of an entire megawatt-scale horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) and as much as 10% of the total cost of energy. The tower is a major cost component, and its design is important: Its structural properties are key to the response of the rotor; its height determines the wind regime that the rotor experiences; it allows access to the turbine nacelle and rotor; and it houses components of the electrical connection and the control and protection systems. Most large wind turbines installed in the United States use self-supporting steel tubular towers. The diameter of these tubes is limited by the size that can be transported by road (approximately 4.3 m). The base dimensions of a truss tower are not restrained by this limit, but trusses may require more maintenance. Guyed tube towers have been used, but they represent additional foundation costs and inconvenience. Addressing these limitations may lead to an alternative that avoids the problems. For this reason, the WindPACT Rotor Design Study was modified to include a study of a hybrid tower to determine the technical and economic feasibility of such a design.

Malcolm, D. J.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants All Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulating water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. Slippage due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome. 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified for the particular requirements before a cooling tower is purchased. This relates to the volume of circulatlng water, hot water temperature on the tower, cold water temperature discharge, and wet bulb temperature (consisting of ambient temperature and relative humidity). After the tower is put on the line and the cold water temperature or volume becomes inadequate, engineers look to solutions other than the obvious. While all cooling towers are purchased to function at 100% of capability in accordance with the required Design Conditions, in actual on-stream employment, the level of operation many times is lower, downwards to as much as 50% due to a variety of reasons: 1. The present service needed is now greater than the original requirements which the tower was purchased for. 2. "Slippage" due to usage and perhaps deficient maintenance has reduced the performance of the tower over years of operation. 3. The installation could have been originally undersized due to the low bidder syndrome (1). 4. New plant expansion needs additional water volume and possibly colder temperatures off the tower.

Burger, R.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By returning the desorbed, concentrated NOx into the engine intake and through the combustion chamber, a percentage of the NOx is decomposed during the combustion process. An initial study of NOx decomposition during lean-burn combustion was concluded in 2004 using a 1993 Cummins L10G 240hp natural gas engine. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO (nitric oxide) quantity and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates of the engine. Chemical kinetic modeling results were also used to determine optimum NOx decomposition operating points and were published in the 2004 annual report. A NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine under lean-burn conditions while the software model predicted between 35-42% NOx decomposition for similar conditions. A later technology 1998 Cummins L10G 280hp natural gas engine was procured with the assistance of Cummins Inc. to replace the previous engine used for 2005 experimental research. The new engine was equipped with an electronic fuel management system with closed-loop control that provided a more stable air/fuel ratio control and improved the repeatability of the tests. The engine was instrumented with an in-cylinder pressure measurement system and electronic controls, and was adapted to operate over a range of air/fuel ratios. The engine was connected to a newly commissioned 300hp alternating current (AC) motoring dynamometer. The second experimental campaign was performed to acquire both stoichiometric and slightly rich (0.97 lambda ratio) burn NOx decomposition rates. Effects of engine load and speed on decomposition were quantified, but Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) was not varied independently. Decomposition rates of up to 92% were demonstrated. Following recommendations at the 2004 ARES peer review meeting at Argonne National Laboratories, in-cylinder pressure was measured to calculate engine indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) changes due to NOx injections and EGR variations, and to observe conditions in the cylinder. The third experimental campaign gathered NOx decomposition data at 800, 1200 and 1800 rpm. EGR was added via an external loop, with EGR ranging from zero to the point of misfire. The air/fuel ratio was set at both stoichiometric and slightly rich conditions, and NOx decomposition rates were calculated for each set of runs. Modifications were made to the engine exhaust manifold to record individual exhaust temperatures. The three experimental campaigns have provided the data needed for a comprehensive model of NOx decomposition during the combustion process, and data have confirmed that there was no significant impact of injected NO on in-cylinder pressure. The NOx adsorption system provided by Sorbent Technologies Corp. (Twinsburg, OH), comprised a NOx adsorber, heat exchanger and a demister. These components were connected to the engine, and data were gathered to show both the adsorption of NOx from the engine, and desorption of NOx from the carbon-based sorbent material back into the engine intake, using a heated air stream. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a bench top adsorption system was constructed and instrumented with thermocouples and the system output was fed into a NOx analyzer. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while gathering data on the characteristics of the sorbent material. These data were required for development of a system model. Preliminary data were gathered in 2005, and will continue in early 2006. To assess the economic benefits of the proposed SNR technology the WVU research team has been joined in the last quarter by Dr Richard Turton (WVU-Chemical Engineering), who is modeling, sizing and costing the major components. The tasks will address modeling and preliminary design of the heat exchanger, demister and NOx sorbent chamber s

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Richard Turton; Chamila Tissera; Emre Tatli; Andy Zimmerman

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Cooling Water Intake Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The types of cooling water systems to be evaluated are: Wet Cooling Tower - The condenser is cooled with water recirculated to a mechanical draft cooling tower. Because there...

387

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

A full-scale demonstration of in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation at the X-701B site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposed an oxidant delivery technique involving injection and recirculation of the oxidant solution into a contaminated aquifer through multiple horizontal and vertical wells. This technique would be applicable to saturated, hydraulically conductive formations. In the spring of 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) agreed to collaborate with the DOE`s Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area to conduct a field-scale treatability study using in situ chemical oxidation through recirculation (ISCOR). PORTS agreed to support the demonstration at the X-701B site where the technology can potentially be used to remediate TCE-contaminated groundwater and sediments. The ISCOR field demonstration took advantage of existing infrastructure and extensive site characterization data generated from previous field demonstrations at X-701B. The field test was implemented using a pair of previously installed horizontal wells that transect an area of DNAPL contamination. Groundwater was extracted from one horizontal well, pumped to an existing pump and treat facility, dosed with KMnO{sub 4}, and re-injected into a parallel horizontal well approximately 90 ft away. The field demonstration lasted approximately one month. Treatment effectiveness was determined by comparing contaminant levels in pre-treatment, during, and post-treatment groundwater samples and pre- and post-treatment soil samples.

West, O.R.; Cline, S.R.; Holden, W.L.; Gardner, F.G.; Schlosser, B.M.; Thate, J.E.; Pickering, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houk, T.C. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Technology Applications, Piketon, OH (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A new fission-fragment detector to complement the CACTUS-SiRi setup at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An array of Parallel Plate Avalanche Counters (PPAC) for the detection of heavy ions has been developed. The new device, NIFF (Nuclear Instrument for Fission Fragments), consists of four individual detectors and covers $60\\%$ of 2$\\pi$. It was designed to be used in conjunction with the SiRi array of ${\\Delta}E-E$ silicon telescopes for light charged particles and fits into the CACTUS array of 28 large-volume NaI scintillation detectors at the Oslo Cyclotron Laboratory. The low-pressure gas-filled PPACs are sensitive for the detection of fission fragments, but are insensitive to scattered beam particles of light ions or light-ion ejectiles. The PPAC detectors of NIFF have good time resolution and can be used either to select or to veto fission events in in-beam experiments with light-ion beams and actinide targets. The powerful combination of SiRi, CACTUS, and NIFF provides new research opportunities for the study of nuclear structure and nuclear reactions in the actinide region. The new setup is particularly well suited to study the competition of fission and $\\gamma$ decay as a function of excitation energy.

Tams Gbor Tornyi; Andreas Grgen; Magne Guttormsen; Ann-Cecilie Larsen; Sunniva Siem; Attila Krasznahorkay; Lrnt Csige

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

First Results From GLAST-LAT Integrated Towers Cosmic Ray Data Taking And Monte Carlo Comparison  

SciTech Connect

GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a gamma ray telescope instrumented with silicon-strip detector planes and sheets of converter, followed by a calorimeter (CAL) and surrounded by an anticoincidence system (ACD). This instrument is sensitive to gamma rays in the energy range between 20 MeV and 300 GeV. At present, the first towers have been integrated and pre-launch data taking with cosmic ray muons is being performed. The results from the data analysis carried out during LAT integration will be discussed and a comparison with the predictions from the Monte Carlo simulation will be shown.

Brigida, M.; Caliandro, A.; Favuzzi, C.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Giordano, F.; Giglietto, N.; Loparco, F.; Marangelli, B.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Mirizzi, N.; Raino, S.; Spinelli, P.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Seismic and cask drop excitation evaluation of the tower shielding reactor  

SciTech Connect

During the current shutdown of the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II), analyses were performed to determine the effect of nearby cask drops on the structural and mechanical integrity of the reactor. This evaluation was then extended to include the effects of earthquakes. Several analytic models were developed to simulate the effects of earthquake and cask drop excitation. A coupled soil-structure model was developed. As a result of the analyses, several hardware modifications and enhancements were implemented to ensure reactor integrity during future operations. 6 figs.

Harris, S.P.; Stover, R.L.; Johnson, J.J.; Sumodobila, B.N. (EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA); Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); EQE, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Conceptual Plan for the Detroit Book and Tower Building: Exploration of the Conjunction of Historic Preservation and Sustainable Design Concepts.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This conceptual project generated an adaptive reuse proposal for the Book and Tower Building in a registered historic district. Louis Kamper designed the thirteen-story Book (more)

Luo, Chi-Ying

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Civil Engineering Work on the Extensions to the Cooling Towers at LEP Points 2, 4, 6 and 8  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Civil Engineering Work on the Extensions to the Cooling Towers at LEP Points 2, 4, 6 and 8

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Design and Demonstration of On-Site Fabrication of Fluted-Steel Towers Using LITS-Form(TM) Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with Native American Technologies to develop a new method of metal plate forming to produce wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase I: Evaluation of Design and Construction Approaches for Economical Hybrid Steel/Concrete Wind Turbine Towers; BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with BERGER/ABAM Engineers Inc. to study the economic feasibility of concrete and hybrid concrete/steel wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Testing of an impedance heating system for solar power tower applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI cable heat trace. We found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

arcControlTower: the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PanDA, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the job resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the PanDA server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with the arcControl...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

arcControlTower, the System for Atlas Production and Analysis on ARC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract content Panda, the Atlas management and distribution system for production and analysis jobs on EGEE and OSG clusters, is based on pilot jobs to increase the throughput and stability of the job execution on grid. The ARC middleware uses specific approach which tightly connects the job requirements with cluster capabilities like resource usage, software availability and caching of input files. The pilot concept renders the ARC features useless. The arcControlTower is the job submission system which merges the pilot benefits and ARC advantages. It takes the pilot payload from the panda server and submits the jobs to the Nordugrid ARC clusters as regular jobs, with all the resources known in advance. All the pilot communication with the panda server is done by the arcControlTower, so it plays the role of a pilot factory and the pilot itself. There are several advantages to this approach: no grid middleware is needed on the worker nodes, the fair-share between the production and user jobs is tuned with t...

Filipcic, A; The ATLAS collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

An evaluation of possible next-generation high temperature molten-salt power towers.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since completion of the Solar Two molten-salt power tower demonstration in 1999, the solar industry has been developing initial commercial-scale projects that are 3 to 14 times larger. Like Solar Two, these initial plants will power subcritical steam-Rankine cycles using molten salt with a temperature of 565 C. The main question explored in this study is whether there is significant economic benefit to develop future molten-salt plants that operate at a higher receiver outlet temperature. Higher temperatures would allow the use of supercritical steam cycles that achieve an improved efficiency relative to today's subcritical cycle ({approx}50% versus {approx}42%). The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of a 565 C subcritical baseline plant was compared with possible future-generation plants that operate at 600 or 650 C. The analysis suggests that {approx}8% reduction in LCOE can be expected by raising salt temperature to 650 C. However, most of that benefit can be achieved by raising the temperature to only 600 C. Several other important insights regarding possible next-generation power towers were also drawn: (1) the evaluation of receiver-tube materials that are capable of higher fluxes and temperatures, (2) suggested plant reliability improvements based on a detailed evaluation of the Solar Two experience, and (3) a thorough evaluation of analysis uncertainties.

Kolb, Gregory J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Seismic response of a tower as measured by an integrated RTK-GPS system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monitoring structural response induced by seismic waves is an efficient way to mitigate the damage of earthquakes. For example, the measured signal can be used to activate an alarm system in order to evacuate people from an endangered building, or to drive a control system to suppress earthquake-excited vibrations so as to protect the integrity of the structure, or to assess post-seismic damage to a structure. Traditionally such vibrations have been measured solely by accelerometers. However, it is impossible to measure the static and semi-static components of the movement with accelerometers. An integrated system combining RTK-GPS and accelerometers has been deployed atop a 108m tall tower in Tokyo in order to monitor its structural integrity on a continuous basis. Data acquired during earthquakes are automatically archived. In this paper, the seismic responses of the tower were analysed using Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT) of the GPS and accelerometer measurements. The data were also converted to displacement (in the case of accelerometer) and acceleration (in the case of GPS) through double-integration and double-differentiation respectively, for the purpose of direct comparison. The results agreed with each other well, except that the static component was

Xiaojing Li; Linlin Ge; Yukio Tamura; Akihito Yoshida; Chris Rizos; Gang-ding Peng

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comparison of Triton SODAR Data to Meteorological Tower Wind Measurement Data in Hebei Province, China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the increased interest in remote sensing of wind information in recent years, it is important to determine the reliability and accuracy of new wind measurement technologies if they are to replace or supplement conventional tower-based measurements. In view of this, HydroChina Corporation and the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a comparative test near a wind farm in Hebei Province, China. We present the results of an analysis characterizing the measurement performance of a state-of-the-art Sound Detection and Ranging (sodar) device when compared to a traditional tower measurement program. NREL performed the initial analysis of a three-month period and sent the results to HydroChina. When another month of data became available, HydroChina and their consultant Beijing Millenium Engineering Software (MLN) repeated NREL's analysis on the complete data set, also adding sensitivity analysis for temperature, humidity, and wind speed (Section 6). This report presents the results of HydroChina's final analysis of the four-month period.

Yuechun, Y.; Jixue, W.; Hongfang, W.; Guimin, L.; Bolin, Y.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Kline, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Comparison of an impedance heating system to mineral insulated heat trace for power tower applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI heat trace. The authors found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Investigation of Microbial Respirometry for Monitoring Natural Sulfide Abatement in Geothermal Cooling Tower Basins  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal plant operators are interested in investigating the ability of micro-organisms found in the cooling tower basin to metabolize and cycle sulfide to less toxic sulfur compounds. If the growth or activity of the organisms participating in sulfur-oxidation could be selectively enhanced, then hydrogen sulfide could be naturally abated in the cooling basin, substantially reducing the costs associated with the chemicals used for abatement. The use of respirometry has been proposed as a technique for monitoring the response of the microbial populations found in geothermal cooling towers to various conditions, including the addition of nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. Respiro-metry is a manometric measurement of dissolved gases that are in equilibrium in a con-fined sample volume. Since microbes expire varying amounts of carbon dioxide or oxygen as they metabolize nutrients, this technique can be used to evaluate their activities in process streams. This report describes a series of experiments designed to determine the suitability of respirometry for tracking microbial activity for evaluating and enhancing natural abatement processes in geothermal cooling basins.

Peter A. Pryfogle

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Microsoft Word - CX-Pearl-Marion-Tower-6-2-Replace_FY12_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2012 3, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Richard Heredia Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Pearl-Marion No.1 Tower 6/2 replacement project PP&A Project No.: PP&A 2147, WO# 00296634, Task 3 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions and modifications to transmission facilities Location: Canby, Clackamas County, Oregon Township 3 South, Range 1 East, Section 19 Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to replace a single tower (6/2) on the existing Pearl-Marion No. 1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. Tower 6/2 is located along the Molalla River where natural river channel movement and continued stream bank erosion

405

Evacuated-Tube Heat-Pipe Solar Collectors Applied to the Recirculation Loop in a Federal Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, simulation, construction, and initial performance of a solar water heating system (a 360-tube evacuated-tube heat-pipe solar collector, 54 m2 in gross area, 36 m2 in net absorber area) installed at the top of the hot water recirculation loop in the Social Security Administration's Mid-Atlantic Center in Philadelphia. When solar energy is available, water returning to the hot water storage tank is heated by the solar array. This new approach, in contrast to the more conventional approach of preheating incoming water, is made possible by the thermal diode effect of heat pipes and low heat loss from evacuated-tube solar collectors. The simplicity of this approach and its low installation costs support the deployment of solar energy in existing commercial buildings, especially where the roof is some distance away from the water heating system, which is often in the basement. Initial performance measurements of the system are reported.

Walker, A.; Mahjouri, F.; Stiteler, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microelectronic chip cooling: an experimental assessment of a liquid-passing heat sink, a microchannel heat rejection module, and a microchannel-based recirculating-liquid cooling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of heat transfer testing of heat absorption modules (HAM), heat rejection modules (HRM), and a recirculating-liquid cooling system are reported. Low-profile, Cu-based, microchannel heat exchangers (MHEs) were fabricated and used as the HAM as ...

Bin Lu; W. J. Meng; Fanghua Mei

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

REFRIGERATIONREFRIGERATION ((svsv: Kylteknik): Kylteknik) 424503 E424503 E 20102010 #7#7 --rzrz 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers7. Air conditioning, cooling towersg, gg, g  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the top of the tower An (earlier) alternative is to use a spray pond to cool water; disadvantages. Air conditioning, cooling towers7. Air conditioning, cooling towersg, gg, g Ron Zevenhoven ??bo, is the hi htemperature at which condensation begins when air is cooled at constant pressurecooled

Zevenhoven, Ron

408

Unusual Decommissioning of Contaminated Facilities at the Savannah River Site - The Demolition of Cooling Towers 285-H and 285-F  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site is an 800-square kilometer (310-square mile) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) industrial facility located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties in South Carolina. The site is dedicated to environmental cleanup, developing and deploying technologies to support the cleanup mission, processing and storing nuclear materials, and supporting national security missions. The current focus in environmental management is on the cleanup of legacy materials, facilities and wastes left from the Cold War. In 2002 the DOE initiated actions to expedite cleanup focusing on significant risk reduction coupled with reducing costs. SRS published the Savannah River Site Environmental Management Integrated Deactivation and Decommissioning Plan in 2003 which addressed the final disposition and physical end state of all 1,013 Environmental Management facilities on site by the year 2025. Included in this list of facilities are reactors, fabrication facilities, process facilities and the support facilities that were required during the past 50 years. By the end of FY06, over 200 facilities had been decommissioned. This paper describes the demolition of two facilities, cooling towers 285-H and 285-F that were associated with the operation of the process canyons. Because of the circumstances surrounding these decommissions, unique and unusual techniques were safely employed to demolish and remove the cooling towers. Both 285-H and 285-F were safely felled by pulling the columns remotely to weaken the internal portion of the structure so it would collapse inwards into the basin. Cooling tower 285-H fell in less than 1 second after approximately two-thirds of the columns had been broken. See Figure 3 for a photo of 285-H after its collapse. 285-F, which was larger than 285-H, fell in three sections, two cells at a time. Once the towers were felled conventional demolition equipment was used to segregate and remove the debris. All protective measures used to protect surrounding equipment and structures were successful and the basins were cleaned out and returned to service in less than two weeks. The demolition of both cooling towers 285- H and 285-F was completed safely and timely using unconventional means to fell the towers due to structural degradation, height, limited access, radiological and asbestos hazards, and a requirement to protect equipment on all sides of the facility as well as preservation of the basins. During felling operations personnel were required to stay outside the fall zone equivalent to a distance of 150% of the height of the towers. Remote operations outside the fall zone required a tracked vehicle to pull cables attached to the columns in a predetermined sequence so as to fell the tower straight down into the basin. Once the towers fell traditional demolition equipment segregated and removed the waste. Wooden cooling towers of this vintage present a difficult challenge to traditional demolition techniques. Because of the height and potential instability of these types of facilities, considerable effort is placed on reducing the potential energy to a point where heavy equipment can reach safely without endangering the operators. The column-pulling technique chosen for both 285-H and 285-F cooling towers proved to be a safe and efficient method for demolition of these types of facilities.

Austin, William E.; Baldwin, Guy R. [Washington Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-128 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Tower Water-Vapor Mixing Ratio Value-Added Product April 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

410

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001 - 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) 2001 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information, such as global PSP (W/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion of the available data: from August 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011. A separate dataset is available for the period between September 23, 1996 and August 23, 2001.The NWTC website provides up to the day updates to this data, from as early as August 24, 2001 through yesterday, as well as instrument specifications.

411

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996 - 2001) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) 1996 - 2001) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information (Global, kWs/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and dew point, as well as wind speed and direction at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m. Included here is a portion of the available data: from September 23, 1996 - August 23, 2001. A separate dataset is available for Aug 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011 in OpenEI. The NWTC website provides current data (updated daily), from as early as August 24, 2001, as well as instrument specifications.

412

Fuzzy Logic Application for Optimization of the Cooling Towers Control System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The control system for the SPS-BA6 cooling towers station is considered in order to introduce the concept of a multivariable process. Multivariable control means the maintenace of several controlled variables at independent set points. In a single-variable system, to keep the single process variables within their critical values is considered a rather simple operation. In a complex multivariable system, the determination of the optimal operation point results in a combination of all set values of the variables. Control of a multivariable system requires therefore a more complex analysis. As the solution based on a mathematical model of the process is far beyond acceptable complexity, most mathematical models involve extensive simplifications and linearizations to optimize the resulting controllers. In this report the author will demonstrate how fuzzy logic might provide elegant and efficient solutions in the design of multivariable control based on experimental results rather than on mathematical models.

Blanc, D

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

Kearney, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Prototype Test Results of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are currently no experiments, either satellite or ground-based, that are sensitive to astrophysical gamma-rays at energies between 20 and 250 GeV. We are developing the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) to explore this energy range. STACEE will use heliostat mirrors at a solar research facility to collect Cherenkov light from extensive air showers produced by high energy gamma-rays. Here we report on the results of prototype test work at the solar facility of Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). The work demonstrates that the facility is suitable for use as an astrophysical observatory. In addition, using a full scale prototype of part of STACEE, we detected atmospheric Cherenkov radiation at energies lower than any other ground-based experiment to date.

STACEE Collaboration

1997-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Vulnerability assessment of medieval civic towers as a tool for retrofitting design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seismic vulnerability of an ancient civic bell-tower is studied. Rather than seeing it as an intermediate stage toward a risk analysis, the assessment of vulnerability is here pursued for the purpose of optimizing the retrofit design. The vulnerability curves are drawn by carrying out a single time history analysis of a model calibrated on the basis of experimental data. From the results of this analysis, the medians of three selected performance parameters are estimated, and they are used to compute, for each of them, the probability of exceeding or attaining the three corresponding levels of light, moderate and severe damage. The same numerical model is then used to incorporate the effects of several retrofitting solutions and to re-estimate the associated vulnerability curves. The ultimate goal is to provide a numerical tool able to drive the optimization process of a retrofit design by the comparison of the vulnerability estimates associated with the different retrofitting solutions.

Casciati, Sara [ASTRA Department, University of Catania, Siracusa (Italy); Faravelli, Lucia [Department of Structural Mechanics, University of Pavia, Pavia, Pavia (Italy)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

Meteorological Tower, Microbarograph Array, and Sodar Observations of Solitary-like Waves in the Nocturnal Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five short-duration disturbances of the stable nocturnal boundary layer, ranging in depth from about 15 m to over 500 m, were observed using a 300 m meteorological tower, 2 sodars, and a 4-station microbarograph array. Four of the events showed ...

T. K. Cheung; C. G. Little

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Long-Term Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from a Very Tall Tower in a Northern Forest: Flux Measurement Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methodology for determining fluxes of CO2 and H2O vapor with the eddy-covariance method using data from instruments on a 447-m tower in the forest of northern Wisconsin is addressed. The primary goal of this study is the validation of the methods ...

Bradford W. Berger; Kenneth J. Davis; Chuixiang Yi; Peter S. Bakwin; Cong Long Zhao

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Constructing a virtual tower of Babel: a case study in cross-cultural collaboration across three continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collaboration project described in this paper revolves around the construction of a virtual Tower of Babel in a 3D Collaborative Virtual Environment (3D CVE). It involved students across three cooperating institutions, on three different continents ... Keywords: 3D collaborative virtual environments, multi-cultural classroom

Ekaterina Prasolova-Frland; Theodor Wyeld; Teng-Wen Chang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Discussion of a New Exhausting Smoke Solution in Natural Draft Cooling Tower with Flue Gas Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First, the three-dimensional model of NDCT with flue gas injection and the boundary conditions was established by GAMBIT2.3 on the basis of structural parameter. On theFLUENT6.3 technology platform with self-designed program, it was found that: The new ... Keywords: NDCT with flue gas injection, jet mechanics numerical simulation, natural draft cooling towers

Yang Shuo; Qing-Jie Qi; Xin-Le Yang; Shi Lei; Chun-Yang Li

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

AUTOMATED DEAD-END ULTRAFILTRATION FOR ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE OF LEGIONELLA 2 PNEUMOPHILA AND LEGIONELLA SPP. IN COOLING TOWER WATERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detection of Legionella pneumophila in cooling towers and domestic hot water systems involves concentration by centrifugation or membrane filtration prior to inoculation onto growth media or analysis using techniques such as PCR or immunoassays. The Portable Multi-use Automated Concentration System (PMACS) was designed for concentrating microorganisms from large volumes of water in the field and was assessed for enhancing surveillance of L. pneumophila at the Savannah River Site, SC. PMACS samples (100 L; n = 28) were collected from six towers between August 2010 and April 2011 with grab samples (500 ml; n = 56) being collected before and after each PMACS sample. All samples were analyzed for the presence of L. pneumophila by direct fluorescence immunoassay (DFA) using FITC-labeled monoclonal antibodies targeting serogroups 1, 2, 4 and 6. QPCR was utilized for detection of Legionella spp. in the same samples. Counts of L. pneumophila from DFA and of Legionella spp. from qPCR were normalized to cells/L tower water. Concentrations were similar between grab and PMACS samples collected throughout the study by DFA analysis (P = 0.4461; repeated measures ANOVA). The same trend was observed with qPCR. However, PMACS concentration proved advantageous over membrane filtration by providing larger volume, more representative samples of the cooling tower environment, which led to reduced variability among sampling events and increasing the probability of detection of low level targets. These data highlight the utility of the PMACS for enhanced surveillance of L. pneumophila by providing improved sampling of the cooling tower environment.

Brigmon, R.; Leskinen, S.; Kearns, E.; Jones, W.; Miller, R.; Betivas, C.; Kingsley, M.; Lim, D.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

OAiC RiDGE NATIONAL LABORAl-ORY LKCKKBSP HAITI MANA%ED AND OPERATED BY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OH42 -7 OH42 -7 / i3-y OAiC RiDGE NATIONAL LABORAl-ORY LKCKKBSP HAITI MANA%ED AND OPERATED BY vxKHEEpyARluEwERoY fEsEARcHcxHtPoM~RN R3RmEuMYED~Am DEPMl' MEU?#bBgKiY . ORNL/TpvI-12968 Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey of the Remedial Action l?erformed at the Former Alba Craft Laboratory Site Oxford, Ohio (0x0001) K. R. Kleinhans M. E. Murray R. F. Carrier - This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Techni- cal Information, P.O. 60x 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37631; prices available from (615) 576-640 1, FTS 626-640 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd.. Springfield, VA 22161.

423

The Use of Polymeric Dispersants in the Condensate/Feedwater Line during Long-Path Recirculation Cleanup at Pressurized Water Reacto rs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator (SG) deposit fouling causes heat-transfer losses, tube and internals corrosion degradation, level instabilities, and reductions in plant output. Utilities routinely devote substantial resources to limiting or reducing the level of such deposit fouling. This report summarizes the results of a two-year EPRI effort to develop dispersant application during the long-path recirculation cleanup process as a SG deposit management strategy. The work showed that the addition of dispersant is very l...

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Steam Generator Management Program: Pressurized Water Reactor Generic Tube Degradation Predictions: Recirculating Steam Generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mill-annealed Alloy 600 heat transfer tubing in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs) has experienced numerous modes of degradation. This report describes predictive models for determining expected tube degradation in recirculating steam generators with Alloy 600TT, Alloy 690TT, and Alloy 800NG tubing. Predictions are based on operating experience with similar designs and use improvement factors to characterize benefits resulting from SG design and material ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

425

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3ŒSelf-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29493 1 * NREL/SR-500-29493 Global Energy Concepts, LLC Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility March 2000-March 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 May 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29493 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 3-Self-Erecting Tower and Nacelle Feasibility March 2000-March 2001 Global Energy Concepts, LLC Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

426

Session: What have studies of communications towers suggested regarding the impact of guy wires and lights on birds and bats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The paper ''Wind turbines and Avian Risk: Lessons from Communications Towers'' was given by Paul Kerlinger. The presenter outlined lessons that have been learned from research on communications (not cell) towers and about the impacts of guy wires and lights on birds and bats and how they could be useful to wind energy developers. The paper also provided specific information about a large 'fatality' event that occurred at the Mountaineer, WC wind energy site in May 2003, and a table of Night Migrant Carcass search findings for various wind sites in the US.

Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Solar-MHD energy conversion system. [tower focus collector with closed-cycle MHD generator  

SciTech Connect

A solar energy conversion system includes a centrally positioned tower supporting a solar receiver, and an array of pivotally mounted reflectors disposed circumferentially therearound which reflect earth incident solar radiation onto the receiver which thermally excites and photo-ionizes a working fluid to form a plasma. The plasma is accelerated and further heated through a ceramic turbo-compressor into a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator to produce direct current. The working fluid is then passed through a heat exchanger channel where the waste heat is removed by another working fluid which drives a vapor turbine connected to the ceramic turbo-compressor and an AC generator. Seed may then be removed and the working fluid is recycled in the closed cycle MHD system. The electrical power is distributed, part of it being used to electrolyze water into hydrogen and oxygen which are stored and allowed to exothermally recombine to drive the system during low solar radiation intervals. In a further embodiment the MHD working fluid receives its velocity from an external turbo-compressor drivem by the second working fluid, and an alternative thermal and photo-ionization chamber is employed. 16 claims, 10 figures.

Rathbun, K.R.

1978-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

428

Program on Technology Innovation: Feasibility Study of Using a Thermosyphon Cooler Hybrid System to Reduce Cooling Tower Water Consu mption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update describes the initial work accomplished by a feasibility study for using a newly developed Thermosyphon Cooler (TSC) Hybrid System to reduce cooling-tower water consumption at steam power plants. The report outlines the overall project and then details the applicable codes and standards that would apply to this technology. It also briefly touches on the literature and patents relating to this field. It describes the rationale and constraints involved in setting up the ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

Numerical Simulation and Test Study on Non-uniform Area Of Round-ended CFST Tubular Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of Poisson ratio of core concrete on the bearing capacity of round-ended CFST tubular tower and non-uniform area were analyzed with test study and the sub-model technology, the most disadvantaged stress state of the structure under the triaxial ... Keywords: round-ended concrete-filled steel(CFST), triaxial compression, Poisson's ratio(), sub-model method, Micro-expansive

Jian-xiong Xie; Zhe-an Lu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Induced-Draft Cooling Towers and Parallel Wet/Dry Cooling for Combined-Cycle Plants: Design Best Practices and Procurement Specifica tions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information and examples of best practices for the design and specification of wet and parallel (hybrid) cooling towers for combined-cycle applications. Two reference (template) specifications are includedone for totally wet cooling systems and one for parallel cooling systems with a wet cooling tower and air-cooled condensers (ACC) in parallel. These template specifications are intended to be the starting point from which the utility or developer can "customize" as needed to fit its...

2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

431

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Recirculating electric air filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric air filter cartridge has a cylindrical inner high voltage eleode, a layer of filter material, and an outer ground electrode formed of a plurality of segments moveably connected together. The outer electrode can be easily opened to remove or insert filter material. Air flows through the two electrodes and the filter material and is exhausted from the center of the inner electrode.

Bergman, Werner (Pleasanton, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

FINAL REPORT: EDDY-COVARIANCE FLUX TOWER AND TRACER TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PROPOSAL: FROM TOWER TO PIXEL: INTEGRATION OF PATCH-SIZE NEE USING EXPERIMENTAL MODELING FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory has been funded since October of 2000 to provide assistance to the University of Georgia in conducting footprint analyses of individual towers based on meteorology and trace gas measurements. Brookhaven researchers conducted air flow measurements using perfluorocarbon tracers and meteorological instrumentation for three experimental campaigns at an AmeriFlux research site maintained by Dr. Monique Leclerc near Gainesville, FL. In addition, BNL provided assistance with remote data collection and distribution from remote field sites operated by Dr. John Hom of the US Forest Service in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and at FACE research sites in North Carolina and Wisconsin.

LEWIN,K.F.; NAGY, J.; WATSON, T.B.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

LBNL-4183E-rev1 N NA AT TU UR RA AL L G GA AS S V VA AR RI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4183E-rev1 4183E-rev1 N NA AT TU UR RA AL L G GA AS S V VA AR RI IA AB BI IL LI IT TY Y I IN N C CA AL LI IF FO OR RN NI IA A: : E EN NV VI IR RO ON NM ME EN NT TA AL L I IM MP PA AC CT TS S A AN ND D D DE EV VI IC CE E P PE ER RF FO OR RM MA AN NC CE E E EX XP PE ER RI IM ME EN NT TA AL L E EV VA AL LU UA AT TI IO ON N O OF F I IN NS ST TA AL LL LE ED D C CO OO OK KI IN NG G E EX XH HA AU US ST T F FA AN N P PE ER RF FO OR RM MA AN NC CE E Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp and Michael G. Apte Indoor Environment Department Atmospheric Sciences Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division July 2011 (Revised February 2012) Disclaimer 1 This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of

435

Waste-heat vertical tube foam evaporation for cooling tower blowdown renovation/recycle. Project summary report  

SciTech Connect

A prototype waste-heat vertical tube foam evaporation (WH-VTFE) plant was designed, constructed, and field-tested for reducing power plant cooling tower blowdown to a small residual volume of solids slurried in brine, while producing distilled water for reuse. Facility design was based on previously-developed pilot plant test data. The WH-VTFE facility was constructed for initial parametric testing in upflow/downflow evaporation modes with boiler steam. The field test/demonstration phase was conducted at a power plant site using turbine exhaust steam for the up to 50-fold cooling tower blowdown concentration in a foamy-flow seed-slurried mode of downflow vertical tube evaporation. The VTFE heat transfer coefficient ranged between 5600 to 9000 W/sq m/degree, over 4-fold the level considered as acceptable in another study. Further, a sufficient temperature difference is available within a typical power plant heat rejection system to operate a WH-VTFE when the plant load is above 50% of its design capacity. Scale formed from inadequate brine recycle rates was readily removed by recycling fresh water through the evaporator to restore the high heat transfer performance of the WH-VTFE. It was concluded that WH-VTFE was demonstrated as feasible and commercially viable.

Sephton, H.H.; Someahsaraii, K.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Removal site evaluation report on the Tower Shielding Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This removal site evaluation report for the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was prepared to provide the Environmental Restoration Program with information necessary to evaluate whether hazardous and/or radiological contaminants in and around the Tower Shielding Facility pose a substantial risk to human health or the environment (i.e., a high probability of adverse effects) and if remedial site evaluations or removal actions are, therefore, required. The scope of the project included a review of historical evidence regarding operations and use of the facility; interviews with facility personnel concerning current and past operating practices; a site inspection; and identification of hazard areas requiring maintenance, removal, or remedial actions. Based an the findings of this removal site evaluation, adequate efforts are currently being made at the TSF to contain and control existing contamination and hazardous substances on site in order to protect human health and the environment No conditions requiring maintenance or removal actions to mitigate imminent or potential threats to human health and the environment were identified during this evaluation. Given the current conditions and status of the buildings associated with the TSF, this removal site evaluation is considered complete and terminated according to the requirements for removal site evaluation termination.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A new code for the design and analysis of the heliostat field layout for power tower system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new code for the design and analysis of the heliostat field layout for power tower system is developed. In the new code, a new method for the heliostat field layout is proposed based on the edge ray principle of nonimaging optics. The heliostat field boundary is constrained by the tower height, the receiver tilt angle and size and the heliostat efficiency factor which is the product of the annual cosine efficiency and the annual atmospheric transmission efficiency. With the new method, the heliostat can be placed with a higher efficiency and a faster response speed of the design and optimization can be obtained. A new module for the analysis of the aspherical heliostat is created in the new code. A new toroidal heliostat field is designed and analyzed by using the new code. Compared with the spherical heliostat, the solar image radius of the field is reduced by about 30% by using the toroidal heliostat if the mirror shape and the tracking are ideal. In addition, to maximize the utilization of land, suitable crops can be considered to be planted under heliostats. To evaluate the feasibility of the crop growth, a method for calculating the annual distribution of sunshine duration on the land surface is developed as well. (author)

Wei, Xiudong; Lu, Zhenwu; Yu, Weixing [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130033 (China); Wang, Zhifeng [The Key Laboratory of Solar Thermal Energy and Photovoltaic system, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

438

Risk-Informed Monitoring, Verification and Accounting (RI-MVA). An NRAP White Paper Documenting Methods and a Demonstration Model for Risk-Informed MVA System Design and Operations in Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper accompanies a demonstration model that implements methods for the risk-informed design of monitoring, verification and accounting (RI-MVA) systems in geologic carbon sequestration projects. The intent is that this model will ultimately be integrated with, or interfaced with, the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) integrated assessment model (IAM). The RI-MVA methods described here apply optimization techniques in the analytical environment of NRAP risk profiles to allow systematic identification and comparison of the risk and cost attributes of MVA design options.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Sadovsky, Artyom; Sullivan, E. C.; Anderson, Richard M.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

440

VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE SOUTH WASTE TANK FARM TRAINING/TEST TOWER AND HAZARDOUS WASTE STORAGE LOCKERS AT THE WEST VALLEY DEMONSTRATION PROJECT WEST VALLEY, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

A team from ORAUs Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the sites conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Phyllis C. Weaver

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Process for separating, especially in multiple stages, acid components such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and specifically H/sub 2/S, from gases, especially from coke oven gases, by means of ammonia recirculation scrubbing  

SciTech Connect

A process of separating in multiple stages acid components in coke oven gas such as CO/sub 2/, HCN and particularly H/sub 2/S by ammonia scrubbing wherein the ammonia used in scrubbing is deacidified to remove the acid components and is recirculated to the scrubbing process at least in part as substantially pure liquid ammonia.

Bauer, H.K.; Otte, E.A.W.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

IRFM T_eff calibrations for cluster and field giants in the Vilnius, Geneva, RI(C) and DDO photometric systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a large sample of disk and halo giant stars, for which accurate effective temperatures derived through the InfraRed Flux Method (IRFM) exist, a calibration of the temperature scale in the Vilnius, Geneva, RI(C) and DDO photometric systems is performed. We provide calibration formulae for the metallicity dependent T_eff vs color relations as well as grids of intrinsic colors and compare them with other calibrations. Photometry, atmospheric parameters and reddening corrections for the stars of the sample have been updated with respect to the original sources in order to reduce the dispersion of the fits. Application of our results to Arcturus leads to an effective temperature in excellent agreement with the value derived from its angular diameter and integrated flux. The effects of gravity on these T_eff vs color relations are also explored by taking into account our previous results for dwarf stars.

I. Ramirez; J. Melendez

2003-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SNR Denton US LLP SNR Denton US LLP 1301 K Street, NW Suite 600, East Tower Washington, DC 20005-3364 USA Thomas C. Jensen Partner thomas.jensen@snrdenton.com D +1 202 408 3956 M 703 304 5211 T +1 202 408 6400 F +1 202 408 6399 snrdenton.com March 28, 2012 BY E-MAIL Lamont Jackson Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Mail Code: OE-20 U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585 Re: OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001 Dear Mr. Jackson:: This letter is submitted on behalf of PPL Electric and Public Service Electric and Gas Company ("PSE&G") 1 ,(referred to herein as "the Companies") with respect to the Susquehanna-Roseland

444

Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

Kildea, J; Ball, J; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Jarvis, A; Lindner, T; Mller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Simulation and Analysis on the Heat and Mass Transfer Processes of a Three-Stage Tower Type of Solar Desalination Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the mechanism of the falling film evaporation and condensation. A three-stage tower type of desalination unit has been designed[1]. Meanwhile the heat and mass transfers are analyzed and studied according to results from the references [2]-[5] ... Keywords: Water treatment technology, Falling film evaporation and condensation, Solar energ

Chen Ziqian; Xie Guo; Zheng Hongfei; Chen Zhili

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evaluation of Three-Beam and Four-Beam Profiler Wind Measurement Techniques Using a Five-Beam Wind Profiler and Collocated Meteorological Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a five-beam wind profiler and a collocated meteorological tower are used to estimate the accuracy of four-beam and three-beam wind profiler techniques in measuring horizontal components of the wind. In the traditional three-beam ...

Ahoro Adachi; Takahisa Kobayashi; Kenneth S. Gage; David A. Carter; Leslie M. Hartten; Wallace L. Clark; Masato Fukuda

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Dealing with cultural differences in a 3D virtual classroom: a case study of collaboratively constructing a virtual Tower of Babel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The collaboration project described in this paper involved students across three cooperating institutions, on three different continents in different time zones, building a virtual Tower of Babel in a 3D Collaborative Virtual Environment (3D CVE). Much ... Keywords: 3D collaborative virtual environments, collaborative learning, multi-cultural classroom

Ekaterina Prasolova-Frland; Theodor G. Wyeld; Teng-Wen Chang

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Design specifications for the development of the initial validation software (Version 3.0) for processing of NWTC 80-Meter meteorological tower data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the design, implementation, and testing of the Initial Validation Software (IVS) for meteorological tower data at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory/National Wind Technology Center. The document outlines all design issues relating to the IVS, including the design process, an outline of the software and testing procedures, and an evaluation of design results after further iterations of the design process.

Johnson, W.; Kelley, N.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies using the Community Land Model (CLM) focused on simulating landatmosphere interactions and water balance at continental to global scales, with limited attention paid to its capability for hydrologic simulations at watershed or regional scales. This study evaluates the performance of CLM 4.0 (CLM4) for hydrologic simulations, and explores possible directions of improvement. Specifically, it is found that CLM4 tends to produce unrealistically large temporal variation of runoff for applications at a mountainous catchment in the Northwest United States where subsurface runoff is dominant, as well as at a few flux tower sites. We show that runoff simulations from CLM4 can be improved by: (1) increasing spatial resolution of the land surface representations; (2) calibrating parameter values; (3) replacing the subsurface formulation with a more general nonlinear function; (4) implementing the runoff generation schemes from the Variability Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. This study also highlights the importance of evaluating both the energy and water fluxes application of land surface models across multiple scales.

Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Aihui; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system for solar-thermal steam-electric power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermal performance and economics of the combined thermal storage pond and dry cooling tower waste heat rejection system concept for solar-thermal steam-electric plants have been evaluated. Based on the computer simulation of the operation of southwest-sited solar-thermal plants, it has been determined that the combined pond-tower concept has significant cost and performance advantages over conventional dry cooling systems. Use of a thermal storage pond as a component of the dry cooling system allows a significant reduction in the required dry cooling heat exchange capacity and the associated parasitic power consumption. Importantly, it has been concluded that the combined pond-tower dry cooling system concept can be employed to economically maintain steam condensing temperatures at levels normally achieved with conventional evaporative cooling systems. An evaluation of alternative thermal storage pond design concepts has revealed that a stratified vertical-flow cut-and-fill reservoir with conventional membrane lining and covering would yield the best overall system performance at the least cost.

Guyer, E.C.; Bourne, J.G.; Brownell, D.L.; Rose, R.M.

1979-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (Pfish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

RI_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionRhodeIslandWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Rhode...

455

Trouble tower game demo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Construction Industry has one of the highest rates of injury and fatality in Australia and across the world. A key challenge for OH&S training is to engage learners. Construction students tend to be experiential learners and class room teaching is ... Keywords: construction industry, hazard identification, learning, occupational health and safety, serious game

Stefan Greuter, Susanne Tepe, Frank Boukamp, Ron Wakefield

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Cooling Towers Make Money  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Question:-Why is the low bidder system a sacred cow? If contractors understand, by specifications, that the second low bidder will be awarded the contract all bidders will do their best to provide 100% performing equipment. If corners are cut, that will produce a low bid which will not be awarded the contract. Case histories are delineated indicated how low bidders by cutting quality, caused facility many times greater losses in dollars than the difference between the low bid and the second low bid. Changing the established low bid system, takes on the task of being Don Quixote. Nobody listens.

Burger, R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Recirculation of Materials and Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013... Chemical Manufacturing and Its Impact on Environment A Review: Sergio Sanchez-Segado1; Animesh Jha1; 1University of Leeds

458

Utilizing a cycle simulation to examine the use of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a spark-ignition engine: including the second law of thermodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system has been widely used to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, improve fuel economy and suppress knock by using the characteristics of charge dilution. However, previous studies have shown that as the EGR rate at a given engine operating condition increases, the combustion instability increases. The combustion instability increases cyclic variations resulting in the deterioration of engine performance and increasing hydrocarbon emissions. Therefore, the optimum EGR rate should be carefully determined in order to obtain the better engine performance and emissions. A thermodynamic cycle simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition engine was used to determine the effects of EGR on engine performance, emission characteristics and second law parameters, considering combustion instability issues as EGR level increases. A parameter, called 'Fuel Fraction Burned,' was introduced as a function of the EGR percentage and used in the simulation to incorporate the combustion instability effects. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in EGR, load and speed for a 5.7 liter spark-ignition automotive engine. Variations in the thermal efficiencies, brake specific NOx emissions, average combustion temperature, mean exhaust temperature, maximum temperature and relative heat transfer as functions of exhaust gas recycle were determined for both cooled and adiabatic EGR configurations. Also effects of variations in the load and speed on thermal efficiencies, relative heat transfers and destruction of availability due to combustion were determined for 0% EGR and 20% EGR cases with both cooled and adiabatic configurations. For both EGR configurations, thermal efficiencies first increase, reach a maximum at about 16% EGR and then decrease as the EGR level increases. Thermal efficiencies are slightly higher for cooled EGR configuration than that for adiabatic configuration. Concentration of nitric oxide emissions decreases from about 2950 ppm to 200 ppm as EGR level increases from 0% to 20% for cooled EGR configuration. The cooled EGR configuration results in lower nitric oxide emissions relative to the adiabatic EGR configuration. Also second law parameters show the expected trends as functions of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency is higher for the 20% EGR case than that for the no EGR case over the range of load (0 to WOT) and speed (600 rpm to 6000 rpm). Predictions made from the simulation were compared with some of the available experimental results. Predicted thermal efficiencies showed a similar trend when compared to the available experimental data. Also, percentage of unused fuel availability increases as the EGR level increases, and it can be seen as one of the effects of deteriorating combustion quality as the EGR level increases.

Shyani, Rajeshkumar Ghanshyambhai

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

An experimental and numerical investigation on the influence of external gas recirculation on the HCCI autoignition process in an engine: Thermal, diluting, and chemical effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to contribute to the solution of controlling the autoignition in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine, parameters linked to external gas recirculation (EGR) seem to be of particular interest. Experiments performed with EGR present some difficulties in interpreting results using only the diluting and thermal aspect of EGR. Lately, the chemical aspect of EGR is taken more into consideration, because this aspect causes a complex interaction with the dilution and thermal aspects of EGR. This paper studies the influence of EGR on the autoignition process and particularly the chemical aspect of EGR. The diluents present in EGR are simulated by N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}, with dilution factors going from 0 to 46 vol%. For the chemically active species that could be present in EGR, the species CO, NO, and CH{sub 2}O are used. The initial concentration in the inlet mixture of CO and NO is varied between 0 and 170 ppm, while that of CH{sub 2}O alters between 0 and 1400 ppm. For the investigation of the effect of the chemical species on the autoignition, a fixed dilution factor of 23 vol% and a fixed EGR temperature of 70 C are maintained. The inlet temperature is held at 70 C, the equivalence ratios between 0.29 and 0.41, and the compression ratio at 10.2. The fuels used for the autoignition are n-heptane and PRF40. It appeared that CO, in the investigated domain, did not influence the ignition delays, while NO had two different effects. At concentrations up until 45 ppm, NO advanced the ignition delays for the PRF40 and at higher concentrations, the ignition delayed. The influence of NO on the autoignition of n-heptane seemed to be insignificant, probably due to the higher burn rate of n-heptane. CH{sub 2}O seemed to delay the ignition. The results suggested that especially the formation of OH radicals or their consumption by the chemical additives determines how the reactivity of the autoignition changed. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France); Guibert, Philippe [UPMC Universite Paris 06, FRT, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert, 2, place de la Gare de Ceinture, 78210 St Cyr l'Ecole (France)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Life Cycle Environmental Impacts Resulting from the Manufacture of the Heliostat Field for a Reference Power Tower Design in the United States: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as a useful analytical approach for quantifying environmental impacts of renewable energy technologies, including concentrating solar power (CSP). An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is conducting a series of LCA studies for various CSP technologies. This paper contributes to a thorough LCA of a 100 MWnet molten salt power tower CSP plant by estimating the environmental impacts resulting from the manufacture of heliostats. Three life cycle metrics are evaluated: greenhouse gas emissions, water consumption, and cumulative energy demand. The heliostat under consideration (the 148 m2 Advanced Thermal Systems heliostat) emits 5,300 kg CO2eq, consumes 274 m3 of water, and requires 159,000 MJeq during its manufacture. Future work will incorporate the results from this study into the LCA model used to estimate the life cycle impacts of the entire 100 MWnet power tower CSP plant.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "towers ri recirculating" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior at Cougar Dam on the south fork of the McKenzie River in Oregon in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower of the dam for USACE and fisheries resource managers use in making decisions about bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from March 1, 2010, through January 31, 2011. Juvenile salmonids (hereafter, called 'fish') were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout the study. Fish abundance index was low in early spring (<200 fish per sample-day), increased in late April, and peaked on May 19 (6,039 fish). A second peak was observed on June 6 (2904 fish). Fish abundance index decreased in early June and remained low in the summer months (<100 fish per sample-day). During the fall and winter, fish numbers varied with a peak on November 10 (1881 fish) and a minimum on December 7 (12 fish). A second, smaller, peak occurred on December 22 (607 fish). A univariate statistical analysis indicated fish abundance index (log10-transformed) was significantly (P<0.05) positively correlated with forebay elevation, velocity over the WTC tower intake gate weirs, and river flows into the reservoir. A subsequent multiple regression analysis resulted in a model (R2=0.70) predicting fish abundance (log-transformed index values) using two independent variables of mean forebay elevation and the log10 of the forebay elevation range. From the approximate fish length measurements made using the DIDSON imaging software, the average fish length during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, the average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 54 mm), after which average lengths increased to 295 {+-} 148 mm for mid-November though early December. From mid-December through January the average fish length decreased to 151 {+-} 76 mm. Milling in front of the WTC tower was the most common fish behavior observed throughout the study period. Traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east, was the next common behavior. The percentage of fish events showing movement from the forebay to the tower or from the tower to the forebay was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall (0 to 30% for both directions combined, March through early November). From mid-November 2010 through the end of the study (January 31, 2011), the combined percentages of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher (25 to 70%) than during previous months of the study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring. Schooling events were present in 30 to 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak on May 19. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. With the exception of some schooling in mid-December, few to no schooling events were observed in the fall and winter months. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring and fall months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours and no schooling was observed at night. However, in December, schooling occurred at night, after midnight, and during daylight hours. Predator activity, most likely bull trout or rainbow trout according to a USACE biologist, was observed during late spring, when fish abundance index and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months.

Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ham, Kenneth D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Use of Treated Municipal Wastewater as Power Plant Cooling System Makeup Water: Tertiary Treatment versus Expanded Chemical Regimen for Recirculating Water Quality Management  

SciTech Connect

Treated municipal wastewater is a common, widely available alternative source of cooling water for thermoelectric power plants across the U.S. However, the biodegradable organic matter, ammonia-nitrogen, carbonate and phosphates in the treated wastewater pose challenges with respect to enhanced biofouling, corrosion, and scaling, respectively. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate the benefits and life cycle costs of implementing tertiary treatment of secondary treated municipal wastewater prior to use in recirculating cooling systems. The study comprised bench- and pilot-scale experimental studies with three different tertiary treated municipal wastewaters, and life cycle costing and environmental analyses of various tertiary treatment schemes. Sustainability factors and metrics for reuse of treated wastewater in power plant cooling systems were also evaluated. The three tertiary treated wastewaters studied were: secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to acid addition for pH control (MWW_pH); secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected to nitrification and sand filtration (MWW_NF); and secondary treated municipal wastewater subjected nitrification, sand filtration, and GAC adsorption (MWW_NFG). Tertiary treatment was determined to be essential to achieve appropriate corrosion, scaling, and biofouling control for use of secondary treated municipal wastewater in power plant cooling systems. The ability to control scaling, in particular, was found to be significantly enhanced with tertiary treated wastewater compared to secondary treated wastewater. MWW_pH treated water (adjustment to pH 7.8) was effective in reducing scale formation, but increased corrosion and the amount of biocide required to achieve appropriate biofouling control. Corrosion could be adequately controlled with tolytriazole addition (4-5 ppm TTA), however, which was the case for all of the tertiary treated waters. For MWW_NF treated water, the removal of ammonia by nitrification helped to reduce the corrosivity and biocide demand. Also, the lower pH and alkalinity resulting from nitrification reduced the scaling to an acceptable level, without the addition of anti-scalant chemicals. Additional GAC adsorption treatment, MWW_NFG, yielded no net benefit. Removal of organic matter resulted in pitting corrosion in copper and cupronickel alloys. Negligible improvement was observed in scaling control and biofouling control. For all of the tertiary treatments, biofouling control was achievable, and most effectively with pre-formed monochloramine (2-3 ppm) in comparison with NaOCl and ClO2. Life cycle cost (LCC) analyses were performed for the tertiary treatment systems studied experimentally and for several other treatment options. A public domain conceptual costing tool (LC3 model) was developed for this purpose. MWW_SF (lime softening and sand filtration) and MWW_NF were the most cost-effective treatment options among the tertiary treatment alternatives considered because of the higher effluent quality with moderate infrastructure costs and the relatively low doses of conditioning chemicals required. Life cycle inventory (LCI) analysis along with integration of external costs of emissions with direct costs was performed to evaluate relative emissions to the environment and external costs associated with construction and operation of tertiary treatment alternatives. Integrated LCI and LCC analysis indicated that three-tiered treatment alternatives such as MWW_NSF and MWW_NFG, with regular chemical addition for treatment and conditioning and/or regeneration, tend to increase the impact costs and in turn the overall costs of tertiary treatment. River water supply and MWW_F alternatives with a single step of tertiary treatment were associated with lower impact costs, but the contribution of impact costs to overall annual costs was higher than all other treatment alternatives. MWW_NF and MWW_SF alternatives exhibited moderate external impact costs with moderate infrastructure and chemical conditioner dosing, which makes them (especially

David Dzombak; Radisav Vidic; Amy Landis

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

RECIPIENT:Desert Research Institute STATE:NV PROJECT Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Southern Nevada; NREl Tracking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Desert Research Institute STATE:NV Desert Research Institute STATE:NV PROJECT Tall Tower Wind Energy Monitoring and Numerical Model Validation in Southern Nevada; NREl Tracking TITLE: No. 11-012 Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number NREl-11-012 G010337 Based on my review of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA CompHance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.1A), I have made the following determination: CX, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: A9 Information gathering (including, but not limited to, literature surveys, inventories, audits), data analYSis (including computer modeling), document preparation (such as conceptual deSign or feasibility studies, analytical energy supply and demand studies), and dissemination (including, but not limited to, document mailings, publication, and distribution;

464

Large Amplitude Spatial and Temporal Gradients in Atmospheric Boundary Layer CO2 Mole Fractions Detected With a Tower-Based Network in the U.S. Upper Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents observations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} mole fraction from a nine-tower, regional network deployed during the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive during 2007-2009. Within this network in a largely agricultural area, mean atmospheric CO{sub 2} gradients were strongly correlated with both ground-based inventory data and estimates from satellite remote sensing. The average seasonal drawdown for corn-dominated sites (35 ppm) is significantly larger than has been observed at other continental boundary layer sites. Observed growing-season median CO{sub 2} gradients are strongly dependent on local flux. The gradients between cross-vegetation site-pairs, for example, average 2.0 ppm/100 km, four times larger than the similar-vegetation site-pair average. Daily-timescale gradients are as large as 5.5 ppm/100 km, but dominated by advection rather than local flux. Flooding in 2008 led to a region-wide 23 week delay in growing-season minima. The observations show that regional-scale CO{sub 2} mole fraction networks yield large, coherent signals governed largely by regional sources and sinks of CO{sub 2}.

Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lauvaux, Thomas; Andrews, A.; West, Tristram O.; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Crosson, Eric R.

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z