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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

High-temperature Thermal Storage System for Solar Tower Power Plants with Open-volumetric Air Receiver Simulation and Energy Balancing of a Discretized Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the modeling of a high-temperature storage system for an existing solar tower power plant with open volumetric receiver technology, which uses air as heat transfer medium (HTF). The storage system model has been developed in the simulation environment Matlab/Simulink®. The storage type under investigation is a packed bed thermal energy storage system which has the characteristics of a regenerator. Thermal energy can be stored and discharged as required via the HTF air. The air mass flow distribution is controlled by valves, and the mass flow by two blowers. The thermal storage operation strategy has a direct and significant impact on the energetic and economic efficiency of the solar tower power plants.

Valentina Kronhardt; Spiros Alexopoulos; Martin Reißel; Johannes Sattler; Bernhard Hoffschmidt; Matthias Hänel; Till Doerbeck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

On thermal performance of seawater cooling towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seawater cooling towers have been used since the 1970s in power generation and other industries, so as to reduce the consumption of freshwater. The salts in seawater are known to create a number of operational problems, ...

Sharqawy, Mostafa H.

8

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Thermal Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Thermal Management Infrared image of rectangular battery cell. Infrared thermal image of a lithium-ion battery cell with poor terminal design. Graph of relative...

9

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' Information

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C Solar heating will introduce stresses into the tower’sTower. The LACMA weather station records additional variables such as humidity and solar

English, Jackson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Aquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"with solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zakhidov, 1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravelwith solar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides aAquifer Storage of Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors,"

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Thermal performance upgrade of the Arkansas Nuclear One cooling tower: A ``root cause`` analysis approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal performance efficiency of the natural draft cooling tower at Entergy Operations` 858 MWe Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit 2 was successfully upgraded to 101% of design performance capability in April 1994 as the end result of a unique root-cause analysis of the cooling tower`s long-standing performance deficiencies. Through application of state-of-the-art diagnostic testing methods and computer modeling techniques, Entergy was able to identify and correct air/water maldistribution problems in the 447 foot tall counterflow cooling tower at minimal cost. Entergy estimates that the savings realized, as a result of the 1.2 F reduction in cooling tower outlet water temperature, will pay for the thermal upgrade project in approximately 14 months.

Liffick, G.W. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Russellville, AR (United States); Cooper, J.W. Jr. [John Cooper and Associates, Tampa, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thermal energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities,...

20

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper first reviews the key hurdles to thermal energy storage. Next, case studies of three electric utility thermal storage marketing programs are reviewed. The results of these case studies. as well as advice and experiences from other...

McDonald, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermalfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

26

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

27

Cost and performance analysis of concentrating solar power systems with integrated latent thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Integrating TES (thermal energy storage) in a CSP (concentrating solar power) plant allows for continuous operation even during times when solar irradiation is not available, thus providing a reliable output to the grid. In the present study, the cost and performance models of an EPCM-TES (encapsulated phase change material thermal energy storage) system and HP-TES (latent thermal storage system with embedded heat pipes) are integrated with a CSP power tower system model utilizing Rankine and s-CO2 (supercritical carbon-dioxide) power conversion cycles, to investigate the dynamic TES-integrated plant performance. The influence of design parameters of the storage system on the performance of a 200 MWe capacity power tower CSP plant is studied to establish design envelopes that satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative requirements, which include a round-trip annualized exergetic efficiency greater than 95%, storage cost less than $15/kWht and LCE (levelized cost of electricity) less than 6 ¢/kWh. From the design windows, optimum designs of the storage system based on minimum LCE, maximum exergetic efficiency, and maximum capacity factor are reported and compared with the results of two-tank molten salt storage system. Overall, the study presents the first effort to construct and analyze LTES (latent thermal energy storage) integrated CSP plant performance that can help assess the impact, cost and performance of LTES systems on power generation from molten salt power tower CSP plant.

K. Nithyanandam; R. Pitchumani

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and on affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a DOE request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. This report discusses the demonstration of ETS equipment at four member light departments.

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

Knebel, D. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named “the… (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Thermal Energy Storage:Analysis and Application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this paper is to analyze and determine the feasibility of a cold thermal storage system in manufacturing Industries. Cooling loads and actual… (more)

Ogunkoya, Dolanimi Olugbenga

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

“Energy Tower” combined with pumped storage and desalination: Optimal design and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The “Energy Tower” (ET) is a power plant project which uses hot dry air and seawater to produce electricity. An optimized design of a system that is a combination of an ET, pumped storage and seawater desalination plant is considered. A model set covering each subsystem, and results of the optimized design for a project in the area of Eilat are presented. The additional benefit from combining the systems comes from an efficient use of the energy in the brine water coming from the desalination process, and from using pumped storage in an unconventional way. The benefits of the combined system lead to an increase of 14% in the annual net profit, compared to the sum of profits from optimally designed stand-alone systems.

E. Omer; R. Guetta; I. Ioslovich; P.O. Gutman; M. Borshchevsky

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation University of South Florida logo...

42

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

43

Project Profile: Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Texas Engineering Experiment Station (TEES), under the Thermal Storage FOA, created a composite thermal energy storage material by embedding nanoparticles in a molten salt base material.

44

Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

45

Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program...

46

Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power...

47

The Solar Power Tower Jülich — A Solar Thermal Power Plant for Test and Demonstration of Air Receiver Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The open volumetric receiver technology allows the use of air as heat transfer medium at high temperatures in solar thermal power tower plants. It combines porous ceramic ... a strictly modular receiver design. H...

K. Hennecke; P. Schwarzbözl; G. Koll…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The newly opened Pennsylvania Convention Center in Philadelphia, PA; Exxon's Computer Facility at Florham Park, NJ; The Center Square Building in Philadelphia, are success stories for demand shifting through thermal storage. These buildings employ a...

Kieninger, R. T.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Thermal Energy Storage for Vacuum Precoolers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radically creating high peak demands and low load factors. An ice bank thermal energy storage (TES) and ice water vapor condenser were installed. The existing equipment and TES system were computer monitored to determine energy consumption and potential... efficiency at night. The ice bank thermal energy storage system has a 4.4 year simple payback. While building ice, the refrigeration system operated at a 6.26 Coefficient of Performance (COP). The refrigeration system operated more efficiently at night...

Nugent, D. M.

50

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summer heat as by solar ponds or "heating towers"; some goodsolar cooking (third world) Relieve firewood depletion Year-round exploitation No cooling towers

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sorption thermal storage for solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Sorption technologies, which are considered mainly for solar cooling and heat pumping before, have gained a lot of interests for heat storage of solar energy in recent years, due to their high energy densities and long-term preservation ability for thermal energy. The aim of this review is to provide an insight into the basic knowledge and the current state of the art of research on sorption thermal storage technologies. The first section is concerned with the terminology and classification for sorption processes to give a clear scope of discussion in this paper. Sorption thermal storage is suggested to cover four technologies: liquid absorption, solid adsorption, chemical reaction and composite materials. Then the storage mechanisms and descriptions of basic closed and open cycles are given. The progress of sorption materials, cycles, and systems are also reviewed. Besides the well-known sorbents like silica gels and zeolites, some new materials, including aluminophosphates (AlPOs), silico-aluminophosphates (SAPOs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), are proposed for heat storage. As energy density is a key criterion, emphais is given to the comparison of storage densities and charging tempertures for different materials. Ongoing research and development studies show that the challenges of the technology focus on the aspects of different types of sorption materials, the configurations of absorption cycles and advanced adsorption reactors. Booming progress illustrates that sorption thermal storage is a realistic and sustainable option for storing solar energy, especially for long-term applications. To bring the sorption storage solution into market, more intensive studies in fields of evaluation of advanced materials and development of efficient and compact prototypes are still required.

N. Yu; R.Z. Wang; L.W. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Modeling and Simulation of Solar Chimney Power Plant with and without the Effect of Thermal Energy Storage Systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A solar updraft tower power plant – sometimes also called 'solar chimney' or just ‘solar tower’ – is a solar thermal power plant utilizing a… (more)

Daba, Robera

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation...

55

Macroencapsulation of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The use of a latent heat storage system using phase change materials (PCMs) is an effective way of storing thermal energy. Latent heat storage enables… (more)

Pendyala, Swetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids and Novel Thermal Storage Concepts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Systems Lehigh University: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Terrafore: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten...

57

Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deployment  of  Thermal  Energy   Storage  under  Diverse  Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

DeForest, Nicolas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcoupled with thermal energy storage," Applied Energy, vol.N. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

Steen, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Solar Power Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power University of Connecticut logo The University of Connecticut, under the Thermal...

65

SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

66

Rehabilitating A Thermal Storage System Through Commissioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplementary chiller (50 tons) was needed due to an under- sized storage tank and an under-sized chller. In 1995, the authors were asked to investigate the problems and provide possible solutions. The thermal storage system was subsequently rehabilitated... draws water from the bottom of the tank and sends the return water to the top of the tank. Valve V4 isolates the chiller from the building and the tank. In the charging mode (Figure 2b), valves V3 and V4 are open while valve V1 is 06 wcad closed...

Liu, M.; Veteto, B.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigations in cool thermal storage: storage process optimization and glycol sensible storage enhancement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

device in order to meet the utility's mandate. The first part of this study looks at the effects of adding propylene glycol to a static-water ice thermal storage tank, in the pursuit of increasing storage capacity. The effects of glycol addition...

Abraham, Michaela Marie

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flowis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceand heat storage; heat exchangers for application of solar

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1974. Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy, in "Governors1976. "Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy for Electric PowerUnderground Longterm Storage of Solar Energy - An Overview,"

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thermal Characterization of Graphitic Carbon Foams for Use in Thermal Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Highly conductive graphitic foams are currently being studied for use as thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. TES systems store… (more)

Drummond, Kevin P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Experimental studies are presented that aim to utilize phase change materials (PCM's) to enhance thermal energy storage systems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems.… (more)

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Latent Heat or Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been explained in sections 1.6 and 1.6.2 how phase change materials (PCM) have considerably higher thermal energy storage densities compared to sensible heat storage materials and are able to absorb or rel...

H. P. Garg; S. C. Mullick; A. K. Bhargava

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Evaluation of Thermal Storage at Two Industrial Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal storage offers substantial energy cost savings potential in situations with favorable electrical rates and significant cooling demand. Full storage is usually restricted to facilities occupied only part of the day, but two industrial plants...

Brown, M. L.; Gurta, M. E.

78

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL STORAGE APPLICATIONS FOR COMMERCIAL/INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES Roger 1. Knipp, PE. Dallas Power & Light Company Dallas, Texas ABSTRACT Texas Utilities Electric Company has been actively encouraging installations of thermal storage... since 1981. Financial incentives and advantageous rates can make thermal storage an attractive cooling concept in Texas Utilities Electric Company service area. Currently, 14 million square feet of commercial building space in Dallas is either...

Knipp, R. L.

80

Molten Oxide Glass Materials for Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Halotechnics, Inc. is developing an energy storage system utilizing a low melting point molten glass as the heat transfer and thermal storage material. This work is supported under a grant from the Department of Energy's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). Advanced oxide glasses promise a potential breakthrough as a low cost, earth abundant, and stable thermal storage material. The system and new glass material will enable grid scale electricity storage at a fraction of the cost of batteries by integrating the thermal storage with a large heat pump device. Halotechnics is combining its proven expertise in combinatorial chemistry with advanced techniques for handling molten glass to design and build a two-tank thermal energy storage system. This system, operating at a high temperature of 1200 °C and a low temperature of 400 °C, will demonstrate sensible heat thermal energy storage using a uniquely formulated oxide glass. Our molten glass thermal storage material has the potential to significantly reduce thermal storage costs once developed and deployed at commercial scale. Thermal storage at the target temperature can be integrated with existing high temperature gas turbines that significantly increase efficiencies over today's steam turbine technology. This paper describes the development and selection of Halotechnics’ molten glass heat transfer fluids with some additional systems considerations.

B. Elkin; L. Finkelstein; T. Dyer; J. Raade

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withhour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not all constraintslifetime ( a) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Carbon Foam Infused with Pentaglycerine for Thermal Energy Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A thermal energy storage device that uses pentaglycerine as a phase change material was developed. This solid-state phase change material was embedded in a carbon… (more)

Johnson, Douglas James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Performance investigation of various cold thermal energy storages.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study deals with solidification and melting of some typical encapsulated ice thermal energy storage geometries. Using ANSYS GAMBIT and FLUENT 6.0 software, HTF fluid… (more)

MacPhee, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Project Profile: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, will design, develop, and test a prototype high-temperature and high-efficiency thermal energy storage (TES) system...

85

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feasibility of using phase change materials (PCM) at elevated temperatures and to acquire engineering results that will lead to the demonstration of large-scale thermal storage...

86

Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Storage System Basics Thermal Storage System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage System Basics August 21, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis One challenge facing the widespread use of solar energy is reduced or curtailed energy production when the sun sets or is blocked by clouds. Thermal energy storage provides a workable solution to this challenge. In a concentrating solar power (CSP) system, the sun's rays are reflected onto a receiver, which creates heat that is used to generate electricity. If the receiver contains oil or molten salt as the heat-transfer medium, then the thermal energy can be stored for later use. This enables CSP systems to be cost-competitive options for providing clean, renewable energy. Several thermal energy storage technologies have been tested and

88

Composite materials for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zakhidov, R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-aquifers for heat storage, solar captors for heat productionthermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and R.A. Zakhidov, "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Heat as Related to the Storage of Solar Energy. Sharing the1974. Geothermal Storage of Solar Energy, in "Governors

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. A. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravelthermal energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems,storage, solar captors for heat production 9 and heat pumps for energy

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

WATTS TOWERS: THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL CYCLES ON THE FORMATION AND BEHAVIOR OF CRACKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to make lasting repairs to the Watts Towers. 15 REFERENCES [1] LSTC. "LS-DYNA KEYWROD MANUAL." DYNA Support. Livermore Software Technology Corporation, n.d. Web. 5 Apr. 2013.

Spencer, Matthew T

2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

93

Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

None

2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage 1 EUROTHERM99-01-103 Convection Energy Storage 2 Nussel number. This study shows that an increase in the convection coefficient leads in this paper consists in horizontal PCM plates separated by an air flow. This is a storage system dedicated

Boyer, Edmond

95

EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have been announced Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics

96

Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

Weaver, Phyllis C.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

98

Continuous Commissioning(SM) of a Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shows that commissioning of the thermal storage system is not limited to the storage tank itself, but is closely related to successful commissioning of building air handling units (AHUs) and chilled water loops. The full benefit of a thermal storage... than a dozen major buildings. The storage system was installed after a campus-wide energy efficiency retrofit. It is designed to store 42?F chilled water with a return water temperature of 56?F. Total storage capacity is 7000 ton-hours. The tank...

Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23.11.2014Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers Ron Zevenhoven Ã?bo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/36 7.1 Humid air #12;23.11.2014 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow

Zevenhoven, Ron

100

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

DeForest, Nicholas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this method is based on the specific heat of water rather than the latent 'heat of fusion of ice as in ice storage, it requires about 4 times the storage capacity of an equivalent ice storage system. ? Salt Storage: This system utilizes eutectic salts... which freeze and melt around 47 o F. Exist ing chillers can be easily retrofitted for salt storage or chilled water storage. For ice stor age systems, a direct refrigerant system or glycol chillers are suitable. This paper discusses the details...

Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

103

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUTURE CONSIDERATIONS FOR CAVERN STORAGE Some of the topicsgravel or sand into the cavern in order to reduce the volumeAbove ground equipment for cavern storage opera- tions.

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

seasonal storage in phase change material, by collecting andof incorporating phase-change materials (PCM) in con- crete

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Thermal and flow analysis of the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% effort of Title 1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computational fluid dynamics code CFX4.2 was used to evaluate steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Fluor Daniel, Inc., Nuclear Material Storage Facility renovation design (initial 30% of Title 1). Thirteen facility cases were evaluated with varying temperature dependence, drywell-array heat-source magnitude and distribution, location of the inlet tower, and no-flow curtains in the drywell-array vault. Four cases of a detailed model of the inlet-tower top fixture were evaluated to show the effect of the canopy-cruciform fixture design on the air pressure and flow distributions.

Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.; Knight, T.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Chapter 12 - Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The foremost challenges of energy supply in meeting the energy demand apply to the development of energy efficient technologies to achieve energy security and environmental emissions. In the spectrum of energy-efficient technologies, thermal energy storage systems offer huge potential to bridge the mismatch between energy supply and energy demand. The overall operational performance of thermal storage systems depends on the quality of energy content and the energy degradation effects exhibited during the cyclic charging and discharging processes. The assessment pertaining to the exergy efficiency in addition to energy efficiency can have a pivotal role to enable thermal storage systems to outperform on a long-term basis.

S. Kalaiselvam; R. Parameshwaran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

An electric thermal storage marketing feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author presents a study undertaken to determine the market potential of a cooling storage rebate program in the Orange and Rockland service territory. The study was also designed to provide insight into which customer groups are the most likely candidates for cool storage. The information gained from this study is useful for both long term demand side planning and in focusing efforts cost effectively on future cool storage marketing programs.

Onofry, R. (Orange and Rockland Utilities (US))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

110

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Speaker(s): Klaus Schiess Date: June 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is a technology that stores "cooling" energy in a thermal storage mass. In the eighties and early nineties the utilities in California incentivised this technology to shift electrical on-peak power to off-peak. Thereafter, for various reasons TES became the most neglected permanent load shifting opportunity. It is only now with the challenges that the renewables provide that TES may have a come- back because it is basically the best and most economical AC battery available with a round trip efficiency of 100% or even better. This presentation gives some background to this development and shows the interdependence of

111

Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage ... Ground-state energy barriers along the NN torsional coordinates were also computed, along with excitation energies and intensities for the species that can contribute to the photostationary state. ...

E. Durgun; Jeffrey C. Grossman

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Strong Case for Thermal Energy Storage and Utility Incentives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

construction costs, more stringent regulations, and increasing environmental constraints regarding development of new generating facilities. As the thermal cooling storage technology has matured, more and more utilities are recognizing that widespread use...

McCannon, L. W.

113

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Dish Sterling High Performance Thermal Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A., "Heat transfer and exergy analysis of cascaded latent heat storage with gravity-assisted heat pipes for concentrating solar power applications," Solar Energy 86 (3)...

117

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. J. Molz. Subsurface Waste Heat Storage, Experimentalfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. forfor land disposal of waste heat and waste water. Inst. for

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower • Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979... ABSTRACT Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Groundwater Aquifers. (December 1979) David Bryan Reed, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald L. Reddell Solar energy is a promising alternate energy source for space heat...

Reed, David Bryan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF POWDER INSULATIONS FOR CRYOGENIC STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF POWDER INSULATIONS FOR CRYOGENIC STORAGE VESSELS Y. S. Choi1 '3 , M. N), powder insulation, and foam insulation, are used in the cryogenic storage vessels. Among CP823, Advances in Cjyogenie Engineering: Transactions of the Cryogenic Engineering Conference - CEC, Vol. 51, edited by J. G

Chang, Ho-Myung

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Thermal Test Facility * NSTTF * Renewable Energy * SAND2012-8086W * solar * Solar Energy * solar power * Solar Research * Solar Tower Comments are closed. Renewable...

122

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

III, "Man-made Geothermal Energy," presented at MiamiA.C.Meyers III; "Manmade Geothermal Energy", Proc. of Miamiin soils extraction of geothermal energy heat storage in the

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of Alabama, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing thermal energy storage (TES) media consisting of low melting point (LMP) molten salt with high TES density for sensible heat storage systems.

124

Design and optimization of solid thermal energy storage modules for solar thermal power plant applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solid sensible heat storage is an attractive option for high-temperature storage applications in terms of investment and maintenance costs. Typical solid thermal energy storage systems use a heat transfer fluid to exchange heat as the fluid flows through a tubular heat exchanger embedded in the solid storage material. The modified lumped capacitance method is used with an effective heat transfer coefficient in a simplified analysis of the heat transfer in solid thermal energy storage systems for a solid cylindrical heat storage unit. The analytical solution was found using the Laplace transform method. The solution was then used to develop an optimization method for designing solid storage modules which uses the system requirements (released energy and fluid outlet temperature) as the constraint conditions and the storage module cost as the objective function for the optimization. Optimized results are then given for many kinds of system configurations.

Yongfang Jian; Quentin Falcoz; Pierre Neveu; Fengwu Bai; Yan Wang; Zhifeng Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Exergy analysis of a rock bed thermal storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, a thermodynamic procedure is presented to analyse energy and exergy balances of a rock bed thermal storage system. The thermal behaviour is described by means of a control volume that includes three subsystems: the solar collectors, the fluid distribution system and the storage chamber. Solar-to-thermal energy conversion was obtained by means of a solar collector at a fixed airflow rate. The final purpose of the method is to determine how well the thermodynamic modelling fits the real data obtained experimentally from the prototype under normal operating conditions.

J.J. Navarrete-Gonzalez; J.G. Cervantes-de Gortari; E. Torres-Reyes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980, but its thermal solar and storage systems received achiller. A 30 m heat storage tank solar decouples heatfacility with thermal storage and solar- assisted HVAC for

Mammoli, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thermal Energy Storage in Adsorbent Beds .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Total produced energy in the world is mostly consumed as thermal energy which is used for space or water heating. Currently, more than 85% of… (more)

Ugur, Burcu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Performance evaluation of thermal energy storage systems;.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solar thermal technologies are promising, given the fact that solar newlineenergy is the cheapest and most widely available of all renewable energy newlinetechnologies. The recent… (more)

Ramana A S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sandia Workers Received Entrepreneurial Spirit Awards On April 3, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

131

Preliminary survey and evaluation of nonaquifer thermal energy storage concepts for seasonal storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The main energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)

Blahnik, D.E.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Thermal Energy Energy Sources o Solar Heat o Winter Coldusual Solar Energy System which uses only a heat source andsources and heat sinks not found anywhere else. Furthermore even where Solar energy

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

Prueitt, M.L.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technologies that are to be developed in this work will enable storage of thermal energy in 100 MWe solar energy plants for 6-24 hours at temperatures around 300oC and 850oC using encapsulated phase change materials (EPCM). Several encapsulated phase change materials have been identified, fabricated and proven with calorimetry. Two of these materials have been tested in an airflow experiment. A cost analysis for these thermal energy storage systems has also been conducted that met the targets established at the initiation of the project.

Neti, Sudhakar; Oztekin, Alparslan; Chen, John; Tuzla, Kemal; Misiolek, Wojciech

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Phase change thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Thermal performance evaluation of a solar air heater with and without thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication presents the experimental study and performance analysis of a solar air heater with and without phase change ... found that the output temperature in case with thermal energy storage (TES) is h...

V. V. Tyagi; A. K. Pandey; S. C. Kaushik…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Olszewski, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermal Analysis of the SAFKEG Package for Long Term Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interim plutonium storage for up to 10 years in the K-reactor building is currently being planned at Savannah River Site (SRS). SAFKEG package could be used to store Pu metal and oxide (PuO2) in the K-reactor complex with other packagings like 9975. The SAFKEG is designed for carrying Type-B materials across the DOE complex and meets the 10CFR71 requirements. Thermal analyses were performed to ensure that the temperatures of the SAFKEG components will not exceed their temperature limits under the K-reactor storage conditions. Thermal analyses of the SAFKEG packaging with three content configurations using BNFL 3013 outer container (Rocky Flats, SRS bagless transfer cans, and BNFL inner containers) were performed for storage of PuO2 and plutonium metal

NARENDRA, GUPTA

2005-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act

144

Computer Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the placement of the wind tower opening and air inlets into the building should be considered. Finally, the model should include energy storage effects in the thermal mass of the building. Perhaps the best way to incorporate all of these issues into a..., the placement of the wind tower opening and air inlets into the building should be considered. Finally, the model should include energy storage effects in the thermal mass of the building. Perhaps the best way to incorporate all of these issues into a...

Seryak, J.; Kissock, J. K.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Two-tank indirect thermal storage designs for solar parabolic trough power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The performance of a solar thermal parabolic trough plant with thermal storage is dependent upon the arrangement of the heat exchangers that ultimately transfer energy… (more)

Kopp, Joseph E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Windmill tower  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A windmill tower supports a propeller and a platform that in turn supports a propeller feather control system and a generator system. The entire tower rotates at its base under changes in wind direction so the rotating propeller is constantly maintained upwind of the tower. The tower is a rigid structure that withstands cyclic thrust and torque loading sufficiently to reduce resonant vibrations of the tower as the propeller rotates under the influence of the wind. The resonant frequency of the tower can be higher than the passing frequency of the rotating propeller blades. The tower includes a pair of generally upright fore legs that converge upwardly toward a first apex on the propeller axis of rotation near the front of the platform immediately behind the propeller hub. A diagonal bracing strut extends downwardly from the first apex away from the plane of the fore legs and toward the rear of the tower. The bottoms of the fore legs and the diagonal bracing strut are rigidly interconnected by base plane truss members. A pair of upwardly converging aft legs extend diagonally upwardly from the bottoms of the fore legs toward a second apex aft of the first apex at the rear of the platform. At regular vertical intervals, stiffening trusses add rigidity to the main upright members of the tower structure. The natural frequency of the tower is raised by the fore legs and the diagonal bracing strut being interconnected in a rigid base plane truss. The diagonal bracing strut resists thrust loading on the tower, and the fore legs and aft legs resist torsional forces produced at the top of the tower.

Schachle, C.; Schachle, E.C.; Schachle, J.R.; Schachle, P.J.

1982-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Convection towers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

Prueitt, M.L.

1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of Connecticut, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage (TES) systems for CSP involving phase change materials (PCMs).

151

Project Profile: Indirect, Dual-Media, Phase Changing Material Modular Thermal Energy Storage System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Acciona Solar, under the Thermal Storage FOA, plans to design and validate a prototype and demonstrate a full-size (800 MWth) thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs).

152

Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Acciona Solar, under the Thermal Storage FOA, plans to develop a prototype thermal energy storage (TES) module with high efficiency. This project is looking at a packed or structured bed TES tank with molten salt flowing through it.

153

Transient-heat-transfer and stress analysis of a thermal-storage solar cooker module  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper details the analysis carried out in Solidworks to determine the best material and configuration of a thermal-storage solar cooker module.The thermal-storage solar cooker utilizes the high-latent-heat lithium ...

Zengeni, Hazel C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

21 - Thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power (CSP) technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The option to supply electricity on demand is a key advantage of solar thermal power plants with integrated thermal storage. Diurnal storage systems providing thermal power in the multi-MW range for several hours are required here, the temperature range being between 250 °C and 700 °C. This chapter describes the state of the art in commercial storage systems used in solar thermal power generation. An overview of alternative and innovative storage concepts for this application area is given.

W.-D. Steinmann

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory's TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1990--March 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1990 to March 1992 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, direct contact ice making, latent heat storage plasterboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Tomlinson, J.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

COUPLING SUPERCRITICAL AND SUPERHEATED DIRECT STEAM GENERATION WITH THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

salt. This a distinct advantage for minimising the amount of salt required for a given amount of energy the advantages of high temperature that are achievable from high-concentration solar collectors such as solar energy storage system, having been demonstrated on both troughs (SEGS I) and towers (Solar Two) [3

158

Technical assessment of solar thermal energy storage technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy is recognized as one of the most promising alternative energy options. On sunny days, solar energy systems generally collect more energy than necessary for direct use. Therefore, the design and development of solar energy storage systems, is of vital importance and nowadays one of the greatest efforts in solar research. These systems, being part of a complete solar installation, provide an optimum tuning between heat demand and heat supply. This paper reviews the basic concepts, systems design, and the latest developments in (sensible and latent heat) thermal energy storage. Parameters influencing the storage system selection, the advantages and disadvantages of each system, and the problems encountered during the systems operation are highlighted.

Hassan E.S. Fath

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources | OSTI, US Dept of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources Read about Thermal Storage Research in OSTI Resources From the DOE Press Release: "High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage (HEATS). More than 90% of energy technologies involve the transport and conversion of thermal energy. Therefore, advancements in thermal energy storage - both hot and cold - would dramatically improve performance for a variety of critical energy applications. ..." From the Databases Energy Citations Database Information Bridge DOE Green Energy WorldWideScience.org More information Secretary Chu announces $130 Million for Advanced Research Projects, April 20, 2011 From Zero to $180 Million in Five Days DOE Blog ARPA-E's High Density Thermal Storage Workshop, January 2011 Advanced Heat Transfer and Thermal Storage Fluids High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage Grant Synopsis

160

Nanofluid \\{PCMs\\} for thermal energy storage: Latent heat reduction mechanisms and a numerical study of effective thermal storage performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The latent heat of fusion of paraffin-based nanofluids has been examined to investigate the use of enhanced phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. The nanofluid approach has often been exploited to enhance thermal conductivity of PCMs, but the effects of particle addition on other thermal properties affecting TES are relatively ignored. An experimental study of paraffin-based nanofluids containing various particle sizes of multi-walled carbon nanotubes has been conducted to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on latent heat of fusion. Results demonstrated that the magnitude of nanofluid latent heat reduction increases for smaller diameter particles in suspension. Three possible mechanisms – interfacial liquid layering, Brownian motion, and particle clustering – were examined to explain further reduction in latent heat, through the weakening of molecular bond structures. Although additional research is required to explore detailed mechanisms, experimental evidence suggests that interfacial liquid layering and Brownian motion cannot explain the degree of latent heat reduction observed. A finite element model is also presented as a method of quantifying nanofluid PCM energy storage performance. Thermal properties based on modified effective medium theory and an empirical relation for latent heat of fusion were applied as model parameters to determine energy stored and extracted over a given period of time. The model results show that while micro-scale particle inclusions exhibit some performance enhancement, nanoparticles in \\{PCMs\\} provide no significant improvement in TES performance. With smaller particles, the enhancement in thermal conductivity is not significant enough to overcome the reduction in latent heat of fusion, and less energy is stored over the PCM charge period. Therefore, the nanofluid approach may not be justifiable for energy storage applications. However, since the model parameters are dependent on the material properties of the system observed, storage performance may vary for differing nanofluid materials.

Aitor Zabalegui; Dhananjay Lokapur; Hohyun Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investigation of thermal storage and steam generator issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review and evaluation of steam generator and thermal storage tank designs for commercial nitrate salt technology showed that the potential exists to procure both on a competitive basis from a number of qualified vendors. The report outlines the criteria for review and the results of the review, which was intended only to assess the feasibility of each design, not to make a comparison or select the best concept.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Materials Storage Materials Laboratory may include: * CSP technology developers * Utilities * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other National laboratories Contact Us If you are interested in working with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn Elam Carolyn.Elam@nrel.gov 303-275-4311 Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of

163

Concrete as a thermal energy storage medium for thermocline solar energy storage systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rising energy costs and the adverse effect on the environment caused by the burning of fossil fuels have triggered extensive research into alternative sources of energy. Harnessing the abundance of solar energy has been one of the most attractive energy alternatives. However, the development of an efficient and economical solar energy storage system is of major concern. According to the Department of Energy (DOE), the cost per kilowatt hour electric from current technologies which utilize solar energy is high, estimated at approximately $0.15–$0.20/kW helectric, while the unit cost to store the thermal energy is approximately $30.00/kW hthermal. Based on traditional means of producing electricity (through burning fossil fuels), the unit cost of electricity is $0.05–$0.06/kW h. Clearly, current solar energy technologies cannot compete with traditional forms of electricity generation. In response, the DOE has established a goal of reducing the cost of solar generated electricity to $0.05–$0.07/kW helectric and achieving thermal storage costs below $15.00/kW hthermal. Reduction in the cost of the storage medium is one step in achieving the stated goal. In this research program economical concrete mixtures were developed that resisted temperatures up to 600 °C. This temperature level represents a 50% increase over the operating temperature of current systems, which is approximately 400 °C. However, long-term testing of concrete is required to validate its use. At this temperature, the unit cost of energy stored in concrete (the thermal energy storage medium) is estimated at $0.88–$1.00/kW hthermal. These concrete mixtures, used as a thermal energy storage medium, can potentially change solar electric power output allowing production through periods of low to no insolation at lower unit costs.

Emerson John; Micah Hale; Panneer Selvam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Encapsulated Phase Change Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants on

166

Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal efficiency from 54 percent to 63 percent. However, very few thermal storage materials are compatible for these high temperatures. Molten salts are thermally stable up to 600 degrees C and beyond. Using the molten salts as the TES materials...

Shin, Donghyun

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

167

Energy management in solar thermal power plants with double thermal storage system and subdivided solar field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the paper, two systems for solar thermal power plants (STPPs) are devised for improving the overall performance of the plant. Each one attempts to reduce losses coming from two respective sources. The systems are simulated and compared to a reference STPP. They consists on: (a) a double thermal energy storage (DTS) with different functionalities for each storage and (b) the subdivision of the solar collector field (SSF) into specialised sectors, so that each sector is designed to meet a thermal requirement, usually through an intermediate heat exchanger. This subdivision reduces the losses in the solar field by means of a decrease of the temperature of the heat transfer fluid (HTF). Double thermal energy storage is intended for keeping the plant working at nominal level for many hours a day, including post-sunset hours. One of the storages gathers a fluid which is heated up to temperatures above the nominal one. In order to make it work, the solar field must be able to overheat the fluid at peak hours. The second storage is the classical one. The combination of both allows the manager of the plant to keep the nominal of the plant for longer periods than in the case of classical thermal energy storage. To the authors’ knowledge, it is the first time that both configurations are presented and simulated for the case of parabolic through STPP with HTF technology. The results show that, if compared to the reference STPP, both configurations may raise the annual electricity generation (up to 1.7% for the DTS case and 3.9% for the SSF case).

Antonio Rovira; María José Montes; Manuel Valdes; José María Martínez-Val

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An investigation of the efficiency of the receiver of a solar thermal cooker with thermal energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A small scale solar concentrator cooker with a thermal energy storage system was designed, constructed and tested on the roof of the Physics building at… (more)

Heilgendorff, Heiko Martin.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Design and Simulation for a Solar House with Building Integrated Photovoltaic-Thermal System and Thermal Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Building integrated photovoltaic-thermal systems (BIPV/T) that pre-heat ambient air may be used in combination with ventilated concrete slabs for thermal storage purposes. This is one of many feasible ways to ...

YuXiang Chen; A. K. Athienitis; K. E. Galal…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

Hobson, M.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Simulation and experimental study on honeycomb-ceramic thermal energy storage for solar thermal systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A honeycomb-ceramic thermal energy storage (TES) was proposed for thermal utilization of concentrating solar energy. A numerical model was developed to simulate the thermal performances, and TES experiments were carried out to demonstrate and improve the model. The outlet temperature difference between simulation and experimental results was within 5% at the end of a charging period, indicating the simulation model was reasonable. The simulation model was applied to predict the effects of geometric, thermo-physical parameters and flow fluxes on TES performances. The temperature dropped more quickly and decreased to a lower temperature in discharging period when the conductivity was smaller. The storage capacity increased with the growth of volumetric heat capacity. As to a TES with big channels and thin walls, the outlet temperature increased quickly and greatly in a charging process and dropped sharply in a discharging process.

Zhongyang Luo; Cheng Wang; Gang Xiao; Mingjiang Ni; Kefa Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Exergetic optimization of solar collector and thermal energy storage system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the exergetic optimization of a solar thermal energy system. This consists of a solar collector (SC) and a rectangular water storage tank (ST) that contains a phase change material (PCM) distributed in an assembly of slabs. The study takes into account both conduction and convection heat transfer mode for water in the SC, and also the phase change process for the PCM in the ST. An analytical solution for the melting process in the PCM is also presented. The results of the study are compared with previous experimental data, confirming the accuracy of the model. Results of a numerical case study are presented and discussed.

F. Aghbalou; F. Badia; J. Illa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

174

Literature review of market studies of thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a review of market studies of thermal energy storage (TES). This project was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). PNL staff reviewed and consolidated the findings of existing TES market studies conducted in the industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. The purpose of this project was to review and assess previous work and to use the information obtained to help provide direction for future technology transfer planning activities and to identify additional economic research needed within those three sectors. 37 refs.

Hattrup, M.P.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

Blahnik, D.E.

1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the ice storage system, during direct cooling, thethe building cooling load. In dynamic systems, ice is formedcooling/demand-limited storage / electric load management / full storage / ice

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with Sensible- Heat Storage Solar Power Plant with Sulfurof the Solar Power Plant Storage-Vessel Design, . . . . .System for Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Futurestock'2003 9 International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

381 Futurestock'2003 9 th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND is also needed when designing a BTES (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage) system. The ground thermal eight countries (Sweden, Canada, Germany, Netherlands, Norway, Turkey, United Kingdom, and USA) have

179

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cecil. E. A. , Research on Dry-Type Cooling _T_o_w_e_r~s~f~oTower Type Wet-Cooled Power Plant Solar-Power Plant Dry-Cool

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Encapsulation of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal energy storage is a major contributor to bridge the gap between energy demand (consumption) and energy production (supply) by concentrating solar power. The utilization… (more)

Nath, Rupa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of the rigid porous manifold as an effevtive device to stratify solar thermal storage tanks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??One of the most effective and simplest methods to maintain thermal stratification of solar hot water storage tanks during charge and discharge is the use… (more)

Ghosh, Vivekananda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presents the reliationship between Pt particle size and NOx storage performance over model catalysts. Novel reaction protocol designed to decouple effects of thermal deactivation and incomplete desulfation.

183

Designing an Optimal Urban Community Mix for an Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research examined what mix of building types result in the most efficient use of a technology known as Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES). Hourly… (more)

Zizzo, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system's design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Environmental risk assessment for aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory at the request of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The US Department of Energy represents the United States in the IEA for Annex IV, the IEA task for research and development in aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Installation and operation of an ATES system is necessarily intrusive to ground-water resources. Therefore, governmental authorities usually require an environmental risk assessment to be performed before permission to construct an ATES system is granted. Writing an accurate statement of risk presupposes a knowledge of aquifer and ground-water characteristics and that an engineering feasibility study has taken place. Effective and logical presentation of the results of the risk assessment can expedite the grant of approval. Introductory remarks should address questions regarding why the ATES project has been proposed, what it is expected to accomplish, and what the expected benefits are. Next, the system configuration, including the aquifer, ATES plant, and well field, should be described in terms of size and location, design components, and thermal and hydraulic capacity. The final element of system design, the predicted annual operating cycle, needs to be described in sufficient detail to allow the reviewer to appreciate the net hydraulic, thermal, and hydrochemical effects imposed on the aquifer. Risks may be environmental or legal. Only after a reviewer has been introduced to the proposed system`s design, operation, and scale can risk issues can be identified and weighed against the benefits of the proposed ATES system.

Hall, S.H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal storage of solar energy as sensible heat at medium temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model has been solved in order to determine the thermal losses of a storage tank, where thermal energy is stored as sensible heat of a diathermic fluid at medium temperatures. A parametric analysis has been ...

C. Bellecci; A. Bonanno; M. Camarca; M. Conti; L. La Rotonda…

187

Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

Pesaran, A. A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Thermal energy storage technologies and systems for concentrating solar power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of thermal energy storage system design methodologies and the factors to be considered at different hierarchical levels for concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Thermal energy storage forms a key component of a power plant for improvement of its dispatchability. Though there have been many reviews of storage media, there are not many that focus on storage system design along with its integration into the power plant. This paper discusses the thermal energy storage system designs presented in the literature along with thermal and exergy efficiency analyses of various thermal energy storage systems integrated into the power plant. Economic aspects of these systems and the relevant publications in literature are also summarized in this effort.

Sarada Kuravi; Jamie Trahan; D. Yogi Goswami; Muhammad M. Rahman; Elias K. Stefanakos

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management October 8, 2013 - 9:39am Addthis Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower primarily through evaporation. Therefore, by design, cooling towers consume significant amounts of water. Overview The thermal efficiency and longevity of the cooling tower and equipment used to cool depend on the proper management of water recirculated through the tower. Water leaves a cooling tower system in any one of four ways: Evaporation: This is the primary function of the tower and is the method that transfers heat from the cooling tower system to the

190

Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

Kelly, Bruce D.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provide solar power plant energy storage for a reasonablefor Chemical Storage of Solar Energy. UC Berkeley, M.S.for a solar power plant without energy storage for nighttime

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

None

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Comparison of Open Versus Closed Systems in Thermal Storage Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of thermal storage, by its very nature, requires a large storage vessel. Depending upon the technology employed, this can vary from as little as 1.6cuft./ton-hour, up to 15cuft./ton-hour. The result can be storage tanks with volumes...

Salbodkin, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lehigh University, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is working to establish the technical feasibility of using phase change materials (PCM) at elevated temperatures and to acquire engineering results that will lead to the demonstration of large-scale thermal storage systems.

197

Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage-term thermal storage, second law analysis * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet@univ-perp.fr Nomenclature c Energy Tecnosud, Rambla de la thermodynamique, 66100 Perpignan, France b Université de Perpignan Via

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

198

A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

200

Performance comparison of thermal energy storage oils for solar cookers during charging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Charging experiments to evaluate the thermal performance of three thermal energy storage oils for solar cookers are presented. An experimental setup using an insulated 20 L storage tank is used to perform the experiments. The three thermal oils evaluated are Sunflower Oil, Shell Thermia C and Shell Thermia B. Energy and exergy based thermal performance parameters are evaluated. A new parameter, the exergy factor, is proposed which evaluates the ratio of the exergy content to the energy content. Sunflower Oil performs better than the other thermal oils under high power charging. Thermal performances of the oils are comparable under low power charging.

Ashmore Mawire; Abigail Phori; Simeon Taole

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New Directions in Low Temperature Solar Thermal Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comprehensive overviews of energy storage techhologies for solar applications are already available [1,2,3...

C. J. Swet

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept....

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

204

Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in District Energy Utility Applications, June 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Use In District Energy (DE) Utility Applications in June 2005

205

Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

Allen, R.D.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE`s thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a ``supply side`` limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a ``demand side`` limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G.E.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Expected benefits of federally-funded thermal energy storage research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the Office of Advanced Utility Concepts of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this study was to develop a series of graphs that depict the long-term benefits of continuing DOE's thermal energy storage (TES) research program in four sectors: building heating, building cooling, utility power production, and transportation. The study was conducted in three steps- The first step was to assess the maximum possible benefits technically achievable in each sector. In some sectors, the maximum benefit was determined by a supply side'' limitation, and in other sectors, the maximum benefit is determined by a demand side'' limitation. The second step was to apply economic cost and diffusion models to estimate the benefits that are likely to be achieved by TES under two scenarios: (1) with continuing DOE funding of TES research, and (2) without continued funding. The models all cover the 20-year period from 1990 to 2010. The third step was to prepare graphs that show the maximum technical benefits achievable, the estimated benefits with TES research funding, and the estimated benefits in the absence of TES research funding. The benefits of federally-funded TES research are largely in four areas: displacement of primary energy, displacement of oil and natural gas, reduction in peak electric loads, and emissions reductions.

Spanner, G E; Daellenbach, K K; Hughes, K R; Brown, D R; Drost, M K

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage characteristics of solid cement mortar cylinders. Two var1a- tions 1nvolving mechanically induced porosity were also investigated. Rocks, a commonly used sensible heat storage material, were tested to prov1de a reference for the cement... mortar. A numer1cal model, analogous to program available for rock bed storage systems, simulating the cement mortar cylinder storage section was developed. Heat transfer coefficients were calculated from the experimental data for use in the model...

Davis, Glenn Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy Cascading Combined with Thermal Energy Storage in Industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The opportunities for energy conservation through the application of storage cascades has not previously been examined in...

R. J. Wood; D. T. Baldwin; P. W. O’Callaghan…

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Thermal Energy Storage in Metal Foams filled with Paraffin Wax.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Phase change materials (PCM) such as paraffin wax are known to exhibit slow thermal response due to their relatively low thermal conductivity. In this study,… (more)

Vadwala, Pathik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Project Profile: High-Efficiency Thermal Storage System for Solar Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

SENER, under the Baseload CSP FOA, aims to develop a highly efficient, low-maintenance and economical thermal energy storage (TES) system using solid graphite modular blocks for CSP plants.

213

Different Models for Determination of Thermal Stratification in A Solar Storage Tank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work two different models are shown for describing the thermal stratification in the solar storage tank of the solar water heating system. The first model was ... hour from the average hourly data of the

P. Géczy-Víg; I. Farkas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Analysis of a solar dish–Stirling system with hybridization and thermal storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high potential of thermosolar power generation systems is the use of thermal storage and/or hybridization to overcome dependability of solar resource availability. The incorporation of these technologies ... on...

Carlos Monné; Yolanda Bravo…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

Andrepont, J. S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Use of Thermal Energy Storage to Enhance the Recovery and Utilization of Industrial Waste Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluation involving process data from 12 industrial plants to determine if thermal energy storage (TES) systems can be used with commercially available energy management equipment to enhance the recovery and utilization of industrial waste heat. Results...

McChesney, H. R.; Bass, R. W.; Landerman, A. M.; Obee, T. N.; Sgamboti, C. T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Science and Technology Press, 1996. [2] J.Kelly kissock, J Michael Hannig, Thomas I. Whitney et al. Early results from testing phase change wallboard, IEA Annex10? phase change materials and chemical reactions for thermal energy storage first...

Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Terrafore, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing novel encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) for use in thermal storage applications to significantly reduce the LCOE for baseload CSP plants.

219

Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Infinia, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing and demonstrating a subscale system for baseload CSP power generation using thermal energy storage (TES) in a unique integration of innovative enhancements that improves performance and reduces cost.

220

Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

State-of-the-Art Thermal Energy Storage Retrofit at a Large Manufacturing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper will describe the existing conditions, strategic planning, feasibility study, economic analysis, design, specification, construction, and project management for the 2.9 megawatt “full shift” chilled water thermal energy storage retrofit...

Fiorino, D.

222

Cooling Strategies Based on Indicators of Thermal Storage in Commercial Building Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

specific instance of this phenomenon, in which thermal storage by building mass over weekends exacerbates Monday cooling energy requirements. The study relies on computer simulations of energy use for a large, office building prototype in El Paso, TX using...

Eto, J. H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

COBRA-SFS thermal analysis of a sealed storage cask for the Monitored Retrievable Storage of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code was used to predict temperature distributions in a concrete Sealed Storage Cask (SSC). This cask was designed for the Department of Energy in the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) program for storage of spent fuel from commercial power operations. Analytical results were obtained for nominal operation of the SSC with spent fuel from 36 PWR fuel assemblies consolidated in 12 cylindrical canisters. Each canister generates 1650 W of thermal power. A parametric study was performed to assess the effects on cask thermal performance of thermal conductivity of the concrete, the fin material, and the amount of radial reinforcing steel bars (rebar). Seven different cases were modeled. The results of the COBRA-SFS analysis of the current cask design predict that the peak fuel cladding temperature in the SSC will not exceed the 37/sup 0/C design limit for the maximum spent fuel load of 19.8 kW and a maximum expected ambient temperature of 37.8/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). The results of the parametric analyses illustrate the importance of material selection and design optimization with regard to the SSC thermal performance.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown....

Knebel, D. E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A., "Heat transfer and exergy analysis of cascaded latent heat storage with gravity-assisted heat pipes for concentrating solar power applications," Solar Energy 86 (3)...

226

Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

Stidham, Paul Emery

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discharges can be made more economically attrac tank holding several thousand gallons of water tive by incorporating thermal energy storage in a maintained at 128-130?F. This scald tank is con heat recovery system. Thermal energy storage can stantly... the ultimate energy end use. of wasting this hot water to the plant drain, a heat A project conducted by the Georgia Tech exchanger was installed at the Gold Kist plant to Engineering Experiment Station to demonstrate preheat scald tank makeup water...

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energy andsolar thermal collectors using flat reflective surfaces. Solar Energy,of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy

Mammoli, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

230

Enhanced performance of high temperature aluminate cementitious materials incorporated with Cu powders for thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cementitious materials have been extensively developed in thermal energy storage system of solar thermal power. This paper deals with the volume heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, and compressive strength of aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials with the addition of metal Cu powders. The specimens were subjected to heat-treatment at 105, 350, and 900 °C, respectively. In the heating process, Cu powders gradually oxidized to Cu2O and CuO, providing a so-called mass compensation mechanism for the composite paste. Meanwhile, it indicates that volume heat capacity and thermal conductivity both increase with increasing Cu powders content and decrease with the rising temperature. The optimum thermal properties were obtained at 15 wt% Cu powders loading. In addition, Calorimetric Test, XRD, TG–DSC, and MIP are performed for characterizing the hydration rates, the phases, the mass/heat evolution, and the pore distribution, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Chunhua Lu; Zhongzi Xu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

undersized due to the low bidder syndrome (1). 4. New plant expansion needs colder temperatures off the tower. State of the Art Upgrading Users of cooling towers are not par ticularly concerned with the thermal analysis involving calculus, or delving... HISTORY I Anhydrous Ammonia Plant The Hawkeye Chemical Corporation, a subsidiary of the Getty Oil Company, pro jected a 50% expansion of their anhydroug ammonia output from 120,000 tons (1.09 Kg) per year to ~ production level of 225,000 tons (2...

Burger, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimental investigation of an innovative thermochemical process operating with a hydrate salt and moist air for thermal storage of solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and moist air for thermal storage of solar energy: global performance Benoit Michela, *, Nathalie Mazeta-gas reaction, hydration, thermal storage, seasonal storage, solar energy * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet in solar energy. Solar energy is widely affordable and has the capability to meet household demand over

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

SunShot Initiative: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Terrafore logo Photo of gray balls grouped together. 10 to 15 millimeter capsules provide high heat transfer surface. Terrafore, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is developing novel encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) for use in thermal storage applications to significantly reduce the LCOE for baseload CSP plants. Approach Terrafore is determining a cost-effective way to produce small 10 mm to 15 mm capsules containing phase change material (PCM salt) in a suitable shell material. Large numbers of these PCM capsules provide high-heat transfer surface and store heat as sensible and latent heat of fusion of salt. The capsules with different PCMs inside the shell are stacked inside a single tank to provide a cascaded storage to effectively use the latent heat of fusion of salts over the solar collection temperature range.

234

Improving Solar Dryers’ Performances Using Design and Thermal Heat Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar drying is one of the most important ... , at the same time as using free solar energy permits to reduce the cost of ... face or to limit the intermittent character of solar energy, storage is proposed as a ...

Lyes Bennamoun

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thermal Stability and Hydrogen Release Kinetics of Ammonia Borane Under Vehicle Storage Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia borane (AB) is a promising chemical hydrogen storage material for H2 powered fuel-cell vehicles (FCVs) owing to its considerable hydrogen density and stability under typical ambient conditions. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems in 2015 provide a requirement for operating temperatures in full-sun exposure as high as 60°C (50°C by 2010) [1]. The purpose of this work is to investigate the thermal stability of solid AB during storage on-board a FCV at 40 to 60°C. Calorimeter measurements and calculation models are used to estimate AB thermal stability and H2 release kinetics under isothermal, adiabatic, and cooled storage conditions as a function of storage time, temperature, and AB purity.

Rassat, Scot D.; Smith, R. Scott; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Autrey, Thomas; Chin, Arthur A.; Magee, Joseph W.; VanSciver, Gary R.; Lipiecki, Frank J.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Thermoeconomic optimization of sensible heat thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of employing thermal storage for cogenerated waste-to-energy recovery such as using mass-burning water-wall incinerators and topping steam turbines. Sensible thermal storage is considered in rectangular cross-sectioned channels through which is passed unused process steam at 1,307 kPa/250 C (175 psig/482 F) during the storage period and feedwater at 1,307 kPa/102 C (175 psig/216 F) during the recovery period. In determining the optimum storage configuration, it is found that the economic feasibility is a function of mass and specific heat of the material and surface area of the channel as well as cost of material and fabrication. Economic considerations included typical cash flows of capital charges, energy revenues, operation and maintenance, and income taxes. Cast concrete is determined to be a potentially attractive storage medium.

Abdul-Razzak, H.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Porter, R.W. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for ThermalOF THE THESIS Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energyto utilize phase change materials (PCM’s) to enhance thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar energy available would result in overcharging of the hot storage.of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energystorage and solar- assisted HVAC for the purpose of optimizing its energy

Mammoli, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Modeling of the rock bed thermal energy storage system of a combined cycle solar thermal power plant in South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A thermocline-based rock bed thermal energy storage system potentially offers a cheap and simple way of achieving dispatchability in an air-cooled central receiver CSP plant. In order to efficiently match heliostat field size, storage dimensions, back-up fuel consumption and turbine sizes for non-stop power generation and economic feasibility, year-long power plant simulations have to be run. This paper focuses on the storage as the center of in- and outgoing thermal energy. The derived storage model has one spatial dimension which is justified by the high tube-to-particle diameter ratio and because yearly aggregated – and not momentary – values are of interest. A validation of the correlations with data from the literature shows acceptable agreement. Sensitivity analyses indicate that, due to low costs of the storage system, above certain minimum storage dimensions, the influence on energetic and monetary performance indicators is marginal. The calculated LCOE is in the range of 0.11–0.18 EUR/kW h and in agreement with other studies on combined cycle CSP plants.

Lukas Heller; Paul Gauché

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

High temperature latent heat thermal energy storage: Phase change materials, design considerations and performance enhancement techniques  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A very common problem in solar power generation plants and various other industrial processes is the existing gap between the period of thermal energy availability and its period of usage. This situation creates the need for an effective method by which excess heat can be stored for later use. Latent heat thermal energy storage is one of the most efficient ways of storing thermal energy through which the disparity between energy production or availability and consumption can be corrected, thus avoiding wastage and increasing the process efficiency. This paper reviews a series of phase change materials, mainly inorganic salt compositions and metallic alloys, which could potentially be used as storage media in a high temperature (above 300 °C) latent heat storage system, seeking to serve the reader as a comprehensive thermophysical properties database to facilitate the material selection task for high temperature applications. Widespread utilization of latent heat storage systems has been held back by the poor thermal conductivity and some other inherent drawbacks of the use of PCMs; this paper reviews several heat transfer and performance enhancement techniques proposed in the literature and discusses a number of design considerations that must be taken into account aiming to provide a broad overview for the design of high temperature latent heat based thermal energy storage systems.

Bruno Cárdenas; Noel León

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Numerical analysis of the influence of inclination angle and wind on the heat losses of cavity receivers for solar thermal power towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The convective heat losses of cavity receivers for solar thermal power towers are of great importance for the overall efficiency of the whole system. However, the influence of wind on these losses has not been studied sufficiently for large scale cavity receivers with different inclination angles. In this present study the impact of head-on and side-on wind on large cavity receivers with inclination angles in the range of 0° (horizontal cavity) to 90° (vertical cavity) is analyzed numerically. The simulation results are compared to data published in literature. When no wind is present the losses decrease considerably with increasing inclination angle of the receiver. In case of a horizontal receiver wind does not have a huge impact on the losses: they remain constant on a high level. In case of an inclined cavity wind increases the heat losses significantly in most of the cases, although the highest absolute value of the losses occurs for the horizontal receiver exposed to head on wind. In some cases, when wind is flowing parallel to the aperture plane, a reduction of the heat losses is observed. The temperature distribution in the cavity is analyzed in order to explain the impact of wind on the heat losses. Wind in general causes a shrinking of the zone with uniform high temperature in the upper region of the cavity, whereas wind flowing parallel to the aperture plane additionally inhibits hot air from leaving the cavity and therefore leads to an increased temperature in the lower zone.

Robert Flesch; Hannes Stadler; Ralf Uhlig; Robert Pitz-Paal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDING DESIGN AND THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter discusses the potential for cost-effectively reducing the energy intensity of office buildings by applying proven technologies, especially the use of ground source systems with thermal energy stor...

Edward Morofsky

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chart of Database of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC)

244

Groundwater contaminant interaction with aquifer thermal energy storage systems on the scale of a large urban area.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This research thesis attempts to answer the question if a pathline analysis can be applied to a transient flow field where aquifer thermal energy storage… (more)

Lieshout, R. van

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report March 31, 2012 Michael Schuller, Frank Little, Darren Malik, Matt Betts, Qian Shao, Jun Luo, Wan Zhong, Sandhya Shankar, Ashwin Padmanaban The Space Engineering Research Center Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University Abstract We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials,

246

Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

Jonemann, M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Potentials of Demand Side Management Using Heat Pumps with Building Mass as a Thermal Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Within this work, load-shifting possibilities of heat pumps in residential buildings as well as its influencing and limiting factors are displayed. The intermediate storage is achieved by using the thermal mass of the building so the heat supply can be postponed from the heat demand for a certain period, depending on the characteristics of the building. No additional water storage is considered.

Charlotte Ellerbrok

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage in Providing Grid Stability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract CSP plants both with and without thermal energy storage are unique renewable resources that provide clean electric power and a range of operational capabilities to support continued reliability of electric power systems. Utilizing stored thermal energy storage to operate a conventional synchronous generator, CSP plants with thermal energy storage can support power and provide ancillary services including voltage support, frequency response, regulation and spinning reserves, and ramping serves – services that would otherwise be provided, at least in part, by conventional fossil-fuel generation. By being available during peak demand in sunlight hours and providing the capability to shift energy to other hours, the addition of thermal energy storage to CSP plants improves their contribution to resource adequacy, or capacity requirements, especially as solar penetration increases. This makes CSP an ideal complement to support greater adaption of intermittent resources such as wind and PV. To make procurement decisions that include a balance of both solar PV and CSP, utilities need to see reasonable estimates of quantifiable economic benefits. In simulations of the California power system, recent studies by the Lawrence Berkeley National Labs (LBNL) found that the comparative value of CSP with storage increases as the amount of solar on the grid increases. If CSP with six hours of storage and PV with no storage were each providing five percent of the grid's power, CSP power would have an additional value of $19/MWh (1.9¢/kWh). At grid penetrations of 10 percent each, CSP power would be worth an additional $35/MWh (3.5¢/kWh). The added value results from a calculation of grid integration costs and market benefits. The author will outline how CSP with storage provides grid stability and its corresponding value to utilities.

J. Forrester

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Stochastic scenario-based model and investigating size of battery energy storage and thermal energy storage for micro-grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage systems (ESS) are designed to accumulate energy when production exceeds demand and to make it available at the user’s request. They can help match energy supply and demand, exploit the variable production of renewable energy sources (e.g. solar and wind), increase the overall efficiency of the energy system and reduce CO2 emissions. This paper presents a unit commitment formulation for micro-grid that includes a significant number of grid parallel PEM-Fuel Cell Power Plants (PEM-FCPPs) with ramping rate and minimum up and down time constraints. The aim of this problem is to determine the optimum size of energy storage devices like hydrogen, thermal energy and battery energy storages in order to schedule the committed units’ output power while satisfying practical constraints and electrical/thermal load demand over one day with 15 min time step. In order to best use of multiple PEM-FCPPs, hydrogen storage management is carried out. Also, since the electrical and heat load demand are not synchronized, it could be useful to store the extra heat of PEM-FCPPs in the peak electrical load in order to satisfy delayed heat demands. Due to uncertainty nature of electrical/thermal load, photovoltaic and wind turbine output power and market price, a two-stage scenario-based stochastic programming model, where the first stage prescribes the here-and-now variables and the second stage determines the optima value of wait-and-see variables under cost minimization. Quantitative results show the usefulness and viability of the suggested approach.

Sirus Mohammadi; Ali Mohammadi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

A review of thermal energy storage technologies and control approaches for solar cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a review of thermal storage media and system design options suitable for solar cooling applications. The review covers solar cooling applications with heat input in the range of 60–250 °C. Special attention is given to high temperature (>100 °C) high efficiency cooling applications that have been largely ignored in existing reviews. Sensible and latent heat storage materials have been tabulated according to their suitability for double effect and triple effect chillers. A summary of system designs for water storage (sensible heat), and phase change material storage (latent heat) has been provided. The article summarizes literature related to solar thermal air-conditioning systems from a material level as well as plant level considerations. This includes evaluating various control strategies for managing the thermal store, that aid in optimal functioning of a solar air conditioning plant. Modeling approaches are reviewed for sizing the solar thermal store, highlighting the large difference seen in specific storage size when applied in different applications.

Sergio Pintaldi; Cristian Perfumo; Subbu Sethuvenkatraman; Stephen White; Gary Rosengarten

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of total energy consumption [4]. Energy and cooling cost caused by data nodes motivate us to study file for clusters by offering about 10 to 15 percent cooling energy savings without significantly degrading I--In this paper, we present thermal-aware file assign- ment technique called TIGER for reducing cooling cost

Qin, Xiao

252

Evaluation of distributed building thermal energy storage in conjunction with wind and solar electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Energy storage is often seen as necessary for the electric utility systems with large amounts of solar or wind power generation to compensate for the inability to schedule these facilities to match power demand. This study looks at the potential to use building thermal energy storage as a load shifting technology rather than traditional electric energy storage. Analyses are conducted using hourly electric load, temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation data for a 5-state central U.S. region in conjunction with simple computer simulations and economic models to evaluate the economic benefit of distributed building thermal energy storage (TES). The value of the TES is investigated as wind and solar power generation penetration increases. In addition, building side and smart grid enabled utility side storage management strategies are explored and compared. For a relative point of comparison, batteries are simulated and compared to TES. It is found that cooling TES value remains approximately constant as wind penetration increases, but generally decreases with increasing solar penetration. It is also clearly shown that the storage management strategy is vitally important to the economic value of TES; utility side operating methods perform with at least 75% greater value as compared to building side management strategies. In addition, TES compares fairly well against batteries, obtaining nearly 90% of the battery value in the base case; this result is significant considering TES can only impact building thermal loads, whereas batteries can impact any electrical load. Surprisingly, the value of energy storage does not increase substantially with increased wind and solar penetration and in some cases it decreases. This result is true for both TES and batteries and suggests that the tie between load shifting energy storage and renewable electric power generation may not be nearly as strong as typically thought.

Byron W. Jones; Robert Powell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Carbonate-salt-based composite materials for medium- and high-temperature thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper discusses composite materials based on inorganic salts for medium- and high-temperature thermal energy storage application. The composites consist of a phase change material (PCM), a ceramic material, and a high thermal conductivity material. The ceramic material forms a microstructural skeleton for encapsulation of the PCM and structural stability of the composites; the high thermal conductivity material enhances the overall thermal conductivity of the composites. Using a eutectic salt of lithium and sodium carbonates as the PCM, magnesium oxide as the ceramic skeleton, and either graphite flakes or carbon nanotubes as the thermal conductivity enhancer, we produced composites with good physical and chemical stability and high thermal conductivity. We found that the wettability of the molten salt on the ceramic and carbon materials significantly affects the microstructure of the composites.

Zhiwei Ge; Feng Ye; Hui Cao; Guanghui Leng; Yue Qin; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

April 15. 2013 | Singh April 15. 2013 | Singh * Thermal modeling will be conducted to establish the benefits of using a high thermal conducting graphite foams in conjunction with PCM and to develop a design for a laboratory scale prototype. * Variety of characterizations will be carried out to qualify the materials (PCMs, alloys, coatings) for the prototype construction. * Process to infiltrate selected PCM into the foam will be developed. * Using the appropriate brazing/joining techniques, prototype will be assembled. * Performance testing of the TES system prototype to ensure a full- scale system will meet the SunShot goals. * Complete cost analysis of the proposed TES system * Complete laboratory scale prototype design * Develop SiC coating using polycarbosilanes for graphite

255

Thermal Modeling Studies for Active Storage Modules in the Calvert Cliffs ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature measurements obtained for two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE) were used to perform validation and sensitivity studies on detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the concrete storage modules, including the dry storage canister within the modules. The storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s ISFSI are a site-specific version of the standard NUHOMS® HSM. The two modules inspected each contained a 24P DSC loaded with 24 CE 14x14 spent fuel assemblies. The thermal analysis was performed using the STAR-CCM+ package, and the models developed for the specific ISFSI modules yielded temperature predictions in actual storage conditions for the concrete structure, the DSC and its contents, including preliminary estimates of fuel cladding temperatures for the used nuclear fuel. The results of this work demonstrate that existing CFD modeling tools can be used to obtain reasonable and accurate detailed representations of spent fuel storage systems with realistic decay heat loadings when the model omits specific conservatisms and bounding assumptions normally used in design-basis and safety-basis calculations. This paper presents sensitivity studies on modeling detail (for the storage module and the DSC), boundary conditions, and decay heat load, to evaluate the effect of the modeling approach on predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. Because nearly all degradation mechanisms for materials and structures comprising dry storage and transportation systems are dependent on temperature, accurate characterization of local temperatures and temperature gradients that the various components of these systems will experience over the entire storage period has been identified as a primary requirement for evaluation of very long term storage of used nuclear fuel.

Adkins, Harold E.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Infinia, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a thermal energy storage (TES) system that, when combined with Infinia's dish-Stirling system, can achieve DOE's CSP cost goals of $0.07/kWh by 2015 for intermediate power and 5¢/kWh by 2020 for baseload power.

257

Stability characteristics of some shale and coal liquids. Final report. [Thermal and storage stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels derived from coal and from oil shale were made available for characterization and thermal and storage stability investigations. The coal-derived liquids identified as naphthas from No. 6 Illinois and Wyodak coals produced by the Exxon Donor Solvent process contained high concentrations of oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds and were considered to be unrefined synthetic crudes. These materials were found to be relatively unstable in storage. The shale-derived fuels were refined to meet the requirements of military specification jet fuels JP-8 and JP-5 and marine diesel fuel (DFM). Virtually all the specification requirements were met and the fuels were found to be thermally and storage stable. During 32-week, 43/sup 0/C storage tests conducted on these liquids, periodic measurements were made of precipitate fuel-insolubles, fuel-soluble gum, dissolved oxygen content and peroxide number. The liquids were analyzed, in some instances, by infrared, NMR, and uv spectroscopy, before and after the 32-week storage test with little or no change being observed in the bulk liquid samples. Shale-derived liquid hydrocarbons have been refined to meet current specification requirements for hydrocarbon fuels, and it appears that coal-derived liquids can also be refined to meet requirements for performance and storage stability.

Bowden, J.N.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand...

Andrepont, J. S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of South Florida, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is researching and developing a thermal energy storage system based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale baseload CSP plant requirements at significantly lower system costs.

260

Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and used when demand is high, instead of engaging the gas-fuel oil boiler. Keywords: multi-energy district believe that by 2015 the supply of oil and natural gas will be unable to keep up with demand [1 of La Rochelle (France) adding to the plant a controlled thermal storage tank. This plant supplies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

DRAIN-BACK PROTECTED LOW-FLOW SOLAR HEATING SYSTEM WITH DISTRIBUTED ELEVATED THERMALLY STRATIFIED STORAGE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Design considerations concerning a drain-back freeze and overheat protection system are given with emphasis on nitrogen management and thermal stratification of an elevated distributed storage. The actual system of GNT in Berg, Federal Republic of Germany is described. KEYWORDS Solar Heating; Freeze Protection; Overheat Protection; Drain-Back System;

W.B. VELTKAMP; J. VAN BERKEL; A.T. KEESMAN

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Project Profile: Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, is collaborating with Curtin University (CU) to evaluate new metal hydride materials for thermal energy storage (TES) that meet the SunShot cost and performance targets for TES systems.

265

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thermal and economical analysis of a central solar heating system with underground seasonal storage in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal performance and economic feasibility of two types of central solar heating system with seasonal storage under four climatically different Turkey locations are investigated. The effects of storage volume and collector area on the thermal performance and cost are studied for three load sizes. The simulation model of the system consisting of flat plate solar collectors, a heat pump, under ground storage tank and heating load based on a finite element analysis and finite element code ANSYS™ is chosen as a convenient tool. In this study, the lowest solar fraction value for Trabzon (41°N) and the highest solar fraction value for Adana (37°N) are obtained. Based on the economic analysis, the payback period of system is found to be about 25–35 years for Turkey.

A. Ucar; M. Inalli

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics August 20, 2013 - 5:06pm Addthis In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid heated in the receiver is used to generate steam, which, in turn, is used in a conventional turbine generator to produce electricity. Some power towers use water/steam as the heat-transfer fluid. Other advanced designs are experimenting with molten nitrate salt because of its superior heat-transfer and energy-storage capabilities. Individual commercial plants can be sized to produce up to 200 megawatts of electricity. Illustration of a power tower power plant. Sunlight is shown reflecting off a series of heliostats surrounding the tower and onto the receiver at the top of the tower. The hot heat-transfer fluid exiting from the receiver flows down the tower, into a feedwater reheater, and then into a turbine, which generates electricity that is fed into the power grid. The cool heat-transfer fluid exiting the turbine flows into a steam condenser to be cooled and sent back up the tower to the receiver.

270

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar thermal energy collection is an exciting technology for the replacement of non-renewable energy production.

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SunShot Initiative: High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP ANL logo Photo of a black and white porous material magnified 50 times by a microscope. Microstructure of the highly thermal conductive foam that will be used for the prototype TES system. Image from ANL Argonne National Laboratory and project partner Ohio Aerospace Institute, under the National Laboratory R&D competitive funding opportunity, will design, develop, and test a prototype high-temperature and high-efficiency thermal energy storage (TES) system with rapid charging and discharging times. By increasing the efficiency of TES systems, this project aims to lower the capital costs of concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Approach The research team is developing and evaluating a novel approach for TES at temperatures greater than 700˚C for CSP systems. The approach uses high thermal conductivity and high-porosity graphite foams infiltrated with a phase change material (PCM) to provide TES in the form of latent heat.

272

Calibration and validation of a thermal energy storage model: Influence on simulation results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a 1-D model of a thermal energy storage (TES) was experimentally validated and calibrated. The experimental tests showed an overall heat transfer coefficient for heat losses four times higher than the theoretical value. This was due to the thermal bridges associated with the hydraulic and sensor connections. Moreover, the lack of thermal insulation at the bottom of the TES causes an increase in dissipation through thermal bridges. The experimental data enabled the evaluation of effective TES heat capacity, which differed from the theoretical value instead based on net storage tank volume. By means of an optimization tool, a fictitious value of the TES volume was calculated. In order to model the natural convection heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchanger immersed in the water storage tank, a Nusselt–Rayleigh correlation was experimentally calibrated. The data derived from tests conducted in a test facility of Università degli Studi del Sannio (Italy) were then compared with a computer simulation based on a calibrated TES model by means of commercial software. The validation procedure showed a satisfactory agreement between experimentally measured temperature values and those predicted by the model. Finally, different dynamic simulations of solar thermal heating systems are carried out in order to highlight the influence of the TES model and its calibration and validation on annual energy performance.

Giovanni Angrisani; Michele Canelli; Carlo Roselli; Maurizio Sasso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Thermal-storage-subsystem analysis report (RADL Item 5-1)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations and internal Rocketdyne memos generated in support of the Thermal Storage Subsystem design are presented. The calculations are presented informally, i.e., original hand calculations are included. General descriptions of computer programs are given where applicable. Correlation of experimental test results with model predictions are made. Environmental extremes are summarized. These extremes, together with Pilot Plant operating requirements, form the inputs to the analyses. Outputs of the thermal analyses in the form of temperatures and temperature gradients are used as inputs to the stress analyses. System level analyses are presented. Subsequent analyses are presented in the order of the WBS format, i.e., Thermal Storage Unit, heat exchangers, controls and instrumentation. The results of charging and discharging loop simulations are included. Subsystem level analyses include pressure loss calculations for both steam/water loops and for both oil loops. These pressure loss calculations provide sizing requirements for pumps, valves, pipes and other components.

Not Available

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigates the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. This topical report describes the demonstration of the model-based predictive optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory in a test facility in real-time using time-of-use differentiated electricity prices without demand charges. The laboratory testing findings presented in this topical report cover the second of three project phases. The novel supervisory controller successfully executed a three-step procedure consisting of (1) short-term weather prediction, (2) optimization of control strategy over the next planning horizon using a calibrated building model, and (3) post-processing of the optimal strategy to yield a control command for the current time step that can be executed in the test facility. The primary and secondary building mechanical systems were effectively orchestrated by the model-based predictive optimal controller in real-time while observing comfort and operational constraints. The findings reveal that when the optimal controller is given imperfect weather fore-casts and when the building model used for planning control strategies does not match the actual building perfectly, measured utility costs savings relative to conventional building operation can be substantial. This requires that the facility under control lends itself to passive storage utilization and the building model includes a realistic plant model. The savings associated with passive building thermal storage inventory proved to be small be-cause the test facility is not an ideal candidate for the investigated control technology. Moreover, the facility's central plant revealed the idiosyncratic behavior that the chiller operation in the ice-making mode was more energy efficient than in the chilled-water mode. Field experimentation (Phase III) is now required in a suitable commercial building with sufficient thermal mass, an active TES system, and a climate conducive to passive storage utilization over a longer testing period to support the laboratory findings presented in this topical report.

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage DUF6 Health Risks line line Accidents Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Transportation Storage A discussion of depleted UF6 cylinder storage activities and associated risks. Management Activities for Cylinders in Storage The long-term management of the existing DUF6 storage cylinders and the continual effort to remediate and maintain the safe condition of the DUF6 storage cylinders will remain a Departmental responsibility for many years into the future. The day to day management of the DUF6 cylinders includes actions designed to cost effectively maintain and improve their storage conditions, such as: General storage cylinder and storage yard maintenance; Performing regular inspections of cylinders; Restacking and respacing the cylinders to improve drainage and to

276

Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Risks » Storage Environmental Risks » Storage Depleted UF6 Environmental Risks line line Storage Conversion Manufacturing Disposal Environmental Risks of Depleted UF6 Storage Discussion of the potential environmental impacts from storage of depleted UF6 at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts Analyzed in the PEIS The PEIS included an analysis of the potential environmental impacts from continuing to store depleted UF6 cylinders at the three current storage sites, as well as potential impacts from the storage of depleted uranium after conversion to an oxide form. Impacts from Continued Storage of UF6 Cylinders Continued storage of the UF6 cylinders would require extending the use of a

277

Database (Report) of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Development of a database, in Excel format, listing CHP installations incorporating thermal energy storage or turbine inlet cooling.

278

Tomorrow`s energy today for cities and counties - keep it cool with thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cool thermal energy storage (TES) is described as a means for electric utilities to provide electricity from off-peak times, particularly in the summer when air-conditioning accounts for 50% or more of electricity consumption. Cool TES uses off-peak power to provide cooling capacity by extracting heat from a storage medium such as ice or other phase change material. A refrigeration system may may be utilized at night to provide a reservoir of cold material. During the day, the reservoir is tapped to provide cooling capacity. The advantages of TES are discussed.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Vice President CEO, Tower Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vice President CEO, Tower Foundation Administrative Assistant to the AVP Information Representative Tower Foundation Charitable Gifts Officer Gift Analyst Gift Analyst Gift Analyst Senior Analyst Tower Foundation Stewardship Director Graphic Designer Administrative Assistant Web Communications

Su, Xiao

280

Predictive Optimal Control of Active and Passive Building Thermal Storage Inventory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cooling of commercial buildings contributes significantly to the peak demand placed on an electrical utility grid. Time-of-use electricity rates encourage shifting of electrical loads to off-peak periods at night and weekends. Buildings can respond to these pricing signals by shifting cooling-related thermal loads either by precooling the building's massive structure or the use of active thermal energy storage systems such as ice storage. While these two thermal batteries have been engaged separately in the past, this project investigated the merits of harnessing both storage media concurrently in the context of predictive optimal control. To pursue the analysis, modeling, and simulation research of Phase 1, two separate simulation environments were developed. Based on the new dynamic building simulation program EnergyPlus, a utility rate module, two thermal energy storage models were added. Also, a sequential optimization approach to the cost minimization problem using direct search, gradient-based, and dynamic programming methods was incorporated. The objective function was the total utility bill including the cost of reheat and a time-of-use electricity rate either with or without demand charges. An alternative simulation environment based on TRNSYS and Matlab was developed to allow for comparison and cross-validation with EnergyPlus. The initial evaluation of the theoretical potential of the combined optimal control assumed perfect weather prediction and match between the building model and the actual building counterpart. The analysis showed that the combined utilization leads to cost savings that is significantly greater than either storage but less than the sum of the individual savings. The findings reveal that the cooling-related on-peak electrical demand of commercial buildings can be considerably reduced. A subsequent analysis of the impact of forecasting uncertainty in the required short-term weather forecasts determined that it takes only very simple short-term prediction models to realize almost all of the theoretical potential of this control strategy. Further work evaluated the impact of modeling accuracy on the model-based closed-loop predictive optimal controller to minimize utility cost. The following guidelines have been derived: For an internal heat gain dominated commercial building, reasonable geometry simplifications are acceptable without a loss of cost savings potential. In fact, zoning simplification may improve optimizer performance and save computation time. The mass of the internal structure did not show a strong effect on the optimization. Building construction characteristics were found to impact building passive thermal storage capacity. It is thus advisable to make sure the construction material is well modeled. Zone temperature setpoint profiles and TES performance are strongly affected by mismatches in internal heat gains, especially when they are underestimated. Since they are a key factor in determining the building cooling load, efforts should be made to keep the internal gain mismatch as small as possible. Efficiencies of the building energy systems affect both zone temperature setpoints and active TES operation because of the coupling of the base chiller for building precooling and the icemaking TES chiller. Relative efficiencies of the base and TES chillers will determine the balance of operation of the two chillers. The impact of mismatch in this category may be significant. Next, a parametric analysis was conducted to assess the effects of building mass, utility rate, building location and season, thermal comfort, central plant capacities, and an economizer on the cost saving performance of optimal control for active and passive building thermal storage inventory. The key findings are: (1) Heavy-mass buildings, strong-incentive time-of-use electrical utility rates, and large on-peak cooling loads will likely lead to attractive savings resulting from optimal combined thermal storage control. (2) By using economizer to take advantage of the cool fresh air during the night, the bu

Gregor P. Henze; Moncef Krarti

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

None

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

282

Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Analysis of Concentrating Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-58186 March 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, and Mark Mehos Prepared under Task No. CP08.8301

283

PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTOR® V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

Phase change material thermal storage for biofuel preheating in micro trigeneration application: A numerical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A biofuel micro trigeneration prototype has been developed to utilise local energy crop oils as fuel in rural areas and developing countries. Straight plant oils (SPOs) only leave behind very little carbon footprint during its simply production process compared to commercial biodiesels in refineries, but the high viscosity of \\{SPOs\\} causes difficulties at engine cold starts, which further results in poor fuel atomisation, compromised engine performance and fast engine deterioration. In this study, a phase change material (PCM) thermal storage is designed to recover and store engine exhaust heat to preheat \\{SPOs\\} at cold starts. High temperature commercial paraffin is selected as the PCM to meet the optimal preheating temperature range of 70–90 °C, in terms of the SPO property study. A numerical model of the PCM thermal storage is developed and validated by references. The PCM melting and solidification processes with the consideration of natural convection in liquid zone are simulated in ANSYS-FLUENT to verify the feasibility of the PCM thermal storage as a part of the self-contained biofuel micro trigeneration prototype.

Dawei Wu; Junlong Chen; Anthony P. Roskilly

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Encapsulation of copper-based phase change materials for high temperature thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Worldwide attention has been paid to high temperature phase change materials (PCMs) utilized in latent heat storage systems such as solar thermal power generation or industrial waste heat recovery. Current high temperature \\{PCMs\\} on basis of molten salts are suffering from inherent low thermal conductivity, which is detrimental to heat release rate and systematically thermal efficiency. Metal materials, always possessing ultrahigh thermal conductivity and satisfied heat fusion, are highly suitable as PCMs. However, the development of metal-based \\{PCMs\\} must overcome the package problem, namely, packing active, high temperature liquid metal into durable container. In this paper, copper capsules coated with refractory metallic shells were proposed as a novel metal PCM, which could work at temperature up to 1000 °C. Copper spheres with diameter of millimeters were encapsulated with a thick chromium–nickel bilayer by a novel chromium periodic-barrel electroplating method and nickel barrel-plating method. The latent heat density of as-prepared capsules is up to 75% of the theoretical value (about 71 J/g) at the melting temperature of 1077 °C and the thermal resistance of chromium–nickel layer is 8.27×10?6 m2 k/w. Particularly, copper capsules could endure 1000 charge–discharge thermal cycles from 1050 °C to 1150 °C without any leakage. The structure investigations reveal the excellent oxidation resistance of capsules and good stability between copper and chromium–nickel layer, even after long-term charge–discharge cycles. The results demonstrate that as-prepared copper capsules are applicable as high temperature \\{PCMs\\} which can facilitate high temperature thermal energy storage systems.

Guocai Zhang; Jianqiang Li; Yunfa Chen; Heng Xiang; Bingqian Ma; Zhe Xu; Xiaoguang Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Current and future costs for parabolic trough and power tower systems in the US market.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

Turchi, Craig (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Mehos, Mark Steven (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Project Profile: Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The University of Arkansas, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a novel concrete material that can withstand operating temperatures of 500°C or more and is measuring the concrete properties.

288

List of Publications A Numerical Study of Transient Mixed Convection Flows in a Thermal Storage Tank, J. Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List of Publications A Numerical Study of Transient Mixed Convection Flows in a Thermal Storage Tank, J. Solar Energy Eng. 105, 246­253 (1983) (with A.M.C. Chan & D. Giusti) An Approximate Analytical

Smereka, Peter

289

Performances of a thermal-storage module in a solar-energy power production perspective: A numerical assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theoretical model has been developed to describe the cyclic behaviour of a latent-heat thermal-storage module. Attention has been focused on power production applications, where stability of the heat supply ...

C. Bellecci; M. Conti

290

Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Solar two: A molten salt power tower demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A consortium of United States utility concerns led by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) is conducting a cooperative project with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories, and industry to convert the 10-MW Solar One Power Tower Pilot Plant to molten nitrate salt technology. The conversion involves installation of a new receiver, a new thermal storage system, and a new steam generator; it utilizes Solar One`s heliostat field and turbine generator. Successful operation of the converted plant, called Solar Two, will reduce economic risks in building initial commercial power tow projects and accelerate the commercial acceptance of this promising renewable energy technology. The estimated cost of Solar Two, including its three-year test period, is $48.5 million. The plant will begin operation in early 1996.

Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sutherland, J.P. [Southern California Edison, Rosemead, CA (United States); Gould, W.R. Jr. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The effects of storage time, storage temperature, and concentration on percent recoveries of thermally desorbed diffusive dosimeter samples contaminated with chloroform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the Analabs Thermal Desorber. 4. The Programmed Thermal Desorber on the left and linear chart recorder on the far right. 5. Gas Chromatograph Peak, Integrator Counting, and GC Conditions for Chloroform. 10 17 19 21 24 6. Photograph Illustrating.... A 2 x 3 x 3 Factorial Treatment Design . 13. Analysis of Variance Table for the Experimental Data 14. Mean Percent Recovery vs. Storage Temperature for 7 Days and 14 Days Storage Time At Concentration I (5 ppm - 8 hours). 26 27 28 29 30 31...

Gallucci, Joseph Matthew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

293

Performance analysis of an integrated CHP system with thermal and Electric Energy Storage for residential application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is the evaluation of the profitability of micro-CHP systems for residential application. An integrated CHP system composed of a prime mover, an Electric Energy Storage system, a thermal storage system and an auxiliary boiler has been considered. The study has been carried out taking into account a particular electrochemical storage system which requires also thermal energy, during its operation, for a better exploitation of the residual heat discharged by the prime mover. The prime mover could be a conventional Internal Combustion Engine or also an innovative system, such as fuel cell or organic Rankine cycle. An investigation of this integrated CHP system has been carried out, by means of an in-house developed calculation code, performing a thermo-economic analysis. This paper provides useful results, in order to define the optimum sizing of components of the integrated CHP system under investigation; the developed code allows also to evaluate the profitability and the primary energy saving with respect to the separate production of electricity and heat.

M. Bianchi; A. De Pascale; F. Melino

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Latent Heat Based High Temperature Solar Thermal Energy Storage for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The design of a phase change material based high temperature solar thermal energy storage device is presented. Said unit will be used as an energy reserve for a 1 kWe domestic CCHP system using a Stirling engine to produce electric power. The thermal energy storage is conducted by means of the exploitation of the latent heat of fusion of the material contained inside the tank. This method was chosen because a great energy density is obtained and, at the same time, it is possible to extract the stored energy with very small variations on the temperature, which is a favorable feature for its intended purpose. The selection of the phase change material is discussed and the design of the different components of the proposed storage model is described. It is analyzed, as well, the insulating solution applied that minimizes heat losses. Finally, a comparison between experimental results of the tests performed on the first built to scale prototype and the data obtained from computer simulations is shown.

Bruno Cárdenas; Noel León

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Experimental Investigation into a Packed Bed Thermal Storage Solution for Solar Gas Turbine Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract High temperature thermal storage in randomly packed beds of ceramic particles is proposed as an effective storage solution for Solar Gas Turbine (SGT) cycles in the near term. Numerical modelling of these systems allows for optimised thermal storage designs, but such models must be validated against experimental data. In this work an experimental test programme was conducted to generate high temperature heat transfer data for a packed bed operating over the temperature ranges 350-900 °C and 600-900 °C. These are representative of two potential SGT cycles. Flue gas from a 45 kW LPG burner was used to heat a packed bed of Denstone ceramic pebbles and the testing procedure involved preheating the system to achieve the desired temperature ranges. The fluid and solid temperature profiles in the packed bed were measured in the axial and radial dimensions and are compared to a numerical model with reasonable agreement. Potential modifications to the test facility are described and future testing plans outlined.

P. Klein; T.H. Roos; T.J. Sheer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermal response of a series- and parallel-connected solar energy storage to multi-day charge sequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal response of a multi-tank thermal storage was studied under variable charge conditions. Tests were conducted on an experimental apparatus that simulated the thermal charging of the storage system by a solar collector over predetermined (prescribed) daylong periods. The storage was assembled from three standard 270 L hot-water storage tanks each charged through coupled, side-arm, natural convection heat exchangers which were connected in either a series- or parallel-flow configuration. Both energy storage rates and tank temperature profiles were experimentally measured during charge periods representative of two consecutive clear days or combinations of a clear and overcast day. During this time, no draw-offs were conducted. Of particular interest was the effect of rising and falling charge-loop temperatures and collector-loop flow rate on storage tank stratification levels. Results of this study show that the series-connected thermal storage reached high levels of temperature stratification in the storage tanks during periods of rising charge temperatures and also limited destratification during periods of falling charge temperature. This feature is a consequence of the series-connected configuration that allowed sequential stratification to occur in the component tanks and energy to be distributed according to temperature level. This effect was not observed in the parallel charge configuration. A further aspect of the study investigated the effect of increasing charge-loop flow rate on the temperature distribution within the series-connected storage and showed that, at high flow rates, the temperature distributions were found to be similar to those obtained during parallel charging. A disadvantage of both the high-flow series-connected and parallel-connected multi-tank storage is that falling charge-loop temperatures, which normally occur in the afternoon, tend to mix and destratify the storage tanks. (author)

Cruickshank, Cynthia A.; Harrison, Stephen J. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

An evaluation of robust controls for passive building thermal mass and mechanical thermal energy storage under uncertainty  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Passive building thermal mass and mechanical thermal energy storage (TES) are known as one of state-of-the-art demand-side control instruments. Specifically, Model-based Predictive Control (MPC) for this operation has the potential to significantly increase performance and bring economic advantages. However, due to the uncertainty in certain operating conditions in the field, its control effectiveness could be diminished and/or seriously damaged, which results in poor performance. This study pursues improvements of the control performance of both thermal inventories under uncertainty by proposing a robust MPC in which relevant uncertainty sources are compiled; therefore, it is designed to perform more stable than traditional \\{MPCs\\} under uncertain conditions. Uniqueness and superiority of the proposed robust demand-side controls include: (i) Controls are developed based on the a priori uncertainty assessment, such that a systematic modeling approach for uncertainty was taken according to characteristics and classifications of uncertainty. (ii) The robust MPC reduces the variability of performance under varied and non-indigenous conditions compared to the deterministic MPC, and thus can avoid the worst case situation.

Sean Hay Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Energy efficient control of HVAC systems with ice cold thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems of medium/high cooling capacity, energy demands can be matched with the help of thermal energy storage (TES) systems. If properly designed, TES systems can reduce energy costs and consumption, equipment size and pollutant emissions. In order to design efficient control strategies for TES systems, we present a model-based approach with the aim of increasing the performance of HVAC systems with ice cold thermal energy storage (CTES). A simulation environment based on Matlab/Simulink® is developed, where thermal behaviour of the plant is analysed by a lumped formulation of the conservation equations. In particular, the ice CTES is modelled as a hybrid system, where the water phase transitions (solid–melting–liquid and liquid–freezing–solid) are described by combining continuous and discrete dynamics, thus considering both latent and sensible heat. Standard control strategies are compared with a non-linear model predictive control (NLMPC) approach. In the simulation examples model predictive control proves to be the best control solution for the efficient management of ice CTES systems.

Alessandro Beghi; Luca Cecchinato; Mirco Rampazzo; Francesco Simmini

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Comparison of the Thermal Performance of a Solar Heating System with Open and Closed Solid Sorption Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The aim of this paper is to compare two solar heating systems with different solid sorption storage concepts; an open storage concept with material transport and external reactor and a closed sorption storage concept with the material reservoir as reactor. Both storage concepts are part of system concepts that have been investigated during national projects for a period of more than 3 years each. A TRNSYS model has been developed for each concept and the corresponding mathematical model is described. An emphasis is given on the model simplifications and thus its up- and downscaling possibilities. TRNSYS simulation studies were performed using similar boundary conditions. Hence the simulation results can be compared directly, thus the advantages and disadvantages of both concepts under investigation can be elaborated and assessed. TRNSYS simulations have been performed for each system concept using the properties of two different thermochemical storage materials (TCM). It is shown that the type of TCM has a significant influence on the systems fractional thermal energy savings. Using silica gel as TCM, both system concepts’ performances are only slightly better compared to a standard water-filled storage tank of the same size. The TCM zeolite 13 XBF, a binder free 13 X zeolite, leads to significantly better fractional thermal energy savings. Although the two systems under investigation behave differently, the fractional thermal energy savings are similar. High solar thermal fractions up to a complete solar coverage can be achieved for both storage concepts with moderate collector array and store sizes.

Florian Bertsch; Dagmar Jaehnig; Sebastian Asenbeck; Henner Kerskes; Harald Drueck; Waldemar Wagner; Werner Weiss

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Neural network modelling of thermal stratification in a solar DHW storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study an artificial neural network (ANN) model is introduced for modelling the layer temperatures in a storage tank of a solar thermal system. The model is based on the measured data of a domestic hot water system. The temperatures distribution in the storage tank divided in 8 equal parts in vertical direction were calculated every 5 min using the average 5 min data of solar radiation, ambient temperature, mass flow rate of collector loop, load and the temperature of the layers in previous time steps. The introduced ANN model consists of two parts describing the load periods and the periods between the loads. The identified model gives acceptable results inside the training interval as the average deviation was 0.22 C during the training and 0.24 C during the validation. (author)

Geczy-Vig, P.; Farkas, I. [Department of Physics and Process Control, Szent Istvan University, Pater K. u. 1., H-2103 Goedoello (Hungary)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Theoretical and Experimental Thermal Performance Analysis of Complex Thermal Storage Membrane Containing Bio-Based Phase Change Material (PCM)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2000, an ORNL research team has been testing different configurations of PCM-enhanced building envelop components to be used in residential and commercial buildings. During 2009, a novel type of thermal storage membrane was evaluated for building envelope applications. Bio-based PCM was encapsulated between two layers of heavy-duty plastic film forming a complex array of small PCM cells. Today, a large group of PCM products are packaged in such complex PCM containers or foils containing arrays of PCM pouches of different shapes and sizes. The transient characteristics of PCM-enhanced building envelope materials depend on the quality and amount of PCM, which is very often difficult to estimate because of the complex geometry of many PCM heat sinks. The only widely used small-scale analysis method used to evaluate the dynamic characteristics of PCM-enhanced building products is the differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). Unfortunately, this method requires relatively uniform, and very small, specimens of the material. However, in numerous building thermal storage applications, PCM products are not uniformly distributed across the surface area, making the results of traditional DSC measurements unrealistic for these products. In addition, most of the PCM-enhanced building products contain blends of PCM with fire retardants and chemical stabilizers. This combination of non-uniform distribution and non-homogenous composition make it nearly impossible to select a representative small specimen suitable for DSC tests. Recognizing these DSC limitations, ORNL developed a new methodology for performing dynamic heat flow analysis of complex PCM-enhanced building materials. An experimental analytical protocol to analyze the dynamic characteristics of PCM thermal storage makes use of larger specimens in a conventional heat-flow meter apparatus, and combines these experimental measurements with three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference modeling and whole building energy simulations. Based on these dynamic tests and modeling, ORNL researchers then developed a simplified one-dimensional (1-D) model of the PCM-enhanced building component that can be easily used in whole-building simulations. This paper describes this experimental-analytical methodology as used in the analysis of an insulation assembly containing a complex array of PCM pouches. Based on the presented short example of whole building energy analysis, this paper describes step-by-step how energy simulation results can be used for optimization of PCM-enhanced building envelopes. Limited results of whole building energy simulations using the EnergyPlus program are presented as well.

Kosny, Jan [ORNL; Stovall, Therese K [ORNL; Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Yarbrough, David W [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Design and operation methodology for active building-integrated thermal energy storage systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A methodology is presented for integrating the design and operation of active building-integrated thermal energy storage (BITES) systems to enhance their thermal and energy performance. A bounding-condition based design approach is proposed in conjunction with predictive control strategies. The predictive control uses frequency domain models and room air temperature set-point profile as input. The set-point profiles and BITES design are improved in a holistic manner according to the thermal dynamic response of active BITES systems and their thermal zones. The dynamic response is obtained from the transfer functions of frequency domain models. The methodology is demonstrated on ventilated systems. The results show that the methodology can significantly improve the design and operation of active BITES systems, and hence improve their thermal and energy performance. The dynamic response of different sizes of systems is presented to provide useful information for design selection. It is shown that concrete thickness of 0.2–0.3 m is a good value to initiate design. Other important application considerations are also discussed.

Yuxiang Chen; Khaled E. Galal; Andreas K. Athienitis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis of Concentrated Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage and Dry Cooling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For comparison, the ratio of life cycle GHG emissions to LCOE for pulverized coal (PC), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), natural gas combined cycle (NGCC), PC with carbon capture and storage (CCS), IGCC with CCS, and NGCC with CCS are 31, 19, 12, 3, 2, and 2 kgCO2eq/$, respectively (Supporting Information Table S4, p S10). ... Poullikkas, A.Economic analysis of power generation from parabolic trough solar thermal plants for the Mediterranean region—A case study for the island of Cyprus Renewable Sustainable Energy Rev. 2009, 13 ( 9) 2474– 2484 ...

Sharon J. W. Klein

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

304

Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Thermal Analysis of the 9975 Package as a Plutonium Storage Container  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analyses of three plutonium storage configurations (two plutonium metal and one plutonium oxide) consisting of the 3013 container within the 9975 package have been performed. All analyses are steady-state with 19 watts of Pu as contents. The analyzed conditions include allowance for storing the 9975 in a lattice configuration with stacking in a maximum ambient temperature 130 degrees F (54.4 degrees C) (assuming total loss of ventilation) and an ambient of 200 degrees F (93.3 degrees C) during accident (fire) conditions.

Hensel, S.J.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Optimizing energy storage and reproduction for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage. A scientific approach in enhancing ATES system performance at Achmea Apeldoorn through application of smart extraction and infiltration strategies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the subsurface beneath the campus of Apeldoorn Achmea, the groundwater flow velocity is high. This causes a problem for its Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage… (more)

Groot, J.H.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Exergy analysis of thermal energy storage in a district energy application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of thermal energy storage (TES) in district energy (DE) system is assessed. The Friedrichshafen DE system is considered as a case study and exergy analysis is utilized. The TES is designed to complement and to increase the effectiveness of the solar panels included in the district energy system. The TES stores the surplus solar energy until is needed by thermal energy users of the Friedrichshafen DE system. The results quantify the positive impact of the TES on the performance of the Friedrichshafen DE system, and demonstrate that the overall energy and exergy efficiencies of the TES are 60% and 19%, respectively. It is also shown over an annual period that the temperature, energy, exergy and energy efficiency of the TES exhibit similar trends and that the TES exergy accumulation and exergy efficiency exhibit similar trends.

Behnaz Rezaie; Bale V. Reddy; Marc A. Rosen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage with phase change materials and applications,"sensible vs phase change material (PCM) heat storage,"energy storage with phase change: materials, heat transfer

Steen, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of annual efficiencies of high temperature central receiver concentrated solar power plants with thermal energy storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance, especially in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Additionally, there are relatively small differences (<2%) in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. This is due the increased thermal losses at higher temperature and operational losses due to subsystem start-up and shut-down. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

Ehrhart, Brian David; Gill, David Dennis

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal characterisation of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture for energy storage in CSP plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Enhancements to energy storage systems developed for solar thermoelectric technologies can yield considerable increases in efficiency for this type of renewable energy. Important improvements include the design of innovative storage fluids, such as molten salts possessing low melting points and high thermal stabilities. This research examines the design of an innovative quaternary molten nitrate mixture, with the goal of improving the solar salt used currently as an energy storage fluid in CSP plants. This quaternary salt, which contains different weight percentages of NaNO3, KNO3, LiNO3 and Ca(NO3)2, exhibits better physical and chemical properties than the binary solar salt (60% NaNO3+40% KNO3) currently used. The melting points, heat capacities and thermal stability of the quaternary mixtures were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). In addition to DSC and TGA tests, viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements were carried out for the quaternary mixtures at different temperatures. The new salt was designed by taking into consideration the risk of solid species formation at high temperatures when calcium nitrate is present (which requires that the wt% does not exceed 20%) and the costs of LiNO3. These boundaries set the maximum wt% of LiNO3 to values below 15%. Finally it was determined that the proposed quaternary mixture, when used as a heat transfer fluid (HTF) in parabolic trough solar power plants, is able to expand plants? operating range to temperatures between 132 and 580 °C.

A.G. Fernández; S. Ushak; H. Galleguillos; F.J. Pérez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

Smith, M.

314

Chapter 10 - Solar Thermal Power Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chapter 10 deals with solar thermal power systems. Initially, the general design considerations are given followed by the presentation of the three basic technologies. These include the parabolic trough collector system, which includes a description of the PTC power plant and outlook of the technology; the power tower systems and the dish systems. This is followed by the thermal analysis of the basic cycles of solar thermal power plants. Subsequently, solar updraft tower systems are examined, which include the initial steps and first demonstration, and the thermal analysis. Finally, solar ponds are examined, which is a form of large solar collector and storage system that can be used for solar power generation and include practical design considerations, salty water transmission estimation, methods of heat extraction, description of two large experimental solar ponds, and applications of solar ponds.

Soteris A. Kalogirou

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Computational simulations of latent heat thermal energy storage systems - with innovative and first-principles based simulation for the underlying unsteady melting (and solidification) processes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis develops an effective modeling and simulation procedure for a specific thermal energy storage system commonly used and recommended for various applications (such… (more)

Gumaste, Rohan Achyut

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Modeling the heating of the Green Energy Lab in Shanghai by the geothermal heat pump combined with the solar thermal energy and ground energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This work involves the study of heating systems that combine solar collectors, geothermal heat pumps and thermal energy storage in the ground. Solar collectors… (more)

Yu, Candice Yau May

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Analysis of the thermo-physical properties of soils and rocky materials in trento area related to use of the subsoil as a thermal energy storage.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis analyzes the thermo-physical properties of soils and rocky materials in trento area related to use of the subsoil as a thermal energy storage.… (more)

Ruggeri, Martino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Domestic demand-side management (DSM): Role of heat pumps and thermal energy storage (TES) systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat pumps are seen as a promising technology for load management in the built environment, in combination with the smart grid concept. They can be coupled with thermal energy storage (TES) systems to shift electrical loads from high-peak to off-peak hours, thus serving as a powerful tool in demand-side management (DSM). This paper analyzes heat pumps with radiators or underfloor heating distribution systems coupled with TES with a view to showing how a heat pump system behaves and how it influences the building occupants' thermal comfort under a DSM strategy designed to flatten the shape of the electricity load curve by switching off the heat pump during peak hours (16:00–19:00). The reference scenario for the analysis was Northern Ireland (UK). The results showed that the heat pump is a good tool for the purposes of DSM, also thanks to the use of TES systems, in particular with heating distribution systems that have a low thermal inertia, e.g. radiators. It proved possible to achieve a good control of the indoor temperature, even if the heat pump was turned off for 3 h, and to reduce the electricity bill if a “time of use” tariff structure was adopted.

A. Arteconi; N.J. Hewitt; F. Polonara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Power Tower | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

50 MW of power from CSP power towers are installed in the United States, Spain, and Germany. The SunShot Initiative funds (R&D) on power tower systems and related aspects within...

320

Dynamic response of guyed towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

guyed towers. A parametric study was conducted using eigen analysis to determine the effects of consistent mass, geometric stiffness and P-Delta gravity loads. Time domain solutions were obtained by direct integration for motion due to regular Stokes... guyed tower 2 References to guyed tower dynamic analysis 4 Effect of mass formulation on tower natural periods. 5 P-Delta effect on fundamental period. 6 Effect of axial compression on the 1st & 2nd mode. 7 Geometric stiffness effect on natural...

Gillcrist, Mark Christopher

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Windmill tower shadow eliminator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a wind driven propeller system an airfoil support for the shaft of a propeller having an even number of blades extends above and below the shaft a distance at least equal to the blade length and pivots with the propeller into the wind for substantially eliminating tower shadow effects on the propeller.

Randolph, A.J.

1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Solar thermal upper stage technology demonstrator liquid hydrogen storage and feed system test program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Demonstrator (STUSTD) Liquid Hydrogen Storage and Feed System (LHSFS) Test Program is described. The test program consists of two principal phases. First an engineering characterization phase includes tests performed to demonstrate and understand the expected tank performance. This includes fill and drain; baseline heat leak; active Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS); and flow tests. After the LHSFS performance is understood and performance characteristics are determined a 30 day mission simulation test will be conducted. This test will simulate a 30 day transfer mission from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO). Mission performance predictions based on the results of the engineering characterization tests will be used to correlate the results of the 30 day mission simulation.

E. C. Cady

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Packed bed thermal energy storage model – Generalized approach and experimental validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Packed beds serve as thermal energy storages (TES) and heat exchangers (HEX) in different technological applications. In this paper, a general heterogeneous model of heat transfer in packed beds is developed. It is implemented by lumped element formulation in object-oriented modeling language Modelica and is successful validated with data sets taken from two different experiments reported in literature. The main advantages of the introduced model are the general, theory-based approach and the lumped element formulation in Modelica. The first point mentioned above should allow to simulate a packed bed TES/HEX without the necessity applying measured data for model calibration or to apply specific heat transfer correlations with restricted application. The second point establishes the possibility to integrate the TES/HEX model within plant models of larger scale without increasing the simulation time drastically.

Florian Opitz; Peter Treffinger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Evaluation Framework and Analyses for Thermal Energy Storage Integrated with Packaged Air Conditioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Few third-party guidance documents or tools are available for evaluating thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with packaged air conditioning (AC), as this type of TES is relatively new compared to TES integrated with chillers or hot water systems. To address this gap, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a project to improve the ability of potential technology adopters to evaluate TES technologies. Major project outcomes included: development of an evaluation framework to describe key metrics, methodologies, and issues to consider when assessing the performance of TES systems integrated with packaged AC; application of multiple concepts from the evaluation framework to analyze performance data from four demonstration sites; and production of a new simulation capability that enables modeling of TES integrated with packaged AC in EnergyPlus. This report includes the evaluation framework and analysis results from the project.

Kung, F.; Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sodium sulfate–diatomite composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work explores the use of sodium sulfate and diatomite to formulate composite materials for high temperature thermal energy storage applications. Sodium sulfate in the composite functions as a phase change material (PCM) and diatomite as a structural skeleton for shape stabilization. It is found that sodium sulfate and diatomite have an excellent chemical compatibility with the PCM melting temperature at around 880 °C. It is shown that the composite containing 45% diatomite gives an optimal formulation in terms of energy density, salt leakage and mechanical strength. The results also suggest that the composite with the optimal formulation has an application window of 890–980 °C. Failures occur to the composite materials at temperatures above 1000 °C.

Yue Qin; Guanghui Leng; Xiang Yu; Hui Cao; Geng Qiao; Yunfeng Dai; Yelong Zhang; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage in the Western United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The value of electricity generation varies as a function of season, time of day, location, and the mix of conventional and renewable energy sources. The ability to control the output of a concentrating solar power (CSP) plant via the use of thermal energy storage (TES) creates the opportunity to maximize its value to the grid. This study performs a series of simulations of the grid in the western United States to determine how a CSP plant with TES might be dispatched to maximize its value when replacing conventional fossil fuel plants. The value of CSP with TES is compared to renewable generators without storage including PV. The study finds that TES adds value by timing CSP generation to periods when high marginal cost units would typically be generating. This includes periods of peak net demand in the summer, as well as periods where changes in demand require start-up and operation of high ramp-rate fossil generators. As a result, CSP with TES can avoid the least efficient generators, as well as avoid costly power plant starts. A significant source of value is the ability of CSP to provide operating reserves, requiring greater operation at part-load. This represents a potentially important opportunity for CSP plants, especially in high renewable scenarios where the requirements for reserves will increase. In addition to its operational value, the ability of CSP with TES to provide firm system capacity is also a quantifiable benefit and another important source of value.

P. Denholm; Y.-H. Wan; M. Hummon; M. Mehos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Influence of nano-ZrO2 on the mechanical and thermal properties of high temperature cementitious thermal energy storage materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The mechanical and thermal properties of high temperature aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials modified with nano-ZrO2 are investigated. The influence of nano-ZrO2 amounts on the performance, such as compressive strength, thermal conductivity, volume heat capacity, and thermal expansion coefficient, of hardened composite cement pastes were studied for future solar thermal energy materials with better performance. It is observed that before heating the pore structure and compressive strength are both optimized at the optimum nano-ZrO2 amount of 1 wt%. At the same time, thermal conductivity and volume heat capacity of the composite paste enriched with nano-ZrO2 improved after heating at 350 and 900 °C compared with that of pure paste, which is very favorable for high thermal storage materials application. XRD, TG–DSC, FTIR, and MIP were used to characterize the mineral phases, the hydration/dehydration evolution, the chemical bonding, and the pore structures of the hydration products, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Zhongzi Xu; Chunhua Lu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Mechanism of Thermal Reversal of the (Fulvalene)tetracarbonyldiruthenium Photoisomerization: Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the currently intensifying quest to harness solar energy for the powering of our planet, most efforts are centered around photoinduced generic charge separation, such as in photovoltaics, water splitting, other small molecule activation, and biologically inspired photosynthetic systems. In contrast, direct collection of heat from sunlight has received much less diversified attention, its bulk devoted to the development of concentrating solar thermal power plants, in which mirrors are used to focus the sun beam on an appropriate heat transfer material. An attractive alternative strategy would be to trap solar energy in the form of chemical bonds, ideally through the photoconversion of a suitable molecule to a higher energy isomer, which, in turn, would release the stored energy by thermal reversal. Such a system would encompass the essential elements of a rechargeable heat battery, with its inherent advantages of storage, transportability, and use on demand. The underlying concept has been explored extensively with organic molecules (such as the norbornadiene-quadricyclane cycle), often in the context of developing photoswitches. On the other hand, organometallic complexes have remained relatively obscure in this capacity, despite a number of advantages, including expanded structural tunability and generally favorable electronic absorption regimes. A highly promising organometallic system is the previously reported, robust photo-thermal fulvalene (Fv) diruthenium couple 1 {l_reversible} 2 (Scheme 1). However, although reversible and moderately efficient, lack of a full, detailed atom-scale understanding of its key conversion and storage mechanisms have limited our ability to improve on its performance or identify optimal variants, such as substituents on the Fv, ligands other than CO, and alternative metals. Here we present a theoretical investigation, in conjunction with corroborating experiments, of the mechanism for the heat releasing step of 2 {yields} 1 and its Fe (4) and Os (6) relatives. The results of the combined study has enabled a rigorous interpretation of earlier and new experimental measurements and paint a surprising picture. First-principles calculations were employed based on spin unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) with a non-empirical gradient corrected exchange-correlation functional. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials were used to describe the valence-core interactions of electrons, including scalar relativistic effects of the core. Wavefunctions and charge densities were expanded in plane waves with kinetic energies up to 25 and 200 Rydberg, respectively. Reaction pathways were delineated with the string method, as implemented within the Car-Parrinello approach. This method allows for the efficient determination of the minimum energy path (MEP) of atomistic transitions and thus also saddle points (transition states, TSs), which are the energy maxima along the MEP. All geometries were optimized until all forces on the atoms were less than 0.02 eV/{angstrom}. The calculated structures of 1 and 2 were in good agreement with their experimental counterparts.

Kanai, Y; Srinivasan, V; Meier, S K; Vollhardt, K P; Grossman, J C

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermal Infrared Imagery: Application to a Walnut Orchard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOTE Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermalmethod to estimate tree biomass heat storage from thermalinfrared (TIR) imaging of biomass surface temperature is

Garai, Anirban; Kleissl, Jan; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Pueblo Towers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towers Towers Jump to: navigation, search Name Pueblo Towers Facility Pueblo Towers Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Vestas Towers Developer Vestas Towers Energy Purchaser Vestas Towers Location CO Coordinates 38.205834°, -104.588141° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.205834,"lon":-104.588141,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Influence of Hydraulics and Control of Thermal Storage in Solar Assisted Heat Pump Combisystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper studies the influence of hydraulics and control of thermal storage in systems combined with solar thermal and heat pump for the production of warm water and space heating in dwellings. A reference air source heat pump system with flat plate collectors connected to a combistore was defined and modeled together with the IEA SHC Task 44/HPP Annex 38 (T44A38) “Solar and Heat Pump Systems” boundary conditions of Strasbourg climate and SFH45 building. Three and four pipe connections as well as use of internal and external heat exchangers for DHW preparation were investigated as well as sensor height for charging of the DHW zone in the store. The temperature in this zone was varied to ensure the same DHW comfort was achieved in all cases. The results show that the four pipe connection results in 9% improvement in SPF compared to three pipe and that the external heat exchanger for DHW preparation leads to a 2% improvement compared to the reference case. Additionally the sensor height for charging the DHW zone of the store should not be too low, otherwise system performance is adversely affected.

Stefano Poppi; Chris Bales

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Economic analysis of community solar heating systems that use annual cycle thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics of community-scale solar systems that incorporate a centralized annual cycle thermal energy storage (ACTES) coupled to a distribution system is examined. Systems were sized for three housing configurations: single-unit dwellings, 10-unit, and 200-unit apartment complexes in 50-, 200-, 400-, and 1000-unit communities in 10 geographic locations in the United States. Thermal energy is stored in large, constructed, underground tanks. Costs were assigned to each component of every system in order to allow calculation of total costs. Results are presented as normalized system costs per unit of heat delivered per building unit. These methods allow: (1) identification of the relative importance of each system component in the overall cost; and (2) identification of the key variables that determine the optimum sizing of a district solar heating system. In more northerly locations, collectors are a larger component of cost. In southern locations, distribution networks are a larger proportion of total cost. Larger, more compact buildings are, in general, less expensive to heat. For the two smaller-scale building configurations, a broad minima in total costs versus system size is often observed.

Baylin, F.; Monte, R.; Sillman, S.; Hooper, F.C.; McClenahan, J.D.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development of Solid Particle Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Plants that Use Fluidized Bed Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is developing a thermal energy storage (TES) system that uses solid particles as the storage medium for a concentrating solar power plant. This paper focuses on the particle-TES performance in terms of three efficiency metrics: first-law efficiency, second-law efficiency, and storage effectiveness. The paper presents the derivation of the efficiency expression and their application in assessing the particle-TES performance and design. The particle-TES system uses low-cost stable materials that withstand high temperature at a fraction of the cost of the salt and metal containment vessels for high-temperature TES. Cost analysis indicates that particle TES costs less than $10/kWhth, which is less than half the cost of the current molten-salt-based TES and just a fraction of liquid heat transfer fluid storage at a similar high temperature of >700 °C, due to its low cost of storage medium and containment. The fluidized-bed TES can hold hot particles of > 800 °C with >95% exergetic efficiency, storage effectiveness, and thermal efficiency.

Z. Ma; G.C. Glatzmaier; M. Mehos

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Improving the Efficiency of a Non-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank Overview Hydroflex had provided the team with a tank and the heat exchanger coil that was to be used to heat the tank. While attempting to improve the tank's efficiency, the team was required to keep certain parameters of the tank the same, such as it insulation and the type of coil that was used

Demirel, Melik C.

335

Physical Properties of Solid Particle Thermal Energy Storage Media for Concentrating Solar Power Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solid ceramic particles have proven to be an effective heat transfer and thermal storage media for central receiver power production for a heat input temperature up to 1000 °C. In the directly illuminated solid particle receiver, a cascade of ?0.1-1 mm diameter particles is directly heated within a receiver cavity by concentrated solar energy. The efficiency of this approach, with respect to the energy balance on the receiver itself, is dependent on the physical properties of the particles. In this work, the radiative properties, solar weighted absorptance and thermal emittance, have been measured for several commercially available particle candidates both in the as-received state and after thermal exposure to simulate extended operation at elevated temperature in air between 700?C-1000?C. Heating the particles is shown to significantly reduce the solar weighted absorptance of as-received particles within 24 hours of exposure to air at 1000 °C, while heating at 700 °C in air has relatively little effect. In the as-received state, solar weighted absorptance can be as high as 93%, dropping to 84% after 192 hours at 1000?C. Particle stability is better at 700?C, and the solar absorptance remains above 92% after 192 hours of exposure. Analysis using x-ray diffraction (XRD) shows evidence of multiple chemical transformations in the sintered bauxite particle materials, which contain oxides of aluminum, silicon, titanium, and iron, following heating in air. However, the XRD spectra show only small differences between as-received and heat treated particles leaving open the possibility that the observed change in radiative properties results from a change in oxidation state without a concomitant phase change. Regardless of the specific degradation mechanism, t he solar weighted absorptance of the particles can be increased beyond the as-received condition by chemically reducing the particles in forming gas (5%H2 in N2 or Ar) above 700 °C, providing a possible means of periodically rejuvenating degraded particles in situ.

N. Siegel; M. Gross; C. Ho; T. Phan; J. Yuan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

COBRA-SFS (Spent-Fuel Storage) thermal-hydraulic analyses of the CASTOR-1C and REA 2023 BWR storage casks containing consolidated spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consolidation of spent nuclear fuel rods is being considered as one option for more efficient and compact storage of reactor spent fuel assemblies. In this concept, rods from two disassembled spent fuel assemblies will be consolidated in a space originally intended to store a single unconsolidated assembly. The thermal performance of consolidated fuel rods in dry storage, especially in multiassembly storage systems, is one of the major issues that must be addressed prior to implementation. In this study, Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers performed thermal-hydraulic analyses for both the REA 2023 cask and the CASTOR-1C cask containing either unconsolidated or consolidated BWR spent fuel assemblies. The objective was to determine the effect of consolidating spent fuel assemblies on the temperature distributions within both types of casks. Two major conclusions resulted from this study. First, a lumping technique (combining rods and flow channels), which reduces the number of computational nodes required to model complex multiassembly geometries, could be used for both unconsolidated and consolidated rods with negligible effect on prediction accuracies. Second, with a relatively high thermal conductivity backfill gas (e.g., helium), the predicted peak fuel rod temperature in a canister of consolidated rods generating the same amount of heat as an unconsolidated assembly is essentially the same as the peak temperature in the unconsolidated assembly. In contrast, with a relatively low thermal conductivity backfill gas (e.g., nitrogen), the opposite is true and the predicted peak temperature in a consolidated canister is significantly higher than in an unconsolidated assembly. Therefore, when rods are consolidated, selection of the backfill gas is important in maintaining peak rod temperatures below allowable values for rods with relatively high decay heat generation rates.

Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials - Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

82 82 Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials. V150: February 4, 2013 Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing Engineering Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Karl J. Gross, H2 Technology Consulting LLC Bruce Hardy, of Savannah River National Laboratory We gratefully acknowledge assistance and financial support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen Storage Program. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contract No. 147388 Contract Technical Monitor: Dr. Philip Parilla H2 Technology Consulting, LLC kgross@h2techconsulting.com tel: (510) 468-7515 Table of Contents Page 2 of 282 Recommended Best Practices for Characterizing

338

Control of Noise in Power Station Cooling Tower Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Power?station cooling tower systems must handle large volumes of water and air with large potential energy in the water flows and the requirement for large fans. To minimize the noise generated at power station sites use is made of efficient tower fill materials dual low?speed fans (which shifts the spectrum and lowers mid?frequency noise level) and barrier effects in tower location and orientation. Conventional noise control measures such as mufflers are avoided because of the required increase in pressure across the fan and the high initial cost for quieting large towers. The use of natural draft towers is discussed and it is shown that although the low?frequency noise may be reduced the noise levels at typical property line locations are of the same order of magnitude as that for conventional mechanical cooling towers. Since cooling towers at power stations are required as an environmental (thermal) pollution control measure a trade?off between temperature rise of local water supplies versus increases in community noise becomes a critical factor.

Lewis S. Goodfriend

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials- Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report, written by H2 Technology Consulting, provides an introduction to and overview of the recommended best practices in making measurements of the hydrogen storage properties of materials.

340

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of Annual Efficiencies of High Temperature Central Receiver Concentrated Solar Power Plants with Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL3 and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case, which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. The optical designs for all four cases were done using the DELSOL3 computer code; the results were then passed to the SOLERGY computer code, which uses historical typical meteorological year (TMY) data to estimate the plant performance over the course of one year of operation. Each of the four cases was sized to produce 100 \\{MWe\\} of gross electric power, have sensible liquid thermal storage capacity to generate electric power at full rated production level for 6 hours, and have a solar multiple of 1.8. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance. The largest differences are in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Another notable finding in the current study is the relatively small difference in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases. For both the Surround Field and North Field cases, the increase in annual solar to electric efficiency is <2%, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. The reasons for this include the increased thermal losses due to higher temperature operation and operational losses due to start-up and shut-down of plant sub-systems. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

B. Ehrhart; D. Gill

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fundamental heat transfer processes related to phase change thermal storage media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research on fundamental heat transfer processes which occur in phase-change thermal storage systems is described. The research encompasses both melting and freezing, and includes both experiment and analysis. The status of four research problems is discussed. One of the freezing problems was focused on investigating, via experiment, the extent to which freezing can be enhanced by the attachment of fins to the external surface of a cooled vertical tube situated in a liquid phase-change medium. Very substantial enhancements were encountered which neutralize the degradation of freezing due to the thermal resistance of the frozen layer and to natural convection in the liquid phase. The second of the freezing problems was analytical in nature and sought to obtain solutions involving both the phase-change medium and the heat transfer fluid used either to add heat to or extract heat from the medium. For freezing on a plane wall, it was possible to obtain a closed-form analytical solution, while for freezing about a coolant-carrying circular tube, a new numerical methodology was devised to obtain finite-difference solutions. For melting, quantitative design-quality heat transfer coefficients were determined experimentally for melting adjacent to a heated vertical tube. These experiments explored the effects of solid-phase subcooling and of open versus closed top containment on the coefficients. A dimensionless correlation enables these results to be used for a wide range of phase-change media. Studies on melting of a phase-change material situated within a circular tube are in progress.

Sparrow, E. M.; Ramsey, J. W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

TOWER-TRACKING HELIOSTAT ARRAY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis presents a method of tracking and correcting for the swaying of a central receiver tower in concentrated solar production plants.  The method… (more)

Masters, Joel T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program: Progress summary for the period April 1986 through March 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses recent progress in the DOE program, directed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to develop seasonal thermal energy storage (STES). STES has been identified as one method to substantially improve energy efficiency and economics in certain sectors of our economy. It provides a potentially economic means of using waste heat and climatic energy resources to meet a significant portion of our growing energy need for building and industrial process heating and cooling. Environmental benefits accompany the use of STES in many applications. Furthermore, STES can contribute to reduced reliance on premium fuels that are often obtained from foreign sources. Lastly by improving the energy economics of industry, STES can contribute to improved US industrial competitiveness. The report is provided in four sections; the first being this introduction Section 2 of the report describes the program and briefly documents its organization, goals, history, and long-term plans. Section 3 describes the progress during the period from April, 1986, through March, 1988. Section 4 provides a short update on international development of STES. 17 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

Kannberg, L.D.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the economic benefit of thermal energy storage (TES) for cooling, across a range of economic and climate conditions. Chilled water TES systems are simulated for a large office building in four distinct locations, Miami in the U.S.; Lisbon, Portugal; Shanghai, China; and Mumbai, India. Optimal system size and operating schedules are determined using the optimization model DER-CAM, such that total cost, including electricity and amortized capital costs are minimized. The economic impacts of each optimized TES system is then compared to systems sized using a simple heuristic method, which bases system size as fraction (50percent and 100percent) of total on-peak summer cooling loads. Results indicate that TES systems of all sizes can be effective in reducing annual electricity costs (5percent-15percent) and peak electricity consumption (13percent-33percent). The investigation also indentifies a number of criteria which drive TES investment, including low capital costs, electricity tariffs with high power demand charges and prolonged cooling seasons. In locations where these drivers clearly exist, the heuristically sized systems capture much of the value of optimally sized systems; between 60percent and 100percent in terms of net present value. However, in instances where these drivers are less pronounced, the heuristic tends to oversize systems, and optimization becomes crucial to ensure economically beneficial deployment of TES, increasing the net present value of heuristically sized systems by as much as 10 times in some instances.

DeForest, Nicolas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy storage with phase change materials and applications.ice and other phase change material [18]) where the medium

DeForest, Nicolas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency requirements - Maximum emission limits Investment constraints: - Payback period is constrained Storage constraints: - Electricity stored is limited by battery

Stadler, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Cooling Towers Make Money  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was hired and wrote specifications for a four cell induced draft counterflow cooling tower to cool 10,000 GPM entering at 95 0 F leaving at 85 0 F during an 80 0 F ambient wet bulb temperature. The specifications required that the bidders project a... F during an ambient wet bulb temperature of 7] OF could not be met The SuperCellular film fill, style] 3] 62 Illustration 3 was selected by the consultant because of its previous highly satisfactory service in sewage treatment trickling filter...

Burger, R.

350

A charging control strategy for active building-integrated thermal energy storage systems using frequency domain modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Primary space conditioning can be provided through active building-integrated thermal energy storage (BITES) systems, such as radiant space heating through concrete slabs. This approach can reduce peak space conditioning demand and energy costs while satisfying thermal comfort. However, thermal charging rates need to be predictively controlled due to the slow thermal response of BITES systems. This paper presents a charge control strategy using frequency domain models and room air temperature set-point profile as input. The models were previously verified with full-scale experiment data. The calculation procedures are demonstrated on active BITES systems with and without airflow to zone. Results show that the calculated charging rates satisfy the desired room air temperature set-point profiles. This control strategy is important for integrating the design and operation of active BITES systems because frequency domain models also provide important design information.

Yuxiang Chen; Andreas K. Athienitis; Khaled E. Galal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code.

Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HP Abs. Chiller PV Solar Thermal Annual CO 2 Emissionsfrom CHP [kW] heat from solar thermal [kW] heat from naturalof micro-CHP units, solar thermal units and heat pumps (

Steen, David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower...

357

Thermal storage for solar cooling using paired ammoniated salt reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the program were to investigate the feasibility of using various solid and liquid ammoniates in heat pump/thermal storage systems for space heating and cooling. The study included corrosion testing of selected metallic and non-metallic specimens in the ammoniates, subscale testing of the candidate ammoniates singly and in pairs, trade studies and conceptual design of a residential system, prototype testing, and ammoniation/deammoniation cyclic testing of manganese chloride. Results of the corrosion testing showed that problems exist with manganese and magnesium chloride ammoniates, except with the teflon which displayed excellent resistance in all environments. Also, all liquid ammoniates are unsuitable for use with uncoated carbon steel. Cycling of the manganese chloride between the high and low ammoniates does not affect its properties. However, the density change between the high and low ammoniates could cause packing problems in a reactor which constrains the salt volume. Subscale tests with solid ammoniates indicated that the heat transfer coefficient in a fixed bed reactor is low (approx. 1 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F). Therefore solid ammoniates are not practical because of the high heat exchanger cost requirement. Forced ammonia recirculation was tested as a means of increasing heat transfer rate in the fixed bed reactor with solid salts, but was not successful. Conversely, the subscale testing with liquid ammoniates produced heat transfer coefficients of 40 to 45 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F. Thus, the residential design was based on a liquid ammoniate/ammonia system using ammonium nitrate as the salt.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

District Cooling Using Central Tower Power Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the operation of solar power towers there are occasions, commonly in the summer season, where some of the heliostats have to stop focusing at the central receiver, located at the top of the tower, because the maximum temperature that the receiver can withstand has been reached. The highest demands of cooling for air conditioning take place at these same occasions. In the present paper, we have analyzed the possibility of focusing the exceeding heliostats to the receiver increasing the mass flow rate of the heat transfer fluid over the nominal value and using the extra heat as a source of an absorption chiller. The chilled water would be used to cool buildings and offices, using a district cooling network. Using the extra heat of the solar power tower plant would greatly reduce the electricity usage. In this work we have analyzed the case of a circular field of heliostats focusing at a circular receiver, such as the case of Gemasolar plant. We have quantified the thermal power that can be obtained from the unused heliostats, the cooling capacity of the absorption system as well as the heat losses through the insulated pipes that distribute the chilled water to the buildings of the network.

C. Marugán-Cruz; S. Sánchez-Delgado; M.R. Rodríguez-Sánchez; M. Venegas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Characterization of Intermediate Phases Formed Between Solid Nickel and Liquid Zinc During Use as an Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Solar Thermal Energy Storage Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Of the new material systems under investigation for use in higher temperature phase change material-based solar thermal energy storage (TES) ... it is possible that the formation of intermediate phases could impe...

J. C. Sabol; W. Z. Misiolek; A. Oztekin…

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work… (more)

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Investigation of the stability of paraffin-exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet composites for latent heat thermal storage systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic materials, such as paraffin wax, are sought as stable and environmentally friendly phase change materials (PCM) for thermal energy storage, but they suffer from low thermal conductivity which limits the rate at which thermal energy flows into and out of the material. A common method to improve the PCM thermal behavior is through loading with high thermal conductivity particulate fillers. However, the stability of these composites in the molten state is a concern as settling of the fillers will change the effective thermal conductivity. In this work, we investigate the stability of wax loaded with exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets either of 1 m (xGnP-1) or 15 m (xGnP-15) diameter. The effect of dispersants, oxidation of the wax, viscosity of the wax, mixing time, and hydrocarbon chain length on stability is reported. It was found that the addition of octadecylphosphonic acid (ODPA) is an effective dispersant for xGnP in paraffin and microcrystalline wax. In addition, mixing time, viscosity, and oxidation of the wax influence stability in the molten state. Overall, it was found that a mixing time of 24 hours for xGnP-15 along with ODPA mixed in a high viscosity, oxidized microcrystalline wax results in composite PCM systems with the greatest stability determined at 80 C in the molten state.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Mallow, Anne [Georgia Institute of Technology; Graham, Samuel [Georgia Institute of Technology; Kalaitzidou, Kyriaki [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 7 Improving Cooling Tower Efficiency ? Two Improvements in Capacity/Performance 1. Filtration for water quality control Side stream filtration Make up water quality...-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 2 Types of Cooling Towers Forced Draft Towers ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 3 Types...

Turpish, W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature [>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)] aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota`s St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. [Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the second long-term cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of high-temperature (>100{degrees}C (>212{degrees}F)) aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the second long-term cycle (LT2), which was conducted from October 1986 through April 1987. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic effects are reported. Approximately 61% of the 9.21 GWh of energy added to the 9.38 {times} 10{sup 4} m{sup 3} of ground water stored during LT2 was recovered. Temperatures of the water stored and recovered averaged 118{degrees}C (244{degrees}F) and 85{degrees}C (185{degrees}F), respectively. Results agreed with previous cycles conducted at the FTF. System operation during LT2 was nearly as planned. Operational experience from previous cycles at the FTF was extremely helpful. Ion-exchange softening of the heated and stored aquifer water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well, and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Sodium bicarbonate replaced magnesium and calcium bicarbonate as primary ions in the softened water. Water recovered form storage was approximately at equilibrium with respect to dissolved ions. Silica, calcium, and magnesium were significantly higher in recovered water than in injected water. Sodium was significantly lower in water recovered than in water stored.

Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Lauer, J.L.; Walton, M.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Howe, J.T.; Splettstoesser, J.F. (Minnesota Geological Survey, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal Conductivity of Certain Rock Types and its Relevance to the Storage of Nuclear Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nine rocks selected from the surface of three plutons have been examined petrographically and their thermal conductivities measured in the temperature range of 100° to 500°C. The thermal conductivities of differe...

V. V. Mirkovich; J. A. Soles

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Energy Efficient Integration of Heat Pumps into Solar District Heating Systems with Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solar district heating (SDH) with seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) is a technology to provide heat for space heating and domestic hot water preparation with a high fraction of renewable energy. In order to improve the efficiency of such systems heat pumps can be integrated. By preliminary studies it was discovered, that the integration of a heat pump does not always lead to improvements from an overall energy perspective, although the operation of the heat pump increases the efficiency of other components of the system e. g. the STES or the solar collectors. Thus the integration of heat pumps in SDH systems was investigated in detail. Usually, the heat pumps are integrated in such a way, that the STES is used as low temperature heat source. No other heat sources from the ambience are used and only that amount of energy consumed by the heat pump is additionally fed into the system. In the case of an electric driven heat pump, this is highly questionable concerning economic and CO2-emission aspects. Despite that fact the operation of the heat pump influences positively the performance of other components in the system e. g. the STES and makes them more efficient. If the primary energy consumption of the heat pump is lower than the energetic benefits of all other components, the integration makes sense from an energetic point of view. A detailed assessment has been carried out to evaluate the most promising system configurations for the integration of a heat pump. Based on this approach a system concept was developed in which the integration of the heat pump is energetically further improved compared to realised systems. By means of transient system simulations this concept was optimised with regard to the primary energy consumption. A parameter study of this new concept has been performed to identify the most sensitive parameters of the system. The main result and conclusion are that higher solar fractions and also higher primary energy savings can be achieved by SDH systems using heat pumps compared systems without heat pumps.

Roman Marx; Dan Bauer; Harald Drueck

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Numerical modelling and experimental studies of thermal behaviour of building integrated thermal energy storage unit in a form of a ceiling panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The paper presents a new concept of building integrated thermal energy storage unit and novel mathematical and numerical models of its operation. This building element is made of gypsum based composite with microencapsulated PCM. The proposed heat storage unit has a form of a ceiling panel with internal channels and is, by assumption, incorporated in a ventilation system. Its task is to reduce daily variations of ambient air temperature through the absorption (and subsequent release) of heat in PCM, without additional consumption of energy. Methods The operation of the ceiling panel was investigated experimentally on a special set-up equipped with temperature sensors, air flow meter and air temperature control system. Mathematical and numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow in the panel account for air flow in the panel as well as real thermal properties of the PCM composite, i.e.: thermal conductivity variation with temperature and hysteresis of enthalpy vs. temperature curves for heating and cooling. Proposed novel numerical simulator consists of two strongly coupled sub models: the first one – 1D – which deals with air flowing through the U-shaped channel and the second one – 3D – which deals with heat transfer in the body of the panel. Results Spatial and temporal air temperature variations, measured on the experimental set-up, were used to validate numerical model as well as to get knowledge of thermal performance of the panel operating in different conditions. Conclusion Preliminary results of experimental tests confirmed the ability of the proposed heat storage unit to effectively control the air temperature inside the building. However, detailed measurement of the temperature of PCM composite have shown some disadvantages of the panel used in the study, e.g. thickness of the walls and distribution of PCM should be optimized. This can be achieved with the aid of the numerical simulator developed in this research. Practical implications The proposed ceiling panel, optimised from the point of view of thermal performance in a given environmental conditions, can be used as a part of ventilation systems in residential and office buildings.

Maciej Jaworski; Piotr ?apka; Piotr Furma?ski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

None

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

371

Thermal energy storage in phase change material. Final scientific report 1 Feb 81-31 Jan 82  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study deals with an experimental investigation of low temperature thermal storage based on macroencapsulation of Phase Change Material (PCM). The storage performance capabilities of capsule bed, tube bank and tubular single-pass heat exchanger are compared. The tests are conducted on the VKI Solar Utility Network (SUN) which is a closed loop facility designed to study air heating systems. An original data acquisition chain based on two conversing microprocessors is developed to carry out mass flow, pressure drop and temperature measurements. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of comparison with numerical predictions and they allow to draw the following conclusions. Each type of matrix has its own range of operation for practical application but from a heat transfer standpoint, the PCM capsule packing unit is strongly recommended. It is suggested to extend this investigation to the effect of Reynolds number to find optimum range for thermo-mechanical efficiency.

White, P.; Buchlin, J-M.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A serious problem of scale and other solid material settling in heat transfer equipment was threatening to shut down our ethylene plant. All evidence pointed to the cooling tower as the source of the contamination. Visual inspection of the cooling...

Brenner, W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

Barineau, Mark Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Multi-tower line focus Fresnel array project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an alternative to conventional tracking solar thermal trough systems, one may use line focus Fresnel reflector systems. In a conventional Fresnel reflector design, each field of reflectors is directed to a single tower. However efficient systems of very high ground utilisation can be setup if a field of reflectors uses multiple receivers on different towers. This paper describes a line focus system, called the compact linear fresnel reflector system and a project to produce an initial 95 MWth solar array. The array will be used as a retrofit preheater for a coal fired generating plant.

Mills, D.R.; Morrison, G.; Pye, J.; Le Lievre, P. [Solar Heat & Power SHP Pty. Ltd., Sydney, NSW (Australia)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

Anderson, Bruce

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Cool Storage Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

Eppelheimer, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Towers for Offshore Wind Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increasing energy demand coupled with pollution free production of energy has found a viable solution in wind energy. Land based windmills have been utilized for power generation for more than two thousand years. In modern times wind generated power has become popular in many countries. Offshore wind turbines are being used in a number of countries to tap the energy from wind over the oceans and convert to electric energy. The advantages of offshore wind turbines as compared to land are that offshore winds flow at higher speed than onshore winds and the more available space. In some land based settings for better efficiency turbines are separated as much as 10 rotor diameters from each other. In offshore applications where only two wind directions are likely to predominate the distances between the turbines arranged in a line can be shortened to as little as two or four rotor diameters. Today more than a dozen offshore European wind facilities with turbine ratings of 450 kw to 3.6 MW exist offshore in very shallow waters of 5 to 12 m. Compared to onshore wind turbines offshore wind turbines are bigger and the tower height in offshore are in the range of 60 to 80 m. The water depths in oceans where offshore turbines can be located are within 30 m. However as the distance from land increases the costs of building and maintaining the turbines and transmitting the power back to shore also increase sharply. The objective of this paper is to review the parameters of design for the maximum efficiency of offshore wind turbines and to develop types offshore towers to support the wind turbines. The methodology of design of offshore towers to support the wind turbine would be given and the environmental loads for the design of the towers would be calculated for specific cases. The marine corrosion on the towers and the methods to control the corrosion also would be briefly presented. As the wind speeds tend to increase with distance from the shore turbines build father offshore will be able to capture more wind energy. Currently two types of towers are considered. Cylindrical tubular structures and truss type structures. But truss type structures have less weight and flexibility in design. The construction of the offshore towers to harness the wind energy is also presented. The results will include the calculation of wind and wave forces on the tower and the design details for the tower.

V. J. Kurian; S. P. Narayanan; C. Ganapathy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Influence of Moisture Content on the Evaluation of Latent Heat of Molten Salts used for Thermal Energy Storage Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Precise measurements of the thermo-physical properties are essential for the process design of thermal energy storage systems. This paper is concerned with the measurement of heat of fusion of molten salts, which plays a key role in determining the storage capacity of latent heat based thermal energy storage units. The focus of the work is on the effect of moisture content of molten salts on latent heat measurements using a differential scanning calorimetry. The results reveal that, the change in the mass of the samples investigated is due to moisture content, and hence, this leads to a reduction in the value of the heat of fusion of the phase change material. For instance, the heat of fusion for one of the wet samples (containing moisture) was determined to be 314.29J/g. However, the calculated heat of fusion for the same sample without moisture is found to be 350.029J/g. This is associated with the methodology of the DSC analysis, which does not consider the mass of the moisture in the sample. It is found that, the deviation in the heat of fusion due to the effect of the moisture content in the investigated samples is proportional to the amount of moisture in the original sample. Therefore, it is imperative to consider the effect of the moisture content on the evaluation of the latent heat of molten salts. In order to obtain reliable findings, either the samples should be dried and then weighed promptly, or weighed after the test and then re-evaluate the latent heat using the new weight.

Salama Omran; Peter Heggs; Yulong Ding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Exergetic analysis of a steam-flashing thermal storage Paul T. O'Brien  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions, although cost benefits are still evident. Currently, there are many solar power plants that have dispatchable, if not continuous, power output from a solar field. At the right cost, a storage system can improve overall economics of a solar energy system. Presented here is a simulation study

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An investigation into the thermal properties of selected sensible and latent heat storage materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the latent heat of fusion. Considerable work has been done in analyzing latent heat storage systems. Telkes and Raymond [lj did early work with a sodium sulfate system using sealed drums. iVore recent experimental work was conducted with other salt...

Wood, Stanley Clayton

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Novel Latent Heat Storage Devices for Thermal Management of Electric Vehicle Battery Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A major aspect for safe and efficient operation of battery electric vehicles (BEV) is the thermal management of their battery systems. As temperature uniformity and level highly ... performance and the lifetime, ...

Ch. Huber; A. Jossen; R. Kuhn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Commissioning through "EDF Tower" construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

michel rouillot -architecte d.p.l.g. CommissioningCommissioningthrough through ??EDF TowerEDF Tower? construction? construction by Michel Rouillot Architect D.P.L.G. michel rouillot -architecte d.p.l.g. What is a building project ? michel rouillot... -architecte d.p.l.g. A spatial answerfor a work structure michel rouillot -architecte d.p.l.g. A very strong relationship between many building participants michel rouillot -architecte d.p.l.g. The production of the buildingThe production of the building...

Rouillot, M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Experimentation of a High Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Prototype Using Phase Change Materials for the Thermal Protection of a Pressurized Air Solar Receiver  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The work addresses the issue of fast variations of temperature of a central solar receiver under cloud covering. A specific attention is paid to the situation of Hybrid Solar Gas Turbine (HSGT) systems using pressurized air as Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF), as it is considered in the Pegase project (France). A Thermal Energy Storage (TES) unit integrated in the receiver is proposed for smoothing the variation of temperature. The technology is based on the utilization of both Phase Change Material (PCM) and metallic fins in order to enhance charge and discharge capability of the storage unit. A test-bench is designed with copper fins and is experienced with paraffin wax and with Li2CO3 successively as PCMs. In the same time, the test unit is modeled and the charging and discharging modes are simulated. The results show that the full charging is achieved in about 4 hours starting from 700 °C when the receiver is maintained at 900 °C, whereas the discharge from 900 °C to 700 °C is achieved in 2.5 hours.

D. Verdier; A. Ferrière; Q. Falcoz; F. Siros; R. Couturier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

GreenTower | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GreenTower Jump to: navigation, search Name: GreenTower Place: Haiger 6, Germany Zip: 35708 Sector: Solar Product: Developer of a solar chimney technology, with greenhouses for...

388

Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by utilizing thermal energy storage such as ice storage orThermal Storage Utilization. ” Journal of Solar Energy

Yin, Rongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module Acciona logo Acciona Solar, under the Thermal Storage FOA, plans to develop a prototype thermal energy storage...

390

The solar towers of Chankillo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An ancient solar observatory is composed by thirteen towers lined on a hill of a coastal desert of Peru. This is the Chankillo observatory. Here we discuss it, showing some simulations of the local sun direction. An analysis of the behaviour of shadows is also proposed.

Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal and economical analysis of an underground seasonal storage heating system in Thrace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Economical analysis of the solar heating system with seasonal storage, which was established in Edirne (41°39?54?N) in order to provide the heat requirement of buildings, has been fulfilled. Optimum collector area for the heating system has been determined. Total heat requirement of 69% has been met by means of heating system concerning the space heating and domestic water heating. In the accordance with the results of the economical analysis, the payback time of the heating system has been determined as 19–20 years.

Berrin Karacavus; Ahmet Can

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Derr Track Storage Bldg Sigma Alpha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

!( Derr Track Storage Bldg Japan Center Memorial Bell Tower Solar House Primrose Chancellor & Storage Bio. Sci Avent Ferry Complex Building Sigma Phi Epsilon 7 Welch Pi Kappa Alpha 10 Sigma Alpha Mu 4 and Visitor's Center Thompson Admin II Bostian Library Storage Facility Winston Clark Ricks Robertson Harris

Reeves, Douglas S.

393

Performance investigation of thermal energy storage system with Phase Change Material (PCM) for solar water heating application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to harvest solar energy, thermal energy storage (TES) system with Phase Change Material (PCM) has been receiving greater attention because of its large energy storage capacity and isothermal behavior during charging and discharging processes. In the present experimental study, shell and tube TES system using paraffin wax was used in a water heating system to analyze its performance for solar water heating application. Energy and exergy including their cost analyses for the TES system were performed. Accordingly, total life cycle cost was calculated for different flow rates of the Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF). With 0.033 kg/min and 0.167 kg/min flow rates of water as HTF, energy efficiencies experienced were 63.88% and 77.41%, respectively, but in exergy analysis, efficiencies were observed to be about 9.58% and 6.02%, respectively. Besides, the total life cycle cost was predicted to be $ 654.61 for 0.033 kg/min flow rate, which could be reduced to $ 609.22 by increasing the flow rate to 0.167 kg/min. Therefore it can be summarized that total life cycle cost decreases with the increase of flow rate.

M.H. Mahfuz; M.R. Anisur; M.A. Kibria; R. Saidur; I.H.S.C. Metselaar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Light storage via coherent population oscillation in a thermal cesium vapor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the storage of light via the phenomenon of Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) in an atomic cesium vapor at room temperature. In the experiment the optical information of a probe field is stored in the CPO of two ground states of a Lambda three-level system formed by the Zeeman sublevels of the hyperfine transition F = 3 - F' = 2 of cesium D2 line. We show directly that this CPO based memory is very insensitive to stray magnetic field inhomogeneities and presents a lifetime which is mainly limited only by atomic motion. A theoretical simulation of the measured spectra was also developed and is in very good agreement with the experiment.

A. J. F. de Almeida; J. Sales; M. -A. Maynard; T. Laupretre; F. Bretenaker; D. Felinto; F. Goldfarb; J. W. R. Tabosa

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

395

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power An Analysis of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a California 33% Renewable Scenario (Report Summary) Paul Denholm, Yih-Huei Wan, Marissa Hummon, Mark Mehos March 2013 NREL/PR-6A20-58470 2 Motivation * Implement concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) in a commercial production cost model o Develop approaches that can be used by utilities and system planners to incorporate CSP in standard planning tools * Evaluate the optimal dispatch of CSP with TES o How would a plant actually be used to minimize system production cost? * Quantify the value of adding storage to CSP in a high renewable energy (RE) scenario in California

396

Dynamic simulation of integrated rock-bed thermocline storage for concentrated solar power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In contrast to wind and photovoltaic, concentrated solar power plants can be equipped with thermal energy storage in order to decouple intermittent energy supply and grid feed-in. The focus of this study is the technical evaluation of a cost-efficient storage concept for solar tower power plants. Consisting of a quartzite-rock bed that is charged with a hot air flow and discharged by cold air counter-flow, the storage essentially operates like a regenerator. For such systems, the discharge temperature typically declines with time. Furthermore, the use of a randomly packed bed results in considerable pressure loss. In order to describe the relevant flow and heat transfer mechanisms in rock beds used for thermal storage, a mathematical model written in the modelling language Modelica is developed and validated. Good agreement with experimental data from literature is obtained. With the aid of the validated model, a rock-bed thermal storage for application in a semi-industrial scale solar power plant (1.5 MWel) is designed and optimised with respect to electrical efficiency of the plant during the charge and discharge cycle. The storage capacity is equivalent to four hours of full-load operation. Results show that compressor work should be considered directly in the selection of packed-bed geometry in order to minimise the efficiency penalty of storage integration in the solar plant.

Nicolas Mertens; Falah Alobaid; Lorenz Frigge; Bernd Epple

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sandia National Laboratories: Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility,...

398

Steam reforming of methane using double-walled reformer tubes containing high-temperature thermal storage Na2CO3/MgO composites for solar fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Double-walled reactor tubes containing thermal storage materials based on the molten carbonate salts—100 wt% Na2CO3 molten salt, 90 wt% Na2CO3/10 wt% MgO and 80 wt% Na2CO3/20 wt% MgO composite materials—were studied for the performances of the reactor during the heat charging mode, while those of methane reforming with steam during heat discharging mode for solar steam reforming. The variations in the temperatures of the catalyst and storage material, methane conversion, duration of reforming for obtaining high levels of methane conversion (>90%), higher heating value (HHV) power of reformed gas and efficiency of the reactor tubes were evaluated for the double-walled reactor tubes and a single-wall reactor tube without the thermal storage. The results for the heat charging mode indicated that the composite thermal storage could successfully store the heat transferred from the exterior wall of the reactor in comparison to the pure molten-salt. The double-walled reactor tubes with the 90 wt% Na2CO3/10 wt% MgO composite material was the most desirable for steam reforming of methane to realize large HHV amounts of reformed gas and higher efficiencies during heat-discharging mode.

Nobuyuki Gokon; Shohei Nakamura; Tsuyoshi Hatamachi; Tatsuya Kodama

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessing thermal energy storage technologies of concentrating solar plants for the direct coupling with chemical processes. The case of solar-driven biomass gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Dynamic simulation, design improvements and control issues in solar power plants might compete with special considerations on energy storing techniques. In order to provide the stability in production of power or chemical commodities in spite of discontinuity in the source of energy, i.e., sun, overall concerns in the details of solar power plant, competition and comparison of common storing technologies should be taken into account to ensure the effectiveness and continuity of the supply. This research activity is aimed at extending the study from the power generation purpose to the solar-supplied chemical commodities production, highlighting the limitations of certain well-established thermal energy storage techniques when concentrating solar is directly coupled with chemical processes. The (intrinsically dynamic and closed-loop) simulation of solar power plants and direct thermal energy storage technologies is performed for the direct thermal energy storage technologies and, only for the case of thermocline, it is coupled with computational fluid-dynamic (CFD) studies for the proper assessment of molten salt and steam temperature trends. To investigate benefits/restrictions of the storage technologies, the solar steam generation is integrated with the gasification of biomasses for syngas production. Also, first-principles dynamic model for the biomass gasifier is provided.

Flavio Manenti; Andres R. Leon-Garzon; Zohreh Ravaghi-Ardebili; Carlo Pirola

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A new design of wind tower for passive ventilation in buildings to reduce energy consumption in windy regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In today’s world, the significance of energy and energy conservation is a common knowledge. Wind towers can save the electrical energy used to provide thermal comfort during the warm months of the year, especially during the peak hours. In this paper, we propose a new design for wind towers. The proposed wind towers are installed on top of the buildings, in the direction of the maximum wind speed in the region. If the desired wind speed is accessible in several directions, additional wind towers can be installed in several positions. The proposed wind tower can also rotate and set itself in the direction of the maximum wind speed. In the regions where the wind speed is low, to improve the efficiency of the system a solar chimney or a one-sided wind tower can be installed in another part of the building in the opposite direction. Using transparent materials in the manufacturing of the proposed wind towers improves the use of natural light inside the building. The major advantage of wind towers is that they are passive systems requiring no energy for operation. Also, wind towers reduce electrical energy consumption and environmental pollution.

A.R. Dehghani-sanij; M. Soltani; K. Raahemifar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the discharge of thermal energy storage without releasingto low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

McAllister, J.E. Jr.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

Ábrahám, Erika

404

CXAllenRadioTower2.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Southwestern Power Administration proposes to modify and reconstruct its Allen Radio Tower communications site as part of the Spectrum Relocation project. Categorical...

405

Sandia National Laboratories: Power Towers for Utilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engine Test Facility Central Receiver Test Facility Power Towers for Utilities Solar Furnace Dish Test Facility Optics Lab Parabolic Dishes Work For Others (WFO) User...

406

Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flow changes the tower?s performance also by about 1%. Internal Influences So, where can easy improvements be found? One of the easiest is balancing the water distribution systems from one cell to the next. Balancing a crossflow tower means... making sure each of the distribution basins has the same water height. Figure 2 shows two adjacent basins where the closer basin height is about 7? lower than the farther basin height. We balanced basins on a 7 cell crossflow tower that had basins...

Phelps Jr., P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Solar Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The intermittent nature of the solar energy supply makes the provision of adequate energy storage essential for the majority of practical applications. Thermal storage is needed for both low-temperature and high-...

Brian Norton BSc; MSc; PhD; F Inst E; C Eng

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energyfor rows of fixed solar thermal collectors using flatassisted by a 232 m solar thermal array providing heat to a

Mammoli, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Microcomputer Model of Crossflow Cooling Tower Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy use characteristics of evaporative cooling towers are of interest because, although such towers are widely used in industry, they do require a substantial amount of energy. Evaporative cooling towers are basically large heat exchangers...

Reichelt, G. E; Jones, J. W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proceedings on thermal energy storage and energy conversion;polymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage. SAE SocLow temperature thermal energy storage: a state of the art

Roshandell, Melina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage,” Angewandtescale molecular solar thermal energy storage system, in

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Storage of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A framework is presented for identifying appropriate systems for storage of electrical, mechanical, chemical, and thermal energy in solar energy supply systems. Classification categories include the nature ... su...

Theodore B. Taylor

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Composite Tower Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solutions Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name Composite Tower Solutions Place Provo, Utah Zip 84604 Sector Wind energy Product Composite Tower Solutions manufactures equipment for wind resource assessment needs, including meteorological towers, weather towers, and data collection and instrumentation towers. Coordinates 40.233765°, -111.668509° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.233765,"lon":-111.668509,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Cooling Tower Management to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Best Management Practice: Cooling Tower Management on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

416

Cooling Tower Report, October 2008 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2008 Electricity Reliability Impacts of a Mandatory Cooling Tower Rule for Existing Steam Generation Units Cooling Tower Report, October 2008 More Documents & Publications...

417

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

among PV, solar thermal, and storage systems can be complex,and solar thermal collectors; electrical storage, flow8, huge PV, solar thermal as well as storage systems will be

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy, the lifeline of all activities is highly ... a country. The gap present between the energy generation and the energy consumption keeps expanding with a precipitous increase in the demand for the energy, e...

R. Parameshwaran; S. Kalaiselvam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

American Institute of Physics Handbook, 1972. Gray, D.E. ,and American Institute of Physics Handbook (1972). The meshAmerican Institute of Physics Handbook design for simulation

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Tower  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power, EC, Energy, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Solar On June 26 and 27, a series of exposures were made to multiple Boeing test...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower heliostat fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-objective optimization of solar tower heliostat fields Pascal Richter, Martin Frank and Erika Introduction Solar tower plants generate electric power from sunlight by focusing concentrated solar radiation electricity. Fig. 1 Solar tower plant PS10, 11 MW in Andalusia, Spain. [Source: flickr] Solar tower plants

Ábrahám, Erika

423

Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Added Economic and Environmental Value of Solar Thermal Systems in Microgrids with Combined Heat and Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal absorption solar photo- storage chiller thermalbetween solar thermal collection and storage systems and CHPimpact of solar thermal and heat storage on CO 2 emissions

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Design of a water tower energy storage system .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This project is aimed at supporting the Mizzou Advantage strategic initiative in the area of Sustainable Energy. In particular, the project focuses on preparatory studies… (more)

Giri, Sagar Kishor

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Hydraulic Cooling Tower Driver- The Innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the weaknesses of present day cooling tower drives are fan wrecks caused by shaft couplings breaking, gear box malfunctions due to inadequate lubrication, gear tooth wear, and inaccessibility for inspection and routine maintenance. The hydro...

Dickerson, J. A.

427

Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

Turner, Jessica K

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers...

Matson, J.

429

Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loving care is paid to the compressors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration systems. When problems arise, operator: run around in circles with expensive "fixes", but historically ignore the poor orphan, the cooling tower perched...

Burger, R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

431

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings and provide information about specific technology and implementation options.

432

Project Profile: Brayton Cycle Baseload Power Tower  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wilson Solarpower, under the Baseload CSP FOA, is validating a proposed utility-scale, Brayton cycle baseload power tower system with a capacity factor of at least 75% and LCOE of $0.09/kWh.

433

Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COOLING TOWERS, THE NEGLECTED ENERGY RESOURCE ROBERT BURGER President, Burger Associates, Inc. Dallas, Texas (USA) Loving care is paid to the compress ors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration and air conditioning systems... is too hot, high temperature cut-outs occur and more energy must be provided to the motors to maintain the refrigeration cycle. COOLING TOWERS: 1) are just as important a link in the chain as the other equipment, 2) are an important source...

Burger, R.

434

Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage, thermal storage, solar thermal collectors, PVs, andis disallowed; 5. a low storage, PV, and solar thermal priceW run 4 force low storage / PV and solar thermal results run

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Case study that summarizes the Wind Tower Systems and its Space Frame tower. Describes their new wind tower design and explains how DOE funding made this possible.

437

Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed photovoltaic generation and energy storageenergy management in buildings and microgrids with e.g. installed Photovoltaic (energy storage, TS – thermal storage, FB – Flow Battery, AC – Absorption Chiller, ST – solar thermal system, PV – photovoltaic.

Stadler, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radio Towers Geothermal Area Radio Towers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Radio Towers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.03666667,"lon":-115.4566667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Project Profile: CSP Energy Storage Solutions — Multiple Technologies Compared  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

US Solar Holdings, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is aiming to demonstrate commercial, utility-scale thermal energy storage technologies and provide a path to cost-effective energy storage for CSP plants >50 MW.

440

Cool Storage for Solar and Conventional Air Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The term thermal energy storage can apply to any storage function for which the principal inputs and outputs are thermal energy, whether as “hotness” or as “coolness”. Generally, hotness storage technologies h...

C. J. Swet

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Energy Storage,” Renewable and Sustainable EnergyReview on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,Energy Storage Using Phase Change Materials,” Renewable and Sustainable Energy

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Techno-economic assessment of substituting natural gas based heater with thermal energy storage system in parabolic trough concentrated solar power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Parabolic-trough (PT) concentrated solar power (CSP) plants are very vulnerable to daily fluctuations in solar radiation. This dependence can be mitigated through a hybridization of solar energy with natural gas based heaters that supply thermal energy during the night or whenever solar irradiance level is dimmed. However, there is more sustainable way for CSP plants to avoid power-generation-outages caused by transient weather conditions, i.e. installation of thermal energy storage (TES). Such a system stores surplus thermal energy provided by solar field during sunny hours and discharges it when the sun is not available. Shams-1 PT plant in Madinat-Zayed, United-Arab-Emirates (UAE) has two natural gas based components, i.e. steam-booster heater and heat transfer fluid (HTF) heater. In the current study, model of Shams-1 was developed and analyzed in the System Advisor Model (SAM) software. It has been attempted to replace the HTF heater with TES. A parametric study has been conducted to determine the size of the TES as well as the solar field such that the specified power target demand would be satisfied. The results of the parametric analysis showed that TES can't completely replace the HTF heater, within reasonable sizes. Nevertheless, consequent simulations depicts that TES increases the capacity factor on one hand and decreases fuel consumption on the other hand.

V. Poghosyan; Mohamed I. Hassan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage coupled with district heating or cooling systems. Volume I. Main text  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The AQUASTOR model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two principal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains the main text, including introduction, program description, input data instruction, a description of the output, and Appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings Broadwind Energy Formerly Tower Tech Holdings Jump to: navigation, search Name Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings) Place Manitowoc, Wisconsin Zip 54221-1957 Sector Wind energy Product US-based manufacturer of wind turbine towers, turbine assemblies such as nacelles, and monopiles. References Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings) is a company located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin . References ↑ "Broadwind Energy (Formerly Tower Tech Holdings)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Broadwind_Energy_Formerly_Tower_Tech_Holdings&oldid=343059"

445

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

446

Project Profile: Solar Power Tower Improvements with the Potential...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

with its baseline solar tower configuration, which is well represented by the System Advisor Model template for a 100-MW solar tower. This mature system-level design is the...

447

Vibration Control for Bridge Towers and Field Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the tower was under construction, there were some occasions to measure wind-induced response of the tower and also the performance of vibration control devices. Figure 9.8...shows the observed relationship, ...

Yozo Fujino; Kichiro Kimura; Hiroshi Tanaka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaporation: This is the primary function of the tower and is the method that transfers heat from the cooling tower system to the environment. The quantity of evaporation is not...

449

Optimal Heliostat Layout for Concentrating Solar Tower Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A methodology to give an optimal layout of a group of heliostats has been developed for concentrating solar tower ... the method determines an optimal configuration of a heliostat field around a tower where refle...

Motoaki Utamura; Yutaka Tamaura…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Tower Systems to develop the Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly optimized design of five custom-shaped legs and interlaced steel struts. With this design, Space Frame towers can support turbines at greater heights, yet weigh and cost less than traditional steel tube towers. Wind Tower Systems LLC (now

451

Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies Preservative Spray Treatment Maintains Cooling Tower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several problems common to most industrial wood framed cooling towers can be easily controlled with annual preservative spray treatment applications to the plenum area framework and drift eliminators. It eliminates the expensive periodic repairs due...

Reidenback, R.

452

Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withn/a n/a electrical flow battery I) thermal I) Flow batteriesor $/kWh) lifetime (a) thermal storage 8 IV) flow battery V)

Stadler, Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Project Profile: A Novel Storage Method for CSP Plants Allowing Operation at High Temperature  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

City College of New York (CCNY), under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing and testing a novel thermal storage method that allows operation at very high temperatures.

455

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP plants.

456

Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Side Stream Filtration Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program By Pacific Northwest National Laboratory X. Duan, J.L. Williamson, K.L McMordie Stoughton and B.K. Boyd October 2012 FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM i Contact Will Lintner, PE Federal Energy Management Program U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Phone: (202) 586-3120 E-mail: william.lintner@ee.doe.gov Cover photo: Cooling Towers. Photo from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ii Acknowledgements The authors of the report would like to thank the following individuals that provided support to

457

Towards Holistic Power Tower System Optimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Many stakeholders today consider power tower systems to be the most promising CSP technology for the future. Therefore much effort is spent to improve individual components and subsystems. While these are valuable steps towards cost reduction, it is also of great importance to perform an overall, i.e. ‘holistic’, system layout and optimization process. Still, even today heliostats are often characterized and even compared using the single parameter ‘cost per square meter’, which is not sufficient. More factors like optical and tracking accuracy, shape, structural deformation under operation loads and maybe even power consumption have to be factored in to allow for a meaningful comparison. In the paper recent activities targeting at a more holistic power tower system optimization are described. For the overall layout process of heliostat field, tower and receiver the complete system is modeled using SAM or an in-house tool based on SolTrace and Matlab to determine investment cost, annual electricity generation and resulting levelised electricity costs. By doing so, different heliostat types and field layouts can be directly compared using \\{LCoE\\} as a reasonable figure of merit. This logical approach to identify the optimum heliostat design is described and illustrated using two generic heliostat designs and the respective field layouts as an example; a recently developed updated tower cost curve is used. It is found that using specific heliostat costs (i.e. $/m2) alone as a figure of merit to assess different heliostat designs can be misleading, because heliostats characterized by lower specific investment costs, but also lower optical and tracking accuracy, can lead to higher levelised electricity costs, which means the real objective of power plant optimization is not reached by looking at heliostat costs per square meter alone.

G. Weinrebe; F. von Reeken; M. Wöhrbach; T. Plaz; V. Göcke; M. Balz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Simplified Numerical Description of Latent Storage Characteristics for Phase Change Wallboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the discharge of thermal energy storage without "dumping"thermal mass, and • utilize low-energy heating and cooling sources. Large thermal storagelow- energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices

Fuestel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Sandia National Laboratories: Molten-Salt Storage System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories on a new concentrated solar power (CSP) installation with thermal energy storage. The CSP storage project combines Areva's...

460

Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt energy storage demonstration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

molten salt energy storage demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Project Profile: CSP Energy Storage Solutions - Multiple Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

CSP Energy Storage Solutions - Multiple Technologies Compared US Solar Holdings logo US Solar Holdings, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is aiming to demonstrate commercial,...

462

Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements to Meet the 2017 On Board...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal H 2 Storage Fuel Cell Vehicle Wheels Management BoP Engineered Heat Transfer BoP What is Needed Materials Designs Component of the Hydrogen Storage...

463

Control of the flux distribution on a solar tower receiver using an optimized aiming point strategy: Application to THEMIS solar tower  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Life time of components is one of the technological bottle-necks in the development of solar tower power plant technology. The receiver, which is subjected to high and variable concentrated solar flux density is particularly affected: High, variable and non-homogeneous solar flux on the solar receiver walls results in strong stresses because of high temperatures, thermal shocks and temperature gradient that contribute to the reduction of the life time of this key component. This work aims to present an open loop approach to control the flux density distribution delivered on a flat plate receiver for a solar power tower. Various distributions of aiming points on the aperture of the receiver are considered. The flux density distribution on the aperture is simulated by a computer code. A specific neighborhood is defined for the TABU optimization meta-heuristic according to the size of the image of each individual heliostat. This modified algorithm is implemented to select the best aiming point for each heliostat. This approach has been validated using the example of THEMIS solar power tower in Targasonne, France.

Adrien Salomé; Fabien Chhel; Gilles Flamant; Alain Ferrière; Frederik Thiery

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

DOE Global Energy Storage Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

465

Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower Oak Ridge's EM Program Demolishes North America's Tallest Water Tower August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Oak Ridge’s K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. Oak Ridge's K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - Oak Ridge's EM program recently demolished one of the most iconic structures at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP). The 382-foot checkerboard water tower - the tallest in North America - dominated the site's skyline since its construction in 1958. The K-1206 F Fire Water Tower operated as part of the site's fire protection system, but it was drained, disconnected and permanently taken

466

LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

467

Competitive Landscape of Mobile Telecommunications Tower Companies in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the entry of 3G and WiMAX players, the Indian mobile subscriber base is expected to reach 1110 million by the end of 2015. To meet mobile infrastructure demand, India will require approximately 350,000 to 400,000 mobile telecommunications towers ... Keywords: Business Models, Infrastructure Sharing, Joint Venture Companies, Mobile Network Operators MNO, Mobile Telecommunication Tower Valuation, Mobile Telecommunications Towers, Telecommunication Circles

N.P. Singh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Tower Manufacturing and Installation...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

systems with hub heights of at least 120 meters. Scaling to taller towers allows wind turbines to capture less turbulent and often stronger wind resources, thereby increasing...

469

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

which, in turn, is used in a conventional turbine generator to produce electricity. Some power towers use watersteam as the heat-transfer fluid. Other advanced designs are...

470

Building a Better Transmission Tower | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

500-kilovolt tower one of hundreds on the McNary-John Day line saving BPA big bucks. | Photo courtesy of Bonneville Power Administration A helicopter hoists...

471

Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Tower Manufacturing and Installation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and logistics constraints affecting the deployment of taller utility-scale wind turbine systems with hub heights of at least 120 meters. Scaling to taller towers allows wind...

472

Microsoft Word - PowerTower_work_2009.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

tower systems Accomplishments * Helped Rocketdyne begin development of their own heliostat * Performed first-ever test of a heliostat at a distance of 1 mile * Updated SOLERGY...

473

Utility-scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prior to commercial operation, large solar systems in utility-size power plants need to pass performance acceptance tests conducted by the engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractor or owners. In lieu of the present absence of ASME or other international test codes developed for this purpose, the NREL undertook the development of interim Guidelines to provide recommendations for test procedures that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The Guidelines contained here follow the general approach of the earlier NREL report on parabolic trough collector fields, but in this case are specifically written for power tower solar systems composed of a heliostat (reflector) field directing the sun's rays to a receiver (heat exchanger) on a high central tower. The working fluid in the tower receiver can be molten salt, water/steam, air, CO2, or other suitable fluids, each with its own particular attributes. The fundamental differences between acceptance of a solar power plant and a conventional fossil-fired plant are the inherently transient nature of the energy source and the necessity to use a performance projection model in the acceptance process. Two primary types of test runs are to be conducted. The first – the Short-Duration Steady-State Thermal Power Test (Power Test) – measures the thermal power output of the solar system under clear-sky conditions over a short period, during which thermal equilibrium and stable steady-state conditions exist, and compares the measured results to performance model projections for those conditions. The second test type – the Long-Duration Production (or Reliability) Test (Production Test)– is a continuous multi-day energy test that gathers multiple detailed daily thermal energy outputs and compares the results to projections from a performance model. Both clear-sky and partly cloudy conditions are acceptable. Additionally, the functionality of the solar system should be observed with regard to such items as daily startup, normal operation, standby and shutdown.

D. Kearney

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Thermochemical energy storage systems: modelling, analysis and design.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thermal energy storage (TES) is an advanced technology for storing thermal energy that can mitigate environmental impacts and facilitate more efficient and clean energy systems.… (more)

Haji Abedin, Ali

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exchanger was configured to use higher temperature water produced by a cooling tower alone. The other coilLBNL-6660E Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger-temperature cooling water, so that it can support many more hours of free cooling compared to traditional systems

476

Norbornadiene-quadricyclane system in the photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Norbornadiene-quadricyclane system in the photochemical conversion and storage of solar energy ... Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage ... Photoswitchable Molecular Rings for Solar-Thermal Energy Storage ...

Constantine Philippopoulos; Dimitrios Economou; Constantine Economou; John Marangozis

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedProceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop,c.F. , ~Aquifer thermal energy storage- parameter study,~

Doughty, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Storage of Solar Thermal Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is estimated that, at the present rate of consumption of (readily available stored energy in) fossil fuels, the world’s ... world are in search of new and renewable energy sources. Developing efficient and ine...

S. Kakaç; E. Paykoç; Y. Yener

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paul Johnston-Knight Introduction Federal laws and regulations require Federal agencies to reduce water use and improve water efficiency. Namely, Executive Order 13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, requires an annual two percent reduction of water use intensity (water use per square foot of building space) for agency potable water consumption as well as a two percent reduction of water use for industrial, landscaping, and agricultural applica- tions. Cooling towers can be a significant

480

Tunable Electrical and Thermal Transport in Ice-Templated MultiLayer Graphene Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to electrical energy storage,1­3 thermal energy storage,4­13 and composite materials.14­21 Ice applications in thermal and electrical energy storage. Phase change thermal storage seeks to reduce building offsets in energy supply and demand.6 Thermal energy storage is also an appealing way to cool power

Maruyama, Shigeo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tower thermal storage" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Recent AGN Observations by the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground?based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for the detection of very high energy gamma rays from Galactic and extra?galactic sources. By utilizing the large collection area provided by the solar mirrors of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque New Mexico STACEE achieves a low energy threshold around 100 GeV for the detection of gamma rays. We briefly describe the STACEE detector and detail recent observations of Active Galactic Nuclei.

J. Kildea; A. Alabiso; D. A. Bramel; J. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; R. Mukherjee; C. Mueller; R. A. Ong; R. A. Scalzo; D. A. Williams; J. Zweerink

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Evaluating Availability of Networked Storages Using Commercial Workloads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and disk faults into the SAN system, we observe and analyze system availability in terms of performability performability of the two SAN systems under different faulty conditions. It is observed that STICS-based SAN), and storage devices such as disk arrays, tapes, and CD towers etc. Little is understood about the effects

Yang, Qing "Ken"

483

Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Gas hydrate cool storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

485

Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Simulation of thermal stress influence on the Boom Clay kerogen (Oligocene, Belgium) in relation to long-term storage of high activity nuclear waste: I. Study of generated soluble compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Closed pyrolyses were performed on the Boom Clay kerogen to simulate the weak thermal stress applied during the in situ CERBERUS heating experiment (80 °C for 5 a). Two stronger thermal stresses, encompassing the range generally considered for the long-term disposal of high-activity nuclear waste (80 °C for 1 ka and 120 °C for 3 ka), were also simulated. Quantitative and qualitative studies were carried out on the products thus generated with a focus on the C12+ fraction, especially on its polar components. It thus appeared that the soluble C12+ fractions generated during these simulation experiments comprise a wide variety of polar O- and/or N-containing compounds, including carboxylic acids and phenols. The nature and/or the relative abundance of these polar compounds exhibit strong variations, with the extent of the thermal stress, reflecting the primary cracking of different types of structures with different thermal stability and the occurrence of secondary degradation reactions. These observations support the idea that the compounds, generated upon exposure of the Boom Clay kerogen to a low to moderate thermal stress, may affect the effectiveness of the geological barrier upon long-term storage of high-activity nuclear waste.

I. Deniau; S. Derenne; C. Beaucaire; H. Pitsch; C. Largeau

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Model Predictive Control for Energy Efficient Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towers water pumps thermal storage tank water supply water loop system weather low-level MPC Setpoints Solar

Ma, Yudong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Proposed Transmission Towers Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6-1E: Recreation Inset Maps for Map 6-1C and Map 6-1D Proposed Transmission Towers Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route Segments (not drawn to scale) New Access Roads...

489

About the Design & Construction Collaborative Life Sciences Building & Skourtes Tower  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

About the Design & Construction Collaborative Life Sciences Building & Skourtes Tower With an emphasis on connection, the inter-disciplinary, multi-institutional building's design reflects its. Anticipating LEED Platinum rating, the building incorporated sustainable construction practices, including div

Chapman, Michael S.

490

Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Guangzhou West Tower Façade System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guangzhou West Tower is an extremely tall public building. The energy efficiency evaluation of its façade should be different than that of ordinary public buildings. Based on the national code GB50189-2005, “Design Standard for Energy efficiency...

Meng, Q.; Zhang, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cooling Towers - Energy Conservation and Money Making Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The utilization of colder water conserves energy, creates profits, increases product output. In an effort to obtain greater efficiencies and conserve both energy and dollars, all too many engineers neglect the potential of the cooling tower. Many...

Burger, R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

On towers of function fields of Artin-Schreier type  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this article we derive strong conditions on the defining equations of asymptotically good Artin-Schreier towers. We will show that at most three kinds of defining equations can give rise to a recursively de...

Peter Beelen; Arnaldo Garcia 1; 2…

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Dynamics and optimal control of flexible solar updraft towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...control of flexible solar updraft towers...University of New Mexico, , Albuquerque...USA The use of solar chimneys for energy production was...a) Potential energy as a function of...University of New Mexico solar chimney prototype...

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Workers Safely Tear Down Towers at Manhattan Project Site | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

uncontaminated and in a non-posted area. Addthis Related Articles Oak Ridge's K-1206 F Fire Water Tower falls into an empty field during a recent demolition project. Oak Ridge's...

495

Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Don Ana Sun Tower Solar Power Plant Facility Don Ana Sun Tower Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer NRG Energy/eSolar Location Dona Ana County, New Mexico Coordinates 32.485767°, -106.7234639° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.485767,"lon":-106.7234639,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

496

Alpine SunTower Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SunTower Solar Power Plant SunTower Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name Alpine SunTower Solar Power Plant Facility Alpine SunTower Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer NRG Energy/eSolar Location Lancaster, California Coordinates 34.6867846°, -118.1541632° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.6867846,"lon":-118.1541632,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

497

Suppression of the vibrations of wind turbine towers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......suppression of the vibrations of wind turbine towers. As a source of renewable and clean energy, wind power is rapidly increasing its...capacity in many countries. Large offshore turbines are subjected to severe weather......

Xiaowei Zhao; George Weiss

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

2010sr27[cooling_tower_complete].doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Friday, September 17, 2010 Friday, September 17, 2010 james-r.giusti@srs.gov Paivi Nettamo, SRNS, (803) 952-6938 paivi.nettamo@srs.gov K Cooling Tower Project Reaches Completion Aiken, S.C. - One of the most visual milestones of cleanup projects underway within the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management was the demolition of the K-Reactor Cooling Tower at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Now, this American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project has been

499

Parametric study and dynamic analysis of compliant piled towers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PARAMETRIC STUDY AND DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF COMPLIANT PILED TOWERS A Thesis by KARL HEINZ MOOG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree ol' MASTER OF SCIENCE... May f990 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering PARAMETRIC STUDY AND DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF COMPLIANT PILED TOWERS A Thesis by KARL HEINZ MOOG Approved as to style and content by: Jack Lou (Chair of Committee) Ala. n slazzolo (Member) Robert Randall...

Moog, Karl Heinz

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

500

Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: An introduction to freshman composition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REBUILDING THE TOWER OF BABEL: AN INTRODUCTION TO FRESHMAN COMPOSITION A Thesis by KAREN DAVIS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1978... Major Subject: English REBUILDING THE TOWER OF BABEL: AN INTRODUCTION TO FRESHMAN COMPOSITION A Thesis by KAREN DAVIS Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of Department) 7 i +i~ Mem er) (Member) May 1978 ABSTRACT...

Davis, Karen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z