Sample records for tower thermal storage

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  2. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

  5. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  6. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  7. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  8. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  10. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

  11. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' InformationLarge-Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and

  12. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  13. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  14. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R.J.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

  15. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Transactions1971. "Storage of Solar Energy in a Sandy-Gravel Ground,"

  16. Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3NiAl(100). Model NOx storage systems: Storage capacity and thermal aging of BaOtheta- Al2O3...

  17. Systems analysis of thermal storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, R. J.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

  18. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

  20. Lih thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

  1. Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

  2. Concentrating Solar Program; Session: Thermal Storage - Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.; Mehos, M.; Mancini, T.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project overview of this presentation is: (1) description--(a) laboratory R and D in advanced heat transfer fluids (HTF) and thermal storage systems; (b) FOA activities in solar collector and component development for use of molten salt as a heat transfer and storage fluid; (c) applications for all activities include line focus and point focus solar concentrating technologies; (2) Major FY08 Activities--(a) advanced HTF development with novel molten salt compositions with low freezing temperatures, nanofluids molecular modeling and experimental studies, and use with molten salt HTF in solar collector field; (b) thermal storage systems--cost analysis and updates for 2-tank and thermocline storage and model development and analysis to support near-term trought deployment; (c) thermal storage components--facility upgrade to support molten salt component testing for freeze-thaw receiver testing, long-shafted molten salt pump for parabolic trough and power tower thermal storage systems; (d) CSP FOA support--testing and evaluation support for molten salt component and field testing work, advanced fluids and storage solicitation preparation, and proposal evaluation for new advanced HTF and thermal storage FOA.

  3. Second thermal storage applications workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyman, C.E.; Larson, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 7 and 8, 1980, approximately 20 persons representing the management of both the Solar Thermal Power Systems Program (TPS) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Division of Central Solar Technology (CST) and the Thermal Energy Storage Program (TES) of the DOE Division of Energy Storage Systems (STOR) met in San Antonio, Texas, for the Second Thermal Storage Applications Workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to review the joint Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Thermal Applications (TESSTA) Program between CST and STOR and to discuss important issues in implementing it. The meeting began with summaries of the seven major elements of the joint program (six receiver-related, storage development elements, and one advanced technology element). Then, a brief description along with supporting data was given of several issues related to the recent joint multiyear program plan (MYPP). Following this session, the participants were divided into three smaller groups representing the program elements that mainly supported large power, small power, and advanced technology activities. During the afternoon of the first day, each group prioritized the program elements through program budgets and discussed the issues defined as well as others of concern. On the morning of the second day, representatives of each group presented the group's results to the other participants. Major conclusions arising from the workshop are presented regarding program and budget. (LEW)

  4. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," SeminarTHERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGS OF COMMERCIAL

  5. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

  6. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

  7. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solid-fluid heat storage systems in the ground; extractions0 Thermal storage of cold water in ground water aquifers forA. 8 1971, Storage of solar energy in a sandy-gravel ground:

  9. Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

    THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

  10. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

  11. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  12. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

  13. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  14. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

  15. Solar energy thermalization and storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

  16. Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial sector marketing efforts, are synthesized into a set of lessons of experience and guidelines for those who are considering developing a thermal storage marketing effort....

  17. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

  18. The Role of Thermal Energy Storage in Industrial Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Storage for Industrial Applications is a major thrust of the Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with process or reject heat recovery systems has been shown to be extremely...

  19. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  20. Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation University of South Florida logo...

  1. U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003 U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES)...

  2. Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer Fluid Containment Materials Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat Transfer...

  3. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Infinia logo Infinia,...

  4. Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power...

  5. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

  6. Dish Sterling High Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage Sandia National Laboratories SNLAndrakaA: FY13Q2: Charles E. Andraka * 2-D PCM model extended to include realistic heat pipe boundary...

  7. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric generation plant for a co-generation program utilizing Thermalthermal energy storage would make it possible to produce heat as a by- product of electric generation,thermal storage at suffi- ciently high temperature and pressure, and with suffi- cient transfer rates, that electric power generation

  8. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

  9. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis

  10. Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

  11. Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

  12. LiH thermal energy storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

  13. Selecting Thermal Storage Systems for Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, C. L.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement at six equally spaced elevations. Charged by chiller or hydronic vent cycle. B. Hot Water Storage Tank - Concrete lined steel 17,000 gallon with four headers arranged for dual temperature storage. C. Chiller - Variable frequency drive, 196... for Thermal Storage Projects since 1985: KW SCHOOL REDUCTION Kimball E.S. 7 1 Poteet H.S. 210 Phases I & I1 AC New M.S. 18 4 Pirrung E.S. 7 6 Poteet H.S. 14 0 Phase I11 Kimball E.S. 2 0 Phase I1 Black E.S. 3 7 Cannaday E.S. 9 0 Austin E.S. 94 N...

  14. Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) investigates materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include the discovery and evaluation of candidate fluids and phase-change materials (PCM) to serve as thermal energy storage media in the temperature range of 300 C to 800 C. Knowledge of thermophysical properties such as melting point, heat of fusion, density, viscosity, thermal stability are essential for understanding how candidate materials could be deployed in CSP plants. The laboratory runs high-temperature instruments for the analysis of thermophysical properties. Small samples of candidate materials are prepared and characterized using differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and other specialized analytical methods. Instrumentation capabilities are being expanded to allow for analysis of samples up to 1,200 C. Higher temperature operation is one method to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of CSP systems.

  15. Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Storage Technology for Transportation and Other Applications D. Bank, M. Maurer, J. Penkala, K. Sehanobish, A. Soukhojak Thermal Energy Storage Technology for Transportation...

  16. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    storage methods that would be applicable for large-scale implementation of thermal energy storage. The team aims to: Develop two methodologies with different designs and...

  17. EXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of concentrator solar thermal systems because-scale thermal energy storage via hot compressed liquid water. Such a cycle is potentially interesting becauseEXERGETIC ANALYSIS OF A STEAM-FLASHING THERMAL STORAGE SYSTEM Paul T. O'Brien 1 , and John Pye 2 1

  18. Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The team’s design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

  19. Molten Glass for Thermal Storage: Advanced Molten Glass for Heat Transfer and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: Halotechnics is developing a high-temperature thermal energy storage system using a new thermal-storage and heat-transfer material: earth-abundant and low-melting-point molten glass. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Halotechnics new thermal storage material targets a price that is potentially cheaper than the molten salt used in most commercial solar thermal storage systems today. It is also extremely stable at temperatures up to 1200°C—hundreds of degrees hotter than the highest temperature molten salt can handle. Being able to function at high temperatures will significantly increase the efficiency of turning heat into electricity. Halotechnics is developing a scalable system to pump, heat, store, and discharge the molten glass. The company is leveraging technology used in the modern glass industry, which has decades of experience handling molten glass.

  20. Thermal Storage Systems at IBM Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, G.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, IBM commissioned its first large scale thermal storage system with a capacity of 2.7 million gallons of chilled water and 1.2 million gallons of reclaimed, low temperature hot water. The stored cooling energy represents approximately 27...

  1. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencethe Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed by

  2. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment  of  Thermal  Energy   Storage  under  Diverse  Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems and applicationsin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  3. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194.Mathematical modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers,of Current Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in

  4. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence Berkeleythe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  5. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrencewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  6. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcoupled with thermal energy storage," Applied Energy, vol.N. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  7. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicolas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2012. [8] Dincer I. On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, InternationalLF. Overview of thermal energy storage (TES) potential

  8. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

  9. Modeling of Thermal Storage Systems in MILP Distributed Energy Resource Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steen, David

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential materials for thermal energy storage in buildingcogeneration coupled with thermal energy storage," AppliedN. Fumo, "Benefits of thermal energy storage option combined

  10. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

  11. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

  12. Gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael Ray (Knoxville, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon fiber carbon matrix hybrid adsorbent monolith with enhanced thermal conductivity for storing and releasing gas through adsorption and desorption is disclosed. The heat of adsorption of the gas species being adsorbed is sufficiently large to cause hybrid monolith heating during adsorption and hybrid monolith cooling during desorption which significantly reduces the storage capacity of the hybrid monolith, or efficiency and economics of a gas separation process. The extent of this phenomenon depends, to a large extent, on the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent hybrid monolith. This invention is a hybrid version of a carbon fiber monolith, which offers significant enhancements to thermal conductivity and potential for improved gas separation and storage systems.

  13. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

  14. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-15A NA7.5.14 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) System THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE (TES) SYSTEM ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-15A (Revised 07/10) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  15. TIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Xiao

    energy efficiency of data centers housing storage clusters. Disks have non-negligible thermal impactTIGER:Thermal-Aware File Assignment in Storage Clusters Ajit Chavan, Xunfei Jiang, Mohemmad I/O performance. I. INTRODUCTION Thermal management for power-dense storage clusters can address cooling problems

  16. Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids— substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system during the day and released at night—when the sun is not shining—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAX’s system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

  17. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  18. Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legalization of Ground Water Storage," Water Resourcesprocedure to above ground storage of heat in huge insulatedthis project is heat storage in ground-water regions storage

  20. Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

  1. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

  2. Computational Study on Thermal Properties of HVAC System with Building Structure Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Y.; Sagara, N.; Ryu, Y.; Maehara, K.; Nagai, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building structure thermal storage (BSTS) HVAC systems can store heat during nighttime thermal storage operation (nighttime operation hours) by using off-peak electricity and release it in the daytime air-conditioning operation (daytime operation...

  3. Thermal Energy Storage for Vacuum Precoolers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nugent, D. M.

    for load shifting. Using thermal energy storage results in a load shift of 174.5 kw. With TES, total energy consumption and operating costs are reduced by $13,400 per season. This is a result of low off-peak energy rates and increased compressor... because the compressors ran fully loaded, had a higher average suction temperature, a lower average discharge pressure, and benefitted from increased subcooling. The average on-peak COP was 4.36. On-peak head pressures as high as 204.2 psig were...

  4. Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

  5. Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials that can be used as high-temperature heat transfer fluids or thermal energy storage media in concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. Research objectives include...

  6. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    studies Goal: * Demonstrate the feasibility of significant thermal storage for dish Stirling systems to leverage their existing high performance to greater capacity * Demonstrate...

  7. Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids and Novel Thermal Storage Concepts...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    were selected under this competitive solicitation: Abengoa: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants Acciona Solar: Indirect,...

  8. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1975. Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test.1975. "Underground Storage of Treated Water: A Field Test,"

  9. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fact sheet describing NREL CSP Program capabilities in the area of thermal storage and advanced heat transfer fluids: measuring thermophysical properties, measuring fluid flow and heat transfer, and simulating flow of thermal energy and fluid.

  10. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  11. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  12. Optimization of Ice Thermal Storage Systems Design for HVAC Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nassif, N.; Hall, C.; Freelnad, D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice thermal storage is promising technology to reduce energy costs by shifting the cooling cost from on-peak to off-peak periods. The paper discusses the optimal design of ice thermal storage and its impact on energy consumption, demand, and total...

  13. Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Eurotherm Seminar #99 Advances in Thermal Energy Storage 1 EUROTHERM99-01-103 Convection Energy Storage 2 Nussel number. This study shows that an increase in the convection coefficient leads in this paper consists in horizontal PCM plates separated by an air flow. This is a storage system dedicated

  14. Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

  15. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    must be if mal energy storage technologies as means for con-Robert Thorne. Energy Storage is more technology-orientedEnergy with Heat Storage Wells," Environmental Science and Technology,

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal energy storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy storage Sandia Solar Energy Test System Cited in National Engineering Competition On May 16, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  17. MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    experimental Thermal energy storage in confined aquifers. ©lAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

  18. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N ATIONAL L ABORATORY Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, International

  19. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20, 2012. I. Dincer, On thermal energy storage systems andin research on cold thermal energy storage, Internationalpp177–189, 2002. [PG&E] Thermal Energy Storage Strategies

  20. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    23.11.2014Ćbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers Ron Zevenhoven Ćbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/36 7.1 Humid air #12;23.11.2014 Ćbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow

  1. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  2. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HAUSZ, W. , 1977. "Seasonal Storage in District Heating,"District Heating, July-August-September, 1977, pp. 5-11.aquifer storage for district heating and cooling. C. W.

  3. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for LWR Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of enough cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. The issues become more severe due to the new round of nuclear power expansion and global warming. During hot summer days, cooling water leaving a power plant may become too hot to threaten aquatic life so that environmental regulations may force the plant to reduce power output or even temporarily to be shutdown. For new nuclear power plants to be built at areas without enough cooling water, dry cooling can be used to remove waste heat directly into the atmosphere. However, dry cooling will result in much lower thermal efficiency when the weather is hot. One potential solution for the above mentioned issues is to use ice thermal storage systems (ITS) that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses those ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS is suitable for supplemental cooling storage due to its very high energy storage density. ITS also provides a way to shift large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. Some gas turbine plants already use ITS to increase thermal efficiency during peak hours in summer. ITSs have also been widely used for building cooling to save energy cost. Among three cooling methods for LWR applications: once-through, wet cooling tower, and dry cooling tower, once-through cooling plants near a large water body like an ocean or a large lake and wet cooling plants can maintain the designed turbine backpressure (or condensation temperature) during 99% of the time; therefore, adding ITS to those plants will not generate large benefits. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body like a river or a small lake, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ice thermal storage systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss and water consumption during hot weather so that new LWRs could be considered in regions without enough cooling water. \\ This paper presents the feasibility study of using ice thermal storage systems for LWR supplemental cooling and peak power shifting. LWR cooling issues and ITS application status will be reviewed. Two ITS application case studies will be presented and compared with alternative options: one for once-through cooling without enough cooling for short time, and the other with dry cooling. Because capital cost, especially the ice storage structure/building cost, is the major cost for ITS, two different cost estimation models are developed: one based on scaling method, and the other based on a preliminary design using Building Information Modeling (BIM), an emerging technology in Architecture/Engineering/Construction, which enables design options, performance analysis and cost estimating in the early design stage.

  4. The Strong Case for Thermal Energy Storage and Utility Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L. W.

    construction costs, more stringent regulations, and increasing environmental constraints regarding development of new generating facilities. As the thermal cooling storage technology has matured, more and more utilities are recognizing that widespread use...

  5. Energy Storage R&D - Thermal Management Studies and Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review Energy Storage R&D Thermal Management Studies and Modeling Ahmad A. Pesaran, Ph. D. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado February 25-28, 2008 DOE...

  6. An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Glenn Baker

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in the storage material. Telkes and Raymond [1] investigated storing thermal energy in a sodium sulfate solution contained in sealed drums. Other salt solutions were tested [2], providing further evidence that phase-change materials are capable...

  7. An investigation of cement mortar thermal storage characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Glenn Baker

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    change in the storage material. Telkes and Raymond [1] investigated storing thermal energy in a sodium sulfate solution contained in sealed drums. Other salt solutions were tested [2], providing further evidence that phase-change materials are capable...

  8. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1985-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls, Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  9. Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

    1986-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, an exterior transparent panel having a heat mirror surface substantially covering the exterior surface thereof and associated top, bottom and side walls. Evaporation of the thermal storage liquid is controlled by a low vapor pressure liquid layer that floats on and seals the top surface of the liquid. Porous filter plugs are placed in filler holes of the module. An algicide and a chelating compound are added to the liquid to control biological and chemical activity while retaining visual clarity. A plurality of modules may be supported in stacked relation by a support frame to form a thermal storage wall structure.

  10. Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niehus, T. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper...

  11. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

  12. COUPLING SUPERCRITICAL AND SUPERHEATED DIRECT STEAM GENERATION WITH THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COUPLING SUPERCRITICAL AND SUPERHEATED DIRECT STEAM GENERATION WITH THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Joe a suitable turbine available. Overall, energy transport and storage concepts are presented that maximise dishes, in particular, minimisation of molten salt quantities in storage, and maximisation of thermal

  13. Storage and Retrieval of Thermal Light in Warm Atomic Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Wook Cho; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report slowed propagation and storage and retrieval of thermal light in warm rubidium vapor using the effect of electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We first demonstrate slowed-propagation of the probe thermal light beam through an EIT medium by measuring the second-order correlation function of the light field using the Hanbury-Brown$-$Twiss interferometer. We also report an experimental study on the effect of the EIT slow-light medium on the temporal coherence of thermal light. Finally, we demonstrate the storage and retrieval of thermal light beam in the EIT medium. The direct measurement of the photon number statistics of the retrieved light field shows that the photon number statistics is preserved during the storage and retrieval process.

  14. Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

  15. THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~Symposium, "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy 11 , Amsterdam,TNO~Symposium "Thermal Storage of Solar Energy" 5~6 NovemberSolar Energy, Office of Advanced Conservation Technology, Division of Thermal

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal storage

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Received Entrepreneurial Spirit Awards On April 3, 2013, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events, Renewable...

  17. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    National Laboratories Amir Faghri, University of Connecticut Judith Gomez, NREL National Solar Thermal Test Facility: World Class Capabilities at Your Service Testing 5MW...

  18. Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Thermal Storage with Conventional Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGee, E. E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand which results in lower electrical costs. The effectiveness of this 'Thermal Retention System" is determined by its design characteristics, its operational efficiency and comparative system analysis. Today's computer technology has provided...

  20. Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reilly, R.W.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

  1. Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neti, Sudhakar; Oztekin, Alparslan; Chen, John; Tuzla, Kemal; Misiolek, Wojciech

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies that are to be developed in this work will enable storage of thermal energy in 100 MWe solar energy plants for 6-24 hours at temperatures around 300oC and 850oC using encapsulated phase change materials (EPCM). Several encapsulated phase change materials have been identified, fabricated and proven with calorimetry. Two of these materials have been tested in an airflow experiment. A cost analysis for these thermal energy storage systems has also been conducted that met the targets established at the initiation of the project.

  2. Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  3. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demonstrated how well a molten salt thermal storage systembased CSP plant. Cold molten salt is pumped from a largetemperature and send to a hot molten salt tank. Salt is then

  4. Modeling of thermal energy storage in groundwater aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, David Bryan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , nuclear fission, fusion, geo- thermal energy, and solar energy as potential alternate energy sources to replace natural gas and oil. Of these, soIar energy is one of the most promisino alternate energy sources for space heating and cooling. Solar...MODELING OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN GROUNDWATER AQUIFERS A Thesis by DAVID BRYAN REED Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979...

  5. Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

    1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

  6. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  7. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  8. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  9. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  10. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  11. Thermal energy storage for cooling of commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Altos, CA (USA))

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of coolness'' has been in use in limited applications for more than a half century. Recently, because of high electricity costs during utilities' peak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a prime target for load management strategies. Systems with cool storage shift all or part of the electricity requirement from peak to off-peak hours to take advantage of reduced demand charges and/or off-peak rates. Thermal storage technology applies equally to industrial, commercial, and residential sectors. In the industrial sector, because of the lack of economic incentives and the custom design required for each application, the penetration of this technology has been limited to a few industries. The penetration rate in the residential sector has been also very limited due to the absence of economic incentives, sizing problems, and the lack of compact packaged systems. To date, the most promising applications of these systems, therefore, appear to be for commercial cooling. In this report, the current and potential use of thermal energy storage systems for cooling commercial buildings is investigated. In addition, a general overview of the technology is presented and the applicability and cost-effectiveness of this technology for developed and developing countries are discussed. 28 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  13. Thermal Storage Applications for Commercial/Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knipp, R. L.

    of the future may yet en courage such unique designs. For more information: Richard N. Poirier CBI Industries (815) 436-2912 I'it,jure 7 CASCADED CARBONDIOXIDE THERMAL STORAGE llYSTEM TRIPLE POINT OF CO2 (60 PSIG) (-7Oo...

  14. Continuous Commissioning(SM) of a Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, W. D.; Liu, M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be costly, which can result in turning on chillers during on-peak hours in order to provide cooling to the buildings. In this paper the optimization of a thermal storage system operation through Continuous CommissioningSM is presented. Detailed building...

  15. Transient-heat-transfer and stress analysis of a thermal-storage solar cooker module

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zengeni, Hazel C

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details the analysis carried out in Solidworks to determine the best material and configuration of a thermal-storage solar cooker module.The thermal-storage solar cooker utilizes the high-latent-heat lithium ...

  16. Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in District Energy Utility Applications, June 2005 Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

  17. Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District Energy Systems, May 2005 Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use in Campus District...

  18. Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap Effect of Thermal Aging on NO oxidation and NOx storage in a Fully-Formulated Lean NOx Trap...

  19. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    could be acquired, e.g. battery storage, the costs for whichlead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, withis limited by battery size - Heat storage is limited by

  20. Design and installation manual for thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R L; Nield, K J; Rohde, R R; Wolosewicz, R M

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this manual is to provide information on the design and installation of thermal energy storage in active solar systems. It is intended for contractors, installers, solar system designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the solar energy business. The reader should have general knowledge of how solar heating and cooling systems operate and knowledge of construction methods and building codes. Knowledge of solar analysis methods such as f-Chart, SOLCOST, DOE-1, or TRNSYS would be helpful. The information contained in the manual includes sizing storage, choosing a location for the storage device, and insulation requirements. Both air-based and liquid-based systems are covered with topics on designing rock beds, tank types, pump and fan selection, installation, costs, and operation and maintenance. Topics relevant to latent heat storage include properties of phase-change materials, sizing the storage unit, insulating the storage unit, available systems, and cost. Topics relevant to heating domestic water include safety, single- and dual-tank systems, domestic water heating with air- and liquid-based space heating systems, and stand alone domestics hot water systems. Several appendices present common problems with storage systems and their solutions, heat transfer fluid properties, economic insulation thickness, heat exchanger sizing, and sample specifications for heat exchangers, wooden rock bins, steel tanks, concrete tanks, and fiberglass-reinforced plastic tanks.

  1. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  2. Exergetic analysis of a steam-flashing thermal storage Paul T. O'Brien

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @vipac.com.au 2 PhD, Australian National University ABSTRACT Thermal energy storage is attractive in the design of the performance of a cycle that uses large-scale thermal energy storage via hot compressed liquid waterExergetic analysis of a steam-flashing thermal storage system Paul T. O'Brien 1 and John Pye 2 1

  3. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  4. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  5. New phase-change thermal energy storage materials for buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, D.K.; Christensen, C.B.; Burrows, R.W.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of phase-change thermal energy storage materials is under development at SERI. These materials are unusual in two ways. They reversibly absorb large amounts of heat during a solid-state, crystal transformation more than 70/sup 0/C below their melting temperatures, and their solid-state transformation temperatures may be adjusted over a range from 7/sup 0/C to 188/sup 0/C by varying the ratios of binary mixtures of the components. Because these storage materials remain solid throughout the range of their service temperatures, unique opportunities exist for incorporating them into building materials. Composites have been made with ordinary, porous construction materials such as wood, gypsum board, and lightweight concrete as the matrix and with the solid-state phase change materials (SS PCM) filling the void space. The thermal storage capacities of such composites are thereby increased by more than 100% without changing the basic nature and workability of the matrix, construction material. Parametric analyses have been conducted to determine what combination of properties would be optimum for certain solar and energy conserving building applications including Trombe wall, direct gain, and distributed cool storage (combined with night ventilation).

  6. Futurestock'2003 9 International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    381 Futurestock'2003 9 th International Conference on Thermal Energy Storage, Warsaw, POLAND is also needed when designing a BTES (Borehole Thermal Energy Storage) system. The ground thermal Thermal Response Test for BTES Applications - State of the Art 2001 Signhild GEHLIN1 and Jeff D. SPITLER2

  7. Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbari, H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trates a design load profile for a partial storage system.load management / full storage / ice storage / partialfor partial storage) because part of the cooling load is

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

  9. Similarity and generalized analysis of efficiencies of thermal energy storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peiwen Li; Jon Van Lew; Cholik Chan; Wafaa Karaki; Jake Stephens; J. E. O'Brien

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examined the features of three typical thermal storage systems including: (1) direct storage of heat transfer fluid in containers, (2) storage of thermal energy in a packed bed of solid filler material, with energy being carried in/out by a flowing heat transfer fluid which directly contacts the packed bed, and (3) a system in which heat transfer fluid flows through tubes that are imbedded into a thermal storage material which may be solid, liquid, or a mixture of the two. The similarity of the three types of thermal storage systems was discussed, and generalized energy storage governing equations were introduced in both dimensional and dimensionless forms. The temperatures of the heat transfer fluid during energy charge and discharge processes and the overall energy storage efficiencies were studied through solution of the energy storage governing equations. Finally, provided in the paper are a series of generalized charts bearing curves for energy storage effectiveness against four dimensionless parameters grouped up from many of the thermal storage system properties including dimensions, fluid and thermal storage material properties, as well as the operational conditions including mass flow rate of the fluid, and the ratio of energy charge and discharge time periods. Engineers can conveniently look up the charts to design and calibrate the size of thermal storage tanks and operational conditions without doing complicated individual modeling and computations. It is expected that the charts will serve as standard tools for thermal storage system design and calibration.

  10. Tokyo Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William; Ashworth, William

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Scanning the skyline of the Japanese capital today, it's hard to catch sight of Tokyo Tower. Modeled on the Eiffel Tower and 333 meters in height, the orange-and-white landmark is the world's tallest self-supporting steel...

  11. PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS IN FLOOR TILES FOR THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas C. Hittle

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive solar systems integrated into residential structures significantly reduce heating energy consumption. Taking advantage of latent heat storage has further increased energy savings. This is accomplished by the incorporation of phase change materials into building materials used in passive applications. Trombe walls, ceilings and floors can all be enhanced with phase change materials. Increasing the thermal storage of floor tile by the addition of encapsulated paraffin wax is the proposed topic of research. Latent heat storage of a phase change material (PCM) is obtained during a change in phase. Typical materials use the latent heat released when the material changes from a liquid to a solid. Paraffin wax and salt hydrates are examples of such materials. Other PCMs that have been recently investigated undergo a phase transition from one solid form to another. During this process they will release heat. These are known as solid-state phase change materials. All have large latent heats, which makes them ideal for passive solar applications. Easy incorporation into various building materials is must for these materials. This proposal will address the advantages and disadvantages of using these materials in floor tile. Prototype tile will be made from a mixture of quartz, binder and phase change material. The thermal and structural properties of the prototype tiles will be tested fully. It is expected that with the addition of the phase change material the structural properties will be compromised to some extent. The ratio of phase change material in the tile will have to be varied to determine the best mixture to provide significant thermal storage, while maintaining structural properties that meet the industry standards for floor tile.

  12. Thermal Analysis of a Dry Storage Concept for Capsule Dry Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOSEPHSON, W S

    2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are 1,936 cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) capsules stored in pools at the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). These capsules will be moved to dry storage on the Hanford Site as an interim measure to reduce risk. The Cs/Sr Capsule Dry Storage Project is conducted under the assumption that the capsules will eventually be moved to the repository at Yucca Mountain, and the design criteria include requirements that will facilitate acceptance at the repository. The storage system must also permit retrieval of capsules in the event that vitrification of the capsule contents is pursued. The Capsule Advisory Panel (CAP) was created by the Project Manager for the Hanford Site Capsule Dry Storage Project (CDSP). The purpose of the CAP is to provide specific technical input to the CDSP; to identify design requirements; to ensure design requirements for the project are conservative and defensible; to identify and resolve emerging, critical technical issues, as requested; and to support technical reviews performed by regulatory organizations, as requested. The CAP will develop supporting and summary documents that can be used as part of the technical and safety bases for the CDSP. The purpose of capsule dry storage thermal analysis is to: (1) Summarize the pertinent thermal design requirements sent to vendors, (2) Summarize and address the assumptions that underlie those design requirements, (3) Demonstrate that an acceptable design exists that satisfies the requirements, (4) Identify key design features and phenomena that promote or impede design success, (5) Support other CAP analyses such as corrosion and integrity evaluations, and (6) Support the assessment of proposed designs. It is not the purpose of this report to optimize or fully analyze variations of postulated acceptable designs. The present evaluation will indicate the impact of various possible design features, but not systematically pursue design improvements obtainable through analysis refinements and/or relaxation of conservatisms. However, possible design improvements will be summarized for future application. All assumptions and related design features, while appropriate for conceptual designs, must be technically justified for the final design. The pertinent thermal design requirements and underlying assumptions are summarized in Section 1.3. The majority of the thermal analyses, as described in Sections 4.2 and 4.3, focus on an acceptable conceptual design arrived at by refinement of a preliminary but unacceptable design. The results of the subject thermal analyses, as presented in Section 4.0, satisfy items 3 and 4 above.

  13. Development of Thermal Analysis Capability of Dry Storage Cask for Spend Fuel Interim Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu-Kuang Ko; Liang, Thomas K.S.; Chung-Yu Yang [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As most of the nuclear power plants, on-site spent fuel pools (SFP) of Taiwan's plants were not originally designed with a storage capacity for all the spent fuel generated over the operating life by their reactors. For interim spent fuel storage, dry casks are one of the most reliable measures to on-site store over-filled assemblies from SFPs. The NUHOMS{sup R}-52B System consisting of a canister stored horizontally in a concrete module is selected for thermal evaluation in this paper. The performance of each cask in criticality, radioactive, material and thermal needs to be carefully addressed to ensure its enduring safety. Regarding the thermal features of dry storage casks, three different kinds of heat transfer mechanisms are involved, which include natural convection heat transfer outside and/or inside the canister, radiation heat transfer inside and outside the canister, and conduction heat transfer inside the canister. To analyze the thermal performance of dry storage casks, RELAP5-3D is adopted to calculate the natural air convection and radiation heat transfer outside the canister to the ambient environment, and ANSYS is applied to calculate the internal conduction and radiation heat transfer. During coupling iteration between codes, the heat energy across the canister wall needs to be conserved, and the inner wall temperature of the canister needs to be converged. By the coupling of RELAP5-3D and ANSYS, the temperature distribution within each fuel assembly inside canisters can be calculated and the peaking cladding temperature can be identified. (authors)

  14. Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation system leads to higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiency. However, in a CSP system, higher operating temperature also leads to greater thermal losses. These two effects combine to give an optimal system-level operating temperature that may be less than the upper operating temperature limit of system components. The overall efficiency may be improved by developing materials, power cycles, and system-integration strategies that enable operation at elevated temperature while limiting thermal losses. This is particularly true for the TES system and its components. Meeting the SunShot cost target will require cost and performance improvements in all systems and components within a CSP plant. Solar collector field hardware will need to decrease significantly in cost with no loss in performance and possibly with performance improvements. As higher temperatures are considered for the power block, new working fluids, heat-transfer fluids (HTFs), and storage fluids will all need to be identified to meet these new operating conditions. Figure 1 shows thermodynamic conversion efficiency as a function of temperature for the ideal Carnot cycle and 75% Carnot, which is considered to be the practical efficiency attainable by current power cycles. Current conversion efficiencies for the parabolic trough steam cycle, power tower steam cycle, parabolic dish/Stirling, Ericsson, and air-Brayton/steam Rankine combined cycles are shown at their corresponding operating temperatures. Efficiencies for supercritical steam and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) are also shown for their operating temperature ranges.

  15. Assessment and Prediction of the Thermal Performance of a Centralized Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Utilizing Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sawi, A.; Haghighat, F.; Akbari, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation tool is developed to analyze the thermal performance of a centralized latent heat thermal energy storage system (LHTES) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The LHTES system is integrated with a mechanical ventilation system...

  16. technology offer SandTES -High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    technology offer SandTES - High Temperature Sand Thermal Energy Storage key words: High Temperature Energy Storage | Fluidized Bed | Sand | The invention consists of a fluidized bed with internal heat together with Dr. Eisl of ENRAG GmbH. Background Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are essential

  17. Short term thermal energy storage Institut fr Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart, FRG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    477 Short term thermal energy storage A. Abhat Institut fĂŒr Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme the problem of short term thermal energy storage for low temperature solar heating applications. The techniques of sensible and latent heat storage are discussed, with particular emphasis on the latter

  18. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV`s) in S area. The FESV`s are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request.

  19. Conceptual design and engineering studies of adiabatic compressed air energy storage (CAES) with thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobson, M. J.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to perform a conceptual engineering design and evaluation study and to develop a design for an adiabatic CAES system using water-compensated hard rock caverns for compressed air storage. The conceptual plant design was to feature underground containment for thermal energy storage and water-compensated hard rock caverns for high pressure air storage. Other design constraints included the selection of turbomachinery designs that would require little development and would therefore be available for near-term plant construction and demonstration. The design was to be based upon the DOE/EPRI/PEPCO-funded 231 MW/unit conventional CAES plant design prepared for a site in Maryland. This report summarizes the project, its findings, and the recommendations of the study team; presents the development and optimization of the plant heat cycle and the selection and thermal design of the thermal energy storage system; discusses the selection of turbomachinery and estimated plant performance and operational capability; describes the control system concept; and presents the conceptual design of the adiabatic CAES plant, the cost estimates and economic evaluation, and an assessment of technical and economic feasibility. Particular areas in the plant design requiring further development or investigation are discussed. It is concluded that the adiabatic concept appears to be the most attractive candidate for utility application in the near future. It is operationally viable, economically attractive compared with competing concerns, and will require relatively little development before the construction of a plant can be undertaken. It is estimated that a utility could start the design of a demonstration plant in 2 to 3 years if research regarding TES system design is undertaken in a timely manner. (LCL)

  20. Solar-thermal-energy collection/storage-pond system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blahnik, D.E.

    1982-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A solar thermal energy collection and storage system is disclosed. Water is contained, and the water surface is exposed directly to the sun. The central part of an impermeable membrane is positioned below the water's surface and above its bottom with a first side of the membrane pointing generally upward in its central portion. The perimeter part of the membrane is placed to create a watertight boundary separating the water into a first volume which is directly exposable to the sun and which touches the membranes first side, and a second volumn which touches the membranes second side. A salt is dissolved in the first water volume.

  1. Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint slide deck was originally presented at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power Program Review by Paul Denholm and Mark Mehos of NREL on April 23, 2013. Entitled "Quantifying the Value of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage," the presenters seek to answer the question, "What is the addition of TES to a CSP plant actually worth?" Ultimately they conclude that CSP with TES can actually complement other variable generation sources including solar PV and act as an enabling technology to achieve higher overall penetration of renewable energy.

  2. Bibliography of the seasonal thermal energy storage library

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prater, L.S.; Casper, G.; Kawin, R.A.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Listing is arranged alphabetically by the last name of the first author. Each citation includes the author's name, title, publisher, publication date, and where applicable, the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) number or other document number. The number preceding each citation is the identification number for that document in the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Library. Occasionally, one or two alphabetic characters are added to the identification number. These alphabetic characters indicate that the document is contained in a collection of papers, such as the proceedings of a conference. An Author Index and an Identification Number Index are included. (WHK)

  3. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energy and Buildings, [of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage A.of a solar-assisted HVAC system with thermal storage. Energy

  4. Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sioshansi, R.; Denholm, P.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the value of concentrating solar power (CSP) and thermal energy storage (TES) in four regions in the southwestern United States. Our analysis shows that TES can increase the value of CSP by allowing more thermal energy from a CSP plant?s solar field to be used, by allowing a CSP plant to accommodate a larger solar field, and by allowing CSP generation to be shifted to hours with higher energy prices. We analyze the sensitivity of CSP value to a number of factors, including the optimization period, price and solar forecasting, ancillary service sales, capacity value and dry cooling of the CSP plant. We also discuss the value of CSP plants and TES net of capital costs.

  5. Study on Commissioning Process for Control Logic of Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shioya, M.; Tsubaki, M.; Nakahara, N.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermal storage system in an actual building using the CLT. Introduction In thermal storage systems, as large temperature difference between the supply water and the return water as possible should be maintained in order to ensure high system..., at the secondary water circuit of a heat exchanger installed between the thermal storage system and secondary HVAC system of an actual building. One of the authors, Nakahara, acted as Commissioning Authority during construction phase and later as a consultant...

  6. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many commercial buildings need heat in one part and, at the same time, cooling in another part. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If that energy could be shifted or stored for later use, significant energy might be saved. If a building's heating and cooling subsystems could be integrated with the building's structural mass and used to collect, store, and deliver energy, the energy might be save cost-effectively. To explore this opportunity, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) examined the thermal interactions between the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and the structure of a commercial building. Computer models were developed to simulate the interactions in an existing building located in Seattle, Washington, to determine how these building subsystems could be integrated to improve energy efficiency. The HVAC subsystems in the existing building were modeled. These subsystems consist of decentralized water-source heat pumps (WSHP) in a closed water loop, connected to cooling towers for heat rejection during cooling mode and boilers to augment heating. An initial base case'' computer model of the Seattle building, as-built, was developed. Metered data available for the building were used to calibrate this model to ensure that the analysis would provide information that closely reflected the operation of a real building. The HVAC system and building structure were integrated in the model using the concrete floor slabs as thermal storage media. The slabs may be actively charged during off-peak periods with the chilled water in the loop and then either actively or passively discharged into the conditioned space during peak periods. 21 refs., 37 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of sealed storage cask containing spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitten, P.F.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PWR spent fuel assembly was encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in a instrumented above surface storage cell during December 1978 for thermal testing. Instrumentation provided to measure canister, liner and concrete temperatures consisted of thermocouples which were inserted into tubes on the outside of the canister and liner and in three radial positions in the concrete. Temperatures from the SSC test assembly have been recorded throughout the past 16 months. Canister and liner temperatures have reached their peak values of 200{sup 0}F and 140{sup 0}F, respectively. Computer predictions of the transient and steady-state temperatures show good agreement with the test data.

  8. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of an evaluation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with simple gas turbine cogeneration systems. The TES system captures and stores thermal energy from the gas turbine exhaust for immediate or future generation of process heat. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers the following two significant advantages: (1) Electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced; (2) Although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The study evaluated the cost of power produced by cogeneration and cogeneration/TES systems designed to serve a fixed process steam load. The value of the process steam was set at the levelized cost estimated for the steam from a conventional stand-alone boiler. Power costs for combustion turbine and combined-cycle power plants were also calculated for comparison. The results indicated that peak power production costs for the cogeneration/TES systems were between 25% and 40% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combustion turbine and between 15% and 35% lower than peak power costs estimated for a combined-cycle plant. The ranges reflect differences in the daily power production schedule and process steam pressure/temperature assumptions for the cases evaluated. Further cost reductions may result from optimization of current cogeneration/TES system designs and improvement in TES technology through future research and development.

  9. Energy Storage R&D: Thermal Management Studies and Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we summarize NREL's FY09 energy storage R&D studies in the areas of 1. thermal characterization and analysis, 2. cost, life, and performance trade-off studies, and 3. thermal abuse modeling.

  10. Title COMBINATION OF THERMAL SOLAR COLLECTORS, HEAT PUMP AND THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR DWELLINGS IN BELGIUM.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contact Raf; De Herdt; Roel De Coninck; Filip Van Den Schoor; Lieve Helsen

    The amount of available solar energy in Belgium is more than sufficient to meet local heat demand for space heating and domestic hot water in a dwelling. However, the timing of both the availability of solar energy and the need for thermal energy, match only to a limited extent. Therefore, compact storage of the surplus of thermal energy is a critical issue. Depending on the temperature at which this energy is available, directly from the sun or indirectly through the storage, different combinations with a heat pump can be considered. By combining solar energy with a heat pump one may benefit on both sides since the fraction of solar energy increases as well as the performance of the heat pump. The aim of this thesis is to select the best out of three configurations that combine thermal solar collectors, heat pump and thermal energy storage for heating purposes in dwellings in Belgium, based on model simulations. Energetic, exergetic and economic criteria are used to evaluate the different configurations, while thermal comfort and domestic hot water tap profiles should be met. One (or more) performance index (indices) is (are) defined enabling an objective comparison between different systems. Today several systems are already commercially available on the international market [4]. Since these systems consist of different components, the system design is a crucial issue. Therefore, special attention should be paid to the sizing of the individual components, the interaction of the components within the global system, and the strategy for operational control. To study the interaction with the building, three types of buildings (already defined in a previous project) are considered.

  11. Thermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurumurthi, Sudhanva

    temperature, known as the thermal envelope. Exceeding the thermal envelope decreases the drive's reliability relationship between disk RPM and viscous heating. If the drive exceeds the thermal envelope, the drive canThermal Attacks on Storage Systems Nathanael Paul Sudhanva Gurumurthi David Evans University

  12. Advanced Thermal Storage for Central Receivers with Supercritical Coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Bruce D.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal objective of the study is to determine if supercritical heat transport fluids in a central receiver power plant, in combination with ceramic thermocline storage systems, offer a reduction in levelized energy cost over a baseline nitrate salt concept. The baseline concept uses a nitrate salt receiver, two-tank (hot and cold) nitrate salt thermal storage, and a subcritical Rankine cycle. A total of 6 plant designs were analyzed, as follows: Plant Designation Receiver Fluid Thermal Storage Rankine Cycle Subcritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Subcritical Supercritical nitrate salt Nitrate salt Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical Low temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature H2O Supercritical H2O Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Low temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Two tank nitrate salt Supercritical High temperature CO2 Supercritical CO2 Packed bed thermocline Supercritical Several conclusions have been drawn from the results of the study, as follows: 1) The use of supercritical H2O as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is likely not a practical approach. The specific heat of the fluid is a strong function of the temperatures at values near 400 °C, and the temperature profile in the bed during a charging cycle is markedly different than the profile during a discharging cycle. 2) The use of supercritical CO2 as the heat transport fluid in a packed bed thermocline is judged to be technically feasible. Nonetheless, the high operating pressures for the supercritical fluid require the use of pressure vessels to contain the storage inventory. The unit cost of the two-tank nitrate salt system is approximately $24/kWht, while the unit cost of the high pressure thermocline system is nominally 10 times as high. 3) For the supercritical fluids, the outer crown temperatures of the receiver tubes are in the range of 700 to 800 °C. At temperatures of 700 °C and above, intermetallic compounds can precipitate between, and within, the grains of nickel alloys. The precipitation leads to an increase in tensile strength, and a decrease in ductility. Whether the proposed tube materials can provide the required low cycle fatigue life for the supercritical H2O and CO2 receivers is an open question. 4) A ranking of the plants, in descending order of technical and economic feasibility, is as follows: i) Supercritical nitrate salt and baseline nitrate salt: equal ratings ii) Low temperature supercritical H2O iii) Low temperature supercritical CO2 iv) High temperature supercritical CO2 v) High temperature supercritical H2O 5) The two-tank nitrate salt thermal storage systems are strongly preferred over the thermocline systems using supercritical heat transport fluids.

  13. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  14. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  15. Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuel’s photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MIT’s technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuels—called Hybrisol—can also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

  16. Review of simulation techniques for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercer, J.W.; Faust, C.R.; Miller, W.J.; Pearson, F.J. Jr.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storage of thermal energy in aquifers has recently received considerable attention as a means to conserve and more efficiently use energy supplies. The analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) systems will rely on the results from mathematical and geochemical models. Therefore, the state-of-the-art models relevant to ATES was reviewed and evaluated. These models describe important processes active in ATES including ground-water flow, heat transport (heat flow), solute transport (movement of contaminants), and geochemical reactions. In general, available models of the saturated ground-water environment are adequate to address most concerns associated with ATES; that is, design, operation, and environmental assessment. In those cases where models are not adequate, development should be preceded by efforts to identify significant physical phenomena and relate model parameters to measurable quantities. Model development can then proceed with the expectation of an adequate data base existing for the model's eventual use. Review of model applications to ATES shows that the major emphasis has been on generic sensitivity analysis and site characterization. Assuming that models are applied appropriately, the primary limitation on model calculations is the data base used to construct the model. Numerical transport models are limited by the uncertainty of subsurface data and the lack of long-term historical data for calibration. Geochemical models are limited by the lack of thermodynamic data for the temperature ranges applicable to ATES. Model applications undertaken with data collection activities on ATES sites should provide the most important contributions to the understanding and utilization of ATES. Therefore, the primary conclusion of this review is that model application to field sites in conjunction with data collection activities is essential to the development of this technology.

  17. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  18. A Novel Integrated Frozen Soil Thermal Energy Storage and Ground-Source Heat Pump System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Y.; Yao, Y.; Rong, L.; Ma, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a novel integrated frozen soil thermal energy storage and ground-source heat pump (IFSTS&GSHP) system in which the GHE can act as both cold thermal energy storage device and heat exchanger for GSHP is first presented. The IFSTS...

  19. Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Comparison of closed and open thermochemical processes, for long-term thermal energy storage-term thermal storage, second law analysis * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet@univ-perp.fr Nomenclature c Energy Tecnosud, Rambla de la thermodynamique, 66100 Perpignan, France b Université de Perpignan Via

  20. A Comparison of Open Versus Closed Systems in Thermal Storage Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salbodkin, A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of thermal storage, by its very nature, requires a large storage vessel. Depending upon the technology employed, this can vary from as little as 1.6cuft./ton-hour, up to 15cuft./ton-hour. The result can be storage tanks with volumes...

  1. EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1971, storage of Solar Energy in a Bandy- Gravel Ground. 2.Aquifer Storage of Heated Water: A Field Experuuent. GroundStorage of Heated Water: Part II - Numerical Simulation of Field Results. Ground

  2. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    process configurations for solar power plants with sensible-heatsolar power plant with sensible-heat storage since the chemical~heat storage processsolar power plant with a sulfur-oxide storage process. chemical~heat

  3. Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun’s not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MIT’s heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat well—this makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MIT’s low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

  4. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  5. Hot Thermal Storage/Selective Energy System Reduces Electric Demand for Space Cooling As Well As Heating in Commercial Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meckler, G.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an experimental residential retrofit incorporating thermal storage, and extensive subsequent modeling, a commercial design was developed and implemented to use hot thermal storage to significantly reduce electric demand and utility energy...

  6. The Effects of Nanoparticle Augmentation of Nitrate Thermal Storage Materials for Use in Concentrating Solar Power Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, Matthew

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy funded a project to determine if the specific heat of thermal energy storage materials could be improved by adding nanoparticles. The standard thermal energy storage materials are molten salts. The chosen molten salt was a...

  7. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Efficiency of Generation, Discharging, Gross Electric Generation,e 1% of the gross electric generation. Thermal losses fromNet Electric Power Generation, Discharging, MWe Net Thermal

  8. Development and characterization of a new MgSO4-zeolite composite for long-term thermal energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the material. For that specific purpose, a new thermal energy storage composite material has been developed expanded structure for MgSO4, with energy densities of 150-400 kWh.m-3 at a storage temperature compatible. Keywords: thermal energy storage; thermochemical process; long-term storage; zeolites; magnesium sulphate

  9. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve...

  10. Experimental investigation of an innovative thermochemical process operating with a hydrate salt and moist air for thermal storage of solar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and moist air for thermal storage of solar energy: global performance Benoit Michela, *, Nathalie Mazeta-gas reaction, hydration, thermal storage, seasonal storage, solar energy * Corresponding author: E-mail: mazet Der energy density of the reactor, Jm -3 thermal conductivity, Wm -1 .K -1 G reactive gas

  11. Relationship of regional water quality to aquifer thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, R.D.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground-water quality and associated geologic characteristics may affect the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system development in any hydrologic region. This study sought to determine the relationship between ground-water quality parameters and the regional potential for ATES system development. Information was collected from available literature to identify chemical and physical mechanisms that could adversely affect an ATES system. Appropriate beneficiation techniques to counter these potential geochemical and lithologic problems were also identified through the literature search. Regional hydrology summaries and other sources were used in reviewing aquifers of 19 drainage regions in the US to determine generic geochemical characteristics for analysis. Numerical modeling techniques were used to perform geochemical analyses of water quality from 67 selected aquifers. Candidate water resources regions were then identified for exploration and development of ATES. This study identified six principal mechanisms by which ATES reservoir permeability may be impaired: (1) particulate plugging, (2) chemical precipitation, (3) liquid-solid reactions, (4) formation disaggregation, (5) oxidation reactions, and (6) biological activity. Specific proven countermeasures to reduce or eliminate these effects were found. Of the hydrologic regions reviewed, 10 were identified as having the characteristics necessary for ATES development: (1) Mid-Atlantic, (2) South-Atlantic Gulf, (3) Ohio, (4) Upper Mississippi, (5) Lower Mississippi, (6) Souris-Red-Rainy, (7) Missouri Basin, (8) Arkansas-White-Red, (9) Texas-Gulf, and (10) California.

  12. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for concentrating solar-thermal energy use a large number ofBoth solar power plants absorb thermal energy in high-of a solar power plant that converts thermal energy into

  13. Seasonal thermal energy storage program. Progress report, January 1980-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minor, J.E.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program is to demonstrate the economic storage and retrieval of energy on a seasonal basis, using heat or cold available from waste sources or other sources during a surplus period to reduce peak period demand, reduce electric utilities peaking problems, and contribute to the establishment of favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems for commercialization of the technology. Aquifers, ponds, earth, and lakes have potential for seasonal storage. The initial thrust of the STES Program is toward utilization of ground-water systems (aquifers) for thermal energy storage. Program plans for meeting these objectives, the development of demonstration programs, and progress in assessing the technical, economic, legal, and environmental impacts of thermal energy storage are described. (LCL)

  14. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  15. Energy Comparison Between Conventional and Chilled Water Thermal Storage Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebzali, M.; Hussain, H. J.; Ameer, B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , encouraged by government subsidies and driven by the rapid and continual expansion in building construction, urban development, and the heavy reliance on Air Conditioning (AC) systems for the cooling of buildings. The Chilled Water Thermal Storage (CWTS...

  16. State-of-the-Art Thermal Energy Storage Retrofit at a Large Manufacturing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiorino, D.

    This paper will describe the existing conditions, strategic planning, feasibility study, economic analysis, design, specification, construction, and project management for the 2.9 megawatt “full shift” chilled water thermal energy storage retrofit...

  17. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES), typically ice TES or chilled water (CHW) TES, has traditionally been thought of, and used for, managing time-of-day electricity use to reduce the cost associated with electric energy and demand charges...

  18. Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry...

  19. Heat recovery and thermal storage : a study of the Massachusetts State Transportation Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjorklund, Abbe Ellen

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the energy system at the Massachusetts State Transportation Building was conducted. This innovative energy system utilizes internal-source heat pumps and a water thermal storage system to provide building heating ...

  20. Optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lizarraga-García, Enrique

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present thesis focuses on the optimal operation and design of solar-thermal energy storage systems. First, optimization of time-variable operation to maximize revenue through selling and purchasing electricity to/from ...

  1. Comparison of the percent recoveries of activated charcoal and Spherocarb after storage utilizing thermal desorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stidham, Paul Emery

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two adsorbents. The parameters of storage in- cluded various durations of time, temperatures, and concentrations. Rather than the present conventional solvent desorption methods, thermal desorption was used in the analysis of samples... Duncan's Multiple Range Test For Variable Percent. 32 6 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Type Of Adsorbent And Storage Time . 7 Mean Percent Recoveries For The Interaction Between Sample Concentration And Storage Time. 39 40 8...

  2. Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi-energy district boiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predictive control and thermal energy storage for optimizing a multi- energy district boiler Julien energy storage. 1. Introduction Managing energy demand, promoting renewable energy and finding ways of the OptiEnR research project, the present paper deals with optimizing the multi-energy district boiler

  3. INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

  4. Thermal-hydraulic assessment of concrete storage cubicle with horizontal 3013 canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEARD, F.J.

    1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The FIDAP computer code was used to perform a series of analyses to assess the thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of the concrete plutonium storage cubicles, as modified for the horizontal placement of 3013 canisters. Four separate models were developed ranging from a full height model of the storage cubicle to a very detailed standalone model of a horizontal 3013 canister.

  5. Wave propagation and thermodynamic losses in packed-bed thermal reservoirs for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander; McTigue, Joshua; Markides, Christos

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

     .     The  reservoirs  of  interest  here  typically  comprise  a  cylindrical  pressure  vessel  containing  the  solid  storage  medium  in  the  form  of  a  packed  bed  of  pebbles  or  gravel,  or  a  uniform... WAVE  PROPAGATION  AND  THERMODYNAMIC  LOSSES  IN  PACKED-­?BED  THERMAL  RESERVOIRS  FOR  ENERGY  STORAGE       Alexander  White1,  Joshua  McTigue1,  Christos  Markides2   1  Cambridge  University...

  6. Optimal Control of Harvesting Ice Thermal Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for optimal control of a harvesting ice storage system. A simplified procedure is used to develop 24 hour load data. Example installations will be shown....

  7. STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

  8. Thermal analysis of adsorptive natural gas storages during dynamic charge phase at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridha, Firas N.; Yunus, Rosli M.; Rashid, Mohd. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Technology Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Ismail, Ahmad F. [Department of Gas Engineering, University of Technology Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal behavior of an adsorptive natural gas (ANG) vessel pressurized continuously with light hydrocarbon gases and their mixture at 27 C was analyzed using two different activated carbons. Activated carbon AC-L showed better isothermal storage capacity than AC-D due to its sufficient porous structure. However, higher adsorption capacity claimed more extreme thermal fluctuation represented by a temperature rise of 99.2 C at the center region of the bed charged continuously with methane at 1 L min{sup -1} up to pressure of 4 MPa, corresponding to 82.5 C in AC-D bed. Higher charge rate of 5 L min{sup -1} claimed severer thermal fluctuation of 116 C in AC-L/methane system calling for a serious reduction of 26.9% in the dynamic storage capacity with respect to the isothermal storage capacity. This reduction brought the storage system to a working pressure of about 2.5 MPa rather than the desired working pressure of {proportional_to}4 MPa (about 40% reduction in storage pressure). The severest temperature rise was at the center region caused by bed poor thermal conductivity leading to limited heat transfer. High ethane and propane portions in natural gas may contribute to the thermal fluctuation of the storage system as their heats of adsorption are higher than that for methane. (author)

  9. Thermal control system and method for a passive solar storage wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortega, Joseph K. E. (Westminister, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a system and method for controlling the storing and elease of thermal energy from a thermal storage wall wherein said wall is capable of storing thermal energy from insolation of solar radiation. The system and method includes a device such as a plurality of louvers spaced a predetermined distance from the thermal wall for regulating the release of thermal energy from the thermal wall. This regulating device is made from a material which is substantially transparent to the incoming solar radiation so that when it is in any operative position, the thermal storage wall substantially receives all of the impacting solar radiation. The material in the regulating device is further capable of being substantially opaque to thermal energy so that when the device is substantially closed, thermal release of energy from the storage wall is substantially minimized. An adjustment device is interconnected with the regulating mechanism for selectively opening and closing it in order to regulate the release of thermal energy from the wall.

  10. Thermal Energy Storage for Space Cooling--Federal Technology Alert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daryl R

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cool storage technology can be used to significantly reduce energy costs by allowing energy-intensive, electrically driven cooling equipment to be predominantly operated during off peak hours when electricity rates are lower. This Federal Technology Alert, which is sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), describes the basic types of cool storage technologies and cooling system integration options. In addition, it defines the savings potential in the federal sector, presents application advice, and describes the performance experience of specific federal users. The results of a case study of a GSA building using cool storage technology are also provided.

  11. Development and Demonstration of an Innovative Thermal Energy Storage System for Baseload Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Y. Goswami

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to research and develop a thermal energy storage system (operating range 3000C ���¹�������� 450 0C ) based on encapsulated phase change materials (PCM) that can meet the utility-scale base-load concentrated solar power plant requirements at much lower system costs compared to the existing thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The major focus of this program is to develop suitable encapsulation methods for existing low-cost phase change materials that would provide a cost effective and reliable solution for thermal energy storage to be integrated in solar thermal power plants. This project proposes a TES system concept that will allow for an increase of the capacity factor of the present CSP technologies to 75% or greater and reduce the cost to less than $20/kWht.

  12. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

  13. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition behavior under various conditions and proposed isothermal aging testing and kinetic-based simulation to determine safety boundaries for HAN storage and handling. Specifically, HAN decomposition in the presence of glass, titanium, stainless steel...

  14. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. , The Central Reciever Power Plant: An Environmental,of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of Storage

  15. Thermal decomposition study of hydroxylamine nitrate during storage and handling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanji

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN), an important agent for the nuclear industry and the U.S. Army, has been involved in several costly incidents. To prevent similar incidents, the study of HAN safe storage and handling boundary has become extremely...

  16. SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

  17. Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: metal hydride storage thermal-management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thermal-management issues ECIS, Boeing, Caltrans, and Others: Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lighting Applications On March 29, 2013, in Capabilities, CRF, Energy, Energy Efficiency,...

  19. Project Profile: Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems for Concentratin...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    resistance between the location where phase change occurs and the working fluid of the power cycle. Either thermosyphons or heat pipes can: Provide an effective thermal...

  20. Advanced Thermal Storage System with Novel Molten Salt: December 8, 2011 - April 30, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonemann, M.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Final technical progress report of Halotechnics Subcontract No. NEU-2-11979-01. Halotechnics has demonstrated an advanced thermal energy storage system with a novel molten salt operating at 700 degrees C. The molten salt and storage system will enable the use of advanced power cycles such as supercritical steam and supercritical carbon dioxide in next generation CSP plants. The salt consists of low cost, earth abundant materials.

  1. Summary Report for Concentrating Solar Power Thermal Storage Workshop: New Concepts and Materials for Thermal Energy Storage and Heat-Transfer Fluids, May 20, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes a workshop on thermal energy storage for concentrating solar power (CSP) that was held in Golden, Colorado, on May 20, 2011. The event was hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. The objective was to engage the university and laboratory research communities to identify and define research directions for developing new high-temperature materials and systems that advance thermal energy storage for CSP technologies. This workshop was motivated, in part, by the DOE SunShot Initiative, which sets a very aggressive cost goal for CSP technologies -- a levelized cost of energy of 6 cents per kilowatt-hour by 2020 with no incentives or credits.

  2. Comparison of domestic olivine and European magnesite for electrically charged thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W.R.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H.; Schoenhals, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically charged thermal energy storage (TES) heaters employing high heat capacity ceramic refractories for sensible heat storage have been in use in Europe for several years. With these devices, low cost off-peak electrical energy is stored by heating a storage core composed of ceramic material to approximately 800/sup 0/C. During the peak period, no electrical energy is used as the building heating needs are supplied by extracting the stored energy from the core by forced air circulation. The recent increase in use of off-peak TES units in the U.S. has led to the search for a domestic supply of high heat capacity ceramic refractory material. North Carolina's extensive but underutilized supply of refractory grade olivine has been proposed as a source of storage material for these units. In this paper the suitability of North Carolina olivine for heat storage applications is assessed by comparing its thermal performance with that of European materials. Using the method of ASHRAE Standard 94.2, the thermal performance of two commercially available room-size TES units was determined experimentally with two different storage materials, North Carolina olivine and German magnesite. Comparisons are made and conclusions are drawn.

  3. Method of making improved gas storage carbon with enhanced thermal conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Rogers, Michael R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making an adsorbent carbon fiber based monolith having improved methane gas storage capabilities is disclosed. Additionally, the monolithic nature of the storage carbon allows it to exhibit greater thermal conductivity than conventional granular activated carbon or powdered activated carbon storage beds. The storage of methane gas is achieved through the process of physical adsorption in the micropores that are developed in the structure of the adsorbent monolith. The disclosed monolith is capable of storing greater than 150 V/V of methane [i.e., >150 STP (101.325 KPa, 298K) volumes of methane per unit volume of storage vessel internal volume] at a pressure of 3.5 MPa (500 psi).

  4. Legal and regulatory issues affecting the aquifer thermal energy storage concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of legal and regulatory issus that potentially can affect implementation of the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) concept are examined. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

  5. Analysis and System Design of a Large Chiller Plant for Korea, with or without Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, C.; Simmonds, P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    % was provided by thermal storage as in the previous scheme. Electric centrifugal chillers, two (2) at 950 tons each, were still required to charge the ice tanks at night, because gas-fired absorption chillers cannot make the 28°F (-2.2"C) glycol solution... simulated. C. Electric Centrifugal Chillers with Thermal Storage: Local code requires that a maximum of 60% of the peak cooling load be satisfied "real-time" by electricity. Therefore, two (2) 1,020-ton electric centrifugal chillers provided 2,040 tons...

  6. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,” Eurosun 2010, Graz,STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa, Ontario: 1999.Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A Thesis submitted

  7. Thermal Modeling of NUHOMS HSM-15 and HSM-1 Storage Modules at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE), visual inspections and temperature measurements were performed on two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI). Detailed thermal models models were developed to obtain realistic temperature predictions for actual storage systems, in contrast to conservative and bounding design basis calculations.

  8. Loss analysis of thermal reservoirs for electrical energy storage schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Alexander

    2011-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    phase. HX1 and HX2 are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turbomachines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 2 Schematic view of heat transfer within... are heat exchangers used to reject heat at near-ambient conditions. The compressor, C, and expander, E, may be turboma- chines as in Ref. [5] or reciprocating devices, as in Ref. [4] 33 T2 x hot 1 T ? T ? T x gas front storage m edia Tg + Tg sT Q . ? Tg...

  9. Thermal Modeling Studies for Active Storage Modules in the Calvert Cliffs ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, Harold E.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Cuta, Judith M.; Collins, Brian A.

    2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Temperature measurements obtained for two storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation (ISFSI) as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the Department of Energy (DOE) were used to perform validation and sensitivity studies on detailed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the concrete storage modules, including the dry storage canister within the modules. The storage modules in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station’s ISFSI are a site-specific version of the standard NUHOMSź HSM. The two modules inspected each contained a 24P DSC loaded with 24 CE 14x14 spent fuel assemblies. The thermal analysis was performed using the STAR-CCM+ package, and the models developed for the specific ISFSI modules yielded temperature predictions in actual storage conditions for the concrete structure, the DSC and its contents, including preliminary estimates of fuel cladding temperatures for the used nuclear fuel. The results of this work demonstrate that existing CFD modeling tools can be used to obtain reasonable and accurate detailed representations of spent fuel storage systems with realistic decay heat loadings when the model omits specific conservatisms and bounding assumptions normally used in design-basis and safety-basis calculations. This paper presents sensitivity studies on modeling detail (for the storage module and the DSC), boundary conditions, and decay heat load, to evaluate the effect of the modeling approach on predicted temperatures and temperature distributions. Because nearly all degradation mechanisms for materials and structures comprising dry storage and transportation systems are dependent on temperature, accurate characterization of local temperatures and temperature gradients that the various components of these systems will experience over the entire storage period has been identified as a primary requirement for evaluation of very long term storage of used nuclear fuel.

  10. Reducing Energy Costs And Minimizing Capital Requirements: Case Studies of Thermal Energy Storage (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and thus during those times when power has its highest cost or value. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) provides a means of de-coupling the generation of cooling from the provision of cooling to the peak cooling loads. In this manner, peak power demand...

  11. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N. [Chicago Bridge and Iron Technical Services Co., Plainfield, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  12. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  13. Development of encapsulated lithium hydride thermal energy storage for space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, D.G.; Foote, J.P.; Olszewski, M.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusion of thermal energy storage in a pulsed space power supply will reduce the mass of the heat rejection system. In this mode, waste heat generated during the brief high-power burst operation is placed in the thermal store; later, the heat in the store is dissipated to space via the radiator over the much longer nonoperational period of the orbit. Thus, the radiator required is of significantly smaller capacity. Scoping analysis indicates that use of lithium hydride as the thermal storage medium results in system mass reduction benefits for burst periods as long as 800 s. A candidate design for the thermal energy storage component utilizes lithium hydride encapsulated in either 304L stainless steel or molybdenum in a packed-bed configuration with a lithium or sodium-potassium (NaK) heat transport fluid. Key issues associated with the system design include phase-change induced stresses in the shell, lithium hydride and shell compatibility, lithium hydride dissociation and hydrogen loss from the system, void presence and movement associated with the melt-freeze process, and heat transfer limitations on obtaining the desired energy storage density. 58 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  14. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  15. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal energy storage. Volume 1. Regions 1 through 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: the Western Mountains; Alluvial Basins; Columbia LAVA Plateau; Colorado Plateau; High Plains; and Glaciated Central Region. (LCL)

  16. Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

  17. Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cost Optimal Operation of Thermal Energy Storage System with Real-Time Prices Toru Kashima, Member of the result [4]. The same can be said for time varying real-time prices. Real-time energy pricing is not yet such as chillers. Energy resources such as electricity or natural gas are bought from suppliers at certain prices

  18. Thermal Energy Storage/Waste Heat Recovery Applications in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beshore, D. G.; Jaeger, F. A.; Gartner, E. M.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and the Portland Cement Association have studied the potential benefits of using waste heat recovery methods and thermal energy storage systems in the cement manufacturing process. This work was performed under DOE Contract No. EC-77-C-01-50S4. The study has been...

  19. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  20. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Ramana G. [The University of Alabama] [The University of Alabama

    2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222șC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go/no-go goals stipulated by the DOE for this project. Energy densities of all salt mixtures were higher than that of the current solar salt. The salt mixtures costs have been estimated and TES system costs for a 2 tank, direct approach have been estimated for each of these materials. All estimated costs are significantly below the baseline system that used solar salt. These lower melt point salts offer significantly higher energy density per volume than solar salt – and therefore attractively smaller inventory and equipment costs. Moreover, a new TES system geometry has been recommended A variety of approaches were evaluated to use the low melting point molten salt. Two novel changes are recommended that 1) use the salt as a HTF through the solar trough field, and 2) use the salt to not only create steam but also to preheat the condensed feedwater for Rankine cycle. The two changes enable the powerblock to operate at 500°C, rather than the current 400°C obtainable using oil as the HTF. Secondly, the use of salt to preheat the feedwater eliminates the need to extract steam from the low pressure turbine for that purpose. Together, these changes result in a dramatic 63% reduction required for 6 hour salt inventory, a 72% reduction in storage volume, and a 24% reduction in steam flow rate in the power block. Round trip efficiency for the Case 5 - 2 tank “direct” system is estimated at >97%, with only small losses from time under storage and heat exchange, and meeting RFP goals. This attractive efficiency is available because the major heat loss experienced in a 2 tank “indirect” system - losses by transferring the thermal energy from oil HTF to the salt storage material and back to oil to run the steam generator at night - is not present for the 2 tank direct system. The higher heat capacity values for both LMP and HMP systems enable larger storage capacities for concentrating solar power.

  1. THERMAL EVALUATION OF DRUM TYPE RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING ARRAYS IN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, N

    2009-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR 71.[1] In recent years, there has been a greater need to use these packagings to store the excess fissile material, especially plutonium for long term storage. While the design requirements for safe transportation of these packagings are well defined, the requirements for safe long term storage are not well established. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are stored carefully to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals to prevent any leakage and the impact limiter to maintain the package structural integrity. This paper analyzes different storage arrays for a typical 9977 packaging for thermal considerations and makes recommendations for their safe storage under normal operating conditions.

  2. Project Profile: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermal Energy

  3. Project Profile: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermal EnergyGeneration |

  4. Beneath the shadow of the Tower Soldiers' Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beneath the shadow of the Tower Soldiers' Tower Schedule of Events October-November 2013 As of Oct. 21, 2013 Telephone: 416-978-3485 (office) E-mail: soldiers.tower@utoronto.ca Soldiers' Tower Web Site: www.alumni.utoronto.ca/tower Facebook: www.facebook.com/soldierstower U of T Events web site: www

  5. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  6. Stability Properties of Magnetic Tower Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanori Nakamura; Hui Li; Shengtai Li

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability properties of ``magnetic tower'' jets propagating in the gravitationally stratified background have been examined by performing three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The current-carrying, Poynting flux-dominated magnetic tower jet, which possesses a highly wound helical magnetic field, is subject to the current-driven instability (CDI). We find that, under general physical conditions including small perturbations in the initial background profiles, the propagating magnetic tower jets develop the non-axisymmetric, $m=1$ kink mode of the CDI. The kink mode grows on the local Alfv\\'en crossing time scale. In addition, two types of kink modes appear in the system. At the central region where external thermal pressure confinement is strong, only the internal kink mode is excited and will grow. A large distance away from the central region where the external thermal pressure becomes low, the external kink mode is observed. As a result, the exterior of magnetic tower jets will be deformed into a large-scale wiggled structure. We also discuss extensively the different physical processes that contribute to the overall stability properties of the magnetic tower jets. Specifically, when the jet propagates in an initially unperturbed background, we find that they can survive the kink mode beyond the point predicted by the well-known Kruskal-Shafranov (K-S) criterion. The stabilization in this case comes mainly from the dynamical relaxation of magnetic twists during the propagation of magnetic towers; the magnetic pitch is reduced and the corresponding K-S critical wavelength becomes longer as the tower jet proceeds. Furthermore, we show that the pressure-driven and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities do not occur in the magnetic tower jets.

  7. Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System: Thermal Storage Using Hybrid Vapor Compression Adsorption System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: UTRC is developing a new climate-control system for EVs that uses a hybrid vapor compression adsorption system with thermal energy storage. The targeted, closed system will use energy during the battery-charging step to recharge the thermal storage, and it will use minimal power to provide cooling or heating to the cabin during a drive cycle. The team will use a unique approach of absorbing a refrigerant on a metal salt, which will create a lightweight, high-energy-density refrigerant. This unique working pair can operate indefinitely as a traditional vapor compression heat pump using electrical energy, if desired. The project will deliver a hot-and-cold battery that provides comfort to the passengers using minimal power, substantially extending the driving range of EVs.

  8. Evaluation of olivine ceramic refractories for thermal-energy-storage application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmour, H. III; Gay, B.M.; Cochran, R.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-heat capacity refractory ceramics have been employed in European electric heat storage furnaces for over two decades. In these systems, ceramic refractories are heated to approximately 1500/sup 0/F, using low-cost electric energy during the off-peak demand hours. During the peak demand hours, heat is extracted as needed by controlled circulation of air through the core to meet space conditioning requirements. Heat storage or thermal energy storage (TES) furnaces represent (a) valuable load-leveling capabilities for electric utilities and (b) safe, convenient, reliable heat sources for consumers. Because of its relatively high-heat capacity and relatively low cost, olivine is one of the more attractive candidate materials for such ceramics. This paper includes a discussion of the goals of the current study, along with results achieved to date. Further, here is a discussion of future work to be undertaken as a part of this study.

  9. PRELIMINARY REPORT: EFFECTS OF IRRADIATION AND THERMAL EXPOSURE ON ELASTOMERIC SEALS FOR CASK TRANSPORTATION AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.

    2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing and analysis approach to predict the sealing behavior of elastomeric seal materials in dry storage casks and evaluate their ability to maintain a seal under thermal and radiation exposure conditions of extended storage and beyond was developed, and initial tests have been conducted. The initial tests evaluate the aging response of EPDM elastomer O-ring seals. The thermal and radiation exposure conditions of the CASTORź V/21 casks were selected for testing as this cask design is of interest due to its widespread use, and close proximity of the seals to the fuel compared to other cask designs leading to a relatively high temperature and dose under storage conditions. A novel test fixture was developed to enable compression stress relaxation measurements for the seal material at the thermal and radiation exposure conditions. A loss of compression stress of 90% is suggested as the threshold at which sealing ability of an elastomeric seal would be lost. Previous studies have shown this value to be conservative to actual leakage failure for most aging conditions. These initial results indicate that the seal would be expected to retain sealing ability throughout extended storage at the cask design conditions, though longer exposure times are needed to validate this assumption. The high constant dose rate used in the testing is not prototypic of the decreasingly low dose rate that would occur under extended storage. The primary degradation mechanism of oxidation of polymeric compounds is highly dependent on temperature and time of exposure, and with radiation expected to exacerbate the oxidation.

  10. Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.

    2001-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the findings of a technology market assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) in space cooling applications. The potential impact of TES in Federal facilities is modeled using the Federal building inventory with the appropriate climatic and energy cost data. In addition, this assessment identified acceptance issues and major obstacles through interviews with energy services companies (ESCOs), TES manufacturers, and Federal facility staff.

  11. Optimal Solid Space Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory and computations are provided for building of optimal (minimum weight) solid space towers (mast) up to one hundred kilometers in height. These towers can be used for tourism; scientific observation of space, observation of the Earth surface, weather and upper atmosphere experiment, and for radio, television, and communication transmissions. These towers can also be used to launch spaceships and Earth satellites. These macroprojects are not expensive. They require strong hard material (steel). Towers can be built using present technology. Towers can be used (for tourism, communication, etc.) during the construction process and provide self-financing for further construction. The tower design does not require human work at high altitudes; the tower is separated into sections; all construction can be done at the Earth surface. The transport system for a tower consists of a small engine (used only for friction compensation) located at the Earth surface. Problems involving security, control, repair, and stability of the proposed towers are addressed in other cited publications.

  12. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  13. Demand-Side and Supply-Side Load Management: Optimizing with Thermal Energy Storage (TES) for the Restructuring Energy Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    -side regarding power generation. Thermal Energy Storage (TES) can provide the flexibility essential to the economical management of power. In large industrial applications, the added value of TES has been demonstrated, not only in managing operating costs...

  14. Dynamic modeling and control strategies for a micro-CSP plant with thermal storage powered by the Organic Rankine cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ireland, Melissa Kara

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic Rankine cycle (ORC) systems are gaining ground as a means of effectively providing sustainable energy. Coupling small-scale ORCs powered by scroll expander- generators with solar thermal collectors and storage can ...

  15. Current and Future Costs for Parabolic Trough and Power Tower Systems in the US Market: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C.; Mehos, M.; Ho, C. K.; Kolb, G. J.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Solar Advisor Model (SAM) is employed to estimate the current and future costs for parabolic trough and molten salt power towers in the US market. Future troughs are assumed to achieve higher field temperatures via the successful deployment of low melting-point, molten-salt heat transfer fluids by 2015-2020. Similarly, it is assumed that molten salt power towers are successfully deployed at 100MW scale over the same time period, increasing to 200MW by 2025. The levelized cost of electricity for both technologies is predicted to drop below 11 cents/kWh (assuming a 10% investment tax credit and other financial inputs outlined in the paper), making the technologies competitive in the marketplace as benchmarked by the California MPR. Both technologies can be deployed with large amounts of thermal energy storage, yielding capacity factors as high as 65% while maintaining an optimum LCOE.

  16. Vice President CEO, Tower Foundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    Vice President CEO, Tower Foundation Administrative Assistant to the AVP Information Representative Tower Foundation Charitable Gifts Officer Gift Analyst Gift Analyst Gift Analyst Senior Analyst Tower Foundation Stewardship Director Graphic Designer Administrative Assistant Web Communications

  17. Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Solar Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gawlik, Keith

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy storage systems using phase change materials were evaluated for trough systems that use oil, steam, and high temperature salts as heat transfer fluids. A variety of eutectic salts and metal alloys were considered as phase change materials in a cascaded arrangement. Literature values of specific heat, latent heat, density, and other thermophysical properties were used in initial analyses. Testing laboratories were contracted to measure properties for candidate materials for comparison to the literature and for updating the models. A TRNSYS model from Phase 1 was further developed for optimizing the system, including a novel control algorithm. A concept for increasing the bulk thermal conductivity of the phase change system was developed using expanded metal sheets. Outside companies were contracted to design and cost systems using platecoil heat exchangers immersed in the phase change material. Laboratory evaluations of the one-dimensional and three-dimensional behavior of expanded metal sheets in a low conductivity medium were used to optimize the amount of thermal conductivity enhancement. The thermal energy storage systems were compared to baseline conventional systems. The best phase change system found in this project, which was for the high temperature plant, had a projected cost of $25.2 per kWhth, The best system also had a cost that was similar to the base case, a direct two-tank molten salt system.

  18. Evaluation of diurnal thermal energy storage combined with cogeneration systems. Phase 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a study of thermal energy storage (TES) systems integrated with combined-cycle gas turbine cogeneration systems. Integrating thermal energy storage with conventional cogeneration equipment increases the initial cost of the combined system; but, by decoupling electric power and process heat production, the system offers two significant advantages. First, electric power can be generated on demand, irrespective of the process heat load profile, thus increasing the value of the power produced. Second, although supplementary firing could be used to serve independently varying electric and process heat loads, this approach is inefficient. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the two independent loads while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. An earlier study analyzed TES integrated with a simple-cycle cogeneration system. This follow-on study evaluated the cost of power produced by a combined-cycle electric power plant (CC), a combined-cycle cogeneration plant (CC/Cogen), and a combined-cycle cogeneration plant integrated with thermal energy storage (CC/TES/Cogen). Each of these three systems was designed to serve a fixed (24 hr/day) process steam load. The value of producing electricity was set at the levelized cost for a CC plant, while the value of the process steam was for a conventional stand-alone boiler. The results presented here compared the costs for CC/TES/Cogen system with those of the CC and the CC/Cogen plants. They indicate relatively poor economic prospects for integrating TES with a combined-cycle cogeneration power plant for the assumed designs. The major reason is the extremely close approach temperatures at the storage media heaters, which makes the heaters large and therefore expensive.

  19. The integration of water loop heat pump and building structural thermal storage systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marseille, T.J.; Schliesing, J.S.

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial buildings often have extensive periods where one space needs cooling and another heating. Even more common is the need for heating during one part of the day and cooling during another in the same spaces. If a building's heating and cooling system could be integrated with the building's structural mass such that the mass can be used to collect, store, and deliver energy, significant energy might be saved. Computer models were developed to simulate this interaction for an existing office building in Seattle, Washington that has a decentralized water-source heat pump system. Metered data available for the building was used to calibrate a base'' building model (i.e., nonintegrated) prior to simulation of the integrated system. In the simulated integration strategy a secondary water loop was manifolded to the main HVAC hydronic loop. tubing in this loop was embedded in the building's concrete floor slabs. Water was routed to this loop by a controller to charge or discharge thermal energy to and from the slabs. The slabs were also in thermal communication with the conditioned spaces. Parametric studies of the building model, using weather data for five other cities in addition to Seattle, predicted that energy can be saved on cooling dominated days. On hot, dry days and during the night the cooling tower can beneficially be used as a free cooling'' source for thermally charging'' the floor slabs using cooled water. Through the development of an adaptive/predictive control strategy, annual HVAC energy savings as large as 30% appear to be possible in certain climates. 8 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  1. Solar two: A molten salt power tower demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyner, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sutherland, J.P. [Southern California Edison, Rosemead, CA (United States); Gould, W.R. Jr. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A consortium of United States utility concerns led by the Southern California Edison Company (SCE) is conducting a cooperative project with the US Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories, and industry to convert the 10-MW Solar One Power Tower Pilot Plant to molten nitrate salt technology. The conversion involves installation of a new receiver, a new thermal storage system, and a new steam generator; it utilizes Solar One`s heliostat field and turbine generator. Successful operation of the converted plant, called Solar Two, will reduce economic risks in building initial commercial power tow projects and accelerate the commercial acceptance of this promising renewable energy technology. The estimated cost of Solar Two, including its three-year test period, is $48.5 million. The plant will begin operation in early 1996.

  2. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  3. Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal Abstract Determination of the internal temperature of a mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) from remotelyRadiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction

  4. Accepted for publication in Energy and Buildings. 2014. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.enbuild.2014.03.056 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .03.056 1 Improvement of Borehole Thermal Energy Storage Design Based on Experimental and Modelling Results Thermal Energy Storage appears to be an attractive solution for solar thermal energy storage. The SOLARGEOTHERM research project aimed to evaluate the energetic potential of borehole thermal energy storage

  5. Control Tower Procedures Nolan, Chap 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 1 Control Tower Procedures Nolan, Chap 6 2 Control Towers · Responsibilities: 1. Ensure Towers · VFR Towers ­ NOT delegated separation responsibility · Except initial departure traffic ­ ARTCC separates IFR traffic · Non-radar-approach control towers ­ Delegated IFR separation responsibility

  6. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam, Micah Hale and Matt strasser

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 Ă?ÂșC to 600 Ă?ÂșC) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES capacity cost of $33.80$/kWhthermal compared with $30.04/kWhthermal for a packed-bed thermocline (PBTC) configuration and $46.11/kWhthermal for a two-tank liquid configuration.

  7. High Energy Density Thermal Batteries: Thermoelectric Reactors for Efficient Automotive Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: Sheetak is developing a new HVAC system to store the energy required for heating and cooling in EVs. This system will replace the traditional refrigerant-based vapor compressors and inefficient heaters used in today’s EVs with efficient, light, and rechargeable hot-and-cold thermal batteries. The high energy density thermal battery—which does not use any hazardous substances—can be recharged by an integrated solid-state thermoelectric energy converter while the vehicle is parked and its electrical battery is being charged. Sheetak’s converters can also run on the electric battery if needed and provide the required cooling and heating to the passengers—eliminating the space constraint and reducing the weight of EVs that use more traditional compressors and heaters.

  8. Thermal Storage and Advanced Heat Transfer Fluids (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems Group: CSP Capabilities (TSG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in theTheoretical Study onThermalEnergy Analysis

  9. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  10. Cool Storage Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This article covers three thermal storage topics. The first section catalogs various thermal storage systems and applications. Included are: load shifting and load leveling, chilled water storage systems, and ice storage systems using Refrigerant 22 or ethylene...

  11. Evaluation of annual efficiencies of high temperature central receiver concentrated solar power plants with thermal energy storage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrhart, Brian David; Gill, David Dennis

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current study has examined four cases of a central receiver concentrated solar power plant with thermal energy storage using the DELSOL and SOLERGY computer codes. The current state-of-the-art base case was compared with a theoretical high temperature case which was based on the scaling of some input parameters and the estimation of other parameters based on performance targets from the Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This comparison was done for both current and high temperature cases in two configurations: a surround field with an external cylindrical receiver and a north field with a single cavity receiver. There is a fairly dramatic difference between the design point and annual average performance, especially in the solar field and receiver subsystems, and also in energy losses due to the thermal energy storage being full to capacity. Additionally, there are relatively small differences (<2%) in annual average efficiencies between the Base and High Temperature cases, despite an increase in thermal to electric conversion efficiency of over 8%. This is due the increased thermal losses at higher temperature and operational losses due to subsystem start-up and shut-down. Thermal energy storage can mitigate some of these losses by utilizing larger thermal energy storage to ensure that the electric power production system does not need to stop and re-start as often, but solar energy is inherently transient. Economic and cost considerations were not considered here, but will have a significant impact on solar thermal electric power production strategy and sizing.

  12. System for thermal energy storage, space heating and cooling and power conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Fields, Paul R. (Chicago, IL)

    1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system for storing thermal energy, for space heating and cong and for power conversion is described which utilizes the reversible thermal decomposition characteristics of two hydrides having different decomposition pressures at the same temperature for energy storage and space conditioning and the expansion of high-pressure hydrogen for power conversion. The system consists of a plurality of reaction vessels, at least one containing each of the different hydrides, three loops of circulating heat transfer fluid which can be selectively coupled to the vessels for supplying the heat of decomposition from any appropriate source of thermal energy from the outside ambient environment or from the spaces to be cooled and for removing the heat of reaction to the outside ambient environment or to the spaces to be heated, and a hydrogen loop for directing the flow of hydrogen gas between the vessels. When used for power conversion, at least two vessels contain the same hydride and the hydrogen loop contains an expansion engine. The system is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators, but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  13. Site-specific investigations of aquifer thermal energy storage for space and process cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D R; Hattrup, M P; Watts, R L

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has completed three preliminary site-specific feasibility studies that investigated using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) to reduce space and process cooling costs. Chilled water stored in an ATES system could be used to meet all or part of the process and/or space cooling loads at the three facilities investigated. The work was sponsored by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Management. The ultimate goal of DOE's Thermal Energy Storage Program is to successfully transfer ATES technology to industrial and commercial sectors. The primary objective of this study was to identify prospective sites and determine the technical and economic feasibility of implementing chill ATES technology. A secondary objective was to identify site-specific factors promoting or inhibiting the application of chill ATES technology so that other potentially attractive sites could be more easily identified and evaluated. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility of commercializing chill ATES in automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities was completed. The results suggested that automotive assembly facilities represent a good entry market for chill ATES, if the system is cost-effective. As a result, this study was undertaken to identify and evaluate prospective chill ATES applications in the automotive industry. The balance of the report contains two main sections. Section 2.0 describes the site identification process. Site feasibility is addressed in Section 3.0. Overall study conclusions and recommendations are than presented in Section 4.0.

  14. Decarbonizing the Electric Sector: Combining Renewable and Nuclear Energy using Thermal Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; King, J.; Kutscher, C.; Wilson, P.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both renewable and nuclear energy can provide significant contributions to decarbonizing the electric sector. However, a grid employing large amounts of wind and solar energy requires the balance of the system to be highly flexible to respond to the increased variability of the net load. This makes deployment of conventional nuclear power challenging both due to the technical challenges of plant cycling and economic limits of reduced capacity factor. In the United States nuclear power plants generally provide constant, base load power and are most economic when operated at constant power levels. Operating nuclear power plants in load-following modes decreases the plants' annual energy output and increases the levelized cost of energy, decreasing economic competitiveness. One possible solution is to couple thermal energy storage to nuclear power plants. This would enable the reactor to remain at nearly constant output, while cycling the electrical generator in response to the variability of the net load. This paper conceptually explores combinations of wind, solar, and nuclear that can provide a large fraction of a system's electricity, assuming the use of thermal energy storage that would allow nuclear power to provide load following and cycling duty while operating at a constant reactor power output.

  15. Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Denholm, P.; Jorgenson, J.; Mehos, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

  16. Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.; Jorgenson, J.; Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power with thermal energy storage (CSP-TES) can provide multiple benefits to the grid, including low marginal cost energy and the ability to levelize load, provide operating reserves, and provide firm capacity. It is challenging to properly value the integration of CSP because of the complicated nature of this technology. Unlike completely dispatchable fossil sources, CSP is a limited energy resource, depending on the hourly and daily supply of solar energy. To optimize the use of this limited energy, CSP-TES must be implemented in a production cost model with multiple decision variables for the operation of the CSP-TES plant. We develop and implement a CSP-TES plant in a production cost model that accurately characterizes the three main components of the plant: solar field, storage tank, and power block. We show the effect of various modelling simplifications on the value of CSP, including: scheduled versus optimized dispatch from the storage tank and energy-only operation versus co-optimization with ancillary services.

  17. The Monster Tower and Action Selectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Wyatt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Monster Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.2.1 Constructing the Monster Tower. . . . . . . . . 3.2.2Material for the Monster Tower 7.1 Definition of a Goursat

  18. Thermal energy storage : a key technology for the food cold chain Denis Leducq(a), P. Schalbart(a), F. Trinquet(a), G. Alvarez(a), B. Verlinden(b),P.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ID: 123 Thermal energy storage : a key technology for the food cold chain Denis Leducq(a), P and intermittent renewable energy sources, energy storage, and more specifically thermal energy storage is one of thermal energy storage devices, is also an important factor of food quality and security enhancement

  19. Temperature-dependent mechanical property testing of nitrate thermal storage salts.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Randy L.; Iverson, Brian D.; Broome, Scott Thomas; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Bronowski, David R.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three salt compositions for potential use in trough-based solar collectors were tested to determine their mechanical properties as a function of temperature. The mechanical properties determined were unconfined compressive strength, Young's modulus, Poisson's ratio, and indirect tensile strength. Seventeen uniaxial compression and indirect tension tests were completed. It was found that as test temperature increases, unconfined compressive strength and Young's modulus decreased for all salt types. Empirical relationships were developed quantifying the aforementioned behaviors. Poisson's ratio tends to increase with increasing temperature except for one salt type where there is no obvious trend. The variability in measured indirect tensile strength is large, but not atypical for this index test. The average tensile strength for all salt types tested is substantially higher than the upper range of tensile strengths for naturally occurring rock salts. Interest in raising the operating temperature of concentrating solar technologies and the incorporation of thermal storage has motivated studies on the implementation of molten salt as the system working fluid. Recently, salt has been considered for use in trough-based solar collectors and has been shown to offer a reduction in levelized cost of energy as well as increasing availability (Kearney et al., 2003). Concerns regarding the use of molten salt are often related to issues with salt solidification and recovery from freeze events. Differences among salts used for convective heat transfer and storage are typically designated by a comparison of thermal properties. However, the potential for a freeze event necessitates an understanding of salt mechanical properties in order to characterize and mitigate possible detrimental effects. This includes stress imparted by the expanding salt. Samples of solar salt, HITEC salt (Coastal Chemical Co.), and a low melting point quaternary salt were cast for characterization tests to determine unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio. Experiments were conducted at multiple temperatures below the melting point to determine temperature dependence.

  20. The nominal cooling tower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, R. [Burger Associates, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat Rejection Industry defines a nominal cooling tower as circulating three gallons of water per minute (GPM) per ton of refrigeration from entering the tower at 95{degrees}F. Hot Water temperature (HWT) Leaving at 85{degrees}F Cold Water Temperature (CWT) at a Design Wet Bulb of 70{degrees}F (WBT). Manufacturers then provide a selection chart based on various wet bulb temperatures and HWTs. The wet bulb fluctuates and varies through out the world since it is the combination ambient temperature, relative humidity, and/or dew point. Different HWT and CWT requirements are usually charted as they change, so that the user can select the nominal cooling tower model recommended by the manufacturer. Ask any HVAC operator, refinery manager, power generating station operator what happens when the Wet Bulb reaches or exceeds the design WBT of the area. He probably will tell you, {open_quotes}My cooling tower works quite well, but in the summer time, I usually have trouble with it.{close_quotes} This occurs because he is operating a nominal cooling tower.

  1. Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, M.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

  2. Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, M.

    Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

  3. Analyzing the Effects of Climate and Thermal Configuration on Community Energy Storage Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.; Coleman, D.; Chen, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community energy storage (CES) has been proposed to mitigate the high variation in output from renewable sources and reduce peak load on the electrical grid. Thousands of these systems may be distributed around the grid to provide benefits to local distribution circuits and to the grid as a whole when aggregated. CES must be low cost to purchase and install and also largely maintenance free through more than 10 years of service life to be acceptable to most utilities.Achieving the required system life time is a major uncertainty for lithium-ion batteries. The lifetime and immediate system performance of batteries can change drastically with battery temperature, which is a strong function of system packaging, local climate, electrical duty cycle, and other factors. In other Li-ion applications, this problem is solved via air or liquid heating and cooling systems that may need occasional maintenance throughout their service life. CES requires a maintenance-free thermal management system providing protection from environmental conditions while rejecting heat from a moderate electrical duty cycle. Thus, the development of an effective, low-cost, zero-maintenance thermal management system poses a challenge critical to the success of CES. NREL and Southern California Edison have collaborated to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of various CES thermal configurations in multiple climates by building a model of CES based on collected test data, integrating it with an NREL-developed Li-ion degradation model, and applying CES electrical duty cycles and historic location-specific meteorological data to forecast battery thermal response and degradation through a 10-year service life.

  4. Evaluation Framework and Analyses for Thermal Energy Storage Integrated with Packaged Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, F.; Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Few third-party guidance documents or tools are available for evaluating thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with packaged air conditioning (AC), as this type of TES is relatively new compared to TES integrated with chillers or hot water systems. To address this gap, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a project to improve the ability of potential technology adopters to evaluate TES technologies. Major project outcomes included: development of an evaluation framework to describe key metrics, methodologies, and issues to consider when assessing the performance of TES systems integrated with packaged AC; application of multiple concepts from the evaluation framework to analyze performance data from four demonstration sites; and production of a new simulation capability that enables modeling of TES integrated with packaged AC in EnergyPlus. This report includes the evaluation framework and analysis results from the project.

  5. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  6. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power Phase 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Songgang

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of this project is to develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia’s family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar TES systems based on latent heat of fusion rather than molten salt temperature differences, have many advantages that include up to an order of magnitude higher energy storage density, much higher temperature operation, and elimination of pumped loops for most of Infinia’s design options. DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other Infinia awarded project using heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the salt. The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES/pool boiler heat transfer system that is the simplest approach identified to date and arguably has the best potential for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). The Phase 1 objectives are to design, build and test a 1-hour TES proof-of-concept lab demonstrator integrated with an Infinia 3 kW Stirling engine, and to conduct a preliminary design of a 12-hour TES on-sun prototype.

  7. Mechanism of Thermal Reversal of the (Fulvalene)tetracarbonyldiruthenium Photoisomerization: Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanai, Y; Srinivasan, V; Meier, S K; Vollhardt, K P; Grossman, J C

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the currently intensifying quest to harness solar energy for the powering of our planet, most efforts are centered around photoinduced generic charge separation, such as in photovoltaics, water splitting, other small molecule activation, and biologically inspired photosynthetic systems. In contrast, direct collection of heat from sunlight has received much less diversified attention, its bulk devoted to the development of concentrating solar thermal power plants, in which mirrors are used to focus the sun beam on an appropriate heat transfer material. An attractive alternative strategy would be to trap solar energy in the form of chemical bonds, ideally through the photoconversion of a suitable molecule to a higher energy isomer, which, in turn, would release the stored energy by thermal reversal. Such a system would encompass the essential elements of a rechargeable heat battery, with its inherent advantages of storage, transportability, and use on demand. The underlying concept has been explored extensively with organic molecules (such as the norbornadiene-quadricyclane cycle), often in the context of developing photoswitches. On the other hand, organometallic complexes have remained relatively obscure in this capacity, despite a number of advantages, including expanded structural tunability and generally favorable electronic absorption regimes. A highly promising organometallic system is the previously reported, robust photo-thermal fulvalene (Fv) diruthenium couple 1 {l_reversible} 2 (Scheme 1). However, although reversible and moderately efficient, lack of a full, detailed atom-scale understanding of its key conversion and storage mechanisms have limited our ability to improve on its performance or identify optimal variants, such as substituents on the Fv, ligands other than CO, and alternative metals. Here we present a theoretical investigation, in conjunction with corroborating experiments, of the mechanism for the heat releasing step of 2 {yields} 1 and its Fe (4) and Os (6) relatives. The results of the combined study has enabled a rigorous interpretation of earlier and new experimental measurements and paint a surprising picture. First-principles calculations were employed based on spin unrestricted density functional theory (DFT) with a non-empirical gradient corrected exchange-correlation functional. Ultrasoft pseudopotentials were used to describe the valence-core interactions of electrons, including scalar relativistic effects of the core. Wavefunctions and charge densities were expanded in plane waves with kinetic energies up to 25 and 200 Rydberg, respectively. Reaction pathways were delineated with the string method, as implemented within the Car-Parrinello approach. This method allows for the efficient determination of the minimum energy path (MEP) of atomistic transitions and thus also saddle points (transition states, TSs), which are the energy maxima along the MEP. All geometries were optimized until all forces on the atoms were less than 0.02 eV/{angstrom}. The calculated structures of 1 and 2 were in good agreement with their experimental counterparts.

  8. Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermal Infrared Imagery: Application to a Walnut Orchard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garai, Anirban; Kleissl, Jan; Llewellyn Smith, Stefan G.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NOTE Estimation of Biomass Heat Storage Using Thermalmethod to estimate tree biomass heat storage from thermalinfrared (TIR) imaging of biomass surface temperature is

  9. Variable Frequency AC Drives for Cooling Tower Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corey, R. W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    speed fan drives. Fan speed is reduced to yield specific water temperatures at thermal conditions less difficult than design. The reduced air flow is accomplished by reduced fan power consumption, resulting in optimum cooling tower operation... and economics. Automatic fan speed control by sensing cold water temperature is the economic essence of the application of adjustable frequency power to A-C fan motors. 2.2 Cell Partitions In some multi-cell mechanical-draft cooling towers, the isolation...

  10. Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    Power generating plants and petro-chemical works are always expanding. An on-going problem is to identify and de-bottle neck restricting conditions of growth. The cooling tower is a highly visible piece of equipment. Most industrial crossflow units...

  11. Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    looking into the function of the cooling tower, which is to produce colder water- and question the quality of water discharged from that simple appearing box. These cross-flow structures are quite large, ranging up to 60 feet tall with as many as 6 or more...

  12. Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    for the sale. This paper investigates the internal elements of the typical types of cooling towers currently used, delineates their functions and shows how to upgrade them in the real world for energy savings and profitability of operation. Hard before... and after statistics of costs and profits obtained through optimization of colder water by engineered thermal upgrading will be discussed. Salient points will be reenforced with on-the-job, hands-on, slides and illustrations. HISTORICAL NEGLECT From...

  13. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalfor application of solar thermal and recovered heat to end-absorption chiller solar thermal photovoltaics Results

  14. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; electricalelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electricelectricity) solar thermal collector (kW) PV (kW) electric

  15. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

  16. University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) project report on the third long-term cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyer, M.C.; Hallgren, J.P.; Uebel, M.H.; Delin, G.N.; Eisenreich, S.J.; Sterling, R.L.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Minnesota aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system has been operated as a field test facility (FTF) since 1982. The objectives were to design, construct, and operate the facility to study the feasibility of high-temperature ATES in a confined aquifer. Four short-term and two long-term cycles were previously conducted, which provided a greatly increased understanding of the efficiency and geochemical effects of high-temperature aquifer thermal energy storage. The third long-term cycle (LT3) was conducted to operate the ATES system in conjunction with a real heating load and to further study the geochemical impact that heated water storage had on the aquifer. For LT3, the source and storage wells were modified so that only the most permeable portion, the Ironton-Galesville part, of the Franconia-Ironton-Galesville aquifer was used for storage. This was expected to improve storage efficiency by reducing the surface area of the heated volume and simplify analysis of water chemistry results by reducing the number of aquifer-related variables which need to be considered. During LT3, a total volume of 63.2 {times} 10{sup 3} m {sup 3} of water was injected at a rate of 54.95 m{sup 3}/hr into the storage well at a mean temperature of 104.7{degrees}C. Tie-in to the reheat system of the nearby Animal Sciences Veterinary Medicine (ASVM) building was completed after injection was completed. Approximately 66 percent (4.13 GWh) of the energy added to the aquifer was recovered. Approximately 15 percent (0.64 GWh) of the usable (10 building. Operations during heat recovery with the ASVM building`s reheat system were trouble-free. Integration into more of the ASVM (or other) building`s mechanical systems would have resulted in significantly increasing the proportion of energy used during heat recovery.

  17. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

    2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has cross-flow and counter-current MDCT's consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to simulate the cooling tower performance for the counter-current cooling tower and to conduct a parametric study under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model and performed the benchmarking analysis against the integral measurement results to accomplish the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of parametric calculations was performed to investigate the impact of wind speeds and ambient conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was also benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS integral test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be published here.

  18. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper, Colorado1991). Wallboard with latent heat storage for passive solarR. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling, Pacific

  19. Optimal Deployment of Thermal Energy Storage under Diverse Economic and Climate Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicolas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation of the economic benefit of thermal energy storage (TES) for cooling, across a range of economic and climate conditions. Chilled water TES systems are simulated for a large office building in four distinct locations, Miami in the U.S.; Lisbon, Portugal; Shanghai, China; and Mumbai, India. Optimal system size and operating schedules are determined using the optimization model DER-CAM, such that total cost, including electricity and amortized capital costs are minimized. The economic impacts of each optimized TES system is then compared to systems sized using a simple heuristic method, which bases system size as fraction (50percent and 100percent) of total on-peak summer cooling loads. Results indicate that TES systems of all sizes can be effective in reducing annual electricity costs (5percent-15percent) and peak electricity consumption (13percent-33percent). The investigation also indentifies a number of criteria which drive TES investment, including low capital costs, electricity tariffs with high power demand charges and prolonged cooling seasons. In locations where these drivers clearly exist, the heuristically sized systems capture much of the value of optimally sized systems; between 60percent and 100percent in terms of net present value. However, in instances where these drivers are less pronounced, the heuristic tends to oversize systems, and optimization becomes crucial to ensure economically beneficial deployment of TES, increasing the net present value of heuristically sized systems by as much as 10 times in some instances.

  20. Potential industrial applications for composite phase-change materials as thermal energy storage media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanner, G.E.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable effort has been spent by the US Department of Energy and its contractors over the last few years to develop composite phase-change materials (CPCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES). This patented TES medium consists of a phase-change material (typically a salt or metal alloy) that is retained within the porous structure of a supporting material (typically a ceramic). The objectives of this study were to (1) introduce CPCMs to industries that may not otherwise be aware of them, (2) identify potentially attractive applications for CPCM in industry, (3) determine technical requirements that will affect the design of CPCM's for specific applications, and (4) generate interest among industrial firms for employing CPCM TES in their processes. The approach in this study was to examine a wide variety of industries using a series of screens to select those industries that would be most likely to adopt CPCM TES in their processes. The screens used in this study were process temperature, presence of time-varying energy flows, energy intensity of the industry, and economic growth prospects over the next 5 years. After identifying industries that passed all of the screens, representatives of each industry were interviewed by telephone to introduce them to CPCM TES, assess technical requirements for CPCM TES in their industry, and determine their interest in pursuing applications for CPCM TES. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Energy Storage: Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.; Turchi, C.; Burkhardt, J.; Kutscher, C.; Decker, T.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

  2. Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program: Progress summary for the period April 1986 through March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses recent progress in the DOE program, directed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to develop seasonal thermal energy storage (STES). STES has been identified as one method to substantially improve energy efficiency and economics in certain sectors of our economy. It provides a potentially economic means of using waste heat and climatic energy resources to meet a significant portion of our growing energy need for building and industrial process heating and cooling. Environmental benefits accompany the use of STES in many applications. Furthermore, STES can contribute to reduced reliance on premium fuels that are often obtained from foreign sources. Lastly by improving the energy economics of industry, STES can contribute to improved US industrial competitiveness. The report is provided in four sections; the first being this introduction Section 2 of the report describes the program and briefly documents its organization, goals, history, and long-term plans. Section 3 describes the progress during the period from April, 1986, through March, 1988. Section 4 provides a short update on international development of STES. 17 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-Mathematical modeling; thermal energy storage; aquifers;

  4. IMU Activities Tower Application and Contract 1 INDIANA MEMORIAL UNION STUDENT ACTIVITIES TOWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    IMU Activities Tower Application and Contract 1 INDIANA MEMORIAL UNION STUDENT ACTIVITIES TOWER March 21, 2012 Union Board Office- 2nd floor of the IMU Activities Tower ­ room 270 The following Student Activities Tower: Organization Name

  5. COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

  6. Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    Experimental Number Theory Part I : Tower Arithmetic by Edinah K. Gnang January 15, 2011 1 rooted trees, which we shall here refer to as towers. The bijection between numbers and towers provides by XXX = (xk)1kn , (1) a tower expansion ( or simply a tower ) over XXX is a finite product of iterated

  7. Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turpish, W.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 2 Types of Cooling Towers Forced Draft Towers ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 3 Types... of Cooling Towers Induced draft Cross-flow ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 4 Types of Cooling Towers Induced Draft-Counter Flow Two-cell Single Cell Four Cell...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: anemometer towers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anemometer towers Characterizing Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Inflow On April 1, 2014, in Energy, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy The Scaled...

  9. Thermal Storage Commercial Plant Design Study for a 2-Tank Indirect Molten Salt System: Final Report, 13 May 2002 - 31 December 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, B.; Kearney, D.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontract report by Nexant, Inc., and Kearney and Associates regarding a study of a solar parabolic trough commercial plant design with 2-tank indirect molten salt thermal storage system.

  10. Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

    of these research projects and presents detailed results of project WKSP. The performance of buildings with systems for underground thermal energy storage is analysed in this project. As the analyses show several systems work worse than expected. Within the project...

  11. Chiller Start/Stop Optimization for a Campus-wide Chilled Water System with a Thermal Storage Tank Under a Four-Period Electricity Rate Schedule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J.; Wei, G.; Turner, W. D.; Deng, S.; Claridge, D.; Contreras, O.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of a 1.4-million-gallon chilled water thermal storage tank greatly increases the operational flexibility of a campuswide chilled water system under a four-part electricity rate structure. While significant operational savings can...

  12. Daily Texan April 1, 2014 Keeping Tower dark for Earth Hour was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    of the University's Energy and Water Conservation program, said the Tower going dark was a gesture similarDaily Texan April 1, 2014 Keeping Tower dark for Earth Hour was intended to raise awareness British thermal units, of natural gas. According to the University's Utilities and Energy Management

  13. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower...

  14. Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phelps Jr., P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cooling towers; crossflow and counterflow. Many older towers are of the crossflow type and many newer towers are counterflow. The two types are most easily identified by looking at the sides of the tower. Crossflow towers have the air inlets all... the way up the sides of the tower, and air is drawn inward across the falling water, hence the term crossflow. Counterflow towers only have inlets around the bottom of the tower, and air is drawn in and upward through the falling water, hence the term...

  15. Efficient Phase-Change Materials: Development of a Low-Cost Thermal Energy Storage System Using Phase-Change Materials with Enhanced Radiation Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    HEATS Project: USF is developing low-cost, high-temperature phase-change materials (PCMs) for use in thermal energy storage systems. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. Most PCMs do not conduct heat very well. Using an innovative, electroless encapsulation technique, USF is enhancing the heat transfer capability of its PCMs. The inner walls of the capsules will be lined with a corrosion-resistant, high-infrared emissivity coating, and the absorptivity of the PCM will be controlled with the addition of nano-sized particles. USF’s PCMs remain stable at temperatures from 600 to 1,000°C and can be used for solar thermal power storage, nuclear thermal power storage, and other applications.

  16. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric storage, energy efficiency, heat storage, micro-generation systems, photovoltaic, software, solar thermal

  17. Stellar Explosions by Magnetic Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri A. Uzdensky; Andrew I. MacFadyen

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a magnetic mechanism for the collimated explosion of a massive star relevant for GRBs, XRFs and asymmetric supernovae. We apply Lynden-Bell's magnetic tower scenario to the interior of a massive rotating star after the core has collapsed to form a black hole with an accretion disk or a millisecond magnetar acting as a central engine. We solve the force-free Grad-Shafranov equation to calculate the magnetic structure and growth of a tower embedded in a stellar environment. The pressure of the toroidal magnetic field, continuously generated by differential rotation of the central engine, drives a rapid expansion which becomes vertically collimated after lateral force balance with the surrounding gas pressure is reached. The collimation naturally occurs because hoop stress concentrates magnetic field toward the rotation axis and inhibits lateral expansion. This leads to the growth of a self-collimated magnetic tower. When embedded in a massive star, the supersonic expansion of the tower drives a strong bow shock behind which an over-pressured cocoon forms. The cocoon confines the tower by supplying collimating pressure and provides stabilization against disruption due to MHD instabilities. Because the tower consists of closed field lines starting and ending on the central engine, mixing of baryons from the cocoon into the tower is suppressed. The channel cleared by the growing tower is thus plausibly free of baryons and allows the escape of magnetic energy from the central engine through the star. While propagating down the stellar density gradient, the tower accelerates and becomes relativistic. During the expansion, fast collisionless reconnection becomes possible resulting in dissipation of magnetic energy which may be responsible for GRB prompt emission.

  18. Analysis of novel, above-ground thermal energy storage concept utilizing low-cost, solid medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barineau, Mark Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy power plants cannot effectively match peak demands without utilizing energy storage technologies. Currently, several solutions address short term demand cycles, but little work has been done to address seasonal ...

  19. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  20. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of energy storage technologies deployed in the SGIG projects.

  1. TOWER OF COARSE MODULI KINYA KIMURA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Michael

    TOWER OF COARSE MODULI KINYA KIMURA Modular Towers is introduced by M. Fried for analogue of the towers of modular curves in the framework of Hurwitz space theory. Let p be a prime, G a p of which order of the elements is prime to p. Then we can consider the tower of Hurwitz space associated

  2. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH APPLETON TOWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH APPLETON TOWER A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES Appleton Tower confirm the evacuation arrangements". #12;Introduction Disabled Access Guide for Appleton Tower APPLETON TOWER was named in posthumous honour of physicist Sir Edward Appleton, the Principal who oversaw

  3. Methodologies for Continuous Cellular Tower Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clauset, Aaron

    Methodologies for Continuous Cellular Tower Data Analysis Nathan Eagle1,2 , John A. Quinn3 cellular tower data from 215 randomly sampled subjects in a major urban city. We demonstrate the potential by tower transitions. The tower groupings from these unsupervised clustering techniques are subsequently

  4. David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    David Hume Tower George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JX 0131 650 8295 http://www.ed.ac.uk/maps THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH DAVID HUME TOWER A GUIDE TO ACCESS AND FACILITIES #12;If you require this document the evacuation arrangements". #12;Disabled Access Guide for David Hume Tower Introduction DAVID HUME TOWER

  5. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacommare, Kristina S H; Stadler, Michael; Aki, Hirohisa; Firestone, Ryan; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of storage technologies such as flow batteries, conventional batteries, and heat storage can improve the economic as well as environmental attractiveness of on-site generation (e.g., PV, fuel cells, reciprocating engines or microturbines operating with or without CHP) and contribute to enhanced demand response. In order to examine the impact of storage technologies on demand response and carbon emissions, a microgrid's distributed energy resources (DER) adoption problem is formulated as a mixed-integer linear program that has the minimization of annual energy costs as its objective function. By implementing this approach in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS), the problem is solved for a given test year at representative customer sites, such as schools and nursing homes, to obtain not only the level of technology investment, but also the optimal hourly operating schedules. This paper focuses on analysis of storage technologies in DER optimization on a building level, with example applications for commercial buildings. Preliminary analysis indicates that storage technologies respond effectively to time-varying electricity prices, i.e., by charging batteries during periods of low electricity prices and discharging them during peak hours. The results also indicate that storage technologies significantly alter the residual load profile, which can contribute to lower carbon emissions depending on the test site, its load profile, and its adopted DER technologies.

  6. A' Brief. History of the Tower Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A' Brief. History of the Tower Shielding Facility and Programs Tower Shielding Facility Hoisting Equipment and Handling Pool Tower Shielding Reactor TSR-II Assembly and Outer Reflector Reactor Suspension buildings (1953) 0 Towers form a lOO- by 200-j? rectangle 0 Unit weight of towers less than 400 lb/' - gives

  7. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Power Towers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trough Systems CLFR Power Towers Acciona Abengoa Sener Solar Millennium SkyFuel Siemens Ausra SPGMann SkyFuel Abengoa Brightsource Energy SolarReserve eSolar Dish Engine...

  9. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system. While our engineers are pretty well convinced of the importance of their sophisticated equipment, and rightly so, they take the cooling towers and the cold water returning from them for granted. Design Conditions are specified...

  10. Cool Storage Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppelheimer, D. M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities have promoted the use of electric heat and thermal storage to increase off peak usage of power. High daytime demand charges and enticing discounts for off peak power have been used as economic incentives to promote thermal storage systems...

  11. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

  12. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Thermal Test Facility NASA's Solar Tower Test of the 1-Meter Aeroshell On August 23, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test...

  14. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahåm, Erika

    Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 of the solar tower Pascal Richter · Optimization of solar tower power plants 2/20 #12;Model of solar tower

  15. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Rongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by utilizing thermal energy storage such as ice storage orThermal Storage Utilization. ” Journal of Solar Energy

  16. Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Materials in Corrugated Copper Panels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aigbotsua, Clifford Okhumeode

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    variations (Lane [2]; Abhat [3]). Latent heat storage has been researched and pioneered by Dr. Telkes in the 1940s (Lane [2]) and others. It did not receive much attention until the energy crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s when it was researched for use... in different applications especially for solar heating. The first application of PCM described in literature was their use for the heating and cooling of buildings by Telkes [4]. The storage capacity of a LHS system incorporating a PCM medium is given...

  17. Thermal Energy Storage Using Phase Change Materials in Corrugated Copper Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aigbotsua, Clifford Okhumeode

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    variations (Lane [2]; Abhat [3]). Latent heat storage has been researched and pioneered by Dr. Telkes in the 1940s (Lane [2]) and others. It did not receive much attention until the energy crisis of the late 1970s and 1980s when it was researched for use... in different applications especially for solar heating. The first application of PCM described in literature was their use for the heating and cooling of buildings by Telkes [4]. The storage capacity of a LHS system incorporating a PCM medium is given...

  18. Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qui, Songgang [Temple University] [Temple University; Galbraith, Ross [Infinia] [Infinia

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the final results of the Phase II Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish-Engine Solar Power Generation project being performed by Infinia Corporation for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-FC36-08GO18157 during the project period of September 1, 2009 - August 30, 2012. The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the practicality of integrating thermal energy storage (TES) modules, using a suitable thermal salt phase-change material (PCM) as its medium, with a dish/Stirling engine; enabling the system to operate during cloud transients and to provide dispatchable power for 4 to 6 hours after sunset. A laboratory prototype designed to provide 3 kW-h of net electrical output was constructed and tested at Infinia's Ogden Headquarters. In the course of the testing, it was determined that the system's heat pipe network - used to transfer incoming heat from the solar receiver to both the Stirling generator heater head and to the phase change salt - did not perform to expectations. The heat pipes had limited capacity to deliver sufficient heat energy to the generator and salt mass while in a charging mode, which was highly dependent on the orientation of the device (vertical versus horizontal). In addition, the TES system was only able to extract about 30 to 40% of the expected amount of energy from the phase change salt once it was fully molten. However, the use of heat pipes to transfer heat energy to and from a thermal energy storage medium is a key technical innovation, and the project team feels that the limitations of the current device could be greatly improved with further development. A detailed study of manufacturing costs using the prototype TES module as a basis indicates that meeting DOE LCOE goals with this hardware requires significant efforts. Improvement can be made by implementing aggressive cost-down initiatives in design and materials, improving system performance by boosting efficiencies, and by refining cost estimates with vendor quotes in lieu of mass-based approaches. Although the prototype did not fully demonstrate performance and realize projected cost targets, the project team believes that these challenges can be overcome. The test data showed that the performance can be significantly improved by refining the heat pipe designs. However, the project objective for phase 3 is to design and test on sun the field ready systems, the project team feels that is necessary to further refine the prototype heat pipe design in the current prototype TES system before move on to field test units, Phase 3 continuation will not be pursued.

  19. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

  20. An investigation into the thermal properties of selected sensible and latent heat storage materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stanley Clayton

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the latent heat of fusion. Considerable work has been done in analyzing latent heat storage systems. Telkes and Raymond [lj did early work with a sodium sulfate system using sealed drums. iVore recent experimental work was conducted with other salt...

  1. An investigation into the thermal properties of selected sensible and latent heat storage materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stanley Clayton

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the latent heat of fusion. Considerable work has been done in analyzing latent heat storage systems. Telkes and Raymond [lj did early work with a sodium sulfate system using sealed drums. iVore recent experimental work was conducted with other salt...

  2. 7.2.9. Tower 7.2.10. Winterdienstgebude /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    .2.9.3.4.3 Überwachung der Notstromversorgung des Towers 7.2.9.3.5 Kälteversorgung des Towers / Cooling Supply of Tower 7

  3. Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Donghyun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid...

  4. Molten Salt Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage and Concentrated Solar Power Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Donghyun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal efficiency of concentrated solar power (CSP) system depends on the maximum operating temperature of the system which is determined by the operating temperature of the TES device. Organic materials (such as synthetic oil, fatty acid...

  5. Domestic olivine vs magnesite as a thermal-energy-storage material: performance comparisons for electrically heated room-size units in accordance with ASHRAE Standard 94. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laster, W.R.; Schoenhals, R.J.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H. III

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrically heated thermal-energy-storage (TES) heaters employing high-heat-capacity ceramic refractories for sensible heat storage have been in use in Europe for several years. With these heaters, low cost off-peak electrical energy is stored by heating a storage core composed of ceramic material to approximately 800/sup 0/C. During the peak period, no electrical energy is used as the building heating needs are supplied by extracting the stored heat from the core by forced air circulation. Recently significant interest in the use of off-peak TES units in the US has occured, leading to the search for a domestic supply of high heat capacity ceramic refractory material. North Carolina's extensive but under-utilized supply of refractory grade olivine has been proposed as a source of storage material for these units. In this paper, the suitability of North Carolina olivine for heat-storage applications is assessed by comparing its thermal performance with that of European materials. Using the method of ASHRAE Standard 94.2, the thermal performance of two small room-sized commercially available TES units was determined experimentally with two different storage materials, North Carolina olivine and German magnesite. Comparisons between the two materials are made and conclusions are drawn.

  6. Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (EPCM-TES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Technologies LLC, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrafore successfully demonstrated and optimized the manufacturing of capsules containing phase-changing inorganic salts. The phase change was used to store thermal energy collected from a concentrating solar-power plant as latent heat. This latent heat, in addition to sensible heat increased the energy density (energy stored per unit weight of salt) by over 50%, thus requiring 40% less salt and over 60% less capsule container. Therefore, the cost to store high-temperature thermal energy collected in a concentrating solar power plant will be reduced by almost 40% or more, as compared to conventional two-tank, sensible-only storage systems. The cost for thermal energy storage (TES) system is expected to achieve the Sun Shot goal of $15 per kWh(t). Costs associated with poor heat-transfer in phase change materials (PCM) were also eliminated. Although thermal energy storage that relies on the latent heat of fusion of PCM improves energy density by as much as 50%, upon energy discharge the salt freezes and builds on the heat transfer surfaces. Since these salts have low thermal conductivity, large heat-transfer areas, or larger conventional heat-exchangers are needed, which increases costs. By encapsulating PCM in small capsules we have increased the heat transfer area per unit volume of salt and brought the heat transfer fluid in direct contact with the capsules. These two improvements have increased the heat transfer coefficient and boosted heat transfer. The program was successful in overcoming the phenomenon of melt expansion in the capsules, which requires the creation of open volume in the capsules or shell to allow for expansion of the molten salt on melting and is heated above its melting point to 550°C. Under contract with the Department of Energy, Terrafore Inc. and Southwest Research Institute, developed innovative method(s) to economically create the open volume or void in the capsule. One method consists of using a sacrificial polymer coating as the middle layer between the salt prill and the shell material. The selected polymer decomposes at temperatures below the melting point of the salt and forms gases which escape through the pores in the capsule shell thus leaving a void in the capsule. We have demonstrated the process with a commonly used inorganic nitrate salt in a low-cost shell material that can withstand over 10,000 high-temperature thermal cycles, or a thirty-year or greater life in a solar plant. The shell used to encapsulate the salt was demonstrated to be compatible with molten salt heat transfer fluid typically used in CSP plants to temperatures up to 600 °C. The above findings have led to the concept of a cascaded arrangement. Salts with different melting points can be encapsulated using the same recipe and contained in a packed bed by cascading the salt melting at higher melting point at the top over the salt melting at lower melting point towards the bottom of the tank. This cascaded energy storage is required to effectively transfer the sensible heat collected in heat transfer fluids between the operating temperatures and utilize the latent heat of fusion in the salts inside the capsule. Mathematical models indicate that over 90% of the salts will undergo phase change by using three salts in equal proportion. The salts are selected such that the salt at the top of the tank melts at about 15°C below the high operating-temperature, and the salt at the bottom of the tank melts 15°C above the low operating-temperature. The salt in the middle of tank melts in-between the operating temperature of the heat transfer fluid. A cascaded arrangement leads to the capture of 90% of the latent-heat of fusion of salts and their sensible heats. Thus the energy density is increased by over 50% from a sensible-only, two-tank thermal energy storage. Furthermore, the Terrafore cascaded storage method requires only one tank as opposed to the two-tanks used in sensible heat storage. Since heat is transferred from the heat transfer fluid by direct contact with capsules, external heat-exchangers are not required

  7. Thermal Energy Storage: It's not Just for Electric Cost Savings Anymore 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrepont, J. S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ”, ASHRAE 1994 Annual Meeting, Seminar 03. 3. Andrepont, John S., 3rd Quarter 1995, “Chilled- Water Storage: A Suite of Benefits for District Cooling”, IDEA District Energy magazine, Volume 81, No. 1. 4. Andrepont, John S., February 2000, “Long... Meeting, Seminar 10. 14. Gansler, Robert, August 1999, “Energy and Environmental Impacts of Space Conditioning Systems”, Report on ASHRAE Research Project 991-RP, University of Wisconsin HVAC&R Center, Madison, Wisconsin. 15. Liebendorfer, Kurt M...

  8. Chilled Water Thermal Storage System and Demand Response at the University of California at Merced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granderson, Jessica; Dudley, Junqiao Han; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann

    2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of California at Merced is a unique campus that has benefited from intensive efforts to maximize energy efficiency, and has participated in a demand response program for the past two years. Campus demand response evaluations are often difficult because of the complexities introduced by central heating and cooling, non-coincident and diverse building loads, and existence of a single electrical meter for the entire campus. At the University of California at Merced, a two million gallon chilled water storage system is charged daily during off-peak price periods and used to flatten the load profile during peak demand periods. This makes demand response more subtle and challenges typical evaluation protocols. The goal of this research is to study demand response savings in the presence of storage systems in a campus setting. First, University of California at Merced summer electric loads are characterized; second, its participation in two demand response events is detailed. In each event a set of strategies were pre-programmed into the campus control system to enable semi-automated response. Finally, demand savings results are applied to the utility's DR incentives structure to calculate the financial savings under various DR programs and tariffs. A key conclusion to this research is that there is significant demand reduction using a zone temperature set point change event with the full off peak storage cooling in use.

  9. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Industrial

  10. Dynamic response of guyed towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillcrist, Mark Christopher

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    also account for entrapped sea water in the tower legs as well as added hydrodynamic mass. Sarpkya and Isaacson (9) show that the added hydrodynamic mass, m , per unit length of a circular cylinder can be closely approximated by m = psr 2 a (3. 1... bending associated with the guyed tower's fundamental mode. The global damping matrix, used in this study, is assumed to account for all sources of damping, with the exception of hydrodynamic damping (implicit in the nonlinear drag term of Morison...

  11. CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a concentrating solar power tower air Brayton combustor project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot CSP R&D award program. The team, led by the Southwest Research Institute, is working to develop an external combustor that allows for the mixing of CSP-heated air with natural gas in hybridized power plants. This project aims to increase the temperature capabilities of the CSP tower air receiver and gas turbine to 1,000șC and achieve energy conversion efficiencies greater than 50%.

  12. Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After comparing the thermal performance parameters of an ordinary wall room to a phase change wall (PCW) room, we learn that phase change wallboard affects the fluctuation of temperature in air-conditioning room in the summer. We built a PCW room...

  13. See the UT Tower going dark? There's a reason why Tower joins campus in conservation project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Daniel

    See the UT Tower going dark? There's a reason why Tower joins campus in conservation project KXAN orange or even its typical white, the University of Texas Tower will join the dark night sky as part of a campus-wide energy conservation project. This is the first time the Tower will take part in Longhorn

  14. RUDDER TOWER: You are standing in the lobby of Rudder Tower, home to the Appelt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RUDDER TOWER: You are standing in the lobby of Rudder Tower, home to the Appelt Aggieland Visitor Center. The lobby elevators take you up Rudder Tower, where the office of the president of Texas A to the Plaza, you'll be facing Albritton Tower in the distance; you will hear its Westminster chimes ring every

  15. Livingston Campus North and South Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston Campus North and South Tower General Instructions: · Print directions and name.7 miles). Continue on Route 18 North. · Follow the signs for Towers move in. From Garden State Parkway the Raritan River (approximately 3.7 miles). Continue on Route 18 North. · Follow the signs for Towers move in

  16. Thermal treatment effects on charge storage performance of graphene-based materials for supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Hongxin [ORNL; Bhat, Vinay V [ORNL; Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene materials were synthesized by reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide sheets by hydrazine hydrate and then thermally treated in nitrogen to improve the surface area and their electrochemical performance as electrical double-layer capacitor electrodes. The structural and surface properties of the prepared reduced graphite oxide (RGO) were investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectra, X-ray diffraction, and nitrogen adsorption / desorption. RGO forms a continuous network of crumpled sheets, which consist of numerous few-layer and single-layer graphenes. Electrochemical studies were conducted by cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements. The modified RGO materials showed enhanced electrochemical performance, with maximum specific capacitance of 96 F/g, energy density of 12.8 Wh/kg, and power density of 160 kW/kg. The results demonstrate that thermal treatment of RGO at selected conditions is a convenient and efficient method for improving specific capacitance, energy, and power density.

  17. Thermal Storage for Energy Efficient Structures (Poteet High School Case Study)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utesch, A. L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and cooling valves in sequence for temperature control. Ventilation air dampers and control valves close when units are de-energized. I. DDC CONTROL SYSTEM Controls equipment, provides system operation information, generates historical data files... with air units or fan and coil units with hot and chilled water coils. Whenever occupancy is sensed the lights and HVAC equipment are energized and automatically oontrolled by sequencing coil valves to maintain the temperature setting. The thermal...

  18. Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, W.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tower pump suction basin was accomplished by diving into the basin using SCUBA gear. It was possible to see a build-up of debris on the pump suction basket strainers and on the floor of the sumps. Also, it was discovered that one of the four baskets had...

  19. Light storage via coherent population oscillation in a thermal cesium vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. F. de Almeida; J. Sales; M. -A. Maynard; T. Laupretre; F. Bretenaker; D. Felinto; F. Goldfarb; J. W. R. Tabosa

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the storage of light via the phenomenon of Coherent Population Oscillation (CPO) in an atomic cesium vapor at room temperature. In the experiment the optical information of a probe field is stored in the CPO of two ground states of a Lambda three-level system formed by the Zeeman sublevels of the hyperfine transition F = 3 - F' = 2 of cesium D2 line. We show directly that this CPO based memory is very insensitive to stray magnetic field inhomogeneities and presents a lifetime which is mainly limited only by atomic motion. A theoretical simulation of the measured spectra was also developed and is in very good agreement with the experiment.

  20. Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feustel, H.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the discharge of thermal energy storage without releasingto low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices

  1. The Volatility and the Thermal Storage Performance of Binary Polyalcohol Systems Used in the Wall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Q.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The structural and chemical analyses of a kind of shape-stabilized paraffin. ACTA Energiae Solaris Sinica. 2000, 21(4):4 421. (in Chinese) Qin Penghua, Yang Rui, Zhang Yinping etc.. Thermal performance of shape-stabilized phase change materials. J (in... Chinese) Fan Yaofeng, Zhang Xinxiang. Progress in studies of solid-solid phase change materials. REVIEW OF MATERIALS. 2003,17(7):50-53. (in Ch [10] Ruan Deshui?Zhang Taiping. DSC Research of phase change materials. ACTA Energiae Solaris Sinica...

  2. Project Profile: Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergyThermalDepartment of

  3. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

  4. Electric Storage in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    microgrid can be fuel cells, PV, solar thermal, stationary storage, absorption cooling, combined heat and power,

  5. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough

  6. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceedings on thermal energy storage and energy conversion;polymer microcomposites for thermal energy storage. SAE SocLow temperature thermal energy storage: a state of the art

  7. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),Toward Molecular Solar-Thermal Energy Storage,” Angewandtescale molecular solar thermal energy storage system, in

  8. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been considered for solar thermal energy storages. These arePCMs for thermal energy storage in solar driven residentialfluid and thermal energy storage medium in the solar heat

  9. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,D. , 2009, “Review on Thermal Energy Storage with PhaseW. , 2002, “Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic

  10. Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeForest, Nicholas; Mendes, Goncalo; Stadler, Michael; Feng, Wei; Lai, Judy; Marnay, Chris

    2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity demand. In the developing world a steadily increasing utilization of air-conditioning places additional strain on already-congested grids. This common thread represents a large and growing threat to the reliable delivery of electricity around the world, requiring capital-intensive expansion of capacity and draining available investment resources. Thermal energy storage (TES), in the form of ice or chilled water, may be one of the few technologies currently capable of mitigating this problem cost effectively and at scale. The installation of TES capacity allows a building to meet its on-peak air conditioning load without interruption using electricity purchased off-peak and operating with improved thermodynamic efficiency. In this way, TES has the potential to fundamentally alter consumption dynamics and reduce impacts of air conditioning. This investigation presents a simulation study of a large office building in four distinct geographical contexts: Miami, Lisbon, Shanghai, and Mumbai. The optimization tool DER-CAM (Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model) is applied to optimally size TES systems for each location. Summer load profiles are investigated to assess the effectiveness and consistency in reducing peak electricity demand. Additionally, annual energy requirements are used to determine system cost feasibility, payback periods and customer savings under local utility tariffs.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Tower

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    top ... Thermal Pulses for Boeing Test Article On September 6, 2012, in Concentrating Solar Power, EC, Energy, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, Partnership,...

  12. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COOLING TOWERS -- ENERGY CONSERVATION STRATEGIES Cooling Water Optimization Dr. JACK MATSON Environmental Engg. Dept. University of Houston Houston, Texas A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower... pressures on generating turbines and all of the good things listed above can be achieved with a well upgraded modernized cooling tower, but if minimum or no attention is paid to the water chemistry, poor performance, and loss of energy and dollar...

  13. Cooling Tower Considerations for Energy Optimizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accumulat- ing in the strainers and tubes. The California Redwood Institute states that the service life of thin section Redwood used in cooling towers .is a'pproximately 15 to 20 years. Therefore, in these older-type towers the fill Is usually... of the art cellular film fill packing. Figure 6. Eight cell blow-thru tower where rebuilding lowered the water temperature 4OF greatly reducing compressor head pressures and temperatures thereby lowering energy consumption throughout the system...

  14. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  15. Evaluation and Optimization of Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP)- A Project within the new German R&D- Framework EnBop 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockelmann, F.; Kipry, H.; Plesser, S.; Fisch, M. N.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation and optimization of underground thermal energy storage systems of Energy Efficient Buildings (WKSP) - A project within the new German R&D-framework EnBop Dipl.-Ing. Franziska Bockelmann IGS ? Institute of Building Services... and Energydesign, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany Dipl.-Ing. Herdis Kipry IGS ? Institute of Building Services and Energydesign, Technical University of Braunschweig, Germany Dipl.-Ing. Stefan Plesser Head of Energy Efficient Non...

  16. Software-as-a-Service Optimised Scheduling of a Solar-Assisted HVAC System with Thermal Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammoli, Andrea

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance of a solar-thermal- assisted hvac system. Energyfor rows of fixed solar thermal collectors using flatassisted by a 232 m solar thermal array providing heat to a

  17. WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA 9/1/06-11/30/06 Prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) Golden.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series...........................................................................................................

  18. WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA 11/13/06-11/30/06 Prepared for Department of Energy (DOE.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series.........................................................................................................

  19. How to Build a Tower

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy 2010a Wind Turbine WorksHomeTower

  20. Pueblo Towers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to:ID8/OrganizationTechProbSolutionsPublic ArtTexas Jump to:Towers Jump to:

  1. Out of Ashes and Rubble: The Pirelli Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziegler, Claudia J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agnese’s text. 13. The Pirelli tower was novel, experimentalpostwar periods, or that the tower was a departure from theand Rubble: The Pirelli Tower Claudia J. Ziegler At the end

  2. Targeting adequate thermal stability and fire safety in selecting ionic liquid-based electrolytes for energy storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for energy storage L. Chancelier,a,b A.O. Diallo,c,d C.C. Santini,*a G. Marlair,*c T. Gutel,b S. Mailley,b C Abstract The energy storage market relating to lithium based systems regularly grows in size and expands for the promotion of a new generation of energy storage systems. These systems must be capable of addressing

  3. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

  4. Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning Deactivation mechanisms of NOx storage materials arising from thermal aging and sulfur poisoning...

  5. Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP plants....

  6. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials - Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials Recommended...

  7. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or (2) from solar energy collectors, and to retrieve the hotof Hot Water from Solar Energy Collectors," Proceedings of

  9. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  10. THE GROUP OF SYMMETRIES OF THE TOWER OF HANOI GRAPH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrstock, Jason

    THE GROUP OF SYMMETRIES OF THE TOWER OF HANOI GRAPH SO EUN PARK The classical Tower of Hanoi puzzle the tower of disks to another peg, moving one topmost disk at a time while never stacking a disk referred to as the Tower of Hanoi problem. Figure 1. Convention for labeling k pegs and n disks

  11. Charlotte Teachers' Circle September 17, 2011 Tower of Hanoi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiter, Harold

    1 Charlotte Teachers' Circle September 17, 2011 Tower of Hanoi The Tower of Hanoi as the Tower of Brahma. According to the legend, when the last move of the puzzle is completed, the world of the three pegs. The objective of the puzzle is to move the entire tower to one of the other pegs

  12. A New Tower Over Cubic Finite Fields , Arnaldo Garcia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    A New Tower Over Cubic Finite Fields Alp Bassa , Arnaldo Garcia and Henning Stichtenoth We present a new explicit tower of function fields (Fn)n0 over the finite field with = q3 elements, where the limit). This tower contains as a subtower the tower which was introduced by Bezerra­ Garcia­Stichtenoth (see [3

  13. Effects of guy wires on SWECS tower dynamics. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C P; Pykkonen, K R; Sexton, J H

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Flats (RF) Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) study for tower testing/analysis has led to some useful information concerning the effect of tower guy pretension on small wind system tower dynamics. The effect of guy-wire pretension on tower natural frequencies is usually considered negligible if the guy: (1) has no sag caused by gravity, and (2) the tension is not approaching the tower buckling load. At the rf test center it was found that, for the test tower even when these conditions were avoided, the guy fundamental frequency must be 30% greater than the tower fundamental frequency to maintain the fundamental's characteristics.

  14. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  15. Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loving care is paid to the compressors, condensers, and computer programs of refrigeration systems. When problems arise, operator: run around in circles with expensive "fixes", but historically ignore the poor orphan, the cooling tower perched...

  16. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers...

  17. WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT WBZ Tower, Hull, MA 12/1/06-2/28/07 Prepared for Department of Energy (DOE) Golden...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jessica K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

  19. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEND D eReview |Panel HydrogenM M aDesign |

  20. Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

  1. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandra, Dhanesh (Primary Contact); Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH ? LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255oC; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (?Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (?Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly stored in the material after the first desorption. The activation energy was found to be 51 kJ/mol, as compared to 81 kJ/mol for pure lithium alanate. It is proposed that based on the data obtained and CALPHAD modeling that the improvement in cycling is due to the formation of pure lithium (liquid at 255oC), which is able to react with nitrogen specifically forming Li3N. The presence of nitrogen in the 80/20 molar mixtures in a hydride bed along with hydrogen causes Li to form Li3N rather than LiH, and subsequently regenerates the Li2NH phase and yields a ~10 wt.%H reversibly.

  2. ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS - - A SURVEY OF RECENT THEORETICAL STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    underground thermal energy storage. In Proc. Th~rmal1980), 'I'hermal energy storage? in a confined aquifer·--al modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers. In ~~-

  3. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    could be acquired, e.g. battery storage, the costs for whichlead/acid battery, and thermal storage, capabilities, witha) thermal storage 8 IV) flow battery V) absorption chiller

  4. Advanced research in solar-energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luft, W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Energy Storage Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute is reviewed. The program provides research, systems analyses, and economic assessments of thermal and thermochemical energy storage and transport. Current activities include experimental research into very high temperature (above 800/sup 0/C) thermal energy storage and assessment of novel thermochemical energy storage and transport systems. The applications for such high-temperature storage are thermochemical processes, solar thermal-electric power generation, cogeneration of heat and electricity, industrial process heat, and thermally regenerative electrochemical systems. The research results for five high-temperature thermal energy storage technologies and two thermochemical systems are described.

  5. Integrated Building Energy Systems Design Considering Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photovoltaic, software, solar thermal systems Abstract Theinteractions among PV, solar thermal, and storage systemsstorage, PV, as well as solar thermal system adoption, two

  6. Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This power tower is part of the...

  7. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seunghwan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    maximizing the thermal conductivity of the nanomaterial (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size varying between ~ 20-30nm) and maximizing the specific heat capacity (which typically occurs for nanoparticle size less than 5nm), while simultaneously...

  8. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Inorganic Nanomaterials for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seunghwan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    cause significant enhancement in the specific heat capacity of nanofluids and nanocomposites. The interfacial thermal resistance (also known as Kapitza resistance, or “Rk”) between a nanoparticle and the surrounding solvent molecules (for these molten...

  9. ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC TOWER JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, 600 Wilson Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14627-0171 (United States); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Observatoire de Paris, F-92195 Meudon (France); Hartigan, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 S. Main, Houston, TX 77521-1892 (United States); Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, SW7 2BW London (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern theoretical models of astrophysical jets combine accretion, rotation, and magnetic fields to launch and collimate supersonic flows from a central source. Near the source, magnetic field strengths must be large enough to collimate the jet requiring that the Poynting flux exceeds the kinetic energy flux. The extent to which the Poynting flux dominates kinetic energy flux at large distances from the engine distinguishes two classes of models. In magneto-centrifugal launch models, magnetic fields dominate only at scales {approx}< 100 engine radii, after which the jets become hydrodynamically dominated (HD). By contrast, in Poynting flux dominated (PFD) magnetic tower models, the field dominates even out to much larger scales. To compare the large distance propagation differences of these two paradigms, we perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations of both HD and PFD stellar jets formed via the same energy flux. We also compare how thermal energy losses and rotation of the jet base affects the stability in these jets. For the conditions described, we show that PFD and HD exhibit observationally distinguishable features: PFD jets are lighter, slower, and less stable than HD jets. Unlike HD jets, PFD jets develop current-driven instabilities that are exacerbated as cooling and rotation increase, resulting in jets that are clumpier than those in the HD limit. Our PFD jet simulations also resemble the magnetic towers that have been recently created in laboratory astrophysical jet experiments.

  10. Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants Project Profile: Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Storage for Baseload CSP Plants...

  11. Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module Project Profile: Sensible Heat, Direct, Dual-Media Thermal Energy Storage Module Acciona logo Acciona Solar, under...

  12. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97{degrees}C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350{degrees}C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97{degrees}C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350{degrees}C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 {times} 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97{degrees}C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350{degrees}C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft {times} 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40{degrees}C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation.

  13. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, “Report on Inspection 1”, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

  14. Digital places : rethinking urban elements : the case of the tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gichuhi, Christopher M. (Christopher Mwethera), 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problem - How can we make working, living and all aspects of our life in the urban tower more palatable? How can we create environment at the urban tower scale. With technology as one of the biggest drivers of social and ...

  15. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

  16. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  17. Marketing Cool Storage Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCannon, L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the field. The International Thermal Storage Advisory Council was formed to help meet this perceived need. This paper will review activities of EPRI and ITSAC to achieve widespread acceptance of the technology....

  18. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL; Muley, Nishant [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  19. Boise Air Traffic Control Tower: High Performance and sustainable Building Guiding Principles Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Goel, Supriya; Henderson, Jordan W.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overview of energy efficiency opportunities for new FAA tower construction using the Boise Air Traffic Control Tower as an example.

  20. Bankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization of Governance at the University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eaton, Charlie; Goldstein, Adam; Habinek, Jacob; Kumar, Mukul; Stover, Tamera Lee; Roehrkasse, Alex

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization ofBankers in the Ivory Tower: The Financialization of

  1. Effect of Heat and Electricity Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of Commercial Buildings in California and New York States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    optimal could be acquired. Battery storage costs are roughlylead/acid battery) and thermal storage, capabilities, withcell electric storage heat storage flow battery abs. chiller

  2. New North Dakota Factory to Produce Wind Towers, Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind tower factory could bring back some of the jobs lost when a machine manufacturing plant closed.

  3. Structural Optimization of High Voltage Transmission Line Towers considering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colominas, Ignasi

    Structural Optimization of High Voltage Transmission Line Towers considering Continuum and Discrete/or to common designs largely repeated (e.g. automotive compo- nents), and high voltage transmission towers can than conventional designs of high voltage transmission line towers. The optimization model proposed

  4. MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viale, Matteo

    MARTIN'S MAXIMUM AND TOWER FORCING SEAN COX AND MATTEO VIALE Abstract. There are several examples, the Reflection Princi- ple (RP) implies that if I is a tower of ideals which concentrates on the class GIC1 of 1 [16], shows that if PFA+ or MM holds and there is an inaccessible cardinal, then there is a tower

  5. About the Design & Construction Collaborative Life Sciences Building & Skourtes Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Michael S.

    About the Design & Construction Collaborative Life Sciences Building & Skourtes Tower Life Sciences Building & Skourtes Tower (CLSB) is an innovative model for health sciences education intention. The building's volumes--the 12-story north tower and the five-story south wing--are connected

  6. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE The TALE Tower Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE The TALE Tower Detector D. R. BERGMAN1 , FOR THE TA and extend the range of its energy coverage to lower energies. One of the TALE detectors is a "tower cosmic rays with energies between 1016.5 and 1018 eV. To achieve this low-energy sensitivity the tower

  7. Muirhead Tower Atrium 9 January17 May 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Muirhead Tower Atrium 9 January­17 May 2013 Weekdays 9am­6pm William Morris and the Kelmscott Press Morris died. Muirhead Tower Atrium, 9 January­17 May 2013 Twitter: @CadburyRL See more exhibitions from Muirhead Tower, Lower Ground Floor University of Birmingham, B15 2TT E: special-collections@bham.ac.uk T

  8. Tower Foundation of SJSU Procurement Card Program Policies & Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eirinaki, Magdalini

    Tower Foundation of SJSU Procurement Card Program Policies & Procedures General Information Overview of Program The Tower Foundation ProCard program has been implemented to provide easy be an authorized signer on the Tower account. Purchases made with the ProCard are billed to Approving Official

  9. THE TOWER AT THE END OF COMMENCEMENT, 2006 THE GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    THE TOWER AT THE END OF COMMENCEMENT, 2006 THE GENERAL UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS INFORMATION AT AUSTIN O Box 7216, Austin TX 78713- 7216. Cover: The Tower at the conclusion of Commencement 2006 of the Tower and celebrated with a fireworks display and light show. Issue Number 2006/5 August 2006

  10. The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    The Albany Particle Tower: Online Access for High School Students Kristen Melnyk­Elsner Kimball education outreach program, the Albany Particle Tower (APT) has been made available online to students who to run the detector and analyze real time data. Introduction The Albany Particle Tower is a Cosmic Ray

  11. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies Preservative Spray Treatment Maintains Cooling Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reidenback, R.

    Several problems common to most industrial wood framed cooling towers can be easily controlled with annual preservative spray treatment applications to the plenum area framework and drift eliminators. It eliminates the expensive periodic repairs due...

  12. Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phelps Jr., P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling tower is often an overlooked source of easy energy savings. As long as it's running not much thought is usually given to it, but when numbers are applied to how much a degree of colder water is worth it can become a valuable and ready...

  13. User manual for AQUASTOR: a computer model for cost analysis of aquifer thermal-energy storage oupled with district-heating or cooling systems. Volume II. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, H.D.; Brown, D.R.; Reilly, R.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model called AQUASTOR was developed for calculating the cost of district heating (cooling) using thermal energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. the AQUASTOR Model can simulate ATES district heating systems using stored hot water or ATES district cooling systems using stored chilled water. AQUASTOR simulates the complete ATES district heating (cooling) system, which consists of two prinicpal parts: the ATES supply system and the district heating (cooling) distribution system. The supply system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the ATES supply system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. The model combines the technical characteristics of the supply system and the technical characteristics of the distribution system with financial and tax conditions for the entities operating the two systems into one techno-economic model. This provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heating (cooling) with an ATES system. This volume contains all the appendices, including supply and distribution system cost equations and models, descriptions of predefined residential districts, key equations for the cooling degree-hour methodology, a listing of the sample case output, and appendix H, which contains the indices for supply input parameters, distribution input parameters, and AQUASTOR subroutines.

  14. Simplified Numerical Description of Latent Storage Characteristics for Phase Change Wallboard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuestel, H.E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the discharge of thermal energy storage without "dumping"thermal mass, and • utilize low-energy heating and cooling sources. Large thermal storagelow- energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices

  15. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: molten salt energy storage demonstration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molten salt energy storage demonstration Sandia-AREVA Commission Solar ThermalMolten Salt Energy-Storage Demonstration On May 21, 2014, in Capabilities, Concentrating Solar Power,...

  17. Project Profile: Thermochemical Heat Storage for CSP Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multivalent Metal Oxides General Atomics logo General Atomics (GA), under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing a high-density thermochemical heat storage system based on solid...

  18. DOE Global Energy Storage Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The DOE International Energy Storage Database has more than 400 documented energy storage projects from 34 countries around the world. The database provides free, up-to-date information on grid-connected energy storage projects and relevant state and federal policies. More than 50 energy storage technologies are represented worldwide, including multiple battery technologies, compressed air energy storage, flywheels, gravel energy storage, hydrogen energy storage, pumped hydroelectric, superconducting magnetic energy storage, and thermal energy storage. The policy section of the database shows 18 federal and state policies addressing grid-connected energy storage, from rules and regulations to tariffs and other financial incentives. It is funded through DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories, and has been operating since January 2012.

  19. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reston, VA. Applied Geomechanics (2001). “Model   716-2  biaxial tiltmeter (model 716-2B) from Applied Geomechanics (Applied Geomechanics, 2001), which is accurate down to

  20. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paradigm for Vibration-Based Structural Health Monitoring.Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA,Worden, K (2001) “Structural   Health   Monitoring   Using  

  1. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the code-level wind forces (Goldstone, 1963). The forcethe full force of the northerly Santa Ana winds. In Aprilof forces and overall displacement under seismic and wind

  2. Study plan for conducting a section 316(a) demonstration: K-Reactor cooling tower, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paller, M.H.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) began operation in 1954. The K-Reactor pumped secondary cooling water from the Savannah River and discharged directly to the Indian Grave Branch, a tributary of Pen Branch which flows to the Savannah River. During earlier operations, the temperature and discharge rates of cooling water from the K-reactor were up to approximately 70{degree}C and 400 cfs, substantially altering the thermal and flow regimes of this stream. These discharges resulted in adverse impacts to the receiving stream and wetlands along the receiving stream. As a component of a Consent Order (84-4-W as amended) with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, the Department of Energy (DOE) evaluated the alternatives for cooling thermal effluents from K Reactor and concluded that a natural draft recirculating cooling tower should be constructed. The cooling tower will mitigate thermal and flow factors that resulted in the previous impacts to the Indian Grave/Pen Branch ecosystem. The purpose of the proposed biological monitoring program is to provide information that will support a Section 316(a) Demonstration for Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch when K-Reactor is operated with the recirculating cooling tower. The data will be used to determine that Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch support Balanced Indigenous Communities when K-Reactor is operated with a recirculating cooling tower. 4 refs., 1 fig. 1 tab.

  3. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  4. LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) of Parabolic Trough CSP: Materials Inventory and Embodied GHG Emissions from Two-Tank Indirect and Thermocline Thermal Storage (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.; Burkhardt, J.; Turchi, C.; Decker, T.; Kutscher, C.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, concentrating solar power (CSP) is one of the most promising renewable energy (RE) technologies for reduction of electric sector greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and for rapid capacity expansion. It is also one of the most price-competitive RE technologies, thanks in large measure to decades of field experience and consistent improvements in design. One of the key design features that makes CSP more attractive than many other RE technologies, like solar photovoltaics and wind, is the potential for including relatively low-cost and efficient thermal energy storage (TES), which can smooth the daily fluctuation of electricity production and extend its duration into the evening peak hours or longer. Because operational environmental burdens are typically small for RE technologies, life cycle assessment (LCA) is recognized as the most appropriate analytical approach for determining their environmental impacts of these technologies, including CSP. An LCA accounts for impacts from all stages in the development, operation, and decommissioning of a CSP plant, including such upstream stages as the extraction of raw materials used in system components, manufacturing of those components, and construction of the plant. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is undertaking an LCA of modern CSP plants, starting with those of parabolic trough design.

  5. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedProceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop,c.F. , ~Aquifer thermal energy storage- parameter study,~

  6. Reliability Analysis of Cooling Towers: Influence of Rebars Corrosion on Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudret, Bruno [Electricite de France - EDF, Research and Development Division, Dpt of Materials and Mechanics of Components, Site des Renardieres, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing Cedex (France); Pendola, Maurice [PHI-MECA Engineering, 1 Allee Alan Turing, 63170 - Aubiere (France)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural-draught cooling towers are used in nuclear power plants as heat exchangers. These structures are submitted to environmental loads such as wind and thermal gradients that are stochastic in nature. A probabilistic framework has been developed by EDF (Electricite de France) for assessing the durability of such structures. In this paper, the corrosion of the rebars due to concrete carbonation and the corresponding weakening of the reinforced concrete sections is considered. Due to the presence of time in the definition of the limit state function associated with the loss of serviceability of the cooling tower, time-variant reliability analysis has to be used. A novel approach is proposed to take into account the random 'initiation time', which corresponds to the time necessary for the carbonation to attain the rebars. Results are given in terms of the probability of failure of the structure over its life time. (authors)

  7. Oral Syllabus of David Nacin Minor Topic: The Automorphism Tower Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oral Syllabus of David Nacin Minor Topic: The Automorphism Tower Problem Simon Thomas: The Automorphism Tower Problem 1. The Automorphism Tower Problem (a) The Automorphism Tower Problem (b) Some Fundamental Results (c) Some Examples of Automorphism Towers (d) The Infinite Dihedral Group 2. Wielandt

  8. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, Jr., John E. (Aiken, SC)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  9. REGULAR PAPER Photosynthetic energy storage efficiency in Chlamydomonas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - resolved photoacoustic (PA) instrument, we measured thermal dissipation and energy storage (ESREGULAR PAPER Photosynthetic energy storage efficiency in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, based framework of two photosystems in all oxygenic photoautotrophs. Keywords Energy storage efficiency Á

  10. Optimization of Multiple Receivers Solar Power Tower systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 8, 2015 ... Solar Power Tower (SPT) systems are known as one of the most promising ...... An appropriate control is required to adapt the mass flow in the ...

  11. Optimization of Multiple Receivers Solar Power Tower systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Carrizosa

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 26, 2015 ... Abstract: In this article a new procedure to optimize the design of a Multiple Receivers Solar Power Tower system is presented. The proposed ...

  12. airport tower stressful: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Abstract For technical, aesthetic and economical reasons, future power transmission line towers will have to be built with new design concepts using new...

  13. airport control towers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Abstract For technical, aesthetic and economical reasons, future power transmission line towers will have to be built with new design concepts using new...

  14. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Tower Manufacturing and Installation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    intends to support partnerships that lead to innovative designs and processes for wind turbine tower manufacturing and turbine system installation. Supported projects will develop...

  15. The Damaging Effects of Earthquake Excitation on Concrete Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abedi-Nik, Farhad [SADRA Institute of Higher Education, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sabouri-Ghomi, Saeid [K.N.T University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinforced concrete cooling towers of hyperbolic shell configuration find widespread application in utilities engaged in the production of electric power. In design of critical civil infrastructure of this type, it is imperative to consider all the possible loading conditions that the cooling tower may experience, an important loading condition in many countries is that of the earthquake excitation, whose influence on the integrity and stability of cooling towers is profound. Previous researches have shown that the columns supporting a cooling tower are sensitive to earthquake forces, as they are heavily loaded elements that do not possess high ductility, and understanding the behavior of columns under earthquake excitation is vital in structural design because they provide the load path for the self weight of the tower shell. This paper presents the results of a finite element investigation of a representative 'dry' cooling tower, using realistic horizontal and vertical acceleration data obtained from the recent and widely-reported Tabas, Naghan and Bam earthquakes in Iran. The results of both linear and nonlinear analyses are reported in the paper, the locations of plastic hinges within the supporting columns are identified and the ramifications of the plastic hinges on the stability of the cooling tower are assessed. It is concluded that for the (typical) cooling tower configuration analyzed, the columns that are instrumental in providing a load path are influenced greatly by earthquake loading, and for the earthquake data used in this study the representative cooling tower would be rendered unstable and would collapse under the earthquake forces considered.

  16. TOWER OF COVERINGS OF QUASI-PROJECTIVE VARIETIES ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    on a tower of coverings of a non-compact Kähler manifold of finite volume with reasonable geometric assumptions to its universal covering. Applicable examples ...

  17. Comparative evaluation of cooling tower drift eliminator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Joseph Kwok-Kwong

    The performance of standard industrial evaporative cooling tower drift eliminators is analyzed using experiments and numerical simulations. The experiments measure the

  18. Model Predictive Control for the Operation of Building Cooling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Yudong

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the cooling towers while consuming less energy. Duringtowers, the thermal storage tank and the electricity energytowers, the thermal storage tank, the campus model and the electricity energy

  19. Tunable Electrical and Thermal Transport in Ice-Templated MultiLayer Graphene Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    to electrical energy storage,1­3 thermal energy storage,4­13 and composite materials.14­21 Ice applications in thermal and electrical energy storage. Phase change thermal storage seeks to reduce building offsets in energy supply and demand.6 Thermal energy storage is also an appealing way to cool power

  20. Tower systems for Linearly repetitive Delone sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    José Aliste-Prieto; Daniel Coronel

    2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study linearly repetitive Delone sets and prove, following the work of Bellissard, Benedetti and Gambaudo, that the hull of a linearly repetitive Delone set admits a properly nested sequence of box decompositions (tower system) with strictly positive and uniformly bounded (in size and norm) transition matrices. This generalizes a result of Durand for linearly recurrent symbolic systems. Furthermore, we apply this result to give a new proof of a classic estimation of Lagarias and Pleasants on the rate of convergence of patch-frequencies.

  1. CXAllenRadioTower2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0 -CURRICULUM VITAEAllen Radio Tower

  2. GreenTower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG ContractingGreenOrder Jump to: navigation,GreenTower Jump to:

  3. Tower, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldsonInformationTorpedo SpecialityVessel JumpTower,

  4. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3), pp.Organometallic Frames for Solar Energy Storage, Berkeley. [Nanotubes as High-Energy Density Solar Thermal Fuels,” Nano

  5. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies, Part I:of various energy storage technologies. Here only batterieseffective solar energy storage technologies makes the sun,

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: energy storage materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News & Events,...

  7. PS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    area equivalent of 17 American Football Tower Solar receiver 4 vertical panels 18ft*39ft Steam turbinePS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang #12;Overview Magnitudes , Cost & TechnologiesMagnitudes , Cost Government . #12;Further ExplanationFurther Explanation Plataforma Solar de SanlĂșcar la Mayor,PSSM Megawatts

  8. A Microcomputer Model of Crossflow Cooling Tower Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichelt, G. E; Jones, J. W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that use both sensible heat transfer and mass transfer to cool. The heat and mass transfer process for a crossflow cooling tower has been modeled on an Apple II microcomputer. Various heat loads or weather conditions can be imposed on a given tower...

  9. Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling Tower and Condenserfor Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condensertower and condenser water optimization Summary Cleanroom energy

  10. Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan; Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM), Carlson; Bryan J. (Ojo Caliente, NM), Wingo; Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM), Robison; Thomas W. (Stilwell, KS)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

  11. Group Date Location Room No. Group Day Date Location Room No. Monday 26 September David Hume Tower 9.18 Friday 30 September David Hume Tower 9.18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    Group Date Location Room No. Group Day Date Location Room No. Monday 26 September David Hume Tower 9.18 Friday 30 September David Hume Tower 9.18 10 October David Hume Tower 9.18 14 October David Hume Tower 9.18 24 October David Hume Tower 9.18 28 October David Hume Tower 9.18 07 November David

  12. Cooling towers, the neglected energy conservations and money making machine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, R. [Burger Associates, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat Rejection Industry defines a nominal cooling tower as circulating three gallons of water per minute (GPM) per ton of refrigeration from entering the tower at 95 {degrees}F, Hot Water temperature (HWT), Leaving at 85{degrees}F Cold Water Temperature (CWT) at a Design Wet Bulb of 70{degrees}F (WBT). Manufacturers then provide a selection chart based on various wet bulb temperatures and HWTs. The wet bulb fluctuates and varies throughout the world since it is the combination ambient temperature, relative humidity, and/or dew point. Different HWT and CWT requirements are usually charted as they change, so that the user can select the nominal cooling tower model recommended by the manufacturer. In the specification of cooling towers it is necessary to clearly understand the definition of nominal cooling tower, and to make sure the specification you need addressed can be met by the system you purchase. This should be tested prior to final acceptance.

  13. Central receiver solar thermal power system, Phase 1: CDRL Item 2, pilot plant preliminary design report. Volume VII. Pilot plant cost and commercial plant cost and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallet, Jr., R. W.; Gervais, R. L.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed cost and performance data for the proposed tower focus pilot plant and commercial plant are given. The baseline central receiver concept defined by the MDAC team consists of the following features: (A) an external receiver mounted on a tower, and located in a 360/sup 0/ array of sun-tracking heliostats which comprise the collector subsystem. (B) feedwater from the electrical power generation subsystem is pumped through a riser to the receiver, where the feedwater is converted to superheated steam in a single pass through the tubes of the receiver panels. (C) The steam from the receiver is routed through a downcomer to the ground and introduced to a turbine directly for expansion and generation of electricity, and/or to a thermal storage subsystem, where the steam is condensed in charging heat exchangers to heat a dual-medium oil and rock thermal storage unit (TSU). (D) Extended operation after daylight hours is facilitated by discharging the TSU to generate steam for feeding the admission port of the turbine. (E) Overall control of the system is provided by a master control unit, which handles the interactions between subsystems that take place during startup, shutdown, and transitions between operating modes. (WHK)

  14. Olivine refractory bricks for heat storage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, R.L.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H.I.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an olivine refractory brick having thermal and physical properties suitable for use as a thermal energy storage unit in an electric thermal storage furnace and characterized by having excellent thermal shock properties and resistance to spalling. The brick consists essentially of densely compacted grains of olivine and a plastic refractory kaolin binder which effects a sintered, liquid assisted but substantially solid state grain-to-grain bonding of the olivine grains.

  15. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  16. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is disclosed for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material. The apparatus consists of a tower bioreactor which has mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  17. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards of downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  18. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  19. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  20. Results from the CDMS 5-Tower Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonghee Yoo; for the CDMS collaboration

    2008-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical observations strongly suggest that non-luminous, nonbaryonic components, so called "Dark Matter", may constitute most of the matter in the Universe. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment is designed to detect Dark Matter interaction events through nuclear recoils from elastic scattering. The detector is capable of reading out both phonon and ionization energy of an interaction in Ge or Si crystals. We present results from the CDMS five-tower detector arrays. The data were collected in the period between October 2006 and July 2007 (with an effective exposure of 121.3 kg-days). No WIMP signal was observed. The results, when combined with previous CDMS Soudan data, set a 90% confidence level upper bound on the WIMP-nucleon cross section of $4.6\\times 10^{-44}$ cm$^2$ at 60 Gev/c$^2$ WIMP mass.

  1. Hydrogen Storage CODES & STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    automotive start-up. · Air/Thermal/Water Management ­ improved air systems, high temperature membranes, heat to pump Hydrogen Fuel/ Storage/ Infrastructure $45/kW (2010) $30kW (2015) 325 W/kg 220 W/L 60% (hydrogen system Component Air management, sensors, MEA's, membranes, Bipolar Plates, fuel processor reactor zones

  2. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water usage.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Andres L.; Everett, Randy L.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cappelle, Malynda A.; Altman, Susan Jeanne

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  3. Use of nanofiltration to reduce cooling tower water consumption.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, Susan Jeanne; Ciferno, Jared

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanofiltration (NF) can effectively treat cooling-tower water to reduce water consumption and maximize water usage efficiency of thermoelectric power plants. A pilot is being run to verify theoretical calculations. A side stream of water from a 900 gpm cooling tower is being treated by NF with the permeate returning to the cooling tower and the concentrate being discharged. The membrane efficiency is as high as over 50%. Salt rejection ranges from 77-97% with higher rejection for divalent ions. The pilot has demonstrated a reduction of makeup water of almost 20% and a reduction of discharge of over 50%.

  4. Underground-Energy-Storage Program, 1982 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannberg, L.D.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two principal underground energy storage technologies are discussed--Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) and Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES). The Underground Energy Storage Program objectives, approach, structure, and milestones are described, and technical activities and progress in the STES and CAES areas are summarized. STES activities include aquifer thermal energy storage technology studies and STES technology assessment and development. CAES activities include reservoir stability studies and second-generation concepts studies. (LEW)

  5. Tower of Hanoi Most of the following paragraphs were copied from wikipedia [I]. Pictures were bor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LalĂ­n, Matilde

    Tower of Hanoi Most of the following paragraphs were copied from wikipedia [I]. Pictures were bor- rowed from [2] and [3]. The Tower of Hanoi or Towers of Hanoi is a mathematical game or puzzle known as the Tower of Brahma puzzle. It is not clear whether Lucas invented this legend or was inspired

  6. ON THE FRAME-STEWART ALGORITHM FOR THE TOWER MICHAEL RAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrstock, Jason

    ON THE FRAME-STEWART ALGORITHM FOR THE TOWER OF HANOI MICHAEL RAND 1. Introduction The Tower is to move the entire tower to another peg, while obeying the following restrictions: · Only one disk may have been: · What is the minimum number of moves required to transfer the entire tower from one peg

  7. FMRI BOLD Cerebellar Activation of First-episode Schizophrenia Patients during the Tower of London Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Paul

    FMRI BOLD Cerebellar Activation of First-episode Schizophrenia Patients during the Tower of London difficulty (number of moves) when performing the Tower of London task. Left Figure: Example of a Tower Tower of London problem. (Yellow labels are for the purpose of illustration only and did not appear

  8. Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Guangzhou West Tower Façade System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Public Buildings”, typical meteorological yearly data for Guangzhou were used and revised according to architectural character of Guangzhou West Tower. The energy efficiency design of a single skin façade and active airflow curtain wall was analyzed by a...

  9. Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference paper for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States.

  10. Cooling Towers - Energy Conservation and Money Making Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling towers in operation are performing at levels as low as 50% of capability. This is energy wasteful and financially foolish. There are many reasons for this deficiency, among them the present service is greater than the original requirements...

  11. Introducing an Online Cooling Tower Performance Analysis Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.; Rao, P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and variable nature of all of the factors that can influence performance; fan speed, wind speed, sump temperature, heat load, ambient temperature, relative humidity, etc. This can be overwhelming for a regular operator resulting in many cooling towers being set...

  12. Experimental Investigation of the Padding Tower for Air Dehumidifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, G.; An, S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and solar power as the heat source for regeneration. Hence, this system has a great latent potential for energy savings and environmental protection. The system chooses the padding tower as a dehumidifier and regenerator, which are often used...

  13. Cooling Towers - Energy Conservation and Money Making Mechanisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utilization of colder water conserves energy, creates profits, increases product output. In an effort to obtain greater efficiencies and conserve both energy and dollars, all too many engineers neglect the potential of the cooling tower. Many...

  14. Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Guangzhou West Tower Façade System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guangzhou West Tower is an extremely tall public building. The energy efficiency evaluation of its façade should be different than that of ordinary public buildings. Based on the national code GB50189-2005, “Design Standard for Energy efficiency...

  15. Armor Tower Inc. Notification of Intent to Investigate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mr. Edward Rosenbloom Chief Executive Officer Armor Tower, Inc. 9 N Main St, 2nd Floor Cortland, New York 13045 Dear Mr. Rosenbloom: This letter serves as notification of the...

  16. Biodiversity Governance: A Tower of Babel of Scales and Cultures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soberon, Jorge; Peterson, A Townsend

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    PERSPECTIVE Biodiversity Governance: A Tower of Babel of Scales and Cultures Jorge Soberón*, A. Townsend Peterson Biodiversity Institute and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas, United States...) explicitly mentions as stakeholders: PLOS Biology | DOI:10.1371/journal.pbio.1002108 March 12, 2015 1 / 5 a11111 OPEN ACCESS Citation: Soberón J, Peterson AT (2015) Biodiversity Governance: A Tower of Babel of Scales and Cultures. PLoS Biol 13(3): e1002108...

  17. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  18. Thermal Conductivity Enhancement of High Temperature Phase Change Materials for Concentrating Solar Power Plant Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roshandell, Melina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    materials (PCM) in solar thermal concentrating technologyeffective and efficient solar thermal electricity generatorbeen considered for solar thermal energy storages. These are

  19. Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coso, Dusan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. a. , 2004, “Solar Thermal Collectors and Applications,”86] Schnatbaum L. , 2009, “Solar Thermal Power Plants,” Thefor Storage of Solar Thermal Energy,” Solar Energy, 18 (3),

  20. Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very...